Ivydene Gardens Infill3 Plants Index Gallery:
Indoor Bulbs flowering in November

Topic
Case Studies
Companion Planting
Garden Construction
Garden Design
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Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants
Soil
Tool Shed
Useful Data

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
Bulb
Climber

 

Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12

All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index

All Foliage 212
All Spring Foliage 212

All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212
Rock Plant Flowers 53

 

Your chosen Garden Style then changes your Plant Selection Process

Garden Style
...Infill3 Plants *
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...
12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

 

Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods

Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Vegetable

Wild Flower

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly

 

Cultivation Requirements of Plant

Outdoor / Garden Cultivation

1

Indoor / House Cultivation

 

Cool Greenhouse (and Alpine House) Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter

1

Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year

1

Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

1

 

Sun Aspect

Full Sun

1

Part Shade

1

Full Shade

1

 

Soil Type

Any Soil

1

Chalky Soil

1

Clay Soil

1

Lime-Free Soil

 

Peaty Soil

1

Sandy Soil

1

Acid Soil

1

Alkaline Soil

1

Badly-drained Soil

 

 

Soil Moisture

Dry

1

Moist

1

Wet

1

 

Position for Plant

Back of Shady Border

 

Back of Shrub Border

1

Bedding

1

Bog Garden

 

Coastal Conditions / Seaside

1

Container in Garden

1

Front of Border

1

Ground Cover 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

1

Ground Cover 24-72 inches (60-180 cms)

1

Ground Cover Over 72 inches (180 cms)

 

Hanging Basket

 

Hedge

1

Hedge - Thorny

 

Pollution Barrier

 

Pond

 

Pot in House, Greenhouse, Conservatory or Stovehouse

1

Raised Bed

 

Rest of Border

1

Rock Garden

1

Scree Bed

1

Speciman on Lawn

 

Sunny Border

1

Tree for Lawn

 

Tree for Small Garden

1

Wildflower

1

Windbreak

 

Woodland

1

 

Use of Plant

Pollen or nectar for Bees

1

Hosts to Butterflies

1

Encouraging birds / wildlife, providing food and shelter

1

Bee-Pollinated plants for Hay Fever Sufferers

1

Berries / Fruit

 

Dry Site in Full Sun

1

Dry Shade

 

Filtering noise

 

Flower Arrange-ments

 

Fragrant Flower

1

Language of Flowers

 

Low maintenance

1

Moist Shade

 

Moist and swampy Sites

 

Nitrogen fixing plants

 

Not Fragrant Flower

1

Rabbit-Resistant

 

Speciman Plant

1

Thornless

 

Tolerant of Poor Soil

1

 

Plant Foliage

Aromatic Foliage

 

Autumn Foliage

 

Finely Cut Leaves

1

Large Leaves

 

Yellow Variegated Foliage

1

White Variegated Foliage

1

Red / Purple Variegated Foliage

 

Silver, Grey and Glaucous Foliage

1

Sword-shaped Leaves

 

 

 

Flower Shape

Number of Flower Petals

Petal-less
 

1

1 Petal

 

2 Petals

 

3 Petals
 

1

4 Petals
 

1

5 Petals
 

1

Above 5
 

1

 

Flower Shape - Simple

Stars
 

1

Bowls
 

 

Cups and Saucers
 

1

Globes
 

 

Goblets and Chalices
 

 

Trumpets
 

1

Funnels
 

1

Bells
 

1

Thimbles
 

 

Urns
 

 

Salverform

 

 

Flower Shape - Elaborated

Tubes, Lips and Straps
 

 

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets
 

 

Hats, Hoods and Helmets
 

 

Standards, Wings and Keels
 

 

Discs and Florets
 

 

Pin-Cushions
 

 

Tufts
 

 

Cushion
 

 

Umbel
 

1

Buttons
 

 

Pompoms
 

 

 

Natural Arrangements

Bunches, Posies, Sprays
 

1

Columns, Spikes and Spires
 

 

Whorls, Tiers and Candelabra
 

1

Plumes and Tails
 

 

Chains and Tassels
 

1

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades
 

 

Spheres, Domes and Plates
 

 

 

Shrub, Tree Shape

Columnar
 

1

Oval
 

1

Rounded or Spherical
 

 

Flattened Spherical
 

1

Narrow Conical / Narrow Pyramidal
 

1

Broad Conical / Broad Pyramidal
 

1

Ovoid /
Egg-Shaped
 

 

