Topic
Case Studies
...Drive
...Foundations

Companion Planting
...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants

Garden Construction
Garden Design
...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
Garden Maintenance
Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants
...in Chalk (Alkaline) Soil
......A-F1, A-F2,
......A-F3, G-L, M-R,
......M-R Roses, S-Z
...in Heavy Clay Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...in Lime-Free (Acid) Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...in Light Sand Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...Poisonous Plants
Soil
...Soil Nutrients
Tool Shed
Useful Data

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape

Bulb with its 7 Flower Colours per Month Comparison Pages
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia

...Gladiolus
......European A-E
......European F-M
......European N-Z
......Eur Non-classified
......American A
......American B
......American C
......American D
......American E
......American F
......American G
......American H
......American I
......American J
......American K
......American L
......American M
......American N
......American O
......American P
......American Q
......American R
......American S
......American T
......American U
......American V
......American W
......American XYZ
......Ame Non-classified
......Australia - empty
......India

......Lithuania

...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
...Each of the above ...Bulb Galleries has its own set of Flower Colour Pages
...Flower Shape
...Bulb Form

...Bulb Use

...Bulb in Soil



Further details on bulbs from the Infill Galleries:-
Hardy Bulbs
...Aconitum
...Allium
...Alstroemeria
...Anemone

...Amaryllis
...Anthericum
...Antholyzas
...Apios
...Arisaema
...Arum
...Asphodeline

...Asphodelus
...Belamcanda
...Bloomeria
...Brodiaea
...Bulbocodium

...Calochorti
...Cyclobothrias
...Camassia
...Colchicum
...Convallaria 
...Forcing Lily of the Valley
...Corydalis
...Crinum
...Crosmia
...Montbretia
...Crocus

...Cyclamen
...Dicentra
...Dierama
...Eranthis
...Eremurus
...Erythrnium
...Eucomis

...Fritillaria
...Funkia
...Galanthus
...Galtonia
...Gladiolus
...Hemerocallis

...Hyacinth
...Hyacinths in Pots
...Scilla
...Puschkinia
...Chionodoxa
...Chionoscilla
...Muscari

...Iris
...Kniphofia
...Lapeyrousia
...Leucojum

...Lilium
...Lilium in Pots
...Malvastrum
...Merendera
...Milla
...Narcissus
...Narcissi in Pots

...Ornithogalum
...Oxalis
...Paeonia
...Ranunculus
...Romulea
...Sanguinaria
...Sternbergia
...Schizostylis
...Tecophilaea
...Trillium

...Tulip
...Zephyranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs
...Acidanthera
...Albuca
...Alstroemeri
...Andro-stephium
...Bassers
...Boussing-aultias
...Bravoas
...Cypellas
...Dahlias
...Galaxis,
...Geissorhizas
...Hesperanthas

...Gladioli
...Ixias
...Sparaxises
...Babianas
...Morphixias
...Tritonias

...Ixiolirions
...Moraeas
...Ornithogalums
...Oxalises
...Phaedra-nassas
...Pancratiums
...Tigridias
...Zephyranthes
...Cooperias


Uses of Bulbs:-
...for Bedding
...in Windowboxes
...in Border
...naturalized in Grass
...in Bulb Frame
...in Woodland Garden
...in Rock Garden
...in Bowls
...in Alpine House
...Bulbs in Greenhouse or Stove:-
...Achimenes
...Alocasias
...Amorpho-phalluses
...Arisaemas
...Arums
...Begonias
...Bomareas
...Caladiums

...Clivias
...Colocasias
...Crinums
...Cyclamens
...Cyrtanthuses
...Eucharises
...Urceocharis
...Eurycles

...Freesias
...Gloxinias
...Haemanthus
...Hippeastrums

...Lachenalias
...Nerines
...Lycorises
...Pencratiums
...Hymenocallises
...Richardias
...Sprekelias
...Tuberoses
...Vallotas
...Watsonias
...Zephyranthes

...Plant Bedding in
......Spring

......Summer
...Bulb houseplants flowering inside House during:-
......January
......February
......March
......April
......May
......June
......July
......August
......September
......October
......November
......December
...Bulbs and other types of plant flowering during:-
......Dec-Jan
......Feb-Mar
......Apr-May
......Jun-Aug
......Sep-Oct
......Nov-Dec
...Selection of the smaller and choicer plants for the Smallest of Gardens with plant flowering during the same 6 periods as in the previous selection

Climber
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree

...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evgr
...Shrub Heathers
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evgr

Fern *

Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
...P -Herbaceous
...RHS Wisley
...Flower Shape
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable

Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour
NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown Note
...Cream Note
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note
Poisonous
Wildflower Plants

Topic - Flower/Foliage Colour
Colour Wheel Galleries

Following your choice using Garden Style then that changes your Plant Selection Process
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

or
you could use these Flower Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12
with its
Explanation of
Structure of this Website with

...User Guidelines
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index
Rock Garden and Alpine Flower Colour Wheel with number of colours
Rock Plant Flowers 53

...Rock Plant Photos

or
these Foliage Colour Wheels structures, which I have done but until I can take the photos and I am certain of the plant label's validity, these may not progress much further
All Foliage 212

All Spring Foliage 212
All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212

or
Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly
Usage of Plants
by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly

Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly usage of
Plant A-C
Plant C-M
Plant N-W
Butterfly usage of Plant

followed by all the Wild Flower Family Pages:-

There are 180 families in the Wildflowers of the UK and they have been split up into 22 Galleries to allow space for up to 100 plants per gallery.

Each plant named in each of the Wildflower Family Pages may have a link to:-

its Plant Description Page in its Common Name in one of those Wildflower Plant Galleries and will have links

to external sites to purchase the plant or seed in its Botanical Name,

to see photos in its Flowering Months and

to read habitat details in its Habitat Column.

 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 1

(o)Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
(o)Arrow-Grass
(o)Arum
(o)Balsam
Bamboo
(o)Barberry
(o)Bedstraw
(o)Beech
(o)Bellflower
(o)Bindweed
(o)Birch
(o)Birds-Nest
(o)Birthwort
(o)Bogbean
(o)Bog Myrtle
(o)Borage
(o)Box
(o)Broomrape
(o)Buckthorn
(o)Buddleia
(o)Bur-reed
(o)Buttercup
(o)Butterwort
(o)Cornel (Dogwood)
(o)Crowberry
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
(o)Daffodil
(o)Daisy
(o)Daisy Cudweeds
(o)Daisy Chamomiles
(o)Daisy Thistle
(o)Daisy Catsears (o)Daisy Hawkweeds
(o)Daisy Hawksbeards
(o)Daphne
(o)Diapensia
(o)Dock Bistorts
(o)Dock Sorrels

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 2


(o)Clubmoss
(o)Duckweed
(o)Eel-Grass
(o)Elm
(o)Filmy Fern
(o)Horsetail
(o)Polypody
Quillwort
(o)Royal Fern
(o)Figwort - Mulleins
(o)Figwort - Speedwells
(o)Flax
(o)Flowering-Rush
(o)Frog-bit
(o)Fumitory
(o)Gentian
(o)Geranium
(o)Glassworts
(o)Gooseberry
(o)Goosefoot
(o)Grass 1
(o)Grass 2
(o)Grass 3
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 1
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 2
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 3 (o)Hazel
(o)Heath
(o)Hemp
(o)Herb-Paris
(o)Holly
(o)Honeysuckle
(o)Horned-Pondweed
(o)Hornwort
(o)Iris
(o)Ivy
(o)Jacobs Ladder
(o)Lily
(o)Lily Garlic
(o)Lime
(o)Lobelia
(o)Loosestrife
(o)Mallow
(o)Maple
(o)Mares-tail
(o)Marsh Pennywort
(o)Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 3


(o)Mesem-bryanthemum
(o)Mignonette
(o)Milkwort
(o)Mistletoe
(o)Moschatel
Naiad
(o)Nettle
(o)Nightshade
(o)Oleaster
(o)Olive
(o)Orchid 1
(o)Orchid 2
(o)Orchid 3
(o)Orchid 4
(o)Parnassus-Grass
(o)Peaflower
(o)Peaflower Clover 1
(o)Peaflower Clover 2
(o)Peaflower Clover 3
(o)Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
(o)Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
Pipewort
(o)Pitcher-Plant
(o)Plantain
(o)Pondweed
(o)Poppy
(o)Primrose
(o)Purslane
Rannock Rush
(o)Reedmace
(o)Rockrose
(o)Rose 1
(o)Rose 2
(o)Rose 3
(o)Rose 4
(o)Rush
(o)Rush Woodrushes
(o)Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
(o)Sandalwood
(o)Saxifrage
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 4


Seaheath
(o)Sea Lavender
(o)Sedge Rush-like
(o)Sedges Carex 1
(o)Sedges Carex 2
(o)Sedges Carex 3
(o)Sedges Carex 4
(o)Spindle-Tree
(o)Spurge
(o)Stonecrop
(o)Sundew
(o)Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
(o)Teasel
(o)Thyme 1
(o)Thyme 2
(o)Umbellifer 1
(o)Umbellifer 2
(o)Valerian
(o)Verbena
(o)Violet
(o)Water Fern
(o)Waterlily
(o)Water Milfoil
(o)Water Plantain
(o)Water Starwort
Waterwort
(o)Willow
(o)Willow-Herb
(o)Wintergreen
(o)Wood-Sorrel
(o)Yam
(o)Yew

 

It is worth remembering that especially with roses that the colour of the petals of the flower may change - The following photos are of Rosa 'Lincolnshire Poacher' which I took on the same day in R.V. Roger's Nursery Field:-

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot91a1a1a1a1a1a

Closed Bud

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot92a1a1a1a1a1a

Opening Bud

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot93a1a1a1a1a1a

Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot94a1a1a1a1a1a

Older Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot95a1a1a1a1a1a

Middle-aged Flower - Flower Colour in Season in its
Rose Description Page is
"Buff Yellow, with a very slight pink tint at the edges in May-October."

