Ivydene Gardens Infill3 Plants Index Gallery:
Indoor Bulbs flowering in April

Topic
Case Studies
Companion Planting
Garden Construction
Garden Design
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Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants
Soil
Tool Shed
Useful Data

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
Bulb
Climber

 

Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12

All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index

All Foliage 212
All Spring Foliage 212

All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212
Rock Plant Flowers 53

 

Your chosen Garden Style then changes your Plant Selection Process

Garden Style
...Infill3 Plants *
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...
12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

 

Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods

Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Vegetable

Wild Flower

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly

 

Cultivation Requirements of Plant

Outdoor / Garden Cultivation

1

Indoor / House Cultivation

 

Cool Greenhouse (and Alpine House) Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter

1

Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year

1

Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

1

 

Sun Aspect

Full Sun

1

Part Shade

1

Full Shade

1

 

Soil Type

Any Soil

1

Chalky Soil

1

Clay Soil

1

Lime-Free Soil

 

Peaty Soil

1

Sandy Soil

1

Acid Soil

1

Alkaline Soil

1

Badly-drained Soil

 

 

Soil Moisture

Dry

1

Moist

1

Wet

1

 

Position for Plant

Back of Shady Border

 

Back of Shrub Border

1

Bedding

1

Bog Garden

 

Coastal Conditions / Seaside

1

Container in Garden

1

Front of Border

1

Ground Cover 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

1

Ground Cover 24-72 inches (60-180 cms)

1

Ground Cover Over 72 inches (180 cms)

 

Hanging Basket

 

Hedge

1

Hedge - Thorny

 

Pollution Barrier

 

Pond

 

Pot in House, Greenhouse, Conservatory or Stovehouse

1

Raised Bed

 

Rest of Border

1

Rock Garden

1

Scree Bed

1

Speciman on Lawn

 

Sunny Border

1

Tree for Lawn

 

Tree for Small Garden

1

Wildflower

1

Windbreak

 

Woodland

1

 

Use of Plant

Pollen or nectar for Bees

1

Hosts to Butterflies

1

Encouraging birds / wildlife, providing food and shelter

1

Bee-Pollinated plants for Hay Fever Sufferers

1

Berries / Fruit

 

Dry Site in Full Sun

1

Dry Shade

 

Filtering noise

 

Flower Arrange-ments

 

Fragrant Flower

1

Language of Flowers

 

Low maintenance

1

Moist Shade

 

Moist and swampy Sites

 

Nitrogen fixing plants

 

Not Fragrant Flower

1

Rabbit-Resistant

 

Speciman Plant

1

Thornless

 

Tolerant of Poor Soil

1

 

Plant Foliage

Aromatic Foliage

 

Autumn Foliage

 

Finely Cut Leaves

1

Large Leaves

 

Yellow Variegated Foliage

1

White Variegated Foliage

1

Red / Purple Variegated Foliage

 

Silver, Grey and Glaucous Foliage

1

Sword-shaped Leaves

 

 

 

Flower Shape

Number of Flower Petals

Petal-less
 

1

1 Petal

 

2 Petals

 

3 Petals
 

1

4 Petals
 

1

5 Petals
 

1

Above 5
 

1

 

Flower Shape - Simple

Stars
 

1

Bowls
 

 

Cups and Saucers
 

1

Globes
 

 

Goblets and Chalices
 

 

Trumpets
 

1

Funnels
 

1

Bells
 

1

Thimbles
 

 

Urns
 

 

Salverform

 

 

Flower Shape - Elaborated

Tubes, Lips and Straps
 

 

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets
 

 

Hats, Hoods and Helmets
 

 

Standards, Wings and Keels
 

 

Discs and Florets
 

 

Pin-Cushions
 

 

Tufts
 

 

Cushion
 

 

Umbel
 

1

Buttons
 

 

Pompoms
 

 

 

Natural Arrangements

Bunches, Posies, Sprays
 

1

Columns, Spikes and Spires
 

 

Whorls, Tiers and Candelabra
 

1

Plumes and Tails
 

 

Chains and Tassels
 

1

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades
 

 

Spheres, Domes and Plates
 

 

 

Shrub, Tree Shape

Columnar
 

1

Oval
 

1

Rounded or Spherical
 

 