Broad Ovoid
 

 

Narrow Vase-shaped / Inverted Ovoid
 

 

Fan-Shaped /Vase-Shaped
 

 

Broad Fan-Shaped / Broad Vase-Shaped
 

 

Narrow Weeping
 

 

Broad Weeping
 

 

Palm

 

 

Conifer Cone

1

 

Form

Arching

1

Climbing

 

Clump-Forming

1

Mat-Forming

 

Mound-Forming

1

Prostrate

1

Spreading

1

Stemless

 

Upright

1

 

Poisonous Plant

1

 

INFILL3 PLANTS INDEX GALLERY PAGES

Links in Table below are available in Shrub Tree Shape Index Gallery


Site Map

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

Click on number in cells below to jump to that page detailing those cultivated plants with that plant type and their botanical name starts with that letter.

Click on or underlined text to jump to page comparing flower thumbnails of that blue colour.
is Red, Pink, Purple and is Unusual or Other Flower Colour.

Plant Type
with links to Other Plant Photo Galleries

A
B
C

D
E
F

G
H
I

J
K
L

M
N
O

P
Q
R

S
T
U

V
W
X

Y
Z

Alpine in Evergreen Perennial, Herbaceous Perennial and Rock Garden

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

Aquatic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annual/ Biennial

1

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

Bamboo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bedding and RHS Mixed Border Beds



















Bicolour

Other Flower Colours

White / Colour Bicolour

Bulb and
Allium / Anemone, Colchicum / Crocus, Dahlia, Gladiolus, Narcissus, Tulip





 

 



 



 



1



Climber



 





 









Conifer

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deciduous Shrub

1

 

 

 



 







Deciduous Tree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evergreen Perennial

1

 

 

 



 







Evergreen Shrub , Semi-Evergreen Shrub and Heather

1

 

 

 



 







Evergreen Tree

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grass

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

Herbaceous Perennial and RHS Mixed Border Beds



 

 

1



 







Herb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Odds and Sods

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rhododendron, Azalea, Camellia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rose

 

 





 









Soft Fruit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sub-Shrub

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top Fruit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wildflower
with
Plants used by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterflies in the UK



















Shrub and Small Tree

Botanical Names Page

Common Names Page

Companion Planting

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

UV

W

XYZ

Pest Control by Companion Planting

The following 2 books (written by Louise Riotte 1909-1998 who was one of North America's most beloved gardeners) provide a wealth of extra information telling you what plants to put together for what purpose and how it does it (The only wasted information on each page is the page number!!!):-

Carrots love Tomatoes: Secrets of Companion Planting for Successful Gardening by Louise Riotte Second Edition (Storey Publishing 1998) ISBN-13: 978-1-58017-027-7

Roses love Garlic: Companion Planting and other Secrets of Flowers by Loiuse Riotte Second Edition (Storey Publishing 1998)
ISBN 1-58017-028-5

 

Click on text in cells below to jump to that page detailing those Infill2 Plants of that plant type for that Cultivation requirement.

Plant Type
 

 

Alpines for Rock Garden (See Rock Garden Plant Flowers)

Alpine Shrubs and Conifers

The Alpine Meadow
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

The Alpine Border

Alpine Plants for a Purpose

The Alpines that Dislike Lime

Alpines and Walls
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

Alpines and Paving

Sink and Trough gardens

Aquatic
(Water Plants) for

Anti-erosion Riverbank

Marginal Plants (Bog Garden Plants)

Oxy-genating Weeds

Water Lilies

Floating Plants

Waterside Plants
and Plants for Dry Margins next to a Pond

Wildlife Pond Plants

Annual for

----------------

Plants for Cut Flowers in
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Exposed Sites

Sheltered Sites with Green-house Annuals from 1916

Extra Poor Soil with Half-Hardy Annuals from 1916

Very Rich Soil with Biennials from 1916

Gap-filling in Mixed Borders with Hardy Annuals from 1916

Patio Containers

Cut Flowers Page 1
Page 2 Everlasting Flowers with Red Flowers from 1916

Attracting beneficial insects

Scent / Fragrance with Annuals for Cool or Shady Places from 1916

Low-allergen Gardens for Hay Fever Sufferers

Annual Plant Pairing Ideas

Low-Growing Annuals

Medium-Growing Annuals

Tall-Growing Annuals with White Flowers from 1916

Black or Brown Flowers

Blue to Purple Flowers

Green Flowers with Annuals and Biennials from 1916

Red to Pink Flowers
Page 1
Page 2

White Flowers

Yellow or Orange Flowers

Decorative Foliage

Moist Soil

Shade

House-plants with Yellow Flowers from 1916

Edging Beds

Hanging Baskets

Vining Annuals

 