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot96a1a1a1a1a1a

Mature Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot97a1a1a1a1a1a

Juvenile Flower and Dying Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot98a1a1a1a1a1a

Form of Rose Bush

There are 720 roses in the Rose Galleries. So one might avoid disappointment if you look at all the photos of the roses in the respective Rose Description Page!!!!

FERN PLANTS GALLERY PAGES
Site Map for pages with photo content (o)

Fern Culture
from Sections 1-10 of Ferns and Fern Culture by J. Birkenhead, F.R.H.S.
Published by John Heywood in Manchester in
May, 1892 with
Rules for Fern Culture
followed by
Sections
1 Modes of Growth
2 Compost
3 Compost for various Genera, growing in pots, pans or baskets
4 Various Habits of Ferns
5 Various Modes of Cultivation
6 Light
7 Temperature
8 Ferns in Dwelling-Houses
9 Propagation (in Use in Brackish Water in Coastal District Page)

10 Selection of Ferns

with

British Ferns and their Allies comprising the Ferns, Club-mosses, Pepperworts and Horsetails by Thomas Moore, F.L.S, F.H.S., Etc. London George Routledge and Sons, Broadway, Ludgate Hill. Hardcover published in 1861 provides details on British Ferns

TYPE OF FERN TO GROW
....Aquatic
....Boston/ Fishbone/
Lace/ Sword

....Cloak/Lip/Hand
....Filmy and Crepe
....Lacy Ground
(o)Lady
....Maidenhair
(o)Miscellaneous
(o)Primitive/ Oddities
....Scrambling/ Umbrella/ Coral/ Pouch
....Selaginellas
(o)Shield/ Buckler/ Holly
....Squirrel/ Rabbit/ Hare's Foot

....Staghorn/ Elkhorn/ Epiphyte
....Tassel, Clubmoss
....The Brakes
....The Polypodies
(o)The Spleenworts
....The Tree Ferns
....Water/ Hard/ Rasp/ Chain

 

 

Where to see

UNITED STATES
San Antonio Botanical Garden.
San Diego Botanic Garden.
San Francisco Botanical Garden at Strybing Arboretum.
Sarah P. Duke Gardens.
Tyringham Cobble.
UNC at Charlotte Botanical Gardens.
University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley.
USCS Arboretum.
Whitehall Historic Home and Garden.
Wild Gardens of Acadia.
Zilker Botanical Garden.

WALES
Aberglasney Gardens.
Dewstow Gardens.
Dyffryn Gardens.

USE OF FERN
(o)Cold-hardy
(o)From Lime-hating Soil
(o)From Limestone Soil
(o)Hanging Basket
(o)Indoor Decoration
(o)Outdoor Pot
(o)Terrariums
(o)Wet Soils
(o)Ground Cover
(o)Pendulous Fronds

 

Where to see

AUSTRALIA
Adelaide Botanic Garden.
Brisbane Botanic Garden.
Mount Lofty Botanic Garden.
Royal Botanic Garden, Melbourne.
Royal Botanic Garden, Sydney.

CANADA
Le Jardin Botanique de Montreal.
Les Jardins de Metis.
Van Dusen Botanical Garden.

ENGLAND
Biddulph Grange Garden.
Brodsworth Hall and Gardens.
Cambridge University Botanic Gardens.
Chelsea Physic Garden.
Harlow Carr Botanic Gardens.
RHS Garden Wisley.
Royal Botanic Gardens Kew.
Savill Gardens.
Sizergh Castle and Garden.
Southport Botanic Gardens.
Tatton Park.
Tremenheere Sculpture Gardens.
University of Oxford Botanic Garden.

FRANCE
Jardin Botanique de Lyon.
Parc Phoenix-Nice.

GERMANY
Arktisch-Alpiner Garten.
Botanischer Garten und Museum.
Flora und Botanischer Garten Koln.

IRELAND
Caher Bridge Garden.
Kells Bay Gardens.

NETHERLANDS
Hortus Botanicus Leiden.

SPORE COLOUR
Spore

BED PICTURES
Garden
 

Where to see

NEW ZEALAND
Franz Fernery at the Auckland Domain Park.
Pukeiti Rhododendron Trust Garden.
Pukekura Park.

SCOTLAND
Arduaine Garden.
Ascog Hall Gardens and Victorian Fernery.
Attadale Gardens.
Benmore Botanic Garden.
Glasgow Botanic Garden.
Inverewe Garden and Estate.
Linn Botanic Gardens.
Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh.

UNITED STATES
Atlanta Botanical Garden.
Balboa Park.
Barnes Foundation Arboretum.
Bartholomew's Cobble.
Bellevue Botanical Garden.
Berkshire Botanical Garden.
Bloedal Reserve.
Bok Tower Gardens.
Botanical Gardens at Asheville.
Bowman's Hill Wildflower Preserve.
Brooklyn Botanic Garden.
Cailfornia State Unversity at Sacramento.
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies.
Chanticleer.
Chicago Botanic Garden.
Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens.
Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden.
Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden.
Denver Botanic Gardens.
Elandan Gardens.
Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden.
Fairchild Tropical Botanical Garden.
Fern Canyon.
Ferndell Canyon in Griffith Park.
Fort Worth Botanic Garden.
Frelinghuysen Arboretum.
Garden in the Woods.
Garvan Woodland Gardens.
Ganna Walska Lotusland.
Georgeson Botanical Garden.
Georgia Perimeter College Botanical Gardens


All
Hardy Fern Foundation members have unlimited access to our spore exchange and can choose from a wide variety of ferns. Our resource pages include publications and books about ferns as well as
useful websites.

A Natural History of Britain's Ferns by Christopher N. Page. Published by William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd in 1988. ISBN 0 00 219382 5 (limpback edition) provides details of Coastal, Man-made Landscapes, Woodland, Wetland, Grassland and Rock Outcrops, Heath and Moorland, Lower Mountain Habitats, Upper Mountain Habitats and Atlantic Fringe Ferns.
I have provided a brief summary in the Ferns in Coastal District with associated plants and Ferns for Man-Made Landscapes with associated plants pages and provided you with the Chapter number for the others, since the information within this book is so comprehensive, that it would need to be completely copied to be of most use.

Tree Ferns by Mark F. Large & John E. Braggins. Published by Timber Press in 2004. ISBN 978-1-60469-176-4 is a scientifically accurate book dealing with Tree Fern species cultivated in the United States and the Pacific, but little known and rare tree ferns are also included.

The Observer's Book of Ferns, revised by Francis Rose, previous editions compiled by W.J.Stokoe. Published by Frederick Warne & Co. Ltd in 1965 provides a comprehensive guide to 45 British species of Ferns. It provides details of habitat and how to use those ferns.

The Plant Lover's Guide to Ferns by Richard Steffen & Sue Olsen. Published in 2015 by Timber Press, Inc. ISBN 978-1-60469-
474-1. It provides details on designing with ferns and details on 140 ferns for the garden in the USA.

Success with Indoor Ferns, edited by Lesley Young. Reprinted 1998. ISBN 1 85391 554 8. It details the care of indoor ferns with their position, choice and fern care.


See
Ferns in Britain and Ireland
or the

British Pteridological Society
for further details and photos.

Mail Order UK Fern Nursery
Shady Plants has ferns for
Vertical Fern Gardens and Companion Plants for growing with Ferns.

 

Where to see

UNITED STATES
Harry P. Leu Gardens.
Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden.
Holden Arboretum.
Honolulu Botanical Gardens.
Huntington Botanical Gardens.
Huntsville-Madison County Botanical Garden.
Inniswood Metro Gardens.
Kruckeberg Botanic Garden.
Lakewold Gardens.
Leach Botanical Garden.
Leonard J. Buck Garden.
Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.
Longwood Gardens.
Lyndhurst Gardens.
Marie Selby Botanical Gardens.
Matthaei Botanical Gardens.
Memphis Botanic Garden.
Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens.
Mercer Arboretum and Botanic Gardens.
Michigan State University.
Missouri Botanical Garden.
Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania.
Mount Pisgah Arboretum.
Mt. Cuba Center.
National Tropical Botanical Garden.
New Jersey State Botanical Garden at Skyland.
New York Botanical Garden.
Norfolk Botanical Garden.
North Carolina Botanical Garden.
Olbrich Botanical Garden.
Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens.
Planting Fields Arboretum State Historic Park.
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden.
Rhododendron Species Botanical Garden.
Rotary Gardens.

 

 

 


TYPE OF FERN - Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix) Page 1 of 3
"As a group these ferns grow in relatively drier situations than most other ferns. These ferns are ideal for regions with a warm climate where the atmosphere tends to be dry. They can be grown in other conditions, providing attention is given to their specific requirements.
Habitat
Ferns of this group grow in a great diversity of habitats. Some species occur in high rainfall climates but are restricted to specialized niches such as rainshadow areas, in exposed situations on skeletal soils, in crevices or on rock faces or in the thin layer of soil which covers a boulder. Most species are found in low rainfall regions and have adapted their growth cycle to match the rigours of the climate. Many of these are Resurrection Ferns (see page 6 of The Encyclopaedia of Ferns An Introduction to Ferns, their Structure, Biology, Economic Importance, Cultivation and Propagation by David L. Jones ISBN 0 88192 054 1.).
Uses
As a general rule the ferns grouped here do not revel when given the usuall fern requirements of shade, moisture and humidity. Their needs are for bright light, careful watering and low humidity. Some species grow well in pots but others are difficult to maintain and are better planted out in a suitable garden position. Most species blend in well with rocks. Ferns of this type may also grow well in a terrarium that is kept on the dry side or even left open (see page 184 of The Encyclopaedia of Ferns An Introduction to Ferns, their Structure, Biology, Economic Importance, Cultivation and Propagation by David L. Jones ISBN 0 88192 054 1.).
Their Habitat, Cultivation, Soil Types, Potting Mix, Watering, Fertilizing, Situation, Pests and Propagation details are given in
Chapter 35 of The Encyclopaedia of Ferns An Introduction to Ferns, their Structure, Biology, Economic Importance, Cultivation and Propagation by David L. Jones ISBN 0 88192 054 1."

