Ivydene Gardens Infill3 Plants Index Gallery:
Climber - 3 Sector Vertical Plant System

Topic
Case Studies
Companion Planting
Garden Construction
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Offbeat Glossary
Plants
Soil
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Useful Data

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
Bulb
Climber

 

Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12

All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index

All Foliage 212
All Spring Foliage 212

All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212
Rock Plant Flowers 53

 

Your chosen Garden Style then changes your Plant Selection Process

Garden Style
...Infill3 Plants *
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...
12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

 

Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods

Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Vegetable

Wild Flower

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly

 

Cultivation Requirements of Plant

Outdoor / Garden Cultivation

1

Indoor / House Cultivation

 

Cool Greenhouse (and Alpine House) Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter

1

Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year

1

Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

1

 

Sun Aspect

Full Sun

1

Part Shade

1

Full Shade

1

 

Soil Type

Any Soil

1

Chalky Soil

1

Clay Soil

1

Lime-Free Soil

 

Peaty Soil

1

Sandy Soil

1

Acid Soil

1

Alkaline Soil

1

Badly-drained Soil

 

 

Soil Moisture

Dry

1

Moist

1

Wet

1

 

Position for Plant

Back of Shady Border

 

Back of Shrub Border

1

Bedding

1

Bog Garden

 

Coastal Conditions / Seaside

1

Container in Garden

1

Front of Border

1

Ground Cover 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

1

Ground Cover 24-72 inches (60-180 cms)

1

Ground Cover Over 72 inches (180 cms)

 

Hanging Basket

 

Hedge

1

Hedge - Thorny

 

Pollution Barrier

 

Pond

 

Pot in House, Greenhouse, Conservatory or Stovehouse

1

Raised Bed

 

Rest of Border

1

Rock Garden

1

Scree Bed

1

Speciman on Lawn

 

Sunny Border

1

Tree for Lawn

 

Tree for Small Garden

1

Wildflower

1

Windbreak

 

Woodland

1

 

Use of Plant

Pollen or nectar for Bees

1

Hosts to Butterflies

1

Encouraging birds / wildlife, providing food and shelter

1

Bee-Pollinated plants for Hay Fever Sufferers

1

Berries / Fruit

 

Dry Site in Full Sun

1

Dry Shade

 

Filtering noise

 

Flower Arrange-ments

 

Fragrant Flower

1

Language of Flowers

 

Low maintenance

1

Moist Shade

 

Moist and swampy Sites

 

Nitrogen fixing plants

 

Not Fragrant Flower

1

Rabbit-Resistant

 

Speciman Plant

1

Thornless

 

Tolerant of Poor Soil

1

 

Plant Foliage

Aromatic Foliage

 

Autumn Foliage

 

Finely Cut Leaves

1

Large Leaves

 

Yellow Variegated Foliage

1

White Variegated Foliage

1

Red / Purple Variegated Foliage

 

Silver, Grey and Glaucous Foliage

1

Sword-shaped Leaves

 

 

 

Flower Shape

Number of Flower Petals

Petal-less
 

1

1 Petal

 

2 Petals

 

3 Petals
 

1

4 Petals
 

1

5 Petals
 

1

Above 5
 

1

 

Flower Shape - Simple

Stars
 

1

Bowls
 

 

Cups and Saucers
 

1

Globes
 

 

Goblets and Chalices
 

 

Trumpets
 

1

Funnels
 

1

Bells
 

1

Thimbles
 

 

Urns
 

 

Salverform

 

 

Flower Shape - Elaborated

Tubes, Lips and Straps
 

 

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets
 

 

Hats, Hoods and Helmets
 

 

Standards, Wings and Keels
 

 

Discs and Florets
 

 

Pin-Cushions
 

 

Tufts
 

 

Cushion
 

 

Umbel
 

1

Buttons
 

 

Pompoms
 

 

 

Natural Arrangements

Bunches, Posies, Sprays
 

1

Columns, Spikes and Spires
 

 

Whorls, Tiers and Candelabra
 

1

Plumes and Tails
 

 

Chains and Tassels
 

1

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades
 

 

