Topic
Case Studies
...Drive
...Foundations

Companion Planting
...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants

Garden Construction
Garden Design
...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
......Camera photos of Plant supports Garden Maintenance
Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants
...Poisonous Plants
Soil
...Soil Nutrients
Tool Shed
Useful Data

................

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries

Camera Photo Galleries:-

RHS Garden at Wisley
Plant Supports .
Coleus Bedding Foliage Trial 1, 2 .

National Trust Garden at Sissinghurst Castle
Plant Supports 1, 2 .

Dry Garden of
RHS Garden at
Hyde Hall
Plants .

Nursery of
Peter Beales Roses
Display Garden
Roses .

Nursery of
RV Roger
Roses A1, .

Damage by Plants in Chilham Village .

Pavements of Funchal, Madeira
Damage to Trees
1
, 2, .

The plant with photo in the above Camera Photo Galleries
join
the plants with photos in the other Plant Photo Galleries below in

Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens - 444

A 1, Photos - 36
B 1, Photos - 13
C 1, Photos - 35
D 1, Photos - 14
E 1, Photos - 21
F 1, Photos - 1
G 1, Photos - 5
H 1, Photos - 21
I 1, Photos - 8
J 1, Photos - 1
K 1, Photos - 1
L 1, Photos - 14
M 1, Photos - 9
N 1, Photos - 12
O 1, Photos - 5
P 1, Photos - 54
Q 1, Photos -
R 1, Photos - 60
S 1, Photos - 111
T 1, Photos - 13
U 1, Photos - 5
V 1, Photos - 4
W 1, Photos - 2
X 1 Photos -
Y 1, Photos -
Z 1 Photos -

Articles/Items in Ivydene Gardens-88

and in
Flower Shape and Plant Use of
Bedding
Bulb
Evergreen Perennial
Herbaceous Perennial
Rose
Evergreen Shrub
Deciduous Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Deciduous Tree
Annual
Fern
Wildflower


Aquatic
Bamboo


Bedding
...by Flower Shape

...Camera photos of Coleus Bedding Foliage Trial

Further details on Bedding from the Infill Galleries:-
...for Spring
...for Summer
...for Autumn
...for Winter
...for Sandy Soil
...for Acid Soil
...for Chalky Soil
...for Clay Soil
...Flower Colour:-
......Black
......Blue
......Orange
......Pink
......Purple
......Red
......White
......Yellow
......Multi-coloured
...Use of Bedding:-
......Aromatic Fol
......Scented Flo
......Long Flo
......Coloured Fol
......for Bees, etc
......Cut Flos
......Hanging Pot
......Pots/ Troughs
......Screening
......Window Box
......Bedding Out
......Filling in

Further details on Annuals from the Infill Galleries:-
Uses of Annuals

...Exposed Sites
...Sheltered Sites
...in Greenhouse
...Extra Poor Soil
...Very Rich Soil
...Gap Filling
...Patio Pots
...Cut Flowers 1, 2
...Everlasting Flos
...Attract Insects
...with Fragrance
...Bee Pollinated
...Annual Pairing
...Low-Growing
...Med-Growing
...Tall Growing
...Flower Colour:-
......Black/Brown
......Blue-Purple
......Green
......Red-Pink
......White
......Yellow/Orange
...for its Foliage
...in Moist Soil
...in Shade
...as Houseplants
...Edging Beds
...Hanging Basket
...Vining Annuals
...Plants for Cut Flowers which flower during:-
......January
......February
......March
......April
......May
......June
......July
......August
......September
......October
......November
......December
Further Details on Biennials from the Infill Galleries:-
Use of Bieenials

...Cottage Garden
...Cut Flower
...for Rock Work
...Patio Pots
...Conservatory
...for Wildlife
...Scented Flo



Bulb
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
Climber
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evgr
...Heather Shrub
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evgr
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
...P -Herbaceous
...RHS Wisley
...Flower Shape
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable

Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour
NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown Note
...Cream Note
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note
Poisonous
Wildflower Plants

............

Topic - Flower/Foliage Colour
Colour Wheel Galleries

Following your choice using Garden Style then that changes your Plant Selection Process
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

or
you could use these Flower Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12
with its
Explanation of
Structure of this Website with

...User Guidelines
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index
Rock Garden and Alpine Flower Colour Wheel with number of colours
Rock Plant Flowers 53

...Rock Plant Photos

or
these Foliage Colour Wheels structures, which I have done but until I can take the photos and I am certain of the plant label's validity, these may not progress much further
All Foliage 212

All Spring Foliage 212
All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212

or
Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index

............

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly
Usage of Plants
by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly

Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly usage of
Plant A-C
Plant C-M
Plant N-W
Butterfly usage of Plant

followed by all the Wild Flower Family Pages:-

Picture Folder Name Pages:-

Since 14 June 2019 I have also started to put my own full-sized 4000 x 3000 digital Camera images into the relevant topics in this website again for use in the Public Domain - since there may
be 9 or more to a page the resulting 43Mb website page may take some time to load
. Since I have more than 26,522 photos using 111,460Mb of my disk space, then the extra upfront cost per annum before creating more folders like Photo coleus is just over 3.16 pence per photo has been paid for the total number in that entire photo collection before any are sent to the website.

It is hoped that you may find them of interest.

 

When supporting plants in a bed, it is found that not only do those plants grow upwards, but also they expand their roots and footpad sideways each year.

Plant Supports Folder from RHS
Garden at Wisley taken on
11 April 2013
1
, 2, 3, 8, 11,
12, 13,
Plants 4, 7, 10,
Bedding Plants 5,
Plant Supports for Unknown Plants 5
,
Clematis Climbers 6,
the RHS does not appear to either follow it's own pruning advice or advice from The Pruning of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers by George E. Brown.
ISBN 0-571-11084-3 with the plants in Pages 1-7 of this folder. You can see from looking at both these resources as to whether the pruning carried out on the remainder of the plants in Pages 7-15 was correct.
Narcissus (Daffodil) 9,
Phlox Plant Supports 14, 15


Coleus Bedding Trial Folder
from Plant Trials Field in RHS Garden
at Wisley taken on
2 October 2013
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32
, Index


Sissinghurst Castle Garden taken on
19 April 2013 with Plant Supports
1
, 5, 10
Plants 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12
Recommended Rose Pruning Methods 13


Sissinghurst Folder from
Sissinghurst Castle Garden taken on
10 April 2018 with Plant Supports
2
,
Plants 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7


Dry garden at hyde hall 4-may-2019 Folder from
Dry Garden at Hyde Hall taken on
4 May 2019 without Plant Supports
Plants 1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9


Rose peter beales may 25 2014
Folder from
Display Garden at Peter Beales Roses taken on 25 May 2014 of Roses
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13


Rose rv roger july 21-25 2014 Folder from Rose Nursery of RV Roger taken
on 21-25 July 2014 of Roses
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13
 


Chilham 20-08-2013 Folder from Chilham Village in Kent
taken on 18 August 2013 of
Plants Causing Damage to Buildings
1
, 2, 3, 4


Madeira trees 2019 Folder from
Funchal in Madeira
taken on 28 February 2019 of
Damage to Trees in Pavements of Funchal
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13 for trees 1-54, 14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25, for trees 55-

List of Pictures in a Picture Folder:-

Damage to Trees in Pavement in Madeira caused by the action of man during January/February 2019.