Flattened Spherical
 

1

Narrow Conical / Narrow Pyramidal
 

1

Broad Conical / Broad Pyramidal
 

1

Ovoid /
Egg-Shaped
 

 

Broad Ovoid
 

 

Narrow Vase-shaped / Inverted Ovoid
 

 

Fan-Shaped /Vase-Shaped
 

 

Broad Fan-Shaped / Broad Vase-Shaped
 

 

Narrow Weeping
 

 

Broad Weeping
 

 

Palm

 

 

Conifer Cone

1

 

Form

Arching

1

Climbing

 

Clump-Forming

1

Mat-Forming

 

Mound-Forming

1

Prostrate

1

Spreading

1

Stemless

 

Upright

1

 

Poisonous Plant

1

 

INFILL3 PLANTS INDEX GALLERY PAGES

Links in Table below are available in Shrub Tree Shape Index Gallery


Site Map

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

Click on number in cells below to jump to that page detailing those cultivated plants with that plant type and their botanical name starts with that letter.

Click on or underlined text to jump to page comparing flower thumbnails of that blue colour.
is Red, Pink, Purple and is Unusual or Other Flower Colour.

Plant Type
with links to Other Plant Photo Galleries

A
B
C

D
E
F

G
H
I

J
K
L

M
N
O

P
Q
R

S
T
U

V
W
X

Y
Z

Alpine in Evergreen Perennial, Herbaceous Perennial and Rock Garden

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

Aquatic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annual/ Biennial

1

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

Bamboo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bedding and RHS Mixed Border Beds



















Bicolour

Other Flower Colours

White / Colour Bicolour

Bulb and
Allium / Anemone, Colchicum / Crocus, Dahlia, Gladiolus, Narcissus, Tulip





 

 



 



 



1



Climber



 





 









Conifer

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deciduous Shrub

1

 

 

 



 







Deciduous Tree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evergreen Perennial

1

 

 

 



 







Evergreen Shrub , Semi-Evergreen Shrub and Heather

1

 

 

 



 







Evergreen Tree

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grass

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

Herbaceous Perennial and RHS Mixed Border Beds



 

 

1



 







Herb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Odds and Sods

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rhododendron, Azalea, Camellia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rose

 

 





 









Soft Fruit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sub-Shrub

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top Fruit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wildflower
with
Plants used by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterflies in the UK



















Shrub and Small Tree

Botanical Names Page

Common Names Page

Companion Planting

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

UV

W

XYZ

Pest Control by Companion Planting

The following 2 books (written by Louise Riotte 1909-1998 who was one of North America's most beloved gardeners) provide a wealth of extra information telling you what plants to put together for what purpose and how it does it (The only wasted information on each page is the page number!!!):-

Carrots love Tomatoes: Secrets of Companion Planting for Successful Gardening by Louise Riotte Second Edition (Storey Publishing 1998) ISBN-13: 978-1-58017-027-7

Roses love Garlic: Companion Planting and other Secrets of Flowers by Loiuse Riotte Second Edition (Storey Publishing 1998)
ISBN 1-58017-028-5

 

Click on text in cells below to jump to that page detailing those Infill2 Plants of that plant type for that Cultivation requirement.

Plant Type
 

 

Alpines for Rock Garden (See Rock Garden Plant Flowers)

Alpine Shrubs and Conifers

The Alpine Meadow
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

The Alpine Border

Alpine Plants for a Purpose

The Alpines that Dislike Lime

Alpines and Walls
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

Alpines and Paving

Sink and Trough gardens

Aquatic
(Water Plants) for

Anti-erosion Riverbank

Marginal Plants (Bog Garden Plants)

Oxy-genating Weeds

Water Lilies

Floating Plants

Waterside Plants
and Plants for Dry Margins next to a Pond

Wildlife Pond Plants

Annual for

----------------

Plants for Cut Flowers in
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Exposed Sites