The following ferns come from that chapter:-
 

Fern

Foliage Colour and
Shape/ Division

Some details from The standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture in 3 Volumes by L.H Bailey. Published by The Macmillan Company in 1939

Height x Spread in inches (cms)
(1 inch =
2.5 cms,
12 inches =
1 foot
12 inches =
30 cms,
24 inches =
2 feet,
3 feet =
1 yard,
40 inches = 100 cms)
 

Type of Fern to Grow

Use of Fern

Comments

Frond

Credit
is usually for Denver Botanic Gardens,
Wikimedia Commons,
Dana Kelley Bressette of Nativeplants PNW.com
or
Chris Garnons-Williams

Form

Bommeria hispida
Copper Fern

Semi-hardy.
Zone 8

North America, Mexico, Nicaragua

Plants form a neat clump of broad fronds.

The fronds range from 4-15 cms (1.5-6 inches) long and have pentagonal blades with surfaces covered with long,white hairs.

4-10 x
(10-25 x )

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation:

Suitable for

 

Stove Evergreen Ferns.

A small fern of rocky situations. Plants require well-drained soil and a sunny situation open to air movement. They must be watered sparingly.

A small fern with medium-creeping rhizomes. Grows under medium light in moist-dry, well-drained potting mix with coarse sand.

Plant Delights Nursery sells Bommeria hispida 'Gila Dwarf'.

item1p1

 

item1a14a

Cheilanthes alabamensis Alabama Lip Fern

Hardy in Zone 7

North America, West Indies and Mexico.

Greek, lip-flower, alluding to the indusium.

Cheilanthes - Wikipedia

It has black stipes, rachises, and costae, with the colour entering the pinnules.

8-20 x
(20-50 x )

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.

Suitable for

Ferns found on Limestone or basic Soils.
Warm Greenhouse.

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

Greenhouse Fern.

A small to medium fern with short-creeping to compact rhizomes and clustered fronds. Grows best under medium-high light in moist-dry to dry, basic garden soil and sand. Typically grows on limestone.

A clumping species with erect, fairly slender, dark green fronds. Plants need a neutral to alkaline freely-draining soil and a sunny to partially-sunny aspect.

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Cheilanthes austrotenuifolia (Cheilanthes tenuifolia)
Rock Fern, Southern Rock-fern, Green Rock Fern

Australia, New Zealand

The Seeds of South Australia database contains 143 families, 837 genera and 3,103 native species with 29,293 images (also with 400 introduced species).

Grow in a terrarium set up with a stony potting mix and kept on the dry side (by sparse watering and leaving the lid off for long periods), Cheilanthes can sometimes be grown to perfection. They may need brighter light than other ferns usually grown in terrariums.

Bright green fronds grow from an underground rhizome. Fronds die down in summer and return with the rain in Autumn.

Spore cases partially enclosed by scalloped margins of lobes.

4-20 x
(10-50 x )

Fronds crowded, mostly 15–30 cm high, 3–10 cm wide at the widest point; stipe red-brown, dark brown or black, covered densely at the base with transparent scales; lamina lanceolate to triangular, 2–3-pinnate, glabrous above, sparsely scaly below; ultimate segments sessile, 2–6 mm long and 1–3 mm wide, with crenate margins.

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.
The plant spreads through division of this rhizome, and also by spores held under the fronds The plant is very difficult to propagate using spores, but it may be more easily done using sections of the rhizome

Suitable for

Conservatory and Heated Greenhouse.
Acid Soil.
Terrarium.
Rock Garden and Wall Fern.
Sun-Tolerant.

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

This is a dwarf fern which develops into compact clumps of bright green, finely divided fronds. It usually occurs in rocky situations and plants look particularly appealing in a rock garden, especially when situated against dark rocks. Plants require well-drained, acid, humus-rich soils in a sunny situation.

Once a common understory plant along streams in moist areas of Southern Australia.

Grows in rocky ground in open forest or on exposed rocky slopes in New South Wales.

Garden Use in Victoria, Australia:While difficult to establish it is very tough for rockeries and exposed positions provided it has root protection.

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Cheilanthes austrotenuifolia H.M.Quirk & T.C.Chambers, Black Mountain, Canberra, ACT, 4 November 2010. By Donald Hobern from Copenhagen, Denmark via Wikimedia Commons.

See more photos from Seeds of South Australia.
 

Cheilanthes argentea
Silver Cloak Fern, Lip Fern

Eastern Asia, Northern India, Japan, China, Siberia

USDA Zone 5a

From the Greek cheilos (lip) and anthos (flower)

Grow in a terrarium set up with a stony potting mix and kept on the dry side (by sparse watering and leaving the lid off for long periods), Cheilanthes can sometimes be grown to perfection. They may need brighter light than other ferns usually grown in terrariums.

Loves a site where the roots can stay cool and moist down among rocks.

Fronds curl when stressed by drought, but unfurl when moisture returns.

4-8 x 4-6
(10-20 x 10-15)

Deer resistant.

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.
The plants are easy to grow from spores.

It needs sharp drainage and lime to do well, winter wet would be the biggest danger for this fern.

Suitable for

Rock Garden and Wall Fern.
Terrarium.
Ferns found on Limestone or Basic Soil.
Colour in Fern Fronds.

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

Herbaceous fern in Full Sun but prefers Part Shade.

A decorative dwarf fern with attractively-shaped fronds which are dark green on the surface and silvery on the underside from a covering of waxy powder. It is an easily grown species that requires plenty of light, looks attractive among rocks.

It is a cute little deer-resistant dryland fern that's a great choice for the rock garden, but good drainage is essential for success.

Excellent in walls and rockeries, the favoured locations for these ferns.

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Cheilanthes brownii (Cheilanthes vellea, Notholaena vellea)
Silver Cloak Fern, Woolly Cloak Fern

Native to Western Australia

Grow in a terrarium set up with a stony potting mix and kept on the dry side (by sparse watering and leaving the lid off for long periods), Cheilanthes can sometimes be grown to perfection. They may need brighter light than other ferns usually grown in terrariums.

The fronds are covered on both surfaces with a dense mat of woolly hairs.

4-10 x
(10-25 x )

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.

Suitable for

Rock Garden and Wall Fern.
Terrarium.
Colour in Fern Fronds.
Drier Soil Fern.
Conservatory and Heated Greenhouse.
 

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

This is a fern of arid and semi-arid climates usually growing among rocks. Plants are attractive when planted among dark rocks in a sunny rock garden.

Rhizomatous, perennial, herb or (fern), 0.04-0.35 m high, blade 2(-3)-pinnate at the base, densely woolly-hairy; sori continuous along margin. Fl. Jan to Aug. Red sandy loam, yellow sand, brown clay. Rock crevices, amongst rocks, shallow soil near seepage areas.

From
The fern genus Cheilanthes in Australia
H Quirk, TC Chambers and M Regan
Australian Journal of Botany 31(5) 501 - 553
Published: 1983

"The fern genus Cheilanthes Sw. in Australia consists of 15 taxa. The range of variation of each species is discussed and the distribution presented in map form. Cheilanthes sieberi Kunze is recognized as having two subspecies, C. sieberi subsp. sieberi stat. nov, and C. sieberi subsp. pseudovellea Quirk & Chambers. Three long-overlooked species are now recognized and defined; they are C. nudiuscula (R.Br.) T. Moore, C. tenuissima Bailey and C. contigua Baker. Cheilanthes vellea (Aiton) F. Muell. is now recognized as C. brownii (R.Br.) Domin. The plant originally referred to as C. tenulfolia (Burm. f.) Sw. and previously regarded as extending from South-East Asia to the south coast of Australia is here recognized as two different species; the northern species extending from South-East Asia to northern Australia is regarded as C. tenuifolia (Burm. f.) Sw. s. str. and the isolated southern species as C. austrotenuifolia Quirk & Chambers."

See photos.

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Cheilanthes californica (Hypolepis californica, Adiantopsis californica)
California Lace Fern

California, Mexico

Grow in a terrarium set up with a stony potting mix and kept on the dry side (by sparse watering and leaving the lid off for long periods), Cheilanthes can sometimes be grown to perfection. They may need brighter light than other ferns usually grown in terrariums.

It has lacy fronds of an attractive fresh green.

Aspidotis californica has leaves that are thin and dissected into many triangular leaflets which are subdivided into small segments with curled teeth.
The leaf segments bear sori containing sporangia, with the edges of the leaves rolled under to create a false indusium over the sori.

2-6 x 2-4
(5-15 x 5-10)

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.

Suitable for

Rock Garden and Wall Fern.
Terrarium.
Acid Soil.
Conservatory and Heated Greenhouse.
Woodlands in California.
 

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

Greenhouse Fern.

It occurs naturally on shaded, rock sites. In cultivation, it has proved tricky to maintain requiring a very porous, acid mixture, bright light but not sun, and ample air movement. Plants are susceptible to overwatering.

It grows in rock cracks and crevices in many types of habitat, including Chaparral, Yellow pine forest, Foothill oak woodland, and Valley grassland in California, USA.

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See Botanical Figure.

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Cheilanthes covillei
Bead Fern, Coville's lip fern

Southwestern United States - California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona. Mexico.

Semi-hardy,
Zones 7a-9b

Grow in a terrarium set up with a stony potting mix and kept on the dry side (by sparse watering and leaving the lid off for long periods), Cheilanthes can sometimes be grown to perfection. They may need brighter light than other ferns usually grown in terrariums.

Tends to be winter deciduous, but its stiff upright form and reflective undersides are smashing in the dryish shade garden. Grows slowly in part sun where soil is well drained. Drought tolerant but accepts some summer water. To 12 inches tall and wide. Frost hardy to 15 °F.

