Ivydene Gardens Companion Planting: Companion Plant : C
 

This Companion Plant A-Z Table shows in tabular form the following, as a quick reference guide:-

  • name of original plant in alphabetical order
  • name of pest/disease of that original plant
  • name of antidote to that pest/disease as a companion plant, or name of companion plant or beneficial insect or animal to the original plant
  • name of antagonistic plant to that original plant or name of a Pest/Disease that this original plant is antagonistic to.

coffeecup2a1a1

Coffee Time Artistry!!

ORIGINAL PLANT

PEST/DISEASE

COMPANION PLANT

ANTAGONISTIC PLANT OR TO PEST/-DISEASE

Cabbage

white cabbage butterfly.


Cabbage worm.

Cutworm.


Aphid.


Cabbage
root fly.

More likely to get club-root if the cabbages are grown in the same spot for 2 or more years

The scent from
Sage,
Rosemary,
Hyssop,
Thyme,
Dill,
Southernwood,
Mint and
Chamomile
in a mixed border round the cabbages deters the white cabbage butterfly.

Tansy repels the caggage worm and cutworm.


Wormwood,
Caraway,
Celeriac,
Celery,
Coriander,
Peppermint,
Onion,
Potato,
Geranium,
Pennyroyal,
Spearmint,
Mustard,
Clover,
Bean,
Beetroot.


Orange Nasturtium grown within the cabbage area deter aphids, whilst yellow nasturtiums grown outside the cabbage area attract aphids.


Oregano,
Borage

Strawberry Tomato
Pole bean
Grape
Rue
Garlic

 

Calendula

 

Marigold
Pansy
Candytuft Beans

 

Camomile ( Chamaemelum nobile )

 

Onion,
Cabbage,
Cucumber,
Mint

 

Caraway
( Carum carvi )

 

Caraway planted with peas will grow after the Peas have been harvested.

Fennel

 

Cardiocrinum giganteum ( a bulb plant capable of reaching 2-4 metres in height )

 

Rhododendrons, Betula

 

 

Carnation

 

 

Carnations planted in soil where Hyacinths (Hyacinthus orientalis) have been growing will die


Site design and content copyright ©December 2006 Chris Garnons-Williams. Page structure amended September 2012.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

Carrot

Bitter Flavour.

 

Carrot Fly

_____.

 


Carrots and Onions planted in alternate rows drive off both the onion or carrot fly.

Sage,
Rosemary and Wormwood planted nearby produce strong smells that repel carrot fly maggots, who attack the roots of carrots.

Sow leeks and carrots in the same row for protection against carrot fly. Then harvest the carrots and leave the leeks to mature for later.

Chives,
Parsley,
Black Salsify.
Radish,
Leaf lettuce,
Tomato,
Asparagus,
Marigold, Nasturtium,
Flax.

Keep the carrots on the sunny side of the Peas for best effect,

Deciduous tree sawdust laid as a mulch protects carrots from carrot fly.

Scorzonera hispanica,
Bean

Ethylene Gas from Apples causes bitter flavour in Carrots.


Potato,
Kohlrabi,
Fennel,
Dill,
Cabbage.

 

Catnip ( Nepeta cataria )

 

Feline and Bee attractant.

 

 

Cauliflower

White Cabbage Butterfly

Celery to keep away the white cabbage butterfly.


Mustard,
Bean,
Beetroot,
Chamomile,
Hyssop,
Mint,
Nasturtium,
Onion,
Oregano,
Potato,
Sage,
Radish,
Rosemary,
Tansy,
Dill

Tomato,
Strawberry,
Celery Leaf Borer.

 

Celeriac

 

Winter vetch sown before Celeriac provides potassium.

Leek and Scarlet runner beans in alternate rows.

Bean,
Cabbage,
Onion,
Tomato.

 

 

Celery

 

Grow Celery in alternate rows with Leeks. Apply mulch of compost with some pig manure in it for increased yield.

The cabbage white butterfly does not like the scent of Celery so is a benefit to all members of the cabbage family.


Tomato
Cauliflower
Bush Bean
Dill
Onion

Cabbage white butterfly.