166 trees in the pavements in a short section of a road in Funchal, Madeira are being slowly, starved, dehydrated, asphyxiated, poisoned by tarmac and concrete, burnt inside their hollow trunks, roots pounded by 40 ton lorries or shoes of pedestrians, and allowed to rot until killed off during February 2019 (see information in Problems with trees in pavements in Funchal, Madeira in January/February 2018 Page, which appears to have had no effect) as shown by my 433 photos in the following pages:-


If man maintained these trees, then every tree could be saved and grow healthily. Tree 32 from end of 2 road junction with watersprout and proper branch IMG 6259.JPG is on Page 8 . You can see that the proper branch has attachment to the main branch all the way round, whereas the watersprout is only attached to the proper branch in less than half its circumference. This means that the watersprout is inherently very weak in the side where it is not attached. If a pulling force is applied to the opposite side which is not attached, then the watersprout will break away. Madeira appears to pollard it's trees and then rely on the watersprouts which grow from the stumps - a dangerous procedure.

If I can save a very old tree, which 10 years later is continuing to flower and grow, I wonder why in Madeira they cut off branches and allow the resulting stump to rot back into the trunk (which leads to that tree falling down), and then ignore the danger for its visitors?

The following comes from Ivydene Gardens Evergreen Trees Gallery:-

"Saving the Common Yew at St. Margarets Church, Rainham, Kent (written 31 July 2009 for the congregation).

Over the years, damage has occurred to the branches coming from this multi-trunked yew tree. Some of this is where a branch has broken off or broken at the junction with its trunk leaving a jagged edge. When it rains, the water collects in this jagged edge and provides a carrier for rot bacteria to enter and break down the strength of the Heartwood. This has happened down the middle of most of the trunks. Mr Noakes (Churchwarden) and I are excavating and removing as much of this rot as possible before replacing it with Polycell Expanding Foam (which contains Diphenylmethane-4, 4-diisocyanate) and empty bottles. The empty bottles reduce the number of cans of Polycell Expanding Foam used. This Foam is normally used in the construction industry to fill the space between Windows and Walls and thus prevent draughts round the edge of the windows. In this case, it fills all the space occupied by the removed rot and if any beastie tries eating it, it will be killed by the cyanate in it. This also prevents the bacteria from having access to air/rain; thus hopefully stopping any further internal rot. Unfortunately the Foam is attacked by light, becomes brittle and flakes off, so we are painting it twice with Black Masonry Paint to prevent that. The Masonry Paint is a plastic film which is flexible, so if the tree moves the paint will move with it rather than cracking apart."

 

Photos of my work on trees using a chainsaw and chipper-shredder are on Gallery 1 Page 13

 

Gallery 1 Page 1

Man strimming grass
IMG 6110.JPG
See effect on surrounding trees/shrubs of grass

Man strimming grass
IMG 6111.JPG

Man strimming grass
IMG 6112.JPG

Tree 1 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6126.JPG
Branch stump rotted into trunk

Tree 1 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6127.JPG
See fungus on damaged trunk of left side

Tree 1 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6129.JPG
Where does this tree get its water and nourishment? Its roots extend to at least the same length as its height. See What to do about Subsidence caused by Clay Page for influence of trees on
House Foundations in clay soils.

Tree 1 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6131.JPG
Branch stump rotted into trunk

Tree 1 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6132.JPG
Main roads both sides of it together with concrete paving over its roots, so then these roots greatly appreciate being pounded by lorries, buses, cars and people!

Tree 1 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6133.JPG
The flower bed on the left of the red bicycle track is irrigated, whereas the trees on the right are not. It is likely that under the bicycle track and the grey concrete pavers that the soil has been removed and replaced with foundation materials which are not suitable to tree roots.

Tree 2 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6135.JPG
Branch stump drying out and cracking open

Tree 2 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6136.JPG
Weeds growing in the ground area between the trunk and the metal frame takes water and nutrients away from this tree.

Gallery 1 Page 2

Tree 3 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6137.JPG
Freshly sawn branch stump, where the bark is drying out, cracking apart and separating from the stump

Tree 4 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6138.JPG
Branch stump rotted into trunk.

Tree 5 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6140.JPG
Branch stump drying out and cracking. The bark on the surrounding callus is also cracking through drying out as well. It would appear that many of the branches have been sawn off through the branch collar, which is incorrect. With no protection, eventually all the stumps end up rotting into the trunk where the callus has not covered the wound.

Tree 5 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6142.JPG
Besides the crossing branches, it would appear that not all the light from the street light is reaching the ground level.

Tree 6 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6143.JPG
Tree stump with good callus. It might have had a black wound dressing applied, most of which is now gone. When the branch was cut off or it broke off then the bottom of the branch broke rather be cut through. My normal system of cutting a large branch is undercutting to about a third of its thickness, then overcutting the branch about an inch beyond the undercut below. Then the branch will slowly depress and come away from the rest without damaging the remaining stump. Then, cut off the very short stump towards the branch collar to tidy it up.

Tree 6 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6144.JPG

Tree 7 forum end of 2 road junction flower bed
IMG 6147.JPG
Note that you can see at least 2 brown irrigation pipes in this flower bed. The plants in this bed are doing well, but why no irrigation for the trees?

Tree 8 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6149.JPG
This tree has overgrown a concrete paving slab and as the tree grows, its weight will increase bu part of its connection to roots in the ground will not.

Tree 8 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6151.JPG
Damaged trunk perhaps by concrete which has mostly been removed.

Tree 10 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6155.JPG
Lump of concrete embedded in root. Green vegetation robbing tree of water and nutrients. Tree now exceeding boundary of metal frame onto concrete pavers. As it encroaches more and more onto the surrounding pavers, the stability of this tree will decrease.

Gallery 1 Page 3

Tree 10 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6156.JPG
Concrete and stone embedded in trunk. Gap under trunk. Green vegetation taking water and nourishment from tree.