Bedding for

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Autumn/ Winter Bedding

Bedding for Light Sandy Soil

Bedding for Acid Soil

Bedding for Chalky Soil

Bedding for Clay Soil

Black Flowers

Blue Flowers

Orange Flowers

Pink Flowers

Long Flowering

Coloured Leaves

Attractive to Wildlife including Bees, Butterflies and Moths

Purple Flowers

Red Flowers

White Flowers

Yellow Flowers

Multi-Coloured Flowers

Aromatic Foliage or Scented Flowers

Bedding Plant Use

Flowers with 2 Petals

Flowers with 3 Petals

Flowers with
4 Petals

Flowers with 5 Petals

Flowers with 6 Petals

Flowers with more than 6 Petals

Use in Hanging Baskets

Flower Simple Shape

Shape of
Stars

Shape of
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Shape of
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

Shape of
Trumpets and Funnels

Shape of
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

Use in Pots and Troughs

Flower Elaborated Shape

Shape of
Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Shape of
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Shape of
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

 

Use in
Screening

Use in
Window Boxes

Shape of
Standards, Wings and Keels

Shape of
Discs and Florets

Shape of
Pin-Cushions and Tufts

Shape of
Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

Cut Flowers

Use in Bedding Out

Use in
Filling In

Biennial for

Cottage and Other Gardens

Cut Flower with Biennials for Rock Work from 1916

Patio Containers with Biennials for Pots in Greenhouse / Conservatory

Beneficial to Wildlife with Purple and Blue Flowers from 1916

Scent with Biennials for Sunny Banks or Borders from 1916

 

 

Bulb for
--------------
Explanation Intro to Bulbs
--------------
725 Blue, White, Yellow, Unusual Colour, or Red-Purple-Pink flowering Bulbs in each month they flower.

Indoor Bulbs for
December
January
February

Indoor Bulbs for
March
April
May

Indoor
Bulbs for
June
July
August

Indoor Bulbs for September
October
November

Bulbs in Window-boxes

Bulbs in the Border

Bulbs naturalised in Grass

Plant Bloom Dec-Jan
Feb-Mar

Plant Bloom
Apr-May
Jun-Aug

Plant Bloom
Sep-Oct
Nov-Dec

Plant Bloom Smallest of Gardens

Bulbs for the Bulb Frame

Bulbs in the Woodland Garden

Bulbs in the Rock Garden

Bulbs in Green-house or Stove

Achimenes, Alocasias, Amorpho-phalluses, Arisaemas, Arums, Begonias, Bomareas, Caladiums

Clivias,
Colocasias, Crinums, Cyclamens, Cyrt-anthuses, Eucharises, Urceocharis, Eurycles

Freesias, Gloxinias, Hae-manthus, Hipp-eastrums

Lachenalias, Nerines, Lycorises, Pen-cratiums, Hymen-ocallises, Richardias, Sprekelias, Tuberoses, Vallotas, Watsonias, Zephy-ranthes

Bulbs in Bowls

Bulbs in the Alpine House

Hardy Bulbs

Aconitum, Allium, Alstroe-meria, Anemone

Amaryllis, Antheri-cum, Antholy-zas, Apios, Arisaema, Arum, Aspho-deline,

Aspho-delus, Belam-canda, Bloomeria, Brodiae, Bulbo-codium

Calochorti, Cyclo-bothras, Camassia, Colchicum, Con-vallaria,
Forcing Lily of the Valley, Corydalis, Crinum, Crosmia, Montbretia , Crocus

Cyclamen, Dicentra, Dierama, Eranthis, Eremurus, Erythrnium, Eucomis

Fritillaria, Funkia, Galanthus, Galtonia, Gladiolus, Hemero-callis

Hyacinth, Hyacinths in Pots,
Scilla, Puschkinia, Chionodoxa, Chionoscilla, Muscari

Iris,
Kniphofia, Lapeyrousia, Leucojum

Lilium,

Lilium in Pots, Malvastrum, Merendera, Milla, Narcissus, Narcissi in Pots

Orni-thogalum, Oxalis, Paeonia, Ran-unculus, Romulea, Sanguin-aria,
Stern-bergia,
Schi-zostylis, Teco-philaea, Trillium