 

Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis)

 

Chamomile encourages plants to increase their essential oils and therefore taste and smell more strongly:-
Mint,
Cabbages.

Rather than growing Chamomile as a lawn because of high mowing maintenance, plant Chamaemelum nobile 'Trenegue' which never flowers and never requires to be cut. See Herbal Lawns for other low maintenance grass lawn replacements.

Plant 3 feet away from Onions.

 

 

Chayote (Sechium edule)

 

Cucumber

 

 

Cherry

Slugs (Agriolimax campestris) and Snails (Helicidae)

White hellebore

Wheat,
Potato

 

Chervil(Anthriscus cerefolium)

 

Radish,
Carrot,
Lettuce,
Endive,
Dill,
Coriander.

Use chervil as a flavouring for grated baby carrots.

 

 

Chicory

 

Sow in pea rows after peas have been pulled out.

 

 

Chinese Celery Cabbage (Brassica chinensis)

 

Brussels sprouts Cauliflower

Corn

 

Chive
(Allium schoenoprasum)
 

 

Cabbage,
Carrot,
Leek,
Tomato,
Cucumber,
Grape,
Parsley,
Soft and Tree Fruits.

Bean,
Pea

 

Chrysanthemum

Aphids

Chives,
Strawberry,
Marigold,
Calendula

 

 

Citrus
Lime
Lemon
Orange Grapefruit

 

Plant Guava nearby to protect the citrus trees from infection.


Oak,
Rubber tree,
Seaweed,
Coffee,
Pepper

 

 

Clover (leguminosae)

 

Deadly nightshade (Solanum nigrum),
Lawn grass

Henbane,
Buttercup

 

Colchicum agrippinum

 

Alyssum,
Dianthus,
Lavender,
Catmint

 

 

Colchicum cilicicum

 

Senecio laxifolius,
Cistus

 

 

Collard

Flea beetle

Tomato
Mustard

 

 

Columbine (Aquilegia Vulgaris)

Red spider

Rhubarb

Do not put in vegetable garden

 

Comfrey (Symphytum asperum)

 

Bees love it.

Mow leaves every 2 months in the summer and use as a mulch round your vegetables/fruit to provide potassium, nitrogen and phosphates.

 

 

Compost Bins

 

During a trial by the RHS, it was found that shredded prunings which filled a series of different 1 cubic yard domestic garden compost bins only reached 20 degrees centigrade and did not kill the weed seeds or produce good compost. When the 10 cubic metre compost bin was filled, it reached 60 degrees centigrade and produced good compost.

From 17 years of experience on a multitude of client's gardens, I recommend the following:-

  • Have a small plastic dustbin under the kitchen sink and fill it with vegetable peelings, tea bags, coffee grounds and fruit but no meat products, milk products or bread. When full, empty the contents onto a weeded area of your flower/vegetable beds and cover with a thin layer of grass mowings to reduce the smell of rotting vegetation and make a smooth cover which turns light brown.
  • Prune your shrubs/perennials and put onto the lawn. Use a rotary mower to cut them up and mulch the beds to 4 inches deep ( 1 brick is about 4 inches ) and then cover with a thin layer of grass mowings.
  • Apply grass mowings to beds at no more than 0.5 inches deep at a time to prevent the heat generated during the first 2 weeks of aerobic decomposition from harming the plant stems alongside. The grass mulch can be added to every 2 weeks.
  • Grass mowings applied as a mulch by themselves or with manure/compost underneath is the only material that on a steep slope will not be washed away by heavy rain.
  • Pernicious weeds like ground elder, bindweed, bramble, or couch-grass should have their roots dug out and either donated to the rubbish bin or cut up and used as a mulch in a thick mature hedge or under a stand of Leylindii Trees where the ground is dry and malnourished.

 

 

Coriander(Coriandrum sativum)

 

Anise,

Dill, Chervil and Coriander growing between rows of carrots and cabbage will protect them from pests.

Radish,
Celery,
Spinach,
Potato.


Bees love Coriander.

Coriander will wilt when Fennel is planted alongside and prevent fennel from forming seed.