Spheres, Domes and Plates
 

 

 

Shrub, Tree Shape

Columnar
 

1

Oval
 

1

Rounded or Spherical
 

 

Flattened Spherical
 

1

Narrow Conical / Narrow Pyramidal
 

1

Broad Conical / Broad Pyramidal
 

1

Ovoid /
Egg-Shaped
 

 

Broad Ovoid
 

 

Narrow Vase-shaped / Inverted Ovoid
 

 

Fan-Shaped /Vase-Shaped
 

 

Broad Fan-Shaped / Broad Vase-Shaped
 

 

Narrow Weeping
 

 

Broad Weeping
 

 

Palm

 

 

Conifer Cone

1

 

Form

Arching

1

Climbing

 

Clump-Forming

1

Mat-Forming

 

Mound-Forming

1

Prostrate

1

Spreading

1

Stemless

 

Upright

1

 

Poisonous Plant

1

 

INFILL3 PLANTS INDEX GALLERY PAGES

Links in Table below are available in Shrub Tree Shape Index Gallery


Site Map

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

Click on number in cells below to jump to that page detailing those cultivated plants with that plant type and their botanical name starts with that letter.

Click on or underlined text to jump to page comparing flower thumbnails of that blue colour.
is Red, Pink, Purple and is Unusual or Other Flower Colour.

Plant Type
with links to Other Plant Photo Galleries

A
B
C

D
E
F

G
H
I

J
K
L

M
N
O

P
Q
R

S
T
U

V
W
X

Y
Z

Alpine in Evergreen Perennial, Herbaceous Perennial and Rock Garden

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

Aquatic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annual/ Biennial

1

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

Bamboo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bedding and RHS Mixed Border Beds



















Bicolour

Other Flower Colours

White / Colour Bicolour

Bulb and
Allium / Anemone, Colchicum / Crocus, Dahlia, Gladiolus, Narcissus, Tulip





 

 



 



 



1



Climber



 





 









Conifer

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deciduous Shrub

1

 

 

 



 







Deciduous Tree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evergreen Perennial

1

 

 

 



 







Evergreen Shrub , Semi-Evergreen Shrub and Heather

1

 

 

 



 







Evergreen Tree

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grass

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

Herbaceous Perennial and RHS Mixed Border Beds



 

 

1



 







Herb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Odds and Sods

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rhododendron, Azalea, Camellia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rose

 

 





 









Soft Fruit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sub-Shrub

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top Fruit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wildflower
with
Plants used by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterflies in the UK



















Shrub and Small Tree

Botanical Names Page

Common Names Page

Companion Planting

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

UV

W

XYZ

Pest Control by Companion Planting

The following 2 books (written by Louise Riotte 1909-1998 who was one of North America's most beloved gardeners) provide a wealth of extra information telling you what plants to put together for what purpose and how it does it (The only wasted information on each page is the page number!!!):-

Carrots love Tomatoes: Secrets of Companion Planting for Successful Gardening by Louise Riotte Second Edition (Storey Publishing 1998) ISBN-13: 978-1-58017-027-7

Roses love Garlic: Companion Planting and other Secrets of Flowers by Loiuse Riotte Second Edition (Storey Publishing 1998)
ISBN 1-58017-028-5

 

Click on text in cells below to jump to that page detailing those Infill2 Plants of that plant type for that Cultivation requirement.

Plant Type
 

 

Alpines for Rock Garden (See Rock Garden Plant Flowers)

Alpine Shrubs and Conifers

The Alpine Meadow
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

The Alpine Border

Alpine Plants for a Purpose

The Alpines that Dislike Lime

Alpines and Walls
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

Alpines and Paving

Sink and Trough gardens

Aquatic
(Water Plants) for

Anti-erosion Riverbank

Marginal Plants (Bog Garden Plants)

Oxy-genating Weeds

Water Lilies

Floating Plants

Waterside Plants
and Plants for Dry Margins next to a Pond

Wildlife Pond Plants

Annual for

----------------

Plants for Cut Flowers in
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Exposed Sites