2-6 x 12
(5-15 x 30)

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.

Suitable for

Rock Garden and Wall Fern.
Terrarium.
Drier Soil Fern.
Colour in Fern Fronds.
Conservatory and Heated Greenhouse.

 

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

A small evergreen fern with compact, short-creeping rhizomes and clustered fronds. Grows under high light in well-drained garden soil kept moist-dry to dry.
It grows on rocky cliffs and ledges, usually on igneous rocks.

A desert-inhabiting fern found naturally in mountainous areas. It forms small clumps of pleasantly divided fronds which are bright green on the surface and covered with white or brown scales on the underside. Plants need very good drainage, bright light and plenty of air movement. Watering must be done carefully so as to keep the fronds dry.

Deer Resistant. Dry soil when dormant.

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Cheilanthes covillei — Coville's lip fern. At the Regional Parks Botanic Garden, Berkeley, California. Taken April 2007 by User:Stan Shebs via Wikimedia Commons

Cheilanthes covillei—Coville's lip fern. Widespread throughout the deserts of Southwestern US and Baja California. Hides amongst the rocks. Photographed at Regional Parks Botanic Garden located in Tilden Regional Park near Berkeley, CA. By John Rusk from Berkeley, CA, United States of America via Wikimedia Commons

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Cheilanthes dalhousiae (Aleuritopteris leptolepis)
薄叶粉背蕨 bao ye fen bei jue

China, North India

Aleuritopteris leptolepis was long known to Asian botanists as A. dalhousiae, but the basionym Cheilanthes dalhousiae was typified by a mixed collection and was thus of ambiguous application; the name has been formally rejected preventing further use.

Grow in a terrarium set up with a stony potting mix and kept on the dry side (by sparse watering and leaving the lid off for long periods), Cheilanthes can sometimes be grown to perfection. They may need brighter light than other ferns usually grown in terrariums.

8-12 x
(20-30 x )

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.

Suitable for

Rock Garden and Wall Fern.
Cold Hardy.
Terrarium.
Woodlands.
 

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

A delightful fern which forms clumps of erect, narrow-deltoid fronds, the segments coarsely toothed. It occurs at high altitudes and is apparently cold-hardy.

Rock crevices in forests; 1900-3500 m. SW Sichuan, SE Xizang, NW Yunnan [Bhutan, India, Kashmir, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines].

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Cheilanthes distans +
Bristly Cloak Fern, woolly cloak fern, woolly rock fern

Australia, New Zealand, Lord Howe Island, New Caledonia

This small plant is native to various parts of Australia including Western Australia and New South Wales in the east. It is occasionally seen around Sydney in rocky exposed areas. The Bristly Cloak Fern grows in areas of high rainfall as well as the semi arid areas of inland Australia.

distans: distant (widely spaced female flowers).

Found in drier, exposed areas in the eastern parts of the North Island from the Bay of Islands the middle of the South Island of New Zealand.

Grow in a terrarium set up with a stony potting mix and kept on the dry side (by sparse watering and leaving the lid off for long periods), Cheilanthes can sometimes be grown to perfection. They may need brighter light than other ferns usually grown in terrariums.

Fronds crowded, to 30 cm high, < 3 cm wide; stipe red-brown to dark brown, shiny, moderately to densely covered with lanceolate, entire brown scales; lamina narrow-lanceolate, 2-pinnate, upper surface sparsely hairy with simple whitish hairs, lower surface with scales only, golden-brown; ultimate segments sessile, 1–6 mm long and 1 mm wide.
Sori becoming confluent and continuous around the margins of the segments.

4-6 x
(10-15 x )

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.

Minute spores are wind dispersed (Thorsen et al., 2009).

Suitable for

Rock Garden and Wall Fern.
Terrarium.
Acid Soil.
Pot in Conservatory or Heated Greenhouse.
Colour in Fern Fronds.
Woodland.
Drier Soil Fern.
Ground Cover.
Cold Hardy.

 

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

A fairly easily grown species which forms clumps of slender fronds that are covered with bristly scales. Attractive in a pot or rock garden. Needs acid, humus-rich soil in a part shade situation.

It has a woolly appearance with small white hairs on the top side of the fronds, and a rusty brown underneath.

Grows on rocky hillsides in woodland or open forest in New South Wales, Australia.

Coastal to montane in dry, rocky habitats with only sparse or no vegetation cover. Often found growing with Asplenium flabellifolium, Cheilanthes sieberi subsp. sieberi and Pellaea calidirupium. More common in the drier eastern parts of the country of New Zealand.
Easily grown in a dry sunny site. An excellent pot plant. In ideal conditions it soon self establishes.

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Cheilanthes distans at UC Berkeley Botanical Garden, California, USA. Identified by sign. Date 31 March 2010. By Stickpen via Wikimedia Commons.

See other photos and Noosa's Publications.
 

Cheilanthes farinosa (Pteris farinosa, Aleuritopteris farinosa)
Floury Cloak Fern

Abyssinia, Java, Mexico, Central America

 

The common name of this fern alludes to the undersurface of the fronds which appear as if they have been liberally dusted with flour.

farinosa: mealy, referring to the powdery substance on the undersurface of the leaves.

Grow in a terrarium set up with a stony potting mix and kept on the dry side (by sparse watering and leaving the lid off for long periods), Cheilanthes can sometimes be grown to perfection. They may need brighter light than other ferns usually grown in terrariums.

It has triangular to narrowly triangular blades that are two-pinnate and have a white or yellow powder on the lower surface. This species is native to the tropics of the world.

12-18 x
(30-45 x )

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.

Suitable for

Rock Garden and Wall Fern.
Fern for Basic or Limestone Soil.
Terrarium.
Colour in Fern Fronds.
Woodland.
 

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

Stove Fern.

This is a neat-clumping fern with finely divided fronds. Cultivation needs are for a brightly lit (part sun) situation in well-drained neutral to alkaline soils.

A small to medium fern with compact rhizomes and clustered fronds. Grows under high light in drained, moist-dry garden soil or potting mix.

Habitat is mostly in undergrowth of moist forest in tropical Africa.
Habitat: In Victoria Falls as a terrestrial on open grass banks in the spray of the falls, or as an epiphyte in the forest. Among granite boulders in Brachystegia woodland near Harare and at the foot of the Nyanga Mts.

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See photos.

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Cheilanthes kuhnii (Hemionitis kuhnii, Aleuritopteris kuhnii)
Northern lipfern, Thin northern lipfern

China

Grow in a terrarium set up with a stony potting mix and kept on the dry side (by sparse watering and leaving the lid off for long periods), Cheilanthes can sometimes be grown to perfection. They may need brighter light than other ferns usually grown in terrariums.

New fronds are attractively scaly and mature fronds are covered with silvery powder on the underside.

8-12 x
(20-30 x )

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.

Suitable for

Rock Garden and Wall Fern.
Colour in Fern Fronds.
Heated Greenhouse.
Terrarium.
Drier Soil Fern.
Woodland.

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

A small fern forming erect clumps. Plants extend to high altitudes and are probably hardy in a temporate climate.

Rock crevices on dry slopes, forests; 1000-3500 m. Gansu, Hebei, Henan, Jilin, Liaoning, Nei Mongol, Shaanxi, Shanxi, Sichuan, Xizang, Yunnan [Japan, Korea, Russia].

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See Spore Photo.

Click on image files.

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Cheilanthes lasiophylla
Woolly Cloak Fern, Woolly Lip Fern
 

Australia - Endemic to Australia and more common in the drier western and central regions of the country. Restricted in Victoria to the north-west near the South Australian border and at two isolated localities in north-central Victoria.

USDA Zones 7a-10b

Grow in a terrarium set up with a stony potting mix and kept on the dry side (by sparse watering and leaving the lid off for long periods), Cheilanthes can sometimes be grown to perfection. They may need brighter light than other ferns usually grown in terrariums.

4-8 x
(10-20 x )

 

This Fern is growing in garden of Alison Evans ,who is a member of the British Pteridological Society.

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.

Suitable for

Rock Garden and Wall Fern.
Colour in Fern Fronds.
Drier Soil Fern.
Tolerates Full Sun.
Terrarium.
 

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

This is a very hardy fern which adapts well to a dry climate, the fronds curling quickly in dry times and resurrecting within a few hours of rain. The narrow fronds are dark green above and have masses of brown hairs and scales on the underside. An attractive plant for a sunny rock garden.

On rocky outcrops and hills in inland arid regions in New South Wales in Australia.

Sandy loam, red clayey sand. On rocky slopes and in rock crevices in Western Australia.

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Cheilanthes lasiophylla frond lower. By Mark Marathon via Wikimedia Commons.

Cheilanthes lasiophylla frond. By Mark Marathon via Wikimedia Commons.

Cheilanthes lasiophylla habit. By Mark Marathon via Wikimedia Commons.

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Cheilanthes lanosa (Notholaena vestita)
Hairy Lip-fern

Hardy in USDA Zone 5, where it is native to the eastern United States.

Native to the Southwestern US, this will handle hot, dry summers, with its roots cool down among the rocks.

Myriopteris lanosa, the hairy lip fern, is a moderately-sized fern of the eastern United States, a member of the family Pteridaceae. Its leaves and stem are sparsely covered in hairs, but lack scales, hence its common name. One of the cheilanthoid ferns, it was usually classified in the genus Cheilanthes until 2013, when the genus Myriopteris was again recognized as separate from Cheilanthes. It typically grows in shallow, dry, soil, often in rocky habitats.

Grow in a terrarium set up with a stony potting mix and kept on the dry side (by sparse watering and leaving the lid off for long periods), Cheilanthes can sometimes be grown to perfection. They may need brighter light than other ferns usually grown in terrariums.

 

Suitable for rockeries, beds, border fringes or in the container with Dianthus, Sempervivums or Sedums for example. A hardy plant which should survive normal winter conditions outside, especially if protected from the hardest frosts in the UK.