Tulip,
Zephy-ranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs

Acidanthera, Albuca, Alstroemeri, Andro-stephium, Bassers, Boussing-aultias, Bravoas, Cypellas, Dahlias, Galaxis,
Geis-sorhizas, Hesper-anthas

Gladioli, Ixias,
Sparaxises, Babianas, Morphixias, Tritonias

Ixiolirions, Moraeas, Orni-thogalums, Oxalises, Phaedra-nassas,
Pan-cratiums, Tigridias, Zephyr-anthes, Cooperias

Bulbs for Bedding

Plant Bedding Spring
Summer

Climber
3 sector Vertical Plant System with flowers in
Jan,
Feb,
Mar,
Apr,
May 1,2
Jun,
Jul,
Aug,
Sep,
Oct,
Nov,
Dec

----------

Choosing the right Shrub or Climber

1a.
The Base -
Base of Wall Plants

1b.
Annuals

1c.
Herbs and Vegetables

1d.
Cut flowers, Cut Foliage

1e.
Scented flower or foliage

1f.
Foliage use only

 

2a. 1,2,3,4
The Prime - Wall Shrubs

2b.
Fruit trees

3a.
The Higher Reaches -
House-wall Ramblers

3b. 1,2
Non-House-Wall - Climbing Twiners

3c.
Non-House-Wall - Self-clinging Climbers

Raised Bed for Wheelchair Users

Plants for Wildlife-Use as well

Fastest Covering

Least protruding growth when fan-trained

1, 2
Evergreen

Use as
Hedge

Exposed Positions

Use as Groundcover

1, 2
Ornam-
ental Fruit

Scented Flowers

1, 2
Autumn Foliage Colour

Winter Bark

Winter and Early Spring Flowers

Summer Colour or Shape of Foliage

Edible Fruit

Needs Conservatory or Greenhouse

Large Pots and Containers

Cut Flowers

Attractive to Bees

Climber - Simple Flower Shape

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a
Stars

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14k1a1
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord2
Trumpets and Funnels

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming
Salverform

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14q1
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

 

Climber - Elaborated Flower Shape

prunellaflotgrandiflora
Tubes, Lips and Straps

aquilegiacfloformosafoord
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14u1a
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14v1a
Standards, Wings and Keels

brachyscomecflorigidulakevock
Disks and Florets

androsacecforyargongensiskevock
Pin-cushions, Tufts, Petal-less and Cushions

armeriaflomaritimakevock
Umbels, Buttons and Pompoms


Indoor Bulb Growing by Edward Pearson. Published by Purnell & Sons, Ltd in 1953. It provides the data about Indoor Bulbs and Bulbs in Window-boxes.

Colour All The Year In My Garden: A selection of choice varieties - annuals, biennials, perennials, bulbs, climbers and trees and shrubs - that will give a continuity of colour in the garden throughout the year. Edited by C.H. Middleton. Gardening Book from Ward, Lock & Co published in 1938, provides plant data for a calendar of plants in bloom throughout the year and for those in the smallest garden.

The Book of Bulbs by S. Arnott, F.R.H.S. Printed by Turnbull & Spears, Edinburgh in 1901. This provides data about Hardy Bulbs, Half-Hardy Bulbs, Greenhouse and Stove Bulbs.

Collins Guide to Bulbs by Patrick M. Synge. ISBN 0 00 214016-0 First Edition 1961, Second Edition 1971, Reprinted 1973. This provides data on bulbs for bedding, bulbs in the border, bulbs naturalised in grass, bulbs in the woodland garden, bulbs in the rock garden, bulbs in pans in the alpine house, bulbs in the greenhouse, bulbs in bowls and the bulb frame.