Sheltered Sites with Green-house Annuals from 1916

Extra Poor Soil with Half-Hardy Annuals from 1916

Very Rich Soil with Biennials from 1916

Gap-filling in Mixed Borders with Hardy Annuals from 1916

Patio Containers

Cut Flowers Page 1
Page 2 Everlasting Flowers with Red Flowers from 1916

Attracting beneficial insects

Scent / Fragrance with Annuals for Cool or Shady Places from 1916

Low-allergen Gardens for Hay Fever Sufferers

Annual Plant Pairing Ideas

Low-Growing Annuals

Medium-Growing Annuals

Tall-Growing Annuals with White Flowers from 1916

Black or Brown Flowers

Blue to Purple Flowers

Green Flowers with Annuals and Biennials from 1916

Red to Pink Flowers
Page 1
Page 2

White Flowers

Yellow or Orange Flowers

Decorative Foliage

Moist Soil

Shade

House-plants with Yellow Flowers from 1916

Edging Beds

Hanging Baskets

Vining Annuals

 

Bedding for

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Autumn/ Winter Bedding

Bedding for Light Sandy Soil

Bedding for Acid Soil

Bedding for Chalky Soil

Bedding for Clay Soil

Black Flowers

Blue Flowers

Orange Flowers

Pink Flowers

Long Flowering

Coloured Leaves

Attractive to Wildlife including Bees, Butterflies and Moths

Purple Flowers

Red Flowers

White Flowers

Yellow Flowers

Multi-Coloured Flowers

Aromatic Foliage or Scented Flowers

Bedding Plant Use

Flowers with 2 Petals

Flowers with 3 Petals

Flowers with
4 Petals

Flowers with 5 Petals

Flowers with 6 Petals

Flowers with more than 6 Petals

Use in Hanging Baskets

Flower Simple Shape

Shape of
Stars

Shape of
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Shape of
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

Shape of
Trumpets and Funnels

Shape of
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

Use in Pots and Troughs

Flower Elaborated Shape

Shape of
Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Shape of
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Shape of
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

 

Use in
Screening

Use in
Window Boxes

Shape of
Standards, Wings and Keels

Shape of
Discs and Florets

Shape of
Pin-Cushions and Tufts

Shape of
Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

Cut Flowers

Use in Bedding Out

Use in
Filling In

Biennial for

Cottage and Other Gardens

Cut Flower with Biennials for Rock Work from 1916

Patio Containers with Biennials for Pots in Greenhouse / Conservatory

Beneficial to Wildlife with Purple and Blue Flowers from 1916

Scent with Biennials for Sunny Banks or Borders from 1916

 

 

Bulb for
--------------
Explanation Intro to Bulbs
--------------
725 Blue, White, Yellow, Unusual Colour, or Red-Purple-Pink flowering Bulbs in each month they flower.

Indoor Bulbs for
December
January
February

Indoor Bulbs for
March
April
May

Indoor
Bulbs for
June
July
August

Indoor Bulbs for September
October
November

Bulbs in Window-boxes

Bulbs in the Border

Bulbs naturalised in Grass

Plant Bloom Dec-Jan
Feb-Mar

Plant Bloom
Apr-May
Jun-Aug

Plant Bloom
Sep-Oct
Nov-Dec

Plant Bloom Smallest of Gardens

Bulbs for the Bulb Frame

Bulbs in the Woodland Garden

Bulbs in the Rock Garden

Bulbs in Green-house or Stove

Achimenes, Alocasias, Amorpho-phalluses, Arisaemas, Arums, Begonias, Bomareas, Caladiums

Clivias,
Colocasias, Crinums, Cyclamens, Cyrt-anthuses, Eucharises, Urceocharis, Eurycles

Freesias, Gloxinias, Hae-manthus, Hipp-eastrums

Lachenalias, Nerines, Lycorises, Pen-cratiums, Hymen-ocallises, Richardias, Sprekelias, Tuberoses, Vallotas, Watsonias, Zephy-ranthes