 

Corydalis solida

 

Forsythia,
Magnolia stellata,
Hellebores,
Pulmonaria,
Primrose,
Primula

 

 

Couch Grass (Agropyron repens)

 

 

Tomato,
Soya beans,
Cowpeas,
Millet,
Rye

 

Courgette (Cucurbita pepo)

 

Bean,
Mint,
Nasturtium,
Radish,
Sweetcorn,
Basil

Potato

 

Crocosmia ( Montbretia )

 

Cotinus cogygria 'Royal Purple', Copper Beech

 

 

Crocus banaticus

Mice

Garlic.
Heather,
Rhododendron

 

 

Crocus biflorus,

Crocus chrysanthus

 

Artemisia,
Lavender,
Anthemis,
Achillea,
Daphne retusa

 

 

Crocus flavus

 

Hellebore,
Hosta,
Pulmonaria,
Viburnum tinus,
Garrya elliptica,
Cyclamen coum,
Scilla tubergeniana,
Grass,
Prunus

 

 

Crocus laevigatus

 

Chamaecyparis 'Boulevard'

 

 

Crocus nudiflorus,

Crocus ochroleucus

Crocus speciosus

 

Grass

 

 

Cucumber

Cucumber beetle.

 

Downy and Powdery Mildew.

Radish,
Nasturtium.
Chives.


Beans,
Pea,
Dill,
Lettuce,
Sweetcorn,
Kohlrabi,
Savoy cabbage,
Broccoli,
Celery,
Chinese cabbage,
Tomato,
Brassica,
Basil,
Jerusalem artichoke.

Sunflowers provide shade.

Potato,
Sage,
Cress

 

Curtonus

 

Berberis,
Cotinus,
deep blue-green conifer,
Stachys lanata

 

 

Cyclamen

 

Anemone hepatica,
Dwarf hostas,
Primula

Orchid

 

Cyclamen coum

 

Winter jasmine,
Galanthus,
Erica carnea,
Rhododendron

 

 

Cyclamen hederifolium

 

Cotinus coggygria,
Rosa rubrifolia

 

 

Cyclamen repandum

 

Acer

 

 

Cypella herbetii

 

Lavendula,
Nepeta

 

 

COMPANION PLANTING
PAGE MENU

Companion Introduction

Site Map
Franck's Veg Garden
My
Vegetable Garden
Katie Thear Veg Garden
Riotte Veg Garden
Create Companion Garden

Companion Plant A
Companion Plant B
Companion Plant C
Companion Plant D
Companion Plant E
Companion Plant F
Companion Plant G
Companion Plant H
Companion Plant I
Companion Plant J
Companion Plant K
Companion Plant L
Companion Plant M
Companion Plant N
Companion Plant O
Companion Plant P
Companion Plant Q
Companion Plant R
Companion Plant S
Companion Plant T
Companion Plant UV
Companion Plant W
Companion Plant XYZ

Pest Control

Companion References
Companion Library AG
Companion Library GW

Biodynamics Introduction
Preparations
     
Preparation Use
     
Advantages
     
Rotation
     
Cropping Sequence
Gardening

 

The 2 EUREKA EFFECT PAGES FOR UNDERSTANDING SOIL AND HOW PLANTS INTERACT WITH IT OUT OF 15,000:-


Explanation of Structure of this Website with User Guidelines Page for those photo galleries with Photos
(of either ones I have taken myself or others which have been loaned only for use on this website from external sources)

-----------------------------------------------------------

Choose 1 of these different Plant selection Methods:-

1. Choose a plant from 1 of 53 flower colours in the Colour Wheel Gallery.

2. Choose a plant from 1 of 12 flower colours in each month of the year from 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery.