Tree 10 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6157.JPG
Gap under trunk.

Tree 10 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6158.JPG
Gap and concrete under trunk. When this pavement was changed, were concrete pavers/slabs removed from under this tree? If so, how far does the gap go under this tree and therefore is there sufficient heartwood trunk to continue to support this tree?

Tree 11 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6162.JPG
Stump of original tree support post left in ground. Damaged tree not covered by tree callus. Green vegetation taking water/nourishment.

Tree 11 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6164.JPG
Note the raised concrete blocks which have been elevated by the tree roots below.

Tree 12 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6165.JPG
Note the raised concrete blocks which have been elevated by the tree roots below.

Tree 13 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6167.JPG
The damaged trunk not covered by the callus is drying out and splitting.

Tree 13 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6168.JPG
Note the raised concrete blocks which have been elevated by the tree roots below.

Tree 14 forum end of 2 road junction grass opposite promenade
IMG 6176.JPG
Note how thin are the trunks of the shrub/trees growing within this grass.

Tree 14 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6171.JPG
Note the raised concrete blocks which have been elevated by the tree roots below.

Tree 14 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6174.JPG
Although the tree callus almost made it in repair terms. It has not and the stump has rotted into the trunk. The bark on the callus is drying out and splitting. It could be that the rot has extended under the callus and is damaging the callus.

Gallery 1 Page 4

Tree 15 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6184.JPG
Perhaps this branch broke in a storm. It was then chopped off with a saw, and then the ends burnt. Now it is rotting into the trunk.

Tree 15 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6185.JPG
Damaged trunk is now rotting.

Tree 15 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6186.JPG
Branch stump deeply rotting into trunk.
With these 3 lots of rotting in the trunk, you have a serious problem.

Tree 16 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6187.JPG
2 branch stumps are rotting into the trunk.

Tree 16 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6188.JPG
This branch stump rot is deep into the trunk.

Tree 16 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6189.JPG
This rot at the trunk base is deep. There is also concrete embedded in the trunk.

Tree 16 forum end of 2 road junction badly damaged trunk
IMG 6190.JPG
This branch stump rot is deep into the trunk. There are 2 other branch stumps which are going to rot.
With these sections of rotting in the trunk, you have a serious problem.

Tree 17 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6192.JPG
This branch stump rot is deep into the trunk.

Tree 18 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6193.JPG
This branch stump rot is deep into the trunk. It may also be riddled with woodworm.

Tree 19 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6196.JPG
This trunk rot is large and deep as shown in this and the next photo, you have a serious problem.

Tree 19 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6197.JPG

Gallery 1 Page 5

Tree 20 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6200.JPG
2 sections of Trunk damage; 1 from ground level.

Tree 21 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6202.JPG

Tree 21 forum end of 2 road junction with hole through trunk
IMG 6203.JPG

Tree 21 forum end of 2 road junction with hole through trunk opposite enotel
IMG 6205.JPG

Tree 21 forum end of 2 road junction with hole through trunk opposite enotel
IMG 6206.JPG
The view through the base of this tree trunk is very revealing. Madeira is oblivious to the safety of its population or its time-share visitors with tree 21.

Tree 21 forum end of 2 road junction with hole through trunk opposite enotel
IMG 6209.JPG

Tree 21 forum end of 2 road junction with hole through trunk opposite enotel
IMG 6204.JPG

Tree 22 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6210.JPG

Tree 22 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6211.JPG

Tree 22 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6212.JPG
This branch stump rot is deep within the trunk and there are 2 sections of trunk damage at the base of the trunk; you have a serious problem with tree 22.

Tree 22 forum end of 2 road junction
IMG 6214.JPG

Gallery 1 Page 6

Tree 23 from end of 2 road junction
IMG 6215.JPG

Tree 23 from end of 2 road junction
IMG 6216.JPG
When you combine the 3 lots trunk damage near the base, with the 2 branch stumps rotting into the trunk with its woodworm and where a third trunk has split away from the other 2 leaving a rotting remaining trunk; you have a serious problem with tree 23.

Tree 23 from end of 2 road junction
IMG 6217.JPG

Tree 23 from end of 2 road junction
IMG 6218.JPG

Tree 23 from end of 2 road junction tree in garden IMG 6219.JPG
This tree in a garden has not had any branches sawn off it by man. There are many small dead branches, which have been caused by the foliage above robbing them of sunlight in the tree's effort to continue growing upwards.

Tree 23 from end of 2 road junction tree in garden IMG 6220.JPG
Unfortunately, with the number of large trees growing in this garden, there is too much competition for water and nourishment in the available soil which may be a bit thin here. There is also the competition of the grass and so the roots of the trees have appeared on the surface to try and obtain the maximum air, nutrients and water that each can obtain. The trees would benefit from having the grass removed carefully, bulbs scattered over the surface and that covered with a 4 inch (10cm) mulch of organic compost. There are bulbs which tend to pull themselves further underground each year. This garden area is not frequented by humans so the bulbs could happily grow, flower and foliage die off without being trampled.

Tree 23 from end of 2 road junction tree in garden IMG 6221.JPG

Tree 23 from end of 2 road junction tree in garden IMG 6222.JPG

Tree 23 from end of 2 road junction tree in garden IMG 6223.JPG

Tree 24 from end of 2 road junction pollarded juvenile tree IMG 6225.JPG
You can see the watershoots growing from the pollarded tree, but those shoots are not as strongly attached to the tree as new branches.

Tree 25 from end of 2 road junction
IMG 6226.JPG
There is a seriously large hole in the trunk which is rotting both inwards and downwards. You have a serious problem with this tree.

Gallery 1 Page 7

Tree 25 from end of 2 road junction
IMG 6227.JPG
Watersprouts have been cut off or broken off while the rot of the trunk behind it has been totally ignored. Does anybody doing tree maintenance in Madeira know anything?

Tree 25 from end of 2 road junction
IMG 6228.JPG

Tree 25 from end of 2 road junction with grahiti on trunk
IMG 6229.JPG
Graphiti carved on trunk!

Tree 26 from end of 2 road junction with broken branch stubs IMG 6233.JPG
Part cut branch was then broken off! New branches (not watersprouts) growing from the trunk in the top right hand corner.

Tree 26 from end of 2 road junction
IMG 6230.JPG
This branch was sawn off without leaving the branch collar. When it was almost sawn though it fell and ripped off the lower bark. The saw cut went through the middle of a sub-branch and you can see from that how much connection of a branch with its parent there was. Why does nobody train these people?