Bulbs in Bowls

Bulbs in the Alpine House

Hardy Bulbs

Aconitum, Allium, Alstroe-meria, Anemone

Amaryllis, Antheri-cum, Antholy-zas, Apios, Arisaema, Arum, Aspho-deline,

Aspho-delus, Belam-canda, Bloomeria, Brodiae, Bulbo-codium

Calochorti, Cyclo-bothras, Camassia, Colchicum, Con-vallaria,
Forcing Lily of the Valley, Corydalis, Crinum, Crosmia, Montbretia , Crocus

Cyclamen, Dicentra, Dierama, Eranthis, Eremurus, Erythrnium, Eucomis

Fritillaria, Funkia, Galanthus, Galtonia, Gladiolus, Hemero-callis

Hyacinth, Hyacinths in Pots,
Scilla, Puschkinia, Chionodoxa, Chionoscilla, Muscari

Iris,
Kniphofia, Lapeyrousia, Leucojum

Lilium,

Lilium in Pots, Malvastrum, Merendera, Milla, Narcissus, Narcissi in Pots

Orni-thogalum, Oxalis, Paeonia, Ran-unculus, Romulea, Sanguin-aria,
Stern-bergia,
Schi-zostylis, Teco-philaea, Trillium

Tulip,
Zephy-ranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs

Acidanthera, Albuca, Alstroemeri, Andro-stephium, Bassers, Boussing-aultias, Bravoas, Cypellas, Dahlias, Galaxis,
Geis-sorhizas, Hesper-anthas

Gladioli, Ixias,
Sparaxises, Babianas, Morphixias, Tritonias

Ixiolirions, Moraeas, Orni-thogalums, Oxalises, Phaedra-nassas,
Pan-cratiums, Tigridias, Zephyr-anthes, Cooperias

Bulbs for Bedding

Plant Bedding Spring
Summer

Climber
3 sector Vertical Plant System with flowers in
Jan,
Feb,
Mar,
Apr,
May 1,2
Jun,
Jul,
Aug,
Sep,
Oct,
Nov,
Dec

----------

Choosing the right Shrub or Climber

1a.
The Base -
Base of Wall Plants

1b.
Annuals

1c.
Herbs and Vegetables

1d.
Cut flowers, Cut Foliage

1e.
Scented flower or foliage

1f.
Foliage use only

 

2a. 1,2,3,4
The Prime - Wall Shrubs

2b.
Fruit trees

3a.
The Higher Reaches -
House-wall Ramblers

3b. 1,2
Non-House-Wall - Climbing Twiners

3c.
Non-House-Wall - Self-clinging Climbers

Raised Bed for Wheelchair Users

Plants for Wildlife-Use as well

Fastest Covering

Least protruding growth when fan-trained

1, 2
Evergreen

Use as
Hedge

Exposed Positions

Use as Groundcover

1, 2
Ornam-
ental Fruit

Scented Flowers

1, 2
Autumn Foliage Colour

Winter Bark

Winter and Early Spring Flowers

Summer Colour or Shape of Foliage

Edible Fruit

Needs Conservatory or Greenhouse

Large Pots and Containers

Cut Flowers

Attractive to Bees

Climber - Simple Flower Shape

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a
Stars

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14k1a1
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord2
Trumpets and Funnels

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming
Salverform

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14q1
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

 

Climber - Elaborated Flower Shape

prunellaflotgrandiflora
Tubes, Lips and Straps

aquilegiacfloformosafoord
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14u1a
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14v1a
Standards, Wings and Keels

brachyscomecflorigidulakevock
Disks and Florets

androsacecforyargongensiskevock
Pin-cushions, Tufts, Petal-less and Cushions

armeriaflomaritimakevock
Umbels, Buttons and Pompoms


Indoor Bulb Growing by Edward Pearson. Published by Purnell & Sons, Ltd in 1953. It provides the data about Indoor Bulbs and Bulbs in Window-boxes.

Colour All The Year In My Garden: A selection of choice varieties - annuals, biennials, perennials, bulbs, climbers and trees and shrubs - that will give a continuity of colour in the garden throughout the year. Edited by C.H. Middleton. Gardening Book from Ward, Lock & Co published in 1938, provides plant data for a calendar of plants in bloom throughout the year and for those in the smallest garden.