Lovely with other woodland plants or grown in a greenhouse in the UK.

Perfect respite for woodland animals when grouped.

8-16 x 4-20
(20-40 x 10-50)

Will not tolerate winter wet. Grow in sharply-drained, gritty, humus-rich soil in full sun, with protection from winter rain. Otherwise grow under glass in full light, with low humidity and good ventilation, in a mix of equal parts loam-based potting compost and coarse grit plus 10 percent added charcoal, and water sparingly in the UK.
Propagation in the UK - Sow spores at 16°C as soon as ripe. Division in spring is possible, but rhizomes resent disturbance.
Grow on Banks and Slopes, Gravel Garden, Patio & Container Plants, Rock Garden in the UK.

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.

 

This evergreen fern is best grown as a house plant here in the UK, although it can survice out in the garden if its roots are well protected from cold.

Suitable for

Rock Garden and Wall Fern.
Acid Soil.
Colour in Fern Fronds.
Drier Soil Fern.
Terrarium.
Heated Greenhouse and Conservatory.
Tolerates Full Sun.
Woodland.
Outdoor Containers. Border and Foundation Fern.
House Fern in Trough Garden.

 

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

A small to medium evergreen fern with short-creeping rhizomes bearing clustered, grayish fronds. Grows under medium-high light in well-drained, acidic garden soil or potting mix kept moist-dry to dry. It usually grows on the ground in or among sandstone; it does not grow on vertical cliff faces.

A neat fern with clumps of bright green fronds which are densely woolly on the underside. Likes dry conditions in a sunny situation. Soil requirements are acid to neutral with excellent drainage. Must not be overwatered.

It can also grow in open woodlands and other open areas. It grows in shallow soil on rocky slopes and ledges, although not usually on cliff faces, at an altitude from 100 to 800 meters (300 to 3,000 ft). It is not particularly sensitive to rock type, growing on limestone, granite and sandstone, among others.

cheilantheslanosapfolwikimediacommons

Cheilanthes lanosa at the University of California Botanical Garden, Berkeley, California. Date: September 2006. By Stan Shebs via Wikimedia Commons.

Cheilanthes lanosa. Date: 10 July 2011.
by ghislain118 (AD) http://www.fleurs-des-montagnes.net via Wikimedia Commons

See photo of greyish foliage in USA.

cheilantheslanosapforwikimediacommons

 

"Although this fern is quite hardy (-15°C), it does not like too much damp in winter.
Maintenance: protect against winter damp by mulching with a thick mattress of pine needles in the autumn. Cut back the dry fronds at the end of winter." from
Le Clos d’Armoise Nursery - a perennial plant nursery in France.

Cheilanthes mulifida (Adiantum globatum, Adiantum multifidum, Cheilanthes bolusii)

Africa, St. Helena - Widespread throughout Swaziland, but more frequent on the western highveld, occurring at altitudes ranging from 760 to 1 672 m. The species is widespread in west-central tropical Africa, east- and south tropical Africa and southern Africa.

multifida: with many divisions, referring to the finely divided lamina.

Grow in a terrarium set up with a stony potting mix and kept on the dry side (by sparse watering and leaving the lid off for long periods), Cheilanthes can sometimes be grown to perfection. They may need brighter light than other ferns usually grown in terrariums.

Fronds closely spaced, to 8 per plant, erect, to 540 mm long.
Ecology: Terrestrial or epilithic, at boulder bases, in rock crevices and in shallow soil pockets overlaying sheet rock, in exposed or partially shaded conditions. In exposed habitats, or during prolonged periods of drought the plants may go dormant.

8-20 x
(20-50 x )

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.

Suitable for

Rock Garden and Wall Fern.
Terrarium.
Sun-Tolerant.
Shade-Tolerant.
Woodlands.
Drier Soil Fern.

 

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

A variable species which also grows in shady positions in forests. It is a tufting species with broad-deltoid, finely lacy fronds which vary from soft to leathery in texture. Requires well-drained, loamy soils and should be kept on the dry side.

Rock crevices and around boulders in grassland, margins of sheetrock, forest margins in high rainfall areas.

item1d9a1

See photos.

 

We have 45 taxa in the database for Cheilanthes as Pteridophytes of Africa.
Derivation of name:  cheilos: lip, anthos: flower; an allusion to the marginal sori.

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Cheilanthes sieberi
Mulga Fern, Poison Rock Fern

Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia

Grow in a terrarium set up with a stony potting mix and kept on the dry side (by sparse watering and leaving the lid off for long periods), Cheilanthes can sometimes be grown to perfection. They may need brighter light than other ferns usually grown in terrariums.

Makes a good groundcover or rockery plant in Australia - Paten Park Native Nursery is a not-for-profit, community organisation specialising in the indigenous plant species of south-east Queensland.
Our purpose is to protect and restore the ecological values of south-east Queensland habitats by returning locally indigenous plants to the landscape. 

4-20 x
(10-50 x )

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.

Suitable for

Rock Garden and Wall Fern.
Terrarium.
Acid Soil.
Woodland in New South Wales.
Drier Soil Fern.
Shade-tolerant.
Sun-Tolerant.
Coastal Districts.
Ground Cover.
 

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

It is a decorative species when planted among rocks in a sunny situation, in acid humus-rich loam.

This fern may grow up to 25 cm tall within Australia and New Zealand. It is a widespread plant, seen in a variety of different habitats: it occurs in arid areas as well as sites with over 1500 mm of annual average rainfall. In desert areas it grows in shaded rocky gullies. However, near the coast, it can grow in full sun in cracks of rocks, or in thin soils.
Excessive consumption of this fern can cause health issues for sheep and cattle .

Grows amongst rocks, widespread in open forest or woodland in New South Wales, Australia.

Sandy to clayey loams, gravel, laterite, granite. Rock crevices, slopes, outcrops, near waterfalls or streams, floodplains.

cheilanthessieberipforwikimediacommons

Cheilanthes sieberi habit. Date 25 August 2011. By Mark Marathon via Wkimedia Commons. See other photos.
 

Cheilanthes tomentosa (Myripteris tomentosa)
Woolly Lip Fern

Hardy, Zones 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

Native to the southwestern United States and Mexico, where it grows on a variety of rock types.

It shrivels up into a brown curled mass and appears dead in periods of drought but will green up again in periods of moisture, this has earned it the name resurrection fern. The name lipfern derives from the fact that the sporecases are located at the margins of the leaves which give the leaves a lipped appearance.

Grow in a terrarium set up with a stony potting mix and kept on the dry side (by sparse watering and leaving the lid off for long periods), Cheilanthes can sometimes be grown to perfection. They may need brighter light than other ferns usually grown in terrariums.

The lower surface is densely hairy with matted hairs and the upper surface with fine hairs.

Woolly lipfern typically grows in dry and rocky places such as high cliffs and crevices in substrate such as limestone or granite.

Rocky slopes and ledges, on a variety of substrates including limestone and granite in North America.

8-24 x 16
(20-60 x 40)

It should be grown in full to partial sun with its toes tucked under a rock or covered with a gravel mulch for best results. The blade is a smoky glaucous-green covered with a smattering of fine unbranched white hairs supported by a purplish-black framework. This charming wooly confection is quite at home next to agave, yuccas, sun-loving bulbs, and other grit and sun loving rock plants.

Ideal for planting in pots or borders ferns look great when left undisturbed where they can slowly spread and multiply. It falls under the desert fern species, so it's the ideal fern for sunny corners of the garden.

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on fine sandy peat, kept moist and shaded under bell-glass.

Sow spores at 16°C as soon as ripe. Division in spring is possible, but rhizomes resent disturbance.

Suitable for

Rock Garden and Wall Fern.
Drier Soil Fern.
Terrarium.
Colour in Fern Fronds.
Conservatory and Heated Greenhouse. Basic or Limestone Soils.
Tolerates Full Sun.
Tolerates Part Shade.
Outdoor Containers. Border and Foundation Ferns.
Xerophytic Fern.

Stove and Greenhouse Ferns. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part loam and silver sand.
Position, pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately October to February, freely afterwards.
Temperature,
Stove species, September to March 55-65F (13-18C), March to September 65-75F (18-24C);
Greenhouse, September to March 45-50F (7-10C), March to September 55-65F (13-18C).
These ferns require less moisture than most.

A small-medium fern with compact rhizomes and clustered fronds. Grows well under high light in well-drained, moist-dry to dry garden soil with sand. The plants usually bear attractive grey-green fronds. This species is relatively easy to grow.

An attractive species with brown woolly hairs on the stipes and grey to white woolly hairs on the fronds. These are especially noticeable on the undersurface. Can be tricky to grow needing very well-drained neutral to alkine soils, sun and plenty of air movement.

Will not tolerate winter wet. Grow in sharply-drained, gritty, humus-rich soil in full sun, with protection from winter rain. Otherwise grow under glass in full light, with low humidity and good ventilation, in a mix of equal parts loam-based potting compost and coarse grit plus 10 percent added charcoal, and water sparingly.

cheilanthestomentosapfolwikimediacommons

Cheilanthes tomentosa (Woolly Lip Fern), growing in cultivation. Date 21 February 2010. By Megan Hansen via Wikimedia Commons.

Cheilanthes tomentosa from the second edition of An Illustrated Flora of the Northern United States, Canada and the British Possessions (New York, 1913). By Nathaniel Lord Britton & Addison Brown via Wikimedia Commons.

cheilanthestomentosapfigurewikimediacommons

Doryopteris concolor (Cheilanthes concolor, Doryopteris kirkii, Pellaea geraniifolia, Pteris concolor)
Oak-leaf Fern, Hand Fern

Central and South America, West Indies, Africa, Asia, Polynesia, Australia

concolor: coloured similarly; alluding to the almost uniform shade of green of both surfaces of the frond.