Tree 27 from end of 2 road junction
IMG 6236.JPG
Not bothering to see exactly where to cut this branch off, the first cut was below the branch into the trunk, the second was on the left side, which got so far until the weight of the branch snapped the branch off. Having caused the injury, the expert then left the work unfinished for it to rot!

Tree 27 from end of 2 road junction
IMG 6237.JPG
The branch collar was cut off and the callus has not covered the wound. The exposed stump has now dried and started cracking.

Tree 27 from end of 2 road junction with bleeding cut stumps IMG 6235.JPG
Above these 2 freshly cut branch stumps is the branch stump from which it was quite likely that these 2 watersprouts started from, which is drying out and starting to crack. These 2 branch stumps are where the chainsaw used has cut between the branch collar and the trunk thus defeating the callus making equipment to partially repair this hacking procedure. You note the red sap exuding from the cambium between the bark and the heartwood. That 1 cell thick layer is where the new watersprouts will grow from and that is why since it does not cover the full circumference of the sawn cut as to why watersprouts (watershoots) are inherently weak at their joint with their parent
.

Tree 28 from end of 2 road junction hole in ground IMG 6242.JPG
Gap under trunk. How far it goes under one cannot see with this photo. You could have a serious problem with Tree 28.

Tree 28 from end of 2 road junction hole in ground IMG 6244.JPG
Another gap under this trunk and a further wound in the trunk which is rotting
.

Tree 28 from end of 2 road junction hole in ground IMG 6246.JPG
There are 2 further trunk wounds which are rotting further up the trunk
.

Gallery 1 Page 8

Tree 28 from end of 2 road junction hole in trunk IMG 6245.JPG
The rot in the trunk from this wound is quite deep
.

Tree 28 from end of 2 road junction root disturbance of pavement IMG 6240.JPG
Note the raised grey concrete pavers indicating uplifting by tree roots.

Tree 29 from end of 2 road junction
IMG 6250.JPG
This branch stump is rotting into the trunk.

Tree 30 from end of 2 road junction
IMG 6256.JPG
There is rot in the base of the trunk. The callus on the other wound has more than half covered the wound.

Tree 30 from end of 2 road junction root disturbance IMG 6257.JPG
There is a small wound in the trunk. The raised grey concrete pavers show that roots are uplifting them.

Tree 31 from end of 2 road junction
IMG 6258.JPG
The long wound from the base of the trunk is drying out and the exposed heartwood is splitting apart.

Tree 32 from end of 2 road junction road section to lido IMG 6263.JPG
There are 4 visible tree wounds, which are exposed. The excess grey concrete pavers should not be stacked against the trunk.

Tree 32 from end of 2 road junction with watersprout and proper branch
IMG 6259.JPG
What a close up of these 2 branch types!

Gallery 1 Page 9

Tree 34 from end of 2 road junction
IMG 6269.JPG
Black mesh has been placed over a large hole.

Tree 34 from end of 2 road junction view back to previous road section
IMG 6274.JPG
A side view of this mesh and hole.

Tree 34 from end of 2 road junction with black plastic mesh IMG 6270.JPG
It turns out to be a rusty metal mesh covering a deep hole.

Tree 34 from end of 2 road junction with black plastic mesh IMG 6271.JPG
A section of tree callus has overgrown the mesh on the left side, so how deep is the rot alongside?

Tree 34 from end of 2 road junction with black plastic mesh IMG 6272.JPG

Tree 34 from end of 2 road junction with black plastic mesh IMG 6273.JPG
Another branch stump rotting into the trunk. How safe is this tree?

Tree 39 from pestana promenade by lido taxi rank IMG 6299.JPG
This tree has wounds where the callus has not enclosed the cut. In order to get it to fit within its concrete circle, 2 of its roots have been cut off close to the trunk. This reduces the stability of the tree.

Tree 40 from pestana promenade by lido taxi rank IMG 6300.JPG
A very small area of open ground for this tree to receive water, nourishment and gas exchange.

Tree 41 from pestana promenade by lido taxi rank IMG 6301.JPG
One of its main roots has been forced to go round the tree rather than outwards to support it.

Tree 42 from pestana promenade by lido taxi rank IMG 6302.JPG

Tree 42 from pestana promenade by lido taxi rank IMG 6304.JPG
It would appear that the taxis run over the roots and into the trunk when they park themselves here. I am sure that you would love to have your toes bashed into by a taxi on an irregular basis.

Gallery 1 Page 10

Tree 43 from pestana promenade by lido taxi rank IMG 6305.JPG
There is tyre marks on the bark and wounded areas caused by the tyres scrapping against the trunk. The wound on the right has been continuously run into by taxis. It is kind of the taxi drivers to smoke and throw their cigarette butts at the tree. Ever have a lit cigarette put against the skin on your face - great experience isn't it?

Tree 44 from pestana promenade by lido taxi rank IMG 6306.JPG
One of its main roots has been forced round the tree in order for the roots of this tree to fit within its concrete enclosure. One of the main roots on the left has been run over by a vehicle destroying 2 of its sub-roots.

Tree 45 from pestana promenade by lido taxi rank IMG 6307.JPG
This was a double leader and the 2 have grown together. However a water trap has formed which will rot the junction of the 2.

Tree 45 from pestana promenade by lido taxi rank IMG 6308.JPG
Here you can see the water trap problem in greater detail.

Tree 45 from pestana promenade by lido taxi rank IMG 6309.JPG
This branch stump has now started to rot into the trunk.

Tree 46 from pestana promenade past lido IMG 6311.JPG
Not only is this tree well out into a main road, where it has been hit repeatedly by lorries and buses, a proportion of the trunk is now sitting on pink concrete blocks and concrete kerb instead of into the ground. Hot tarmac has been brought right up to the roots of the tree and compressed into place. So it is no wonder that you can see the wounds and the rot going into the trunk.
 

Tree 46 from pestana promenade past lido IMG 6312.JPG
A very nice Black and Yellow striped sign has been placed next to the pavement. Once the tree has been knocked down by the traffic, then this sign might also suffer the same fate. Move the sign so the sign is beyond the extent of the tree, so that the sign is hit rather than the tree. The sign is meant to warn drivers about this hazard!!!

Tree 46 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6310.JPG

Tree 46 from pestana promenade past lido view of next road section IMG 6313.JPG
It has 4 branch stumps which are rotting into the trunk. You can also see other trees in the road.

Tree 47 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6314.JPG
The part of the trunk in the road has had tarmac compressed onto its roots and nobody was bothered to remove the metal post, so they just snapped it off.

Tree 47 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6315.JPG

Gallery 1 Page 11

Tree 47 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6316.JPG
Branch stump is rotting into trunk.