Sheltered Sites with Green-house Annuals from 1916

Extra Poor Soil with Half-Hardy Annuals from 1916

Very Rich Soil with Biennials from 1916

Gap-filling in Mixed Borders with Hardy Annuals from 1916

Patio Containers

Cut Flowers Page 1
Page 2 Everlasting Flowers with Red Flowers from 1916

Attracting beneficial insects

Scent / Fragrance with Annuals for Cool or Shady Places from 1916

Low-allergen Gardens for Hay Fever Sufferers

Annual Plant Pairing Ideas

Low-Growing Annuals

Medium-Growing Annuals

Tall-Growing Annuals with White Flowers from 1916

Black or Brown Flowers

Blue to Purple Flowers

Green Flowers with Annuals and Biennials from 1916

Red to Pink Flowers
Page 1
Page 2

White Flowers

Yellow or Orange Flowers

Decorative Foliage

Moist Soil

Shade

House-plants with Yellow Flowers from 1916

Edging Beds

Hanging Baskets

Vining Annuals

 

Bedding for

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Autumn/ Winter Bedding

Bedding for Light Sandy Soil

Bedding for Acid Soil

Bedding for Chalky Soil

Bedding for Clay Soil

Black Flowers

Blue Flowers

Orange Flowers

Pink Flowers

Long Flowering

Coloured Leaves

Attractive to Wildlife including Bees, Butterflies and Moths

Purple Flowers

Red Flowers

White Flowers

Yellow Flowers

Multi-Coloured Flowers

Aromatic Foliage or Scented Flowers

Bedding Plant Use

Flowers with 2 Petals

Flowers with 3 Petals

Flowers with
4 Petals

Flowers with 5 Petals

Flowers with 6 Petals

Flowers with more than 6 Petals

Use in Hanging Baskets

Flower Simple Shape

Shape of
Stars

Shape of
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Shape of
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

Shape of
Trumpets and Funnels

Shape of
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

Use in Pots and Troughs

Flower Elaborated Shape

Shape of
Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Shape of
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Shape of
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

 

Use in
Screening

Use in
Window Boxes

Shape of
Standards, Wings and Keels

Shape of
Discs and Florets

Shape of
Pin-Cushions and Tufts

Shape of
Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

Cut Flowers

Use in Bedding Out

Use in
Filling In

Biennial for

Cottage and Other Gardens

Cut Flower with Biennials for Rock Work from 1916

Patio Containers with Biennials for Pots in Greenhouse / Conservatory

Beneficial to Wildlife with Purple and Blue Flowers from 1916

Scent with Biennials for Sunny Banks or Borders from 1916

 

 

Bulb for
--------------
Explanation Intro to Bulbs
--------------
725 Blue, White, Yellow, Unusual Colour, or Red-Purple-Pink flowering Bulbs in each month they flower.

Indoor Bulbs for
December
January
February

Indoor Bulbs for
March
April
May

Indoor
Bulbs for
June
July
August

Indoor Bulbs for September
October
November

Bulbs in Window-boxes

Bulbs in the Border

Bulbs naturalised in Grass

Plant Bloom Dec-Jan
Feb-Mar

Plant Bloom
Apr-May
Jun-Aug

Plant Bloom
Sep-Oct
Nov-Dec

Plant Bloom Smallest of Gardens

Bulbs for the Bulb Frame

Bulbs in the Woodland Garden

Bulbs in the Rock Garden

Bulbs in Green-house or Stove

Achimenes, Alocasias, Amorpho-phalluses, Arisaemas, Arums, Begonias, Bomareas, Caladiums

Clivias,
Colocasias, Crinums, Cyclamens, Cyrt-anthuses, Eucharises, Urceocharis, Eurycles

Freesias, Gloxinias, Hae-manthus, Hipp-eastrums

Lachenalias, Nerines, Lycorises, Pen-cratiums, Hymen-ocallises, Richardias, Sprekelias, Tuberoses, Vallotas, Watsonias, Zephy-ranthes

Bulbs in Bowls

Bulbs in the Alpine House

Hardy Bulbs

Aconitum, Allium, Alstroe-meria, Anemone

Amaryllis, Antheri-cum, Antholy-zas, Apios, Arisaema, Arum, Aspho-deline,

Aspho-delus, Belam-canda, Bloomeria, Brodiae, Bulbo-codium

Calochorti, Cyclo-bothras, Camassia, Colchicum, Con-vallaria,
Forcing Lily of the Valley, Corydalis, Crinum, Crosmia, Montbretia , Crocus

Cyclamen, Dicentra, Dierama, Eranthis, Eremurus, Erythrnium, Eucomis

Fritillaria, Funkia, Galanthus, Galtonia, Gladiolus, Hemero-callis

Hyacinth, Hyacinths in Pots,
Scilla, Puschkinia, Chionodoxa, Chionoscilla, Muscari