Its common name is the Hand Fern due to having fronds (large divided leaves) shaped like hands (Arab Times, 2011) and also the Oak Leaf Fern (Lockyer Valley Regional Council, n.d.) in Western Australia.

Rhizome erect to procumbent, up to 3 mm in diameter; rhizome scales dark-brown, linear, up to 3 mm in length, margins pale, entire. Fronds tufted, sometimes weakly dimorphic.

 

Doryopteris concolor is nowadays generally placed in the genus called Chelianthes (Spencer, 1995). According to Cook Islands Biodiversity Database (n.d.), Doryopteris concolor is commonly called the Cheilanthes fern in Cook Island (Cook Islands Biodiversity Database, n.d.).

Sori continuous along the margins of the lobules, brownish.

4-12 x
(10-30 x )

 

Doryopteris concolor is known as a resurrection fern. This is because its fronds curl inwards when they dry out. It is able to survive long periods of dry weather. The fern can completely dry out (known as desiccation) and when it becomes wet again the fronds resume their normal function in just a few hours (Bostock, n.d.). Doryopteris concolor has been recorded fertile from May to August (Smith, 1992). It has up to 12 fronds per plant, 64 spores per sporangium (Roux, 2003) and a root system which sets it in the ground. It has no dormant period and is known as epilithic, meaning it grows on the surface of rocks (Roux, 2003).

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation:
From spores and offset plantlets.

Suitable for

Acid Soil.
Rock Garden and Wall Fern where the temperature does not fall below 16° C (61° F) during the winter.
Conservatory and Heated Greenhouse in UK.
Woodland in tropical areas.
Terrarium.

Bright to semi- shady, no sunlight. The same indoor temperature all year round. Not below 16° C (61° F) during the winter. Keep evenly moist. In winter water less when temperatures are low. Sensitive to water-logging. Give low doses of fertilizer every four weeks from early spring to early autumn. Make sure ventilation is good. Repot in spring if necessary.

A fern with dark green, hand-shaped fronds. Forms a pleasant little clump and blends well with rocks. Needs wam, dry, airy conditions in well-drained, acid to neutral soil.

A small fern with erect rhizomes.

Habitat in Rock crevices, base of boulders, shaded earth banks in ravines in miombo woodland in Zimbabwe

It grows in montane areas (mountains or areas of high elevation). Landforms in which Doryopteris concolor inhabits includes in ravines, on earth mounds and at the base of boulders (Flora of Zambia, n.d.). It is a fern that establishes itself in deeply shaded leaf litter and on rocks in seasonally moist evergreen forests. It is an epilithic fern and lithophytic fern meaning it grows on rocks, frequently on limestone.  Sometimes it is found in sheltered damp areas of woodland or open forest but most commonly in rainforests. It thrives in moist soils (University of Connecticut, 2013), especially brown to red loam, and grows best in high humidity.

doryopterisconcolorpforwikimediacommons

Doryopteris concolor - Young fronds of an Oak-leaf fern in Krantzkloof Nature Reserve, KwaZulu-Natal. Date: 4 June 2013. By JMK via Wikimedia Commons.

Doryopteris ludens (Dryopteris wallichii)
Chinese Name : 戟叶黑心蕨

Peninsular Malaysia with northern India to southern China.
Bangladesh, Cambodia, China (Southern Yunnan), India,  Laos, Malaysia, Philippines, Vietnam.

The Tropical Fern & Exotic Plant Society is based in South Florida.
Our dedicated individual members collect and cultivate tropical ferns & exotic plants. Currently, this site deals with subtropical and tropical ferns that are grown in the South Florida area.

It has dimorphic leaves; the leaves change shape.

It has a creeping rhizome and spaced fronds, the fertile ones of which are taller and more deeply lobed. Fronds are dark green and leathery and are carried on wiry black stems.

Able to tolerate short spells of dryness at the root zone if there is high humidity; planting media/ soil should be moist, but not soggy or wet continually as this can cause the plant to rot.

12 x
(30 x )

 

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Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation:
From spores and offset plantlets.

Suitable for

Containers or Hanging Baskets in Conservatory or Heated Greenhouse in the UK.
Shade-Tolerant.
Drier Soil Fern.
Basic or Limestone Soils.
Rock Garden and Wall Fern where the temperature does not fall below 16° C (61° F) during the winter.
 

Bright to semi- shady, no sunlight. The same indoor temperature all year round. Not below 16° C (61° F) during the winter. Keep evenly moist. In winter water less when temperatures are low. Sensitive to water-logging. Give low doses of fertilizer every four weeks from early spring to early autumn. Make sure ventilation is good. Repot in spring if necessary.

Best to keep above 50 degrees F (10 degrees C).

This small fern is suitable for containers or hanging baskets in shade.

A small-medium fern with slender, long-creeping rhizomes. Grows well under medium light in moist potting mix.

Plants like warm, dry, airy conditions and a well-drained, alkaline soil mix.

Grows on limestone.

The perennials prefer a half-shady situation on moderately moist soil. The substrate should be gritty loam. They tolerate temperatures only above at least 1°C (USDA zone 10).

Grows on Limestone rocks by streams in forests; 400-1000 m.

doryopterisludenspfor1wikimediacommons

Doryopteris ludens - Botanical specimen in Saigon Zoo and Botanical Gardens - Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. By Daderot via Wikimedia Commons.

 

Doryopteris ludens - Botanical specimen in the Marie Selby Botanical Gardens - Sarasota, Florida, USA. Date: 20 March 2017. By Daderot via Wikimedia Commons.

See more photos.

doryopterisludenspfor2wikimediacommons

Doryopteris pedata
Hand Fern, Digit Fern

Tropical Fen from West Indies, Central and South America.

Fronds are very variable, young, sterile fronds are maple shaped. Mature fertile fronds are deeply lobed and palmate.

The leaves can extend to about 30cm long and these are deeply lobed. They have a deep brown rim which matches the colour of the stems and leaf veins.

Fronds are variable and of two different shapes. The, young, sterile fronds look rather like a maple leaf, whilst the mature fertile fronds are deeply lobed and palmate.

20 x 12
(50 x 30)

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation:
From spores and offset plantlets.


Breeder buds (bulbils) grow on the leaves where the leaf emerges from the stalk. These develop into tiny plantlets.

Suitable for

Terrrarium.
Conservatory and Heated Greenhouse.
Indoor Decoration.
Shade-Tolerant in pot outdoors during summer in UK.
Basic or Limestone Soils.

Grow in a 12cm (5 inch) pot with open compost with reasonably good drainage and out of direct sunlight.

Bright to semi- shady, no sunlight. The same indoor temperature all year round. Not below 16° C (61° F) during the winter. Keep evenly moist. In winter water less when temperatures are low. Sensitive to water-logging. Give low doses of fertilizer every four weeks from early spring to early autumn. Make sure ventilation is good. Repot in spring if necessary.

Not frost hardy, height to 50cm. Suitable as a terrarium, conservatory or house plant. Very eye catching and attractive evergreen fern. Requires a good open compost with reasonably good drainage.

Suitable for a sheltered, shady position outdoors during summer, and a shady position indoors. Particularly suitable for a terrarium.

Grows on rocks.

This a tough fern which resents coddling and prefers warm, airy, airy conditions in bright light. Drainage must be excellent and the addition of lime may be beneficial.

doryopterispedatapfolwikimediacommons

Doryopteris pedata - Botanischer Garten Leipzig. Date: 26 March 2010. By Tubifex - Own work, copyleft: Multi-license with GFDL and Creative Commons CC-BY-SA-3.0 and older versions (2.5, 2.0 and 1.0) via Wikimedia Commons.

Doryopteris pedata - Botanischer Garten Leipzig. Date: 26 March 2010. By Tubifex - Own work, copyleft: Multi-license with GFDL and Creative Commons CC-BY-SA-3.0 and older versions (2.5, 2.0 and 1.0) via Wikimedia Commons.

doryopterispedatapforwikimediacommons

Gymnopteris marantae (Cheilanthes marantae, Paraceterach marantae, Acrostichum marantae, Para-gymnopteris marantae)

European golden-haired bare fern

Africa, Southern Europe, Syria, Northern India, Canary Islands.

The undersides of the fronds are covered in rusty red scales, which add to its ornamental appeal.

The lateral veins are bifurcated, and the sporangia group is placed along the upper part of the small veins, covering the scales, without a cover.

4-10 x
(10-25 x )

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation:
From spores. Use a coarse sowing mixture with a nuetral to alkaline pH (7-8.5). Mixes containing a preponerance of scoria or fly ash are particularly suitable.

Suitable for

Terrarium or Conservatory or Heated Greenhouse for Temperate regions;
Grow outdoors in tropical climates in Rock Garden.
Colour in Fen Fronds.
Shade-Tolerant.
Scree in tropical woodland.

Keep the terrarium on the dry side or even left open.

A very drought-tolerant little fern. Best grown in a rock pocket exposed to partial or filtered sun. Likes air movement and must not be overwatered.

In temperate regions it should be kept as dry as possible over winter.

It grows in the dry stone seams under the forest, at an altitude of 1800-4200 meters.

gymnopterismarantaepfor1efloras

Gymnopteris marantae. Photo by David E. Boufford - Photos by The Biodiversity of the Hangduan Mountains Project. It may be cited as 'eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org [accessed 28 April 2019]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA. The underside of the leaves.

Gymnopteris marantae. Photo by David E. Boufford - Photos by The Biodiversity of the Hangduan Mountains Project. It may be cited as 'eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org [accessed 28 April 2019]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.

gymnopterismarantaepfor2efloras

See photos.

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Gymnopteris vestita (Hemionitis vestita, Gymno-gramma vestita, Syngramma vestita)
Mouse-ear Fern

North India, Southwest China.

Rhizome short creeping, bearing closely spaced fronds, densely covered with both scales and hairs; scales linear, about 0.1 mm broad, brown, like hairs: hairs downy, brown to paler, up to 5 mm long. Sori dispersed along veins, naked.