Tree 47 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6317.JPG
These watersprouts were ripped off. Not doing anything and they will rot into the trunk.

Tree 48 from pestana promenade past lido out in road view of next road section IMG 6319.JPG There are 3 wounds in the trunk, 2 of which are rotting into the trunk, and possibly another at the base. These need investigating.

Tree 48 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6318.JPG

Tree 49 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6320.JPG
Another tree in the road where the base of the trunk has been wounded from the laying of the tarmac and the traffic running into it. The wound is drying and splitting as well as starting to rot.

Tree 49 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6321.JPG

Tree 49 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6322.JPG
Branch wound is now rotting into the trunk. This needs investigating.

Tree 49 from pestana promenade past lido out in road pollarded tree IMG 6323.JPG
Besides the branch wound in the last image, there is another smaller one.

Tree 50 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6324.JPG
Shows tree in road.

Tree 50 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6325.JPG
There are 4 branch stumps rotting into the trunk with one being near the base.

Tree 50 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6327.JPG
Another branch stump rotting into the trunk. This tree needs investigating
.

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 1


(o)Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
(o)Arrow-Grass
(o)Arum
(o)Balsam
Bamboo
(o)Barberry
(o)Bedstraw
(o)Beech
(o)Bellflower
(o)Bindweed
(o)Birch
(o)Birds-Nest
(o)Birthwort
(o)Bogbean
(o)Bog Myrtle
(o)Borage
(o)Box
(o)Broomrape
(o)Buckthorn
(o)Buddleia
(o)Bur-reed
(o)Buttercup
(o)Butterwort
(o)Cornel (Dogwood)
(o)Crowberry
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
(o)Daffodil
(o)Daisy
(o)Daisy Cudweeds
(o)Daisy Chamomiles
(o)Daisy Thistle
(o)Daisy Catsears (o)Daisy Hawkweeds
(o)Daisy Hawksbeards
(o)Daphne
(o)Diapensia
(o)Dock Bistorts
(o)Dock Sorrels

 

 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 2


(o)Clubmoss
(o)Duckweed
(o)Eel-Grass
(o)Elm
(o)Filmy Fern
(o)Horsetail
(o)Polypody
Quillwort
(o)Royal Fern
(o)Figwort - Mulleins
(o)Figwort - Speedwells
(o)Flax
(o)Flowering-Rush
(o)Frog-bit
(o)Fumitory
(o)Gentian
(o)Geranium
(o)Glassworts
(o)Gooseberry
(o)Goosefoot
(o)Grass 1
(o)Grass 2
(o)Grass 3
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 1
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 2
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 3 (o)Hazel
(o)Heath
(o)Hemp
(o)Herb-Paris
(o)Holly
(o)Honeysuckle
(o)Horned-Pondweed
(o)Hornwort
(o)Iris
(o)Ivy
(o)Jacobs Ladder
(o)Lily
(o)Lily Garlic
(o)Lime
(o)Lobelia
(o)Loosestrife
(o)Mallow
(o)Maple
(o)Mares-tail
(o)Marsh Pennywort
(o)Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 3


(o)Mesem-bryanthemum
(o)Mignonette
(o)Milkwort
(o)Mistletoe
(o)Moschatel
Naiad
(o)Nettle
(o)Nightshade
(o)Oleaster
(o)Olive
(o)Orchid 1
(o)Orchid 2
(o)Orchid 3
(o)Orchid 4
(o)Parnassus-Grass
(o)Peaflower
(o)Peaflower Clover 1
(o)Peaflower Clover 2
(o)Peaflower Clover 3
(o)Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
(o)Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
Pipewort
(o)Pitcher-Plant
(o)Plantain
(o)Pondweed
(o)Poppy
(o)Primrose
(o)Purslane
Rannock Rush
(o)Reedmace
(o)Rockrose
(o)Rose 1
(o)Rose 2
(o)Rose 3
(o)Rose 4
(o)Rush
(o)Rush Woodrushes
(o)Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
(o)Sandalwood
(o)Saxifrage
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 4


Seaheath
(o)Sea Lavender
(o)Sedge Rush-like
(o)Sedges Carex 1
(o)Sedges Carex 2
(o)Sedges Carex 3
(o)Sedges Carex 4
(o)Spindle-Tree
(o)Spurge
(o)Stonecrop
(o)Sundew
(o)Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
(o)Teasel
(o)Thyme 1
(o)Thyme 2
(o)Umbellifer 1
(o)Umbellifer 2
(o)Valerian
(o)Verbena
(o)Violet
(o)Water Fern
(o)Waterlily
(o)Water Milfoil
(o)Water Plantain
(o)Water Starwort
Waterwort
(o)Willow
(o)Willow-Herb
(o)Wintergreen
(o)Wood-Sorrel
(o)Yam
(o)Yew

 

It is worth remembering that especially with roses that the colour of the petals of the flower may change - The following photos are of Rosa 'Lincolnshire Poacher' which I took on the same day in R.V. Roger's Nursery Field:-

 

 

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot91a1a1a1a1a1

Closed Bud

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot92a1a1a1a1a1

Opening Bud

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot93a1a1a1a1a1

Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot94a1a1a1a1a1

Older Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot95a1a1a1a1a1

Middle-aged Flower - Flower Colour in Season in its
Rose Description Page is
"Buff Yellow, with a very slight pink tint at the edges in May-October."

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot96a1a1a1a1a1

 

Plant Labelling - A suggestion for plant labelling to help visitors

A different solution is that each gardening member of the RHS staff at Wisley be provided with Large White Plastic Angled-Head Labels which are 20 inches (50 cms) in height with a 6 x 4 inch (16 x 10 cms) writing surface and a Marker pen with Black ink to provide a good temporary label for the above broken label (in Lost Flowers page) or for missing labels.
Then, the black background permanent label could be ordered at the end of that working day to replace this temporary label, which has been inserted into the ground in front of the relevant plant section.

If you are concerned about these labels going on "Walkabout", then insert another white label behind the plant and make it invisible to the public.

Mature Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot97a1a1a1a1a1

Juvenile Flower and Dying Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot98a1a1a1a1a1

Form of Rose Bush

Site design and content copyright ©October 2019.
Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a
courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are
not responsible for the content and/or quality of external
web sites linked from this site.  

There are 720 roses in the Rose Galleries; many of which have the above series of pictures in their respective Rose Description Page.

So one might avoid the disappointment that the 2 elephants had when their trunks were entwined instead of them each carrying their trunk using their own trunk, and your disappointment of buying a rose to discover that the colour you bought it for is only the case when it has its juvenile flowers; if you look at all the photos of the roses in the respective Rose Description Page!!!!