Ivydene Gardens Infill3 Plants Index Gallery:
Indoor Bulbs flowering in November

Botanical Plant Name

with link to
UK or
European Union
mail-order supplier for you to contact to buy this plant

Flower Colour
and Background Colour nearest to main petal colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Sun Aspect:- Full Sun,
Part Shade, Full Shade

with link to external website for photo/data

Flowering Months in UK

with link to
USA or
Canada
mail-order supplier

Height with Spacings or Width (W) in inches (cms)

1 inch =
2.5 cms
12 inches = 30 cms
40 inches = 100 cms

Foliage Colour
and Background Colour nearest to middle-aged leaf colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Soil Moisture:-
Dry,
Moist,
Wet

with link to Australia or New Zealand mail-order supplier

Plant Type is:-

A for Aquatic
Ann for Annual / Biennial
Ba for Bamboo
Bu for Bulb
Cl for Climber
Co for Conifer
F for Fern
G for Grass
H for Herb
P for Perennial
Rh for Rhodo-dendron, Azalea, Camellia
Ro for Rose
Sh for Shrub
So for Soft Fruit
To for Top Fruit
Tr for Tree
V for Vegetable
W for Wildflower

followed by:-
E for Evergreen,
D for Deciduous,
H for Herbaceous,
Alpine for being an Alpine as well as being 1 of above Plant Type /

 
Acid for Acidic,
Alk for Alkaline,
Any for AnySoil
 

with link to
ALL PLANTS Index Gallery page

Cultivation Details

Varieties

Plant Photos

It is sad to reflect that in England so few gardens open to the public label their plants or label them so that the label is visible when that plant is in flower, so that visitors can identify; and then later locate and purchase that plant.

Few mail-order nurseries provide the detail as shown in my rose or heather galleries.

If you want to sell a product, it is best to display it. When I sold my Transit van, I removed its signage, cleaned it and took photos of the inside and outside before putting them onto an advert in Autotrader amongst more than 2000 other Transit vans - it was sold in 20 minutes.

If mail-order nurseries could put photos to the same complexity from start of the year to its end with the different foliage colours and stages of flowering on Wikimedia Commons, then the world could view the plant before buying it, and idiots like me would have valid material to work with.

I have been in the trade (until ill health forced my Sole Trader retirement in 2013) working in designing, constructing and maintaining private gardens for decades and since 2005 when this site was started, I have asked any nursery in the world to supply photos. R.V. Roger in Yorkshire allowed me to use his photos from his website in 2007 and when I got a camera to spend 5 days in July 2014 at my expense taking photos of his roses growing in his nursery field, whilst his staff was propagating them. I gave him a copy of those photos.

Cyclamen persicum (Persian cyclamen)

The Cyclamen Society will provide further information.

 

 

 

 

 

These Cyclamen can be grown from seed sown between August and November and then potted on. The principal seeding time is between October and November. From sowing till flowering time takes approximately 15-18 months. However, while to raise Cyclamen persicum from seed may be possible in the house, it is a long and exacting task and, therefore, not recommended. The simplest and most convenient way is to buy the potted plant either for growing-on or already in flower. It is not easily bought as a corm, and the best results are had from a seedling plant.

Water. Watering is best carried out by standing the pot in a saucer, preferably of the earthenware type, and feeding the water into the saucer. If necessary, this should be done daily. Alternately, the pot may be stood upon a block of wood which is kept continually moist by being itself immersed in water.

Fertiliser. When the first flower buds are seen, water in every 3-4 weeks a complete fertiliser. This will help the robustness and quality of the plant.

Temperature. Cyclamen do not want excessive heat. More failures are caused by hot conditions than by any other reason(unless it be of bad watering). A temerature of from 50 degrees Fahrenheit (10 degrees Celsius) to 55 degrees Fahrenheit (13 degrees Celsius) is satisfactory, and provided sufficient humidity is created it is possible to have good results at temperatures varying from 45 degrees Fahrenheit (7 degrees Celsius) to 65 degrees Fahrenheit (18 degrees Celsius).

Position. An east window, in full light, but not exposed to the glare or heat of the sun.

Flowering. They can be in flower from mid-November until March, depending upon the stage at which they are bought and the care with which they are tended.

After flowering water should gradually be decreased and the corms kept in a cool, well-lighted place, but shielded from the full sun. So many corms are killed at this stage by allowing them to die of thirst. If allowed to dry out, the flower and leaf formation are severely checked or killed outright. They will give better results if allowed to remain in the same pots for up to 4 years or more. During the resting period enough humidity can be created by standing the pots on a tray of pebbles and water. At this time the corms can have plenty of fresh air, but not droughts. Thus it will be possible to have them in flower year after year.

Giant White
Large flowers, very free-flowering.

Mont Blanc
Pure White.

Perle Von Zehlendorf
Salmon.

Pink Pearl
Light Pink.

Vuurbaak
Red

cyclamencflospersicumwikimediacommons

Cyclamen persicum. By ‪Olei via Wikimedia Commons.