Iris,
Kniphofia, Lapeyrousia, Leucojum

Lilium,

Lilium in Pots, Malvastrum, Merendera, Milla, Narcissus, Narcissi in Pots

Orni-thogalum, Oxalis, Paeonia, Ran-unculus, Romulea, Sanguin-aria,
Stern-bergia,
Schi-zostylis, Teco-philaea, Trillium

Tulip,
Zephy-ranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs

Acidanthera, Albuca, Alstroemeri, Andro-stephium, Bassers, Boussing-aultias, Bravoas, Cypellas, Dahlias, Galaxis,
Geis-sorhizas, Hesper-anthas

Gladioli, Ixias,
Sparaxises, Babianas, Morphixias, Tritonias

Ixiolirions, Moraeas, Orni-thogalums, Oxalises, Phaedra-nassas,
Pan-cratiums, Tigridias, Zephyr-anthes, Cooperias

Bulbs for Bedding

Plant Bedding Spring
Summer

Climber
3 sector Vertical Plant System with flowers in
Jan,
Feb,
Mar,
Apr,
May 1,2
Jun,
Jul,
Aug,
Sep,
Oct,
Nov,
Dec

----------

Choosing the right Shrub or Climber

1a.
The Base -
Base of Wall Plants

1b.
Annuals

1c.
Herbs and Vegetables

1d.
Cut flowers, Cut Foliage

1e.
Scented flower or foliage

1f.
Foliage use only

 

2a. 1,2,3,4
The Prime - Wall Shrubs

2b.
Fruit trees

3a.
The Higher Reaches -
House-wall Ramblers

3b. 1,2
Non-House-Wall - Climbing Twiners

3c.
Non-House-Wall - Self-clinging Climbers

Raised Bed for Wheelchair Users

Plants for Wildlife-Use as well

Fastest Covering

Least protruding growth when fan-trained

1, 2
Evergreen

Use as
Hedge

Exposed Positions

Use as Groundcover

1, 2
Ornam-
ental Fruit

Scented Flowers

1, 2
Autumn Foliage Colour

Winter Bark

Winter and Early Spring Flowers

Summer Colour or Shape of Foliage

Edible Fruit

Needs Conservatory or Greenhouse

Large Pots and Containers

Cut Flowers

Attractive to Bees

Climber - Simple Flower Shape

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a
Stars

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14k1a1
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord2
Trumpets and Funnels

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming
Salverform

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14q1
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

 

Climber - Elaborated Flower Shape

prunellaflotgrandiflora
Tubes, Lips and Straps

aquilegiacfloformosafoord
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14u1a
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14v1a
Standards, Wings and Keels

brachyscomecflorigidulakevock
Disks and Florets

androsacecforyargongensiskevock
Pin-cushions, Tufts, Petal-less and Cushions

armeriaflomaritimakevock
Umbels, Buttons and Pompoms


Indoor Bulb Growing by Edward Pearson. Published by Purnell & Sons, Ltd in 1953. It provides the data about Indoor Bulbs and Bulbs in Window-boxes.

Colour All The Year In My Garden: A selection of choice varieties - annuals, biennials, perennials, bulbs, climbers and trees and shrubs - that will give a continuity of colour in the garden throughout the year. Edited by C.H. Middleton. Gardening Book from Ward, Lock & Co published in 1938, provides plant data for a calendar of plants in bloom throughout the year and for those in the smallest garden.

The Book of Bulbs by S. Arnott, F.R.H.S. Printed by Turnbull & Spears, Edinburgh in 1901. This provides data about Hardy Bulbs, Half-Hardy Bulbs, Greenhouse and Stove Bulbs.

Collins Guide to Bulbs by Patrick M. Synge. ISBN 0 00 214016-0 First Edition 1961, Second Edition 1971, Reprinted 1973. This provides data on bulbs for bedding, bulbs in the border, bulbs naturalised in grass, bulbs in the woodland garden, bulbs in the rock garden, bulbs in pans in the alpine house, bulbs in the greenhouse, bulbs in bowls and the bulb frame.