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

 

 

Gallery 1 Page 12

Tree 50 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6328.JPG

Tree 50 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6329.JPG

Tree 51 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6330.JPG
Another tree out in the road and you can see the dip of the compressed tarmac against the loose tarmac right up to the trunk.

Tree 51 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6331.JPG
Branch stump not only rotting quite deeply into trunk but woodworm is as well.

Tree 51 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6332.JPG
Deep rot in another wound. This needs investigating.

Tree 52 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6333.JPG
This tree has grown over the concrete kerb and into the road. Although the tarmac has been compressed over a main root, that root has uplifted that tarmac. That root is now being pounded by tyres from lorries and buses!! Weeds are also depriving the tree.

Tree 52 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6334.JPG
This shows the compression caused by the tyres since there is a dip in the tarmac round the raised root section.

Tree 52 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6335.JPG
A branch stump that is beyond the branch collar and so the bark on it has died, the stump dried and is now splitting and the repairing callus cannot get to cover the damage. Result - the stump will rot and continue rotting into the trunk. The roots of this tree need protection if nothing else!!!

Tree 53 from pestana promenade past lido out in road by zebra crossing IMG 6337.JPG

Tree 53 from pestana promenade past lido out in road with root access to water IMG 6336.JPG
This tree has pushed out the concrete kerb into the road on one side. It has grown over the kerb on the other and may be trying to get into the drain to receive water, whilst the tarmac has been compressed onto its roots in the road
.

Gallery 1 Page 13

Tree 54 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6338.JPG
Another tree out into the road with climbing over the concrete kerb and being attacked by the new tarmac being compressed at the laying time and by lorries/buses etc ever since. To add insult to injury weeds and grass are growing in its available open ground area.

Tree 54 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6339.JPG
The base of the trunk of this tree has overgrown a pink concrete slab and concrete under it. How much of the cross-sectional area of this tree is simply sitting on concrete?

Tree 54 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6340.JPG
There are 3 unprotected tree wounds on this trunk.

Tree 54 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6341.JPG
This branch stump is rotting deeply into the trunk and under the protective callus that it tried to protect itself with. The trunk under this branch stump is also exposed, splitting from drying out and infested with woodworm.

Tree 54 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6342.JPG
Part of the callus on this branch stump has been removed. The stump is drying out and splitting.

Tree 54 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6343.JPG
The root growing over the concrete kerb has been damaged.

Tree 54 from pestana promenade past lido out in road IMG 6344.JPG
3 out of the 4 branch stem wounds have rotted into their parent. Tree 54 needs investigating.

Ivydene Gardens Photo Damage to Trees in Madeira 1:
Page 1 has photos of Damage to Trees in the Pavement of Funchal in Madeira from the
Madeira 30 310119
Folder
taken in January 2019 in Funchal of Madeira.


Photos taken by Chris Garnons-Williams using a digital camera in the original size and as a thumbnail.
These can used in the Public Domain for educational purposes in schools, or at home.

Row 1 has the Pass-Through Camera image of Thumbnail image named in Row 2
and is usually 4000 x 3000 pixels.

Row 2 has same image reduced to fit the image frame of 160 x 120 pixels as a
Passthrough Thumbnail to show all of the Camera Image. This image has been
reduced to 72 pixels per inch by Freeway before I stored it as a Passthrough image
for use both here (from August 2019) and as the image in
Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens A 1 Gallery.

Click on either image and drag to your desktop.
Then you can crop the Pass-Through Camera image to obtain the particular detail
that you require from that image, before using that cropped result in your endeavour.

Copying the pages and then clicking on the images to drag them may not work.

manstrimminggrassIMG6110

Item is
Man strimming grass IMG 6110.JPG
taken in January/February 2019 in Funchal, Madeira by Chris Garnons-Williams

pIMG6110indexmanstrimminggrassinfunchalgarnonswilliams

manstrimminggrassIMG6111

Item is
Man strimming grass IMG 6111.JPG
taken in January/February 2019 in Funchal, Madeira by Chris Garnons-Williams

pIMG6111indexmanstrimminggrassinfunchalgarnonswilliams

manstrimminggrassIMG6112

Item is
Man strimming grass IMG 6112.JPG
taken in January/February 2019 in Funchal, Madeira by Chris Garnons-Williams

pIMG6112indexmanstrimminggrassinfunchalgarnonswilliams

tree1forumendof2roadjunctionIMG6126

Item is
Tree 1 forum end of 2 road junction IMG 6126.JPG
taken in January/February 2019 in Funchal, Madeira by Chris Garnons-Williams

pIMG6126indextree1forumendof2roadjunctioninfunchalgarnonswilliams

tree1forumendof2roadjunctionIMG6127

Item is
Tree 1 forum end of 2 road junction IMG 6127.JPG
taken in January/February 2019 in Funchal, Madeira by Chris Garnons-Williams

pIMG6127indextree1forumendof2roadjunctioninfunchalgarnonswilliams

tree1forumendof2roadjunctionIMG6129

Item is
Tree 1 forum end of 2 road junction IMG 6129.JPG
taken in January/February 2019 in Funchal, Madeira by Chris Garnons-Williams.
See What to do about Subsidence caused by Clay Page for influence of trees on
House Foundations in clay soils.

pIMG6129indextree1forumendof2roadjunctioninfunchalgarnonswilliams

tree1forumendof2roadjunctionIMG6131

Item is
Tree 1 forum end of 2 road junction IMG 6131.JPG
taken in January/February 2019 in Funchal, Madeira by Chris Garnons-Williams

pIMG6131indextree1forumendof2roadjunctioninfunchalgarnonswilliams

tree1forumendof2roadjunctionIMG6132

Item is
Tree 1 forum end of 2 road junction IMG 6132.JPG
taken in January/February 2019 in Funchal, Madeira by Chris Garnons-Williams

pIMG6132indextree1forumendof2roadjunctioninfunchalgarnonswilliams

tree1forumendof2roadjunctionIMG6133

Item is
Tree 1 forum end of 2 road junction IMG 6133.JPG
taken in January/February 2019 in Funchal, Madeira by Chris Garnons-Williams

pIMG6133indextree1forumendof2roadjunctioninfunchalgarnonswilliams

tree2forumendof2roadjunctionIMG6135

Item is
Tree 2 forum end of 2 road junction IMG 6135.JPG
taken in January/February 2019 in Funchal, Madeira by Chris Garnons-Williams

pIMG6135indextree2forumendof2roadjunctioninfunchalgarnonswilliams

tree2forumendof2roadjunctionIMG6136

Item is
Tree 2 forum end of 2 road junction IMG 6136.JPG
taken in January/February 2019 in Funchal, Madeira by Chris Garnons-Williams

pIMG6136indextree2forumendof2roadjunctioninfunchalgarnonswilliams


I have copied the archived post below, because what is stated there is extremely important, since 99.99% of
gardeners in the UK totally ignore the fact that plants require humus and think that double-digging is beneficial
every year. That is why they are killing their soil and their plants do not grow well.