Iris reticulata

The American Iris Society has info about irises, as does The British Iris Society.

 

 

 

 

 

Pot into small pots in October, using either sandy loam or John Innes base compost, and placing tubers 3 inches (7.5 cms) deep and about 3-4 inches apart. Thereafter, treat them in the same way as other bulbs which do not like coddling, such as Eranthis, Scillas, etc, but they will require a reasonably warm, sunny position and will not thrive in cold or shade.

Iris Histrioides
Light blue. 5 inches (12.5 cms). February-March.

Iris Histrioides Major - Sadly this once popular bulb is no longer freely available but there are other good, similar cultivars. ‘Angel’s Eye’ (‘Angels’ Tears’) and ‘Lady B Stanley’ are recommended.
Rich deep blue. Falls with yellow markings. 4 inches (10 cms).

Iris Reticulata
Violet-purple, blotched yellow. Fragrant. February-March.

Iris Cantab
Light blue. 6 inches (15 cms). February-March.

Iris Reticulata J. S. Dijt
Reddish-purple. Sweetly scented. 8 inches (20 cms). Early February.

Iris tingitana var. Fontanesii
Deep-blue flowers of fine texture. Falls with orange blotch. Cannot be forced, but will flower in February under cool conditions. 30 inches (75 cms).

iriscforreticulatawikimediacommons

Iris reticulata. By ‪Rasbak via Wikimedia Commons.

Hyacinths (Dutch hyacinth, Hyacinthus orientalis)

All parts of hyacinths, if ingested cause stomach upset and gloves should be worn when handling the bulbs as they may aggravate skin allergies. See the profile on harmful plants for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

Pot 2 bulbs up to half their depth in a 6-inch (15 cms) or 3 in an 8-inch (20 cms) non-porous bowl or pan, using bulb fibre as potting medium. After potting, plunge in ashes or keep the pot in a dark cool place until the bulbs are well rooted. They can be brought to the light and warmth.

Water. The bulb fibre should be kept moist at all times so that its consistency is always alive.

Fertilisers. No fertilisers are needed when correctly mixed fibre is used.

Temperature. Room heat is sufficient to bring prepared Hyacinths into early bloom, but they will stand a temperature of 70 degrees Fahrenheit (21 degrees Celsius) without showing undue signs of being forced.

Position. South window with full light.

Flowering. For pre-Christmas flowers prepared bulbs must be used, and for satisfactory flowering these should be from 17-18 cms as a minimum. For later flowering the same size of bulbs, but unprepared, will give the best flowers. After flowering the bulbs can be rested and planted in the garden.

Prepared varieties:-

Bismarck
Clear violet blue and white

Delft Blue
Blue.

Dr. Leiber
Light blue.

Dr. Streseman
Clear blue.

Jan Bos
Red.

L'Innocence
very tall, White.

Marconi
Cream-pink.

Unprepared Varieties:-

Bismarck
Clear violet blue and white.

City of Haarlem
Pale yellow.

Grand Maitre
Porcelain blue.

King of the Blues
Oxford blue.

King of the Lilacs
Pure lilac.

L'Innocence
White.

Lady Diamond
Pale pink.

Marconi
Cream-pink.

Princess Margaret
Pale powder-pink.

hyacinthuscflosorientalisdelftbluewikimediacommons

Flower beds in park Kolomenskoye (Moscow). Hyacinthus orientalis ‘Delft Blue

Русский: Цветники в Коломенском (Москва). Гиацинт восточный ‘Delft Blue’. By Kor!An (Корзун Андрей) via Wikimedia Commons.

Hyacinthus praecox (Hyacinthus orientalis is the accepted name in 2016, Roman Hyacinths)

 

 

 

 

 

If potted at 3-week intervals in late August through September, they will flower in late November and early December and into the spring when brought into the warmth. After potting, the bulbs should be barely above soil level. In all other respects they can be managed in the same way as Hyacinths. The colours are yellow, pink, blue and white, and the flowers are about 6-8 inches (15-20 cms) high. They are very dainty and attractive, even if not so stately as the usual Hyacinths. The Roman Hyacinths produce several spikes with smaller flowers of about 6 inches (15 cms) in height.

 

 

Schizostylis coccinea (Mrs Hegarty, Kaffir Lily, currently Hesperantha instead of Schizostylis)

 

 

 

 

 

Pot from 4 to 5 tubers into a 5-inch (12.5 cms) pot in March. Compost should be John Innes or equal parts fibrous loam, peat, and 0.25 part fine sand. After potting the pot should be placed in a warm sunny position.