2-6 x
(5-15 x )

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation:
From spores. Use a coarse sowing mixture with a nuetral to alkaline pH (7-8.5). Mixes containing a preponerance of scoria or fly ash are particularly suitable.

Suitable for

Colour in Fern Fronds.
Rock Garden and Wall Fern in tropical regions.

An interesting dwarf fern which forms a small tussock of narrow, wiry fronds which have rounded to ovate pinnae, dark green above and covered with rusty to silvery hairs beneath. Plants may be somewhat tricky to grow. They require excellent drainage and good light.

In temperate regions it should be kept as dry as possible over winter.

In rock crevices at about 2000 m alt. in limestone areas of Doi Chiang Dao.

gymnopterisvestitiapforefloras

Gymnopteris vestita. Photo by David E. Boufford - Photos by The Biodiversity of the Hangduan Mountains Project. It may be cited as 'eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org [accessed 28 April 2019]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.

Gymnopteris vestita. Photo by Susan Kelley - Photos by The Biodiversity of the Hangduan Mountains Project. This shows the hairy underside of the leaves with black sori.

gymnopterisvestitiapfuefloras

Hemionitis cordata (Hemionitis arifolia, Hemionitis cordifolia, Asplenium arifolium, Gymnogramma arifolia, Parahemionitis cordata)

Heart Fern, Heart Leaf Fern.

India, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Malaysia, Phillipines. Zones 10-12 (between 8C to 40C).

Hemionitis is a group of small tropical ferns, with copiously netted veins and naked lines of sporangia following the veins. 8 or 9 species occur in the tropics of both hemispheres. The plants are dwarf, and are grown in Wardian cases by a few fanciers in the Old World.

It has dimorphic fronds: the sterile blades are heart-shaped; the fertile, triangular-hastate. Both fronds have hais on the stipes and thinly on the blades, and the veins are netted with polygonal, elongate areoles.

6-12 x 12-18
(15-30 x 30-45)

For a potted crop: During the spring-summer growing season, water regularly with non-calcareous water at room temperature and, if necceccary, apply a small amount of fertilizer, always on moist soil; it will take a good month after its acquisition when the Hemionite will seem to have acclimated, select a fertilizer for green plants highly diluted, do not forget that in a natural environment, it is often a myrmecophilous plant. Recommend watering by immersion of the root ball during about 30 minutes, then take care not to let water stagnate in the pot cache. In the winter, reduce the watering and maintain it ptreferably at a temperature between 10-14C. Repotting, if necessary, will be done in the spring in a slightly enriched substrate.

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: Division in the spring.
Buds produced on different parts of their fronds - Doryopteris palmata, Goniopteris vivipara,
Hemionitis
palmata,
Hemionitis
cordata, Stenosemia aurita, and a few others which produce buds on different parts of their fronds,
should be pegged down to the surface of the soil, and the young plants will soon be ready to take off and to commence an independent existence.

Suitable for

Terrarium or Wardian Case.
Conservatory or Heated Greenhouse for Temperate regions;
Grow outdoors on trunks of trees in tropical climates in Woodlands or in Rock Garden.
Ferns found on Limestone or Basic Soil.

 

Warm Greenhouse Evergreen Ferns. Fronds heart-shaped or hand-shaped. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part sand.
Position, small well-drained pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately March to September, occasionally other times. Syringing not required.
Temperature,
March to September 60-70F (15-21C), September to March 55-60F (13-18C).
 

Warm Greenhouse Fern.

A neat little fern which is very sensitive to over-potting and is best maintained in a small pot for as long as possible. Plants prefer an open, humus-rich neutral to alkaline soil mix, warm conditions and strong light. Small plantlets arise on the main veins of the leaf near the base.

The terrarium is ideal for its constant temperature and hygrometry.

Its origin was in the rainforests of Southeast Asia present in Laos, Vietnam, Ceylon and Taiwan.
A fern covetted by terrarium enthusiasts, bottles or greenhouses, not always easy to aclimatize and grow because it lives on the trunks of trees, the infractiosities of the rocks.

Wet soil and rock crevices of stream valleys in dense forests, shrublands, slopes; below 1000 m..

Use in Terrarium; reptile and amphibian safe.

hemionitisarifoliapforwikimediacommons

Hemionitis arifolia - Botanical specimen in the Lyman Plant House, Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts, USA. Date 20 December 2012. By Daderot via Wikimedia Commons.

See images of this fern from Ferns of Thailand, Laos and Cambodia - On muddy rocks or terrestrial by paths in dense forests at low to medium altitudes below 600 m throughout the country but rather rare.

Use as houseplant, in Terrarium or in Bog Garden. Needs excellent drainage in pots. See photos.

Excellent ground cover in terrarium - Siam Greenculture ship throughout world.

Hemionitis elegans (Doryopteris elegans, Bommeria elegans, Hemionitis hederifolia)

Mexico

 

Hemionitis is a group of small tropical ferns, with copiously netted veins and naked lines of sporangia following the veins. 8 or 9 species occur in the tropics of both hemispheres. The plants are dwarf, and are grown in Wardian cases by a few fanciers in the Old World.

Bommeria is a "gymno-grammoid" fern, exhibiting unprotected sori aligned along veins on the undersides of the fronds. This is why it was assumed to be closely allied to Hemionitis. Such a feature is strongly at odds with most pteridoid ferns (Pteridaceae), which typically have linear marginal sori with an indusium, and sometimes protected with a reflexed leaf tissue margin. Apparently, this is a trait that can arise independently, and may be an atavistic trait.

Leaves 4-10 inches wide, with a broad sinus at the base and 5 long slender, lanceolate divisions: plant smooth.

4-10 x 4-10
(10-25 x 10-25)

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: By spores sown on pans of sandy peat under bell-glass in temperature 65-75F (18-24C) at any time

Suitable for

Terrarium or Wardian Case.
Conservatory or Heated Greenhouse for Temperate regions;
Grow outdoors in tropical climates
in Rock Garden.
Fern for Acid Soil.
Drier Soil Fern.
Shade-tolerant Fern.

Warm Greenhouse Evergreen Ferns. Fronds heart-shaped or hand-shaped. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part sand.
Position, small well-drained pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately March to September, occasionally other times. Syringing not required..
Temperature,
March to September 60-70F (15-21C), September to March 55-60F (13-18C).
 

Warm Greenhouse Fern.

A very beautiful species with large, shallowly-lobed fronds of a pleasing shape. New fronds are light green and contrast with the darker green, mature fronds. Plants like warm, dry, airy conditions in a well-drained acid to neutral soil mix.

bommeriaeleganspfigurewikimediacommons

Bommeria elegans - gardenforestjour41891sarg illustration from Garden and forest; a journal of horticulture, landscape art and forestry published in 1888. Date: 1891. By Sargent, Charles Sprague, 1841-1927 via Wikimedia Commons.

Hemionitis palmata

Strawberry Fern, Star Fern, Mule Fern

West Indies, Central and South America with Distribution Map

掌叶泽泻蕨

Hemionitis is a group of small tropical ferns, with copiously netted veins and naked lines of sporangia following the veins. 8 or 9 species occur in the tropics of both hemispheres. The plants are dwarf, and are grown in Wardian cases by a few fanciers in the Old World.

Leaf-blades borne on tall stalks, palmate, 2-6 inches (5-15 cms) wide, with 5 nearly equal triangular divisions, those of the sterile leaves less acute; surfaces pubescent. Reproduces by numerous buds as well as by spores.

Spores elongate on the netted veins as shown by images in Ferns and Lycophytes of the World

8 x
(20 x )

 

Hemionitis grows in open, or sometimes dense, forests, on shrubby hillsides, and in open rocky areas. It is often on stream banks, on road banks, or on old rock walls, very rarely on rotting logs. Hemionitis palmata may be weedy, sometimes invading coffee or bannana plantations. Colonies of Hemionitis palmata are often formed by vegetative reproduction. Buds in the major sinuses of the lamina develop when the leaf ages and lies on the soil. Hemionitis usually grows between 100 and 1000 m, sometimes lower to nearly sea level, and in the Andes higher to 2800 m.

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and Their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix)

 

Propagation: Division in the spring.
Buds produced on different parts of their fronds - Doryopteris palmata, Goniopteris vivipara,
Hemionitis
palmata,
Hemionitis
cordata, Stenosemia aurita, and a few others which produce buds on different parts of their fronds,
should be pegged down to the surface of the soil, and the young plants will soon be ready to take off and to commence an independent existence.

Suitable for

Wardian Case or Terrarium.
Small Pot in Conservatory or Heated Greenhouse for Temperate regions;
Grow outdoors in tropical climates
in dry forested
Rock Garden.
Woodland.
Drier Soil Fern.
Shade-Tolerant Fern.
 

Warm Greenhouse Evergreen Ferns. Fronds heart-shaped or hand-shaped. First introduced late eighteenth century.
Culture: Compost, 2 parts peat, 1 part sand.
Position, small well-drained pots in shade. Pot, February or March. Water moderately March to September, occasionally other times. Syringing not required.
Temperature,
March to September 60-70F (15-21C), September to March 55-60F (13-18C).
 

Warm Greenhouse Fern.

An attractive little fern with leaves of a similar shape to those of a strawberry. The sterile fronds have short stalks and are clustered below the much taller fertile fronds. Small plantlets arise on the main veins of the leaf near the base. Plants are popular in cultivation and like warm, airy conditions in a small pot.

Grows well under medium light in moist potting mix. Usually 1 bud develops in a large marginal notch on the blade.

Grow in shade.

Plants of Saint Lucia - Indigenous rare terrestrial on dry forested rocky hills.
St. Martin, Montserrat, Guadeloupe, Dominica, Martinique, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada, Greater Antilles, Trinidad, Mesoamerica, South America.

hemionitispalmatapforwikimediacommons

Hemionitis palmata specimen in the Botanischer Garten München-Nymphenburg, Munich, Germany. Date: 2 May 2011. By Daderot via Wikimedia Commons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Page structure amended December 2012.
Gallery structure changed November 2018.
Chris Garnons-Williams.