How Soil Works in the Category Archives: Flowering House Plants of Houseplantsguru. com:-

"Nature’s plan is to build up the humus year after year and this can only be done by organic matter. There is need
to replace and return that which has been taken out. The Chinese, who are the best gardeners, collect, ‘use’, and
return to the soil, every possible kind of waste, vegetable, animal and human. In over 4000 years of intensive
cultivation they still support more human beings per hectare than any other country in the world!
On the other
hand in areas like the Middle West of the U.S.A. And the Regina Plain of Canada, where the Wheel of Life has not
been recognized, tens of thousands of hectares which once grew heavy crops are now useless, or practically so.

Every flower crop grown reduces the organic content of the ground. Every piece of work done helps to break down
the humus. The value of the soil in your garden, therefore, is not the mica particles or grains of sand. It lies in the
humus that the soil contains. Humus makes all the difference to successful gardening. Have plenty of humus
present and the soil is in good tilth. Humus is the organic colloid of the soil. It can store water, it can store plant
foods, it can help to keep the soil open. It can help to ensure the right aeration. It will give ideal insulation against
heat and cold.

Using Compost

Garden owners proposing to dig their land shallowly in preparation for flower growing, should realize the
importance of adding ample quantities of organic matter before they start. Composted farmyard manure, fine
wool shoddy, properly composted vegetable refuse, or hop manure should be added at the rate of one good
barrow-load to 10 m2 (12 sq yds) and in addition into the top 25 or 50 mm (1 or 2 in) of soil finely divided sedge
peat, non-acid in character should be raked in at about half a bucketful (9 litres) per square metre (2 gallons per
sq yd). This organic matter in the top few millimetres of soil gives the little roots a good start and so sends them
on to find the organic matter below.

It is when the organic content of the soil has been helped in this way, that the gardener dares to add plant foods
of an organic origin. These are usually applied on the surface of the ground and raked in. Fertilizers with an
organic base are particularly useful. Fish Manure may be applied at 105 to 140 g/m2 (3 oz to 4 oz per sq yd), or a
meat and bone meal or even hoof and horn meal mixed with equal quantities of wood ashes may be used at a
similar rate. These plant foods can be supplied not only when the flower garden is first made but every season
very early in the spring. A good dried poultry manure to which a little potash has been added is another fertilizer
that is very useful when applied at this time.

Minimum Digging

Flower growers must realize that proper soil treatment is the first essential to success. The millions and millions
of soil bacteria that live in the ground to help the gardener, much appreciate little or no digging. It enables
them to work better, for they need conditions which are natural. So do give them what they need.

Liming

Lime should be regarded as an essential except in very definite cases where acidity is demanded, e.g. the
heaths and heathers, rhododendrons and azaleas.

Lime not only prevents soil from being acid but it ‘sweetens’ it, as well as playing its part as a plant food.
It improves the texture and workability of heavy soils. It helps to release other plant foods, and it
decomposes organic compounds in the soil so that they can be used as plant food also.

Generally speaking it should be applied at about 245 g/m2 (7 oz per sq yd). It should not be dug in, as it
washes down into the soil very quickly. It should be sprinkled on the surface of the ground after the digging
and manuring has been done. Do not mix lime with organic fertilizers. There are three main types of lime:
Quicklime, sometimes sold as Buxton Lime or Lump Lime, which has to be slaked down on the soil;
Chalk or Limestone, often sold as Ground Limestone, only half as valuable as quicklime; and
Hydrated Lime, which is perhaps the most convenient to handle and is therefore most usually used by gardeners.
The quantity of lime mentioned previously i.e. 245 g/m2 (7 oz per sq yd), refers to hydrated lime."
 

 

The following is the opinion of Chris Garnons-Williams to the above:-

If you walk through an old wooded area, which is not intensively managed, you will see dead leaves on the
ground, together with fallen branches, brambles, nettles, other weeds and juvenile plants. There will be
waste material from birds and animals and this has not been cleared up and disposed of. This mulch then
provides the organic material to be recycled via the ground with its different organisms to the roots of those
same trees for them to continue to grow.
Nobody digs up the ground to push this material in a few inches or to the depth of the topsoil, nature does it
with earthworms and other organisms at the rate required by the organisms down below to then use it. The
trees in this wood then grow fairly uniformly using the available resources.

So, do not dig the manure, wool shoddy, vegetable refuse or hop manure or anything else in. Leave it on top
as a mulch and that includes the organic fertilizers and the lime.
Instead of adding finely divided sedge peat, add spent mushroom compost which contains peat which has
already been used; and so you are using their waste product for recycling, instead of destroying more peat
bogs which have taken 1000's of years to be created. You could use bracken instead of peat.

The topsoil is full of organisms, either the waste products from are used by another or they are. If you turn
them up from the bottom of the topsoil to the top, then those new top ones will starve to death and the ones
who were at the top are now at the bottom and they will as well since it is only waste down there which is
not their normal fare. They do have a bus transport system to get them back to their original levels, since water
is the only transport system down there, which unfortunately normally goes downwards.

So why do you not use the companion planting cultivation method as further detailed in Companion Planting?
You may follow this with the following which is normally used for the vegetable garden:-

"Spinach is sown in spring in rows 50cm apart over the whole vegetable garden area for the following
purposes:

  • these rows divide the vegetable garden up for the whole year,
  • the spinach roots prevent erosion, so the usual paths between beds are omitted,
  • young spinach plants provide protection and shade for the vegetable crops to be grown between them,
  • spinach provides ideal material for sheet surface composting, which becomes an intermediate space, a footpath, and
  • it is in between these lines of spinach that the other vegetable varieties are arranged."

This could be used in the flower beds as the system between the permanent plants of trees, shrubs
and perennials, which is where you may put bedding. This will also provide you with access to the bedding
and the permanent plants together with the nitrogen fertilizer for the other plants from the legumes of
spinach.
You plant your bedding, bulbs or vegetables through the mulch between the lines of spinach. The damage you
do to where you plant is fairly quickly repaired by the organisms in the surrounding soil, who each come into
the level below the ground level where they normally reside, until they meet their relatives onthe other side of
the planting hole. The ecosystem is then restored.
 