Water liberally after potting and through the summer, but from autumn onwards reduce the water.

Fertiliser. A complete fertiliser occasionally during summer.

Temperature. 55-65 degrees Fahrenheit (13-18 degrees Celsius).

Position. Full light in south window.

coccinea
Spectacular crimson and scarlet globe-shaped flowers. 18 inches (45 cms). October-November.

Mrs Hegarty
Silken pale-pink flowers. October-November.

coccinea Viscountess Byng
Flesh-pink flowers in December and January. Leaves pale olive-green.

schizostyluscfloscoccineamrshegartywikimediacommons

Schizostylus coccinea 'Mrs Hegarty'. By Wouter Hagens via Wikimedia Commons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Book of Welsh Soups & Savouries including traditional Welsh Cawl by Bobby Freeman (ISBN 0-86243-142-5) - For over a quarter of a century Bobby Freeman has been involved with Wesh food. In the 1960's she ran the first (and only) restaurant in Wales specialising in the traditional dishes. Since then she has researched and written about Welsh food - both the traditional cookery and the eating-out scene in Wales, contributing to, and consulted by, a variety of publications. She originally produced and published these little books herself, but has now handed them over to Y Lolfa after adding 2 more titles to the earlier series.

 

 

 

CAWL

The basic dish of meat, root vegetables, potatoes and leeks, and sometimes cabbage, finds many variations, nor is it made exactly the same in 2 kitchens together. Like any other 'national' dish it has regional variations, and in North Wales it tends to be called 'lobscows' from the English 'sheep broth'.

Cawl is traditionally eaten in wooden bowls with hand-carved wooden spoons which vary in design from region to region. There were also pretty, flowered pottery cawl bowls. Bread and cheese are taken with the cawl to make an extremely satisfying meal.

But in times of hardship the broth would be drunk first, on its own. Then the meat eaten with some potatoes. Next day, root vegetables would be cooked in the left-over broth, still rich with nourishment. This was known as cawl twymo (second cawl), or cawl ail-dwym (re-heated cawl). Otherwise the meat would be taken out when cooked, the vgetables added to the broth, and when this was served in bowls everyone helped themselves to the meat from a large wooden platter in the centre of the table.

 

 

 

Basic instructions:

Precise quantities are unimportant, so these are just a guide. For a weight of 2lbs (908 grammes) meat - about 2 large parsnips, 2 large carrots, 1 small swede turnip, 2 medium onions, 2 or 3 leeks and 1.5 lbs(781 grammes) potatoes (the tiny, marble-size new potatoes are most prized). You will need a big pan to hold all this, covered with cold water, so reduce quantities by half if you only want 3-4 servings. Flavour with plenty of thyme or winter savoury, parsley, bayleaf and 1 or 2 cloves, and I like to add celery. Season with whole black peppercorns (leave the salt to add later). Some cooks thicken the cawl with a handful of oatmeal or flour and water paste.

I leave the leeks out of the cooking altogether and sprinkle them on top of the bowls of cawl, chopped very fine, with plenty of freshly-chopped parsley, so that they are crisp, crunchy and peppery. If you cook them, don't add them until the final 10 minutes of cooking time. The same applies to cabbage if you include it.

Cook the tougher meates for an hour or so first before adding the vegetables, which should be cut up roughly (not finely) to ensure the character of the dish. and brown both meat, onions and vegetables first in a little oil or dripping.

 

Variations on the basic theme:

Bacon & Brisket: -this is my favourite combination and most will agree it is the best - the brisket gives the cawl a very particular quality and taste. A hock-end of bacon - smoked for preference - pairs well with an equal weight of brisket. Make sure everyone gets a portion of both in their bowl. Since cawl is in fact better reheated, you can lift the surplus fat off the top next day, when it is cold.

Bacon only: very fatty home-cured bacon was traditionally used (plenty of 'stars' on its face) but nowadays our taste and lifestyle are for something leaner. Again a hock-end is useful, or shoulder bacon, or you can be extravagant and use a piece of gammon or other lean cut.