3. Choose a plant from 1 of 6 flower colours per month for each type of plant:-
Aquatic
Bedding
Bulb
Climber
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Wild Flower

4. Choose a plant from its Flower Shape:-
Shape, Form
Index

Flower Shape

5. Choose a plant from its foliage:-
Bamboo
Conifer
Fern
Grass
Vegetable

6. There are 6 Plant Selection Levels including Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers in
Plants Topic.

or

7. When I do not have my own or ones from mail-order nursery photos , then from March 2016, if you want to start from the uppermost design levels through to your choice of cultivated and wildflower plants to change your Plant Selection Process then use the following galleries:-

  • Create and input all plants known by Amateur Gardening inserted into their Sanders' Encyclopaedia from their edition published in 1960 (originally published by them in 1895) into these
    • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery,
      then
    • Stage 2 - Infill Plants Index Gallery being the only gallery from these 7 with photos (from Wikimedia Commons) ,
      then
    • Stage 3 - All Plants Index Gallery with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2
    • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery,
    • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery with
    • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery and
    • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery
    • Unfortunately, if you want to have 100's of choices on selection of plants from 1000's of 1200 pixels wide by up to 16,300 pixels in length webpages, which you can jump to from almost any of the pages in these 7 galleries above, you have to put up with those links to those choices being on
      • the left topic menu table,
      • the header of the middle data table and on
      • the page/index menu table on the right of every page of those galleries.

 

I like reading and that is shown by the index in my Library, where I provide lists of books to take you between designing, maintaining or building a garden and the hierarchy of books on plants taking you from

There are other pages on Plants which bloom in each month of the year in this website:-

 

 

 

Before reaching for the pesticides, here are a few alternative natural, non-toxic methods of slug control:  

• Watering Schedule - Far and away the best course of action against slugs in your garden is a simple adjustment in the watering schedule. Slugs are most active at night and are most efficient in damp conditions. Avoid watering your garden in the evening if you have a slug problem. Water in the morning - the surface soil will be dry by evening. Studies show this can reduce slug damage by 80%.

 

• Seaweed - If you have access to seaweed, it's well worth the effort to gather. Seaweed is not only a good soil amendment for the garden, it's a natural repellent for slugs. Mulch with seaweed around the base of plants or perimeter of bed. Pile it on 3" to 4" thick - when it dries it will shrink to just an inch or so deep. Seaweed is salty and slugs avoid salt. Push the seaweed away from plant stems so it's not in direct contact. During hot weather, seaweed will dry and become very rough which also deters the slugs.

 

• Copper - Small strips of copper can be placed around flower pots or raised beds as obstructions for slugs to crawl over. Cut 2" strips of thin copper and wrap around the lower part of flower pots, like a ribbon. Or set the strips in the soil on edge, making a "fence" for the slugs to climb. Check to make sure no vegetation hangs over the copper which might provide a 'bridge' for the slugs. Copper barriers also work well around wood barrels used as planters.
A non-toxic copper-based metallic mesh Slug Shield is available which can be wrapped around the stem of plants and acts as a barrier to slugs. When slugs come in contact with the mesh they receive an electric-like shock. The mesh also serves as a physical barrier. These slug shields are reusable, long-lasting and weather-proof.

 

• Diatomaceous Earth - Diatomaceous earth (Also known as "Insect Dust") is the sharp, jagged skeletal remains of microscopic creatures. It lacerates soft-bodied pests, causing them to dehydrate. A powdery granular material, it can be sprinkled around garden beds or individual plants, and can be mixed with water to make a foliar spray.
Diatomaceous earth is less effective when wet, so use during dry weather. Wear protective gear when applying, as it can irritate eyes and lungs. Be sure to buy natural or agricultural grade diatomaceous earth, not pool grade which has smoother edges and is far less effective. Click for more information or to purchase Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth.

 

• Electronic "slug fence" - An electronic slug fence is a non-toxic, safe method for keeping slugs out of garden or flower beds. The Slugs Away fence is a 24-foot long, 5" ribbon-like barrier that runs off a 9 volt battery. When a slug or snail comes in contact with the fence, it receives a mild static sensation that is undetectable to animals and humans. This does not kill the slug, it cause it to look elsewhere for forage. The battery will power the fence for about 8 months before needing to be replaced. Extension kits are availabe for increased coverage. The electronic fence will repel slugs and snails, but is harmless to people and pets.

 

• Lava Rock - Like diatomaceous earth, the abrasive surface of lava rock will be avoided by slugs. Lava rock can be used as a barrier around plantings, but should be left mostly above soil level, otherwise dirt or vegetation soon forms a bridge for slugs to cross.