Ivydene Gardens Infill3 Plants Index Gallery:
Indoor Bulbs flowering in April

Botanical Plant Name

with link to
UK or
European Union
mail-order supplier for you to contact to buy this plant

Flower Colour
and Background Colour nearest to main petal colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Sun Aspect:- Full Sun,
Part Shade, Full Shade

with link to external website for photo/data

Flowering Months in UK

with link to
USA or
Canada
mail-order supplier

Height with Spacings or Width (W) in inches (cms)

1 inch =
2.5 cms
12 inches = 30 cms
40 inches = 100 cms

Foliage Colour
and Background Colour nearest to middle-aged leaf colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Soil Moisture:-
Dry,
Moist,
Wet

with link to Australia or New Zealand mail-order supplier

Plant Type is:-

A for Aquatic
Ann for Annual / Biennial
Ba for Bamboo
Bu for Bulb
Cl for Climber
Co for Conifer
F for Fern
G for Grass
H for Herb
P for Perennial
Rh for Rhodo-dendron, Azalea, Camellia
Ro for Rose
Sh for Shrub
So for Soft Fruit
To for Top Fruit
Tr for Tree
V for Vegetable
W for Wildflower

followed by:-
E for Evergreen,
D for Deciduous,
H for Herbaceous,
Alpine for being an Alpine as well as being 1 of above Plant Type /

 
Acid for Acidic,
Alk for Alkaline,
Any for AnySoil
 

with link to
ALL PLANTS Index Gallery page

Cultivation Details

Varieties

Plant Photos

It is sad to reflect that in England so few gardens open to the public label their plants or label them so that the label is visible when that plant is in flower, so that visitors can identify; and then later locate and purchase that plant.

Few mail-order nurseries provide the detail as shown in my rose or heather galleries.

If you want to sell a product, it is best to display it. When I sold my Transit van, I removed its signage, cleaned it and took photos of the inside and outside before putting them onto an advert in Autotrader amongst more than 2000 other Transit vans - it was sold in 20 minutes.

If mail-order nurseries could put photos to the same complexity from start of the year to its end with the different foliage colours and stages of flowering on Wikimedia Commons, then the world could view the plant before buying it, and idiots like me would have valid material to work with.

I have been in the trade (until ill health forced my Sole Trader retirement in 2013) working in designing, constructing and maintaining private gardens for decades and since 2005 when this site was started, I have asked any nursery in the world to supply photos. R.V. Roger in Yorkshire allowed me to use his photos from his website in 2007 and when I got a camera to spend 5 days in July 2014 at my expense taking photos of his roses growing in his nursery field, whilst his staff was propagating them. I gave him a copy of those photos.

Arum Lily (Lily of the Nile, Richardia africana, Calla Lilly, Calla aethiopica or Zantedeschia aethiopica)

 

 

 

 

 

Pot in August and September into a 5 inch (12.5 cms) pot 1 tuber, using either John Innes compost or a general-purpose mixture, such as 4 parts loam, 1.25 parts well-rotted manure, 2 parts leaf-mould, with 0.5 ounces (14 grammes) medium bone-meal. The neck of the tuber should show above the soil. The potting mixture should always be rich.

Water. After potting, see that the compost is well moistened, thereafter water sparingly until growth is well under way. At this stage Richardia need to be kept continually moist. In resting, from June to October, they must be well watered.

Ferilisers. When the plants start to flower a complete fertiliser should be watered into the pots once every 3-4 weeks.

Temperature 50-60 degrees Fahrenheit (10-15.5 degrees Celsius).

Position. A warm south window with full light.

Flowering. They will flower in almost every month of the year, as, with normal conditions, Richardia will be in bloom in 8 weeks from potting. Some varieties, such as Elliotiana, will give better results if the tubers are left in a warm, dry atmosphere for 3-4 weeks before potting.

Resting. The Lily should be allowed to rest during the summer, preferably in the garden, and must be kept well watered till October.

Repot. As the tubers increase in size fairly rapidly they will need to be potted into larger pots each year.

Aethiopica
White. 36-48 inches (90-120 cms). Flowers December, January and February.

Elliotiana
Golden yellow, with white spotted leaves. 36 inches (0 cms). Flowers August - Choice Bulbs and Plants sell to the European Union and America.

Pentlandii
Deep yellow and purple. 24 inches (60 cms). Summer-flowering.

Rehmannii
Rosy purple. 24 inches. Summer.

callacforlilieswikimediacommons

Italiano: Pianta di calla.