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Fern Grower's Manual by Barbara Joe Hoshizaki & Robbin C. Moran. Revised and Expanded Edition. Published in 2001 by Timber Press, Inc. Reprinted 2002, 2006. ISBN-13:978-0-88192-495-4.
"This book is mainly written for people seriously interested in growing ferns, knowing their names and what makes them similar or different, and appreciating their diversity. It is not a coffee-table book, nor a chatty type of garden book meant for light reading. Beginning fern amateurs may find more information than they need, but they will also find information useful at their level. Although this book primarily is a reference, it is also for browsing and gleaning bits of information not readily found elsewhere.
The core information in this book will be particularly helpful to plant people who want to grow or identify different ferns and fern allies." from the Preface to the above book.

 

 

USE OF FERN WITH PHOTOS
using information from Fern Grower's Manual by Barbara Joe Hoshizaki & Robbin C. Moran and
The Encyclopaedia of Ferns An Introduction to Ferns, their Structure, Biology, Economic Importance, Cultivation and Propagation by David L. Jones ISBN 0 88192 054 1


Outdoor Use in
Northeastern United States
Zones 3-6
Southeastern United States Zones 6-8
Southern Florida and Hawaii Zones 10-11
Central United States Zones 3-6
Northwestern United States Zones 5-8 with some Zone 9
Southwestern United States Zones 6-9
Coastal Central and Southern California Zones 9-10

Accent
Aquatic 1, 2

Basket 1,
Ferns for Hanging Baskets 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Ferns for Hanging Baskets with Pendulous Fronds or weeping Growth Habit 7, 8

Bog or Wet-Soil 1,
Ferns for Wet Soils 2, 3
Border and Foundation 1, 2
Grow in Coastal Region
Cold-hardy Ferns 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Colour in Fern Fronds 1, 2, 3, 4
Conservatory (Stove House) or Heated Greenhouse 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Drier Soil 1, 2, 3, 4
Grows on Rock (epilithic) 1, 2
Borne on Leaf (epiphyllous) 1, 2
Grows on another Plant (epiphyte) 1, 2
Evergreen and Deciduous
Fronds in Floral Decorations

Ferns for Acid Soil 1,
Lime-hating (Calcifluges) 2, 3, 4, 5

Ferns for Basic or Limestone Soil 1,
Ferns Found on Limestone or Basic Soils (Calciphiles) 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

Ferns for Ground Cover 1,
Ground Cover Ferns 2, 3, 4, 5
Ferns of the Atlantic Fringe with associated plants (1 - Atlantic Cliff-top Grassland, Ledges and Rough Slopes; 2 - Clay Coasts and Dunes of South-East Ireland; 3 - Limestones of Western Atlantic Coasts; 4 - Hebridean Machair; 5 - Horsetail Flushes, Ditches and Stream Margins; 6 - Water Margin Osmunda Habitats; 7 - Western, Low-lying, Wet, Acid Woodlands; 8 - Western, Oak and Oak-Birch Woodlands and Ravines, in the UK and Ireland)
Ferns in Coastal District with associated plants
(Hard Rock Cliffs, Soft Rock Cliffs, Clay Coasts, or Coastal Sand-Dunes in the UK)
Ferns of Grasslands and Rock Outcrops (Grasslands; Rocks, Quarries and Mines in the UK)
Ferns of Heath and Moorland with associated plants (1 - Bracken Heath; 2 - Ferns of Moist Heathland Slopes and Margins of Rills and Streams; 3 - Heathland Horsetails, 4 - Heathland Clubmosses, in the UK)
Ferns of Lower Mountain Habitats with associated plants (1 - Upland Slopes and Screes; 2 - Base-rich, Upland Springs and Flushes; 3 - Base-rich, Upland, Streamside Sands and Gravels; 4 - Juniper Shrub Woodland, in the UK)
Ferns for Man-Made Landscapes with associated plants (South-western Hedgebanks, Hedgerows and Ditches, Walls and Stonework, Water Mills and Wells, Lime Kilns and abandoned Lime-Workings, Pit heaps and Shale Bings, Canals, Railways and Their Environs in the UK)
Ferns of Upper Mountain Habitats with associated plants (1 - High Mountain, Basic Cliffs and Ledges; 2 - High, Cliff Gullies; 3 - High Mountain Corries, Snow Patches and Fern beds; 4 - Ridges, Plateaux and High Summits, in the UK)
Ferns for Wetlands with associated plants (1- Ponds, Flooded Mineral Workings and Wet Heathland Hollows; 2 - Lakes and Reservoirs; 3 - Fens; 4 - Ferns of the Norfolk Broads' Fens; 5 - Willow Epiphytes in the UK)
Ferns in Woodland with associated plants (1 - Dry, Lowland, Deciduous Woodland; 2 - Inland, Limestone, Valley Woodland; 3 - Base-rich Clay, Valley Woodland; 4 - Basic, Spring-fed Woodland; 5 - Ravine Woodland on Mixed Rock-types; 6 - Native Pine Forest in the UK)

Ferns in Hedges or Hedgebanks

Outdoor Containers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Rapidly Growing Fern 1, 2
Resurrection Fern
Rock Garden and Wall Ferns 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Shade Tolerant 1, 2, 3, 4
Slowly Growing Fern
Sun Tolerant 1, 2, 3, 4
House Fern in Trough Garden 1,
Fern Suitable for
Indoor Decoration 2
, 3, 4, 5, 6
House Fern in Terrarium, Wardian Case or
Bottle Garden 1,

Ferns suitable for Terrariums, Wardian Cases 2, 3, 4,
5, 6

Grow in Woodlands 1, 2, 3, 4
 

TYPE OF FERN TO GROW WITH PHOTOS
using information from
Fern Grower's Manual by Barbara Joe Hoshizaki & Robbin C. Moran and
The Encyclopaedia of Ferns An Introduction to Ferns, their Structure, Biology, Economic Importance, Cultivation and Propagation by David L. Jones ISBN 0 88192 054 1


Aquatic Ferns (Azolla, Ceratopteris, Marsilea, Pilularia, Regnellidium, Salvinia)

Boston ferns (Nephrolepis exaltata), Fishbone ferns (Nephrolepis cordifolia), Lace ferns and Sword ferns

Cloak, Lip, Hand Ferns and their Hardy Relatives (Bommeria, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Gymnopteris, Hemionitis, Notholaena, Paraceterach, Pellae, Pleurosorus, Quercifilix) 1,
2, 3


Davallia Ferns (Araiostegia, Davallia, Davallodes, Gymno-grammitis, Humata, Leucostegia, Scyphularia, Trogostolon) 1, 2

Fern Allies (Psilotums or Whisk Ferns, Lycopodiums or Ground Pines, Selaginellas or Spike Mosses, and Equisetums, Horsetails or Scouring Rushes) 1, 2

Filmy and Crepe Ferns (Hymenophyllum, Trichomanes, Leptopteris) 1, 2

Lacy Ground Ferns (Culcita, Dennstaedtia, Histiopteris, Hypolepis, Leptolepia, Microlepia, Paesia, Pteridium) 1, 2

Lady Ferns and Their Allies (Allantodia, Athyrium, Diplazium, Lunathyrium, Pseudo-cystopteris, Callipteris, Cornopteris, Cystopteris) 1, 2

Maidenhair Ferns (Adiantum) 1, 2

Miscellaneous Ferns (Acrostichum, Actiniopteris, Anemia, Anogramma, Anopteris, Blotiella, Bolbitis, Christella, Coniogramma, Cryptogramma, Ctenitis, Cyclosorus, Didymochlaena, Dipteris, Elaphoglossum, Equisetum, Gymnocarpium, Llavea, Lonchitis, Lygodium, Macrothelypteris, Oeontrichia, Oleandra, Onoclea, Onychium, Oreopteris, Parathelypteris, Phegopteris, Photinopteris, Pityrogramma, Pneumatopteris, Psilotum, Stenochlaena, Thelypteris, Vittaria)
1
, 2, 3, 4 including Fern Allies of Equisetum and Psilotum or Whisk Ferns


Polypodium Ferns and Relatives (Anarthropteris, Belvisia, Campyloneurum, Colysis, Crypsinus, Dictymia, Gonphlebium, Lecanopteris, Lemmaphyllum, Lexogramme, Microgramma, Microsorum, Niphidium, Phlebodium, Phymatosurus, Pleopeltis, Polypodium, Pyrrosia, Selliguea) 1, 2, 3

Primitive Ferns and Fern Oddities (Angiopteris, Botrychium, Christensenia, Danaea, Helminthostachys, Marattia, Ophioglossum, Osmunda and Todea)

Scrambling, Umbrella, Coral and Pouch Ferns (Dicranopteris, Diploptergium, Gleichenia, Sticherus)

Shield, Buckler, Holly Ferns and their Relatives (Arachniodes, Cyrtomium, Dryopteris, Lastreopsis, Matteuccia, Polystichum, Rumohra, Tectaria and Woodsia) 1, 2, 3, 4

Spleenworts Ferns (Asplenium) 1, 2, 3

Staghorns, Elkhorns and other large epiphytes (Aglaomorpha, Drynaria, Merinthosorus, Platycerium, Pseudodrynaria) 1, 2

Fern Allies - Tassel Ferns and Clubmosses (Lycopodium)

The Brakes (Pteris) 1, 2

Tree Fern
s (Cibotium, Cnemidaria, Cyathea, Dicksonia, Nephelea and Trichipteris) 1, 2

Water, Hard, Rasp and Chain Ferns (Blechnum, Doodia, Woodwardia, Sadleria) 1, 2

Xerophytic Ferns (Actinopteris, Astrolepis, Cheilanthes, Doryopteris, Notholaena, Pellaea, Pityrogramma) 1, 2