• Salt - If all else fails, go out at night with the salt shaker and a flashlight. Look at the plants which have been getting the most damage and inspect the leaves, including the undersides. Sprinkle a bit of salt on the slug and it will kill it quickly. Not particularly pleasant, but use as a last resort. (Note: some sources caution the use of salt, as it adds a toxic element to the soil. This has not been our experience, especially as very little salt is used.)

• Beer - Slugs are attracted to beer. Set a small amount of beer in a shallow wide jar buried in the soil up to its neck. Slugs will crawl in and drown. Take the jar lid and prop it up with a small stick so rain won't dilute the beer. Leave space for slugs to enter the trap.

• Overturned Flowerpots, Grapefruit Halves, Board on Ground - Overturned flowerpots, with a stone placed under the rim to tilt it up a bit, will attract slugs. Leave overnight, and you'll find the slugs inside in the morning. Grapefruit halves work the same way, with the added advantage of the scent of the fruit as bait.
Another trap method, perhaps the simplest of all, is to set a wide board on the ground by the affected area. Slugs will hide under the board by day. Simply flip the board over during the day to reveal the culprits. Black plastic sheeting also works the same way.

 

• Garlic-based slug repellents
Laboratory tests at the University of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (UK) revealed that a highly refined garlic product (ECOguard produced by ECOspray Ltd, a British company that makes organic pesticides) was an effective slug killer. Look for garlic-based slug deterrents which will be emerging under various brand names, as well as ECOguard.

• Coffee grounds; new caffeine-based slug/snail poisons - Coffee grounds scattered on top of the soil will deter slugs. The horticultural side effects of using strong grounds such as espresso on the garden, however, are less certain. When using coffee grounds, moderation is advised.
A study in June 2002 reported in the journal Nature found that slugs and snails are killed when sprayed with a caffeine solution, and that spraying plants with this solution prevents slugs from eating them. The percentage of caffeine required in a spray (1 - 2%) is greater than what is found in a cup of coffee (.05 - 07%), so homemade sprays are not as effective. Look for new commercial sprays which are caffeine-based.


Topic
Case Studies
...Drive
...Foundations

Companion
Planting
*
...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants

Garden Construction
Garden Design
...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants Garden Maintenance
Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants
...Poisonous Plants
Soil
...Soil Nutrients
Tool Shed
Useful Data

................

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape

Bulb
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
Climber
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evgr
...Heather Shrub
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evgr
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous
Perennial

...P -Herbaceous
...Peony
...Flower Shape
...RHS Wisley
......Mixed Border
......Other Borders
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable

Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour
NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown Note
...Cream Note
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note
Poisonous
Wildflower Plants

............

Topic - Flower/Foliage Colour
Colour Wheel Galleries

Following your choice using Garden Style then that changes your Plant Selection Process
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

or
you could use these Flower Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12
with its
Explanation of
Structure of this Website with

...User Guidelines
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index
Rock Garden and Alpine Flower Colour Wheel with number of colours
Rock Plant Flowers 53

...Rock Plant Photos

or
these Foliage Colour Wheels structures, which I have done but until I can take the photos and I am certain of the plant label's validity, these may not progress much further
All Foliage 212

All Spring Foliage 212
All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212

or
Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index

............

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly
Usage of Plants
by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly

Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly usage of
Plant A-C
Plant C-M
Plant N-W
Butterfly usage of Plant

followed by all the Wild Flower Family Pages:-

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 1


(o)Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
(o)Arrow-Grass
(o)Arum
(o)Balsam
Bamboo
(o)Barberry
(o)Bedstraw
(o)Beech
(o)Bellflower
(o)Bindweed
(o)Birch
(o)Birds-Nest
(o)Birthwort
(o)Bogbean
(o)Bog Myrtle
(o)Borage
(o)Box
(o)Broomrape
(o)Buckthorn
(o)Buddleia
(o)Bur-reed
(o)Buttercup
(o)Butterwort
(o)Cornel (Dogwood)
(o)Crowberry
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
(o)Daffodil
(o)Daisy
(o)Daisy Cudweeds
(o)Daisy Chamomiles
(o)Daisy Thistle
(o)Daisy Catsears (o)Daisy Hawkweeds
(o)Daisy Hawksbeards
(o)Daphne
(o)Diapensia
(o)Dock Bistorts
(o)Dock Sorrels