English: Bush of calla lilies. By Giovanni Dall'Orto via Wikimedia Commons.

Dicentra spectabilis (Lamprocapnos spectabilis, Bleeding Heart - Lyre Flower)

 

 

 

 

 

Pot, in October-November, 1 tuberous root in a 7-inch (17.5 cm) pot. There is no particular need to use a specially prepared potting soil. If the plant is dug from the garden, use can well be made of the surrounding soil.

Water generously at potting; generously again when in full growth.

Temperature. After potting in October the plant should be left in either a cool frame or cold room until January and then be brought to a warmer room at a temperature not exceeding 60 degrees Fahrenheit (15.5 degrees Celsius).

Flowering April-May.

Resting. When flowering is done, the Dicentra may be planted out in the garden. It should not be grown indoors for more than 1 year.

Spectabilis
Grey-green foliage on red stems. Flowers deep pink and white, hanging like bells from stems. 30 inches (75 cms).

 

"How careful do you need to be when using glyphosate?" from Roger Brook

The National Dicentra Collection by Roger Brook.

"Why the no-dig Gardener? Except in a few exceptional circumstances I have not dug for forty years. ‘Minimum cultivation’ best describes what I do. It may surprise you then, that a small stainless steel border spade is my favourite garden tool! Spades have many uses other than digging, not least making planting slits and holes, edging the lawn and lifting potatoes.

Many gardeners imagine the more they cultivate the soil, the better it will be. My philosophy is the opposite, the more you avoid disturbing the soil, the more the plants will be healthy, and the better the soil structure will be. I am quite evangelical about the benefits of not digging." by Roger Brook, with Is the no-dig-gardener still not digging?

lamprocapnoscflosspectabiliswikimediacommons

Lamprocapnos spectabilis, Papaveraceae, Venus's Car, Bleeding Heart, Dutchman's Trousers, Lyre Flower, inflorescence; Botanical Garden KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany. The plant is used in homeopathy as remedy: Dicentra spectabilis (Dice-s.). By H. Zell via Wikimedia Commons.

Fritillaria meleagris (Snake's Head)

 

 

 

 

 

Pot in September into equal parts of leaf-mould, peat and sand at 2.5 inches (6.25 cms) apart and 3 inches (7.5 cm) depth.

Water very sparingly until the first sign of top growth appears.

Temperature. Cool at all times.

Position. Fritillaria will stand moderate shade.

Flowering. April.

Meleagris alba
White.

Meleagris Aphrodite
Pure white.

Meleagris Charon
Very dark purple.

Meleagris Saturnus
Pink and white. Large-flowered.

A mixture of varieties can also be used.

fritillariacflosmeleagriswikimediacommons

Fritillaria meleagris. By Kurt Stüber via Wikimedia Commons.

Ixia (African Corn Lily)

 

 

 

 

 

Pot, for succession, 6 bulbs 2.5 inches (11.25 cms) deep in a 5-inch (11.25 cms) pot from September to December. Compost can be either John Innes or a mixture of fibrous loam, leaf-mould and fine sand. After potting plunge the pot to the rim in a sheltered place outside or in a light frost-free place indoors. It must remain there until growth is well advanced, when it can be brought into the living room.

Water moderately, with increasing attention as the plants develop. Withhold water gradually after flowering.

Temperature. Cool until February and then not more than 55-60 degrees Fahrenheit (13-15.5 degrees Celsius).

Position. Full light in warm window.

Repot every 3 years.

Dainty
Graceful flowers, cresting wiry stems, with a range of colours almost as wide as Freesias and Sparaxis.

Blue Bird
The best white with a bold blue centre. 18 inches (45 cms).

Bucephalus Major
A magnificent large-flowered variety of shaded carmine. 23 inches (57.5 cms).

Golden Drop
Rich yellow with magenta centre. 20 inches (50 cms).

Viridiflora
Translucent green. 15 inches (37.5 cms)

Wonder (Rosa Plena)
Shining pink, double flowers. 12 inches (30 cms)

ixiacflosviridiflorawikimediacommons

English: Ixia viridiflora family Iridaceae

Svenska: Grön ixia. By HelenaH via Wikimedia Commons.