 

 

 

Glamorgan Sausages
Selsigen Morgannwg

In George Borrow's day there were many sausages of this type, dipped in egg-white and rolled in crumbs rather than encased in skins. It is reasonable to suppose that these took their name from the Glamorgan cheese used for them - it was an especially hard, white cheese made from the milk of Glamorgan cattle, an almost extinct breed now re-introduced to Wales. The sausages are nicer than you might think, freeze well and are popular with vegetarians. Eat them with a sharp and spicy sauce, like tomato.

5 ounces (150 grammes) white or brown breadcrumbs

3 ounces (84 grammes) grated hard cheese

1 small onion

1 egg

pinch dry mustard

pinch mixed herbs

1 ounce (28 grammes) butter

pepper and salt

 

Mince or chop the onion very fine and soften in the butter before adding to the other dry ingredients - it makes shaping the sausages easier. Separate the egg and bind the mixture with the yolk. Divide into 6 small sausage shapes, moulding with your hands, then roll in flour, dip into the lightly-beaten egg white and finally roll in fine breadcrumbs. Deep fry in hot oil until the coating is nice and crisp. Do not re-heat in a microwave.

 

 

 

Green Pancakes
Crempog Las

Another good vegetarian dish or an alternative to bread or potatoes as an accompaniment to meat or bacon; in fact it quite likely originated as a meat-stretcher in lean times. It requires some skill to make as the batter must be stiff enough to support the onions and allow them to cook through.

8 ounces (227 grammes) flour

2 eggs

chopped parsley

spring onions or shallots

milk to mix (0.5 pint = 285 ml)

pepper and salt

 

Make a batter with the flour, eggs and milk. Stir in the parsley and onion and seasoning. Cook on both sides as for pancakes, but over a very moderate heat in a well-buttered, heavy pan. Make sure they are cooked right through. Spread with butter and eat hot.

 

 

 

Mum's Supper
Swper Mam

Variations on the bacon theme are endless in welsh cookery. No wonder, with a pig in every backyard! This quickly-made dish is comforting on a cold winter's night - which is perhaps how it got its name?

8 bacon or ham rashers

2 onions, finely chopped

4 ounces (112 grammes) grated cheese

pepper and salt

 

Layer bacon, onion and cheese in a shallow, oven-proof dish, seasoning each layer and ending with a layer of bacon. Bake in a hot oven 30 minutes or until the top bacon is crisp. Good with jacket potatoes.

 

 

 

Laverbread for Breakfast
Bara lawr a Brecwast

If you are lucky you will be offered 'laverbread' with your breakfast bacon when you are staying in Wales, especially in south west Wales. 'Laverbread' is a bit of a misnomer, for it is seaweed, not bread. But a literal translation of the Welsh is lawr-laver, bara-bread; however in this case bread is meant in the sense of sustenance. To avoid confusion I try to call it laverweed or simply laver. It's a thin, transparent variety found on the west coast of Wales. It takes a lot of boiling to make it edible and in its prepared form it is sold on the cheese and bacon or fish stalls in local markets. Mixed with medium oatmeal and made into little patties and fried in bacon fat it is a most enduring feature of Welsh home cooking.

But laverweed can be used in other ways, too:-

Soup: 2 tablespoons laver stirred into a pint (570 ml) of good vegetable soup with a chicken or mutton stock, then liquidised to an interesting green colour. Serve with a swirl of cream and croutons. Not traditional in any way.

Sauce: 2 ways:-

1 laver added to a bechamel sauce to serve with roast lamb or grilled lamb chops

2 Laver and orange juice mixed with good gravy from roast lamb and served with it. Astonishingly good.

Salad: Dress laver with a few drops of olive oil and lemon juice and a good grind of black pepper. Serve with fingers of dry toast, like caviare, which in appearane it resembles. Welsh caviare? Wickedly, that's what I once menu-dubbed it....'Caviare Cymreig'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ivydene Gardens Infill3 Plants Index Gallery:
Indoor Bulbs flowering in November

 

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

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Ramblers Scramblers & Twiners by Michael Jefferson-Brown (ISBN 0 - 7153 - 0942 - 0) describes how to choose, plant and nurture over 500 high-performance climbing plants and wall shrubs, so that more can be made of your garden if you think not just laterally on the ground but use the vertical support structures including the house as well.

The Gardener's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Climbers & Wall Shrubs - A Guide to more than 2000 varieties including Roses, Clematis and Fruit Trees by Brian Davis. (ISBN 0-670-82929-3) provides the lists for 'Choosing the right Shrub or Climber' together with Average Height and Spread after 5 years, 10 years and 20 years.

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