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 2


(o)Clubmoss
(o)Duckweed
(o)Eel-Grass
(o)Elm
(o)Filmy Fern
(o)Horsetail
(o)Polypody
Quillwort
(o)Royal Fern
(o)Figwort - Mulleins
(o)Figwort - Speedwells
(o)Flax
(o)Flowering-Rush
(o)Frog-bit
(o)Fumitory
(o)Gentian
(o)Geranium
(o)Glassworts
(o)Gooseberry
(o)Goosefoot
(o)Grass 1
(o)Grass 2
(o)Grass 3
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 1
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 2
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 3 (o)Hazel
(o)Heath
(o)Hemp
(o)Herb-Paris
(o)Holly
(o)Honeysuckle
(o)Horned-Pondweed
(o)Hornwort
(o)Iris
(o)Ivy
(o)Jacobs Ladder
(o)Lily
(o)Lily Garlic
(o)Lime
(o)Lobelia
(o)Loosestrife
(o)Mallow
(o)Maple
(o)Mares-tail
(o)Marsh Pennywort
(o)Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 3


(o)Mesem-bryanthemum
(o)Mignonette
(o)Milkwort
(o)Mistletoe
(o)Moschatel
Naiad
(o)Nettle
(o)Nightshade
(o)Oleaster
(o)Olive
(o)Orchid 1
(o)Orchid 2
(o)Orchid 3
(o)Orchid 4
(o)Parnassus-Grass
(o)Peaflower
(o)Peaflower Clover 1
(o)Peaflower Clover 2
(o)Peaflower Clover 3
(o)Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
(o)Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
Pipewort
(o)Pitcher-Plant
(o)Plantain
(o)Pondweed
(o)Poppy
(o)Primrose
(o)Purslane
Rannock Rush
(o)Reedmace
(o)Rockrose
(o)Rose 1
(o)Rose 2
(o)Rose 3
(o)Rose 4
(o)Rush
(o)Rush Woodrushes
(o)Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
(o)Sandalwood
(o)Saxifrage
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 4


Seaheath
(o)Sea Lavender
(o)Sedge Rush-like
(o)Sedges Carex 1
(o)Sedges Carex 2
(o)Sedges Carex 3
(o)Sedges Carex 4
(o)Spindle-Tree
(o)Spurge
(o)Stonecrop
(o)Sundew
(o)Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
(o)Teasel
(o)Thyme 1
(o)Thyme 2
(o)Umbellifer 1
(o)Umbellifer 2
(o)Valerian
(o)Verbena
(o)Violet
(o)Water Fern
(o)Waterlily
(o)Water Milfoil
(o)Water Plantain
(o)Water Starwort
Waterwort
(o)Willow
(o)Willow-Herb
(o)Wintergreen
(o)Wood-Sorrel
(o)Yam
(o)Yew

 

It is worth remembering that especially with roses that the colour of the petals of the flower may change - The following photos are of Rosa 'Lincolnshire Poacher' which I took on the same day in R.V. Roger's Nursery Field:-

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Closed Bud

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Opening Bud

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Juvenile Flower

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Older Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot95a1a1a1

Middle-aged Flower - Flower Colour in Season in its
Rose Description Page is
"Buff Yellow, with a very slight pink tint at the edges in May-October."

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot96a1a1a1

Mature Flower

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Juvenile Flower and Dying Flower

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Form of Rose Bush

There are 720 roses in the Rose Galleries; many of which have the above series of pictures in their respective Rose Description Page.

So one might avoid the disappointment that the 2 elephants had when their trunks were entwined instead of them each carrying their trunk using their own trunk, and your disappointment of buying a rose to discover that the colour you bought it for is only the case when it has its juvenile flowers; if you look at all the photos of the roses in the respective Rose Description Page!!!!