Lilium (Lilies)

Cats are extremely sensitive to lilly toxicity and ingenstion is often fatal; households and gardens which are visited by cats are strongly advised against keeping this plant or placing dried flowers where a cat may brush against them and become dusted with pollen which they then consume while cleaning.

 

 

 

 

 

The preferred months for potting are October and November, if it is possible to get the bulbs during those months. When Lily bulbs are received they may be soft and limp. If they are, they should, as long as they have a reasonable root system, be buried in moist sand for approximately a fortnight (14 days) in order to plump them, in which state they can be planted properly. A mixture of equal parts of loam, leaf-mould, decayed manure and coarse sand is suitable, or John Innes potting compost. The varieties suggested in the next column are stem-rooting, so that the method of potting is applicable only to such varieties.

Pot 1 bulb into a 5-inch (12.5 cms) or 6-inch (15 cms) pot, or 3 into an 8 inch or 10 inch (20 or 25 cms) pot. It is most necessary to give adequate drainage. Put about 2 inch (5 cms) of compost in the pot and then plant the bulbs, afterwards adding only sufficient compost compost to cover them. Planting must be very firm. After planting, the final level of the soil should not be over 0.75 of the depth of the pot, so that further dressings of compost can be given when the stems are about 6-inches (15 cms) high and the stem roots are forming. After potting, the Lilies can be started in a cool place. There is no need to keep them in the dark. Normally, Lily bulbs will have rooted within a fortnight of potting. When the shoots are about 3 inches (7.5 cms - it is absolutely imperative that not an extra micron is allowed in growth before the concluding part of this sentence is executed! or the original author might turn in his grave - we dot know whether he was interred or cremated. No doubt the reader of this bit of drivel might do the research and put us out of our misery... etc, etc, etc) the Lilies can be brought into more light, but direct sunlight should be avoided (sounds as though when these plants are outside in the ground, that only sunshades should be provided but that moonshades are not required since the heat in the the sun's rays has been absorbed by the moon and only the light passed on for the romantic earthmen - they're coming to take me away).

Water. After potting, the soil should be kept moist. When in full growth water liberally. After flowering, decrease, and finally withold water during the resting time.

Feriliser. A complete fertiliser should be watered in every fortnight after the flower buds have formed. Soot-water can be used instead.

Temperature. 50-65 degrees Fahrenheit (10-18.3 degrees Celsius).

Repot. When ripened, the Lilies recommended for indoor flowering, alongside, should be repotted.

Auratum
Yellow. 48-60 inches (120-150 cms). August.

Longiflorum (Trumpet Tree Lily, Easter Lily, Japanese: テッポウユリ, Teppōyuri)
White trumpet. Normally June, but it can be flowered in March up to June, depending upon potting time and methods of treatment. This is the easiest Lily to grow indoors.

Philippinense Formosanum
White trumpet. Fragrant. 36-48 inches (90-120 cms). July.

Rubellum
Pink. 12-24 inches (30-60 cms). May.

Speciosum
Pink and white. September.

Speciosum album kractzeri
Pure white. 48 inches (120 cms). August.

liliumcfloauratumwikimediacommons

Lilium auratum ,Alpine flower, Abkhazia mountains at about 1200-1500 metres above the sea level. By Vyacheslav Stepanyuchenko from Rostov-on-Don, Russian Federation via Wikimedia Commons.

Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)

 

 

 

 

 

Pot from August to November, 18-20 small bulbs or 3-5 larger 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep, and 1 inch apart, in a 5-inch (12.5 cms) pot, using John Innes No. 2, or a mixture of 2 parts sandy loam, 1 part leaf-mould, 1 part sand. After potting they should be plunged until growth has started, when they can be brought to a cool, well-lighted window.

Warer moderately until after flowering and then dry off the bulbs.

Fertilisers. Occasional dose of complete fertiliser, up to flowering.

Temperature. 50 degrees Fahrenheit (10 degrees Celsius).

Armeniacum
Deep cobalt blue, large spikes. 7 inches (17.5 cms).

Botryoides
Deep blue. April. 6 inches (15 cms)

Botryoides Album
Pure white. April. 6 inches (15 cms).

Comosum (Leopoldia comosa, Tassel Hyacinth)
Purplish blue. April. 8 inches (20 cms).

Conicum (Heavenly Blue)
Intense blue.8 inches (20 cms). April.