 

BEDDING PLANT GALLERY PAGES

Site Map of pages with content (o)

Introduction

FOLIAGE COLOUR
(o)Black
.Blue
(o)Brown
(o)Bronze
(o)Green
.Grey
(o)Purple
(o)Red
.Silver
(o)Variegated
.White
.Yellow

SEED COLOUR
Seed with EXTRA Plant INDEX of Extra Plants in Extra Pages of Bloom and Blooms Calendar Galleries.

BEDS WITH PICTURES
Garden

 


Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

BEDDING PLANT GALLERY PAGES

Flower Colour

Bicolour

Blue

Green

Orange

Other Colours

Pink

Purple

Red

White

White / Bicolour

Yellow

 

 

 

Flower Simple Shape

3 Petals

4 Petals

5 Petals

6 Petals

Stars

Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Globes, Goblets and Chalices

irisflotpseudacorus1a1a1a1a1a

aethionemacfloarmenumfoord1a1a1a1a1a

anemonecflo1hybridafoord1a1a1a1a1a

 

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a1a1a1a1a1

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

paeoniamlokosewitschiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1

Trumpets and Funnels

Bells, Thimbles and Urns

 

Single Flower provides pollen for bees

 

2 Petals

 

acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord1a1a1a1a1a1

digitalismertonensiscflorvroger1a1a1a1a1a

 

anagalisflotcskylover1a1a1a1a1a1

 

cupheacflollaveakavanagh1a1a1a1a1a

 

Flower Elabor-ated Shape

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Hats, Hoods and Helmets

Standards, Wings and Keels

Discs and Florets

Pin-cushions and Tufts

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

prunellaflotgrandiflora1a1a1a1a1a

aquilegiacfloformosafoord1a1a1a1a1a

acanthusspinosuscflocoblands1a1a1a1a1a

lathyrusflotvernus1a1a1a1a1a

brachyscomecflorigidulakevock1a1a1a1a1a

echinaceacflo1purpurealustrehybridsgarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a

argyranthemumflotcmadeiracrestedyellow1a1a1a1a1a

Bedding Plant Use

Bedding Out

Filling In

Screen-ing

Pots and Troughs

Window Boxes

Hanging Baskets

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Winter Bedding

 


Bedding Photos for use in Public Domain

 

Bedding Plant Height from Text Border Gallery

Blue =
0-24 inches
(0-60 cms)

Green =
24-72 inches
(60-180 cms) or
Green =
24-72 inches
(60-180 cms)

Red =
72+ inches
(180+ cms)
 

Bedding Plant Soil Moisture from Text Background

 

Wet Soil

Moist Soil

Dry Soil

Click on thumbnail to change this Comparison Page to the Plant Description Page of the Bedding Plant named in the Text box below that photo.


The Comments Row of that Bedding Plant Description Page details where that Bedding Plant is available from.

 

 

Bedding Plant INDEX .

See also the Bedding Plant INDEX of the Bedding in the Mixed Borders of the Royal Horticultural Society Garden at Wisley in 2013. This gallery also compares the Flower Colours, Foliage Colours, Bedding Use and Flower Shape of the bedding plants in those Mixed Borders.

 

 

The following is copied from Site Map of Evergreen Trees Gallery:-

 

The Yew Tree of St Margaret’s Church, Rainham, Kent,

written by Clifford Hansford. Contributory Member of the Ancient Yew Group www.ancient-yew.org

 

Observations of the tree’s current restoration/conservation work now nearing completion,
15th February 2010.

 

The following observations have been recorded in response to a request from Tim Hills
(Ancient Yew Group) for information relating to the particular method currently being used
to rescue and protect the above yew from further decay. It is hoped that the information
will be of use to assist Mr Russell Ball, President of the United Kingdom & Ireland
International Society of Arboriculture, in assessing the methods’ acceptability for such a task.

Having learned of the tree’s plight from a colleague at the Kent Wildlife Trust, and visited
the yew on Sat’ 13th February with Mr Chris Garnons-Williams, who is undertaking the
work, my understanding of the situation is as follows:-

1: This yew (recorded in the AYG Gazetteer) is believed by the church to be an ancient
yew of approximately 1300 years old.

2: Concern was raised by members of the church regarding the way in which the open
centre of the yew retained water. Such water retention was believed to be accelerating
the decay already prevalent in this area of the yew. Also, it was noted that other areas
of the yew were displaying similar symptoms, particularly where a large branch had
partially broken away from the main trunk.

3: Having engaged the services of Chris Garnons-Williams, the proprietor of Ivydene
Horticultural Services (www.ivydenegardens.co.uk) a horticulturalist, it was agreed to
implement the current method of recovery and conservation as Chris has proved it
successful when used on other types of tree.

Firstly, all old decayed material is removed. All hollows and cavities are then back-filled
with a combination of empty bottles (supplied by the pub next door to the church) and
expandable polystyrene foam. The bottles are used to help fill the cavities, thus saving
money on the use of foam. Care is taken to ensure the foam forms around the bottles,
and mates with all areas of surrounding heartwood. Finally two coats of black masonry,
water based paint is applied to both the foam and locally exposed heartwood (Without
a paint covering the foam decays if directly exposed to sunlight).

4: To date £700 has been spent on this work, (£200 donated directly by a group of church
members and the remainder supplied from church funds).

Notes:

An assortment of different size bottles, ranging from whiskey and wine (large bottles) to
the smaller fruit juice bottles, are used depending on the size of the cavities/gaps to be filled.

In hindsight, Chris would recommend the use of high-pressure water to remove the
decayed wood rather than screwdrivers and other blade-type implements. The residual
water left from the process would help to set the expandable polystyrene foam.

Work started in August 2009, with a break during the cold weather, and is still ongoing.
A further five to ten days is anticipated for completion.

All old, firm wood has been left in situ. Lots of new shoots are now forming.

Between Chris and myself we were able to measure the girth of the yew as being 26 feet
at its base.

It just so happened that on the day Chris and I met for the first time (13 Feb 2010),
the church had its annual open day. This gave me an opportunity to learn from church
members how very determined they are to preserve this much respected yew.

evergreentreewesternfacing1a

Western facing aspect.

 

evergreentreeeasternfacing1a

View of Eastern aspect.

 

 

evergreentreesouthernfacing1a

View of Southern aspect

 

View of Northern aspect which indicates the open centre before preservation action.

evergreentreenorthernbefore1a

 

 

View of Northern aspect with Clifford Hansford - after preservation action.

evergreentreenorthernafter1a

 

evergreentreebottlefoam1a

Bottle-filled foam repair.

 

View showing filled split in a limb growing from a fallen branch.

evergreentreesplit1a

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