Moschatum Flavum (Musk) (Muscari macrocarpum)
Yellow and violet. Musk-scented. 8 inches (20 cms). May.

muscaricflosarmeniacumwikimediacommons

Muscari armeniacum. By Kurt Stüber via Wikimedia Commons.

Oxalis (wood Sorrel)

 

Oxalis Collection pages with photos

 

 

 

 

 

These bulbous plants are very suitable for hanging pots, owing to their rather soft and falling growth.

Pot winter-flowering kinds in September; spring-flowering kinds in January; summer-flowering kinds in March and April; and autumn-flowering kinds in August. Plat 1 in a 3-inch (7.5 cms) or 6 in 5-inch (12.5 cms) pot at from 0.5 to 0.75 inches (1.25-1-8.75 cms) deep. Their essential needs are good drainage and adequate lime with the potting mixture, which can otherwise be any good friable soil.

Water sparingly until growth is about 0.25 inches (6mm) above the soil; thereafter water freely. Relax watering when the flowers begin to fade and keep them quite dry until growth starts again.

Fertiliser. Water-in a complete fertiliser as soon as the flower buds begin to form.

Temperature. 50-60 degrees Fahrenheit (10-15.5 degrees Celsius).

Position. A south window in full light and with maximum sunlight.

Resting. When the flowers are over, the bulbs should be allowed to become quite dry and to remain in this state until growth starts again. The general rest period lasts from about 8 to 10 weeks.

Winter: cernua(is actually Oxalis pes-caprae, Bermuda Buttercup)
Clover-shaped leaves, yellow flowers. 6 inches (15 cms).

Spring: rosea (Pink Wood Sorrel)
Pale-green leaves, pink flowers. 3 inches (7.5 cms).

 

Summer:
Adenophylla (Silver Shamrock )
Grey foliage with rose-pink flowers. 3 inches (7.5 cms).

hirta (tropical woodsorrel)
Clear pink flowers on trailing stems. 3 inches (7.5 cms).

Deppei (Iron Cross)
Large leaves banded with purple. Flowers bright terra-cotta. 6 inches (15 cms)

 

Autumn:
carnosa
Deep-green leaves. Flowers pale yellow. 6 inches (15 cms).

variabilis
Flowers red, white and purple. 3 inches (7.5 cms).

Boweina
Large-leafed, with rich, yellow-centred flowers. Long-flowering perion. 9 inches (22.5 cms).

oxaliscforbowieiwikimediacommons

Oxalis bowiei Location: Botanical Gardens Berlin. By BotBln via Wikimedia Commons.

Puschkinia scilloides (Striped Squill), Puschkinia hyacinthoides, Puschkinia libanotica)

 

 

 

 

 

Flowers in April with dainty white flowers shaded and striped with blue. 4 inches (10 cms). Plant in shallow pan and treat as Eranthis, etc:-

Pot into 3-inch (7.5 cm) pots or pans in October. Tubers should be put at 0.5 inch (1.25 cm) deep and close together (about 6-8 in a 3-4 inch (7.5-10 cms) pan). Bulb fibre is a satisfactory potting medium, but equal parts of leaf-mould, loam and sand can be used.

Water moderately at all times.

Temperature. When taken from the cold in December they should be brought for 3-4 weeks into an atmosphere of 50 degrees Fahrenheit (10 degrees Celsius). They need the coolest possible conditions and are better when not brought into a warmer temerature until in bud.

 

puschkiniacforlibanoticawikimediacommons

Puszkinia cebulicowata Puschkinia libanotica. By Barbara Wrzesińska via Wikimedia Commons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ivydene Gardens Infill3 Plants Index Gallery:
Indoor Bulbs flowering in April

 

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

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Ramblers Scramblers & Twiners by Michael Jefferson-Brown (ISBN 0 - 7153 - 0942 - 0) describes how to choose, plant and nurture over 500 high-performance climbing plants and wall shrubs, so that more can be made of your garden if you think not just laterally on the ground but use the vertical support structures including the house as well.

The Gardener's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Climbers & Wall Shrubs - A Guide to more than 2000 varieties including Roses, Clematis and Fruit Trees by Brian Davis. (ISBN 0-670-82929-3) provides the lists for 'Choosing the right Shrub or Climber' together with Average Height and Spread after 5 years, 10 years and 20 years.

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