The Book of Bulbs by S. Arnott, F.R.H.S. Printed by Turnbull & Spears, Edinburgh in 1901. This provides data about Hardy Bulbs, Half-Hardy Bulbs, Greenhouse and Stove Bulbs.

Collins Guide to Bulbs by Patrick M. Synge. ISBN 0 00 214016-0 First Edition 1961, Second Edition 1971, Reprinted 1973. This provides data on bulbs for bedding, bulbs in the border, bulbs naturalised in grass, bulbs in the woodland garden, bulbs in the rock garden, bulbs in pans in the alpine house, bulbs in the greenhouse, bulbs in bowls and the bulb frame.

Ivydene Gardens Infill3 Plants Index Gallery:
Climber - 3 Sector Vertical Plant System

Botanical Plant Name

with link to
UK or
European Union
mail-order supplier for you to contact to buy this plant

Flower Colour
and Background Colour nearest to main petal colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Sun Aspect:- Full Sun,
Part Shade, Full Shade

with link to external website for photo/data

Flowering Months in UK

with link to
USA or
Canada
mail-order supplier

Height with Spacings or Width (W) in inches (cms)

1 inch =
2.5 cms
12 inches = 30 cms
40 inches = 100 cms

Foliage Colour
and Background Colour nearest to middle-aged leaf colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Soil Moisture:-
Dry,
Moist,
Wet

with link to Australia or New Zealand mail-order supplier

Plant Type is:-

A for Aquatic
Ann for Annual / Biennial
Ba for Bamboo
Bu for Bulb
Cl for Climber
Co for Conifer
F for Fern
G for Grass
H for Herb
P for Perennial
Rh for Rhodo-dendron, Azalea, Camellia
Ro for Rose
Sh for Shrub
So for Soft Fruit
To for Top Fruit
Tr for Tree
V for Vegetable
W for Wildflower

followed by:-
E for Evergreen,
D for Deciduous,
H for Herbaceous,
Alpine for being an Alpine as well as being 1 of above Plant Type /

 
Acid for Acidic,
Alk for Alkaline,
Any for AnySoil
 

with link to
ALL PLANTS Index Gallery page

Use

Description

Pruning

Training

Average Height and spread
5 years

10 years

20 years

Problems

Similar Forms of Interest

 

Ramblers Scramblers & Twiners by Michael Jefferson-Brown (ISBN 0 - 7153 - 0942 - 0) describes how to choose, plant and nurture over 500 high-performance climbing plants and wall shrubs, so that more can be made of your garden if you think not just laterally on the ground but use the vertical support structures including the house as well. It provides some of the following:-

 

THERE ARE 3 SECTORS UP A HOUSE WALL OR HIGH WALL:-

  • 0-36 inches (0-90 cms) in height - The Base. This gives the most sheltered conditions in the garden, with soil and air temperatures above those of the surrounding area. This area will suffer less buffeting from wind. Soil care will be ensuring a high humus content - to enrich the nutrient value and help to create reservoirs of moisture. Light intensity will depend on the aspect of the wall (North-facing will get very little sunlight) with the surrounding buildings and plants, including trees. The following pages in this gallery cover The Base:
    1a Base of Wall Plants
    1b Annuals
    1c Herbs and Vegetables
    1d Cut Flowers, Cut Foliage
    1e Scented Flower or Foliage
    1f Foliage Use only.
  • 36-120 inches (90-300 cms) in height - The Prime Site. As the plant moves upwards to about 6 feet, conditions change: plants still benefit from the reflected heat and stored heat of walls warmed by the sun but have more light and air. Many climbers will have established a trunk below and now begin to spread themselves. This middle section is visually important, because it is at eye level and just below that that we should display those items to which we want to draw most attention. Most of the shrubs that are suitable for growing against walls are between 3 and 10 feet in height. The following pages in this gallery cover The Prime Site:
    2a Wall Shrubs
    2b Fruit Trees
    Plants for Wildlife-use as well
    Raised Bed for Wheelchair Users
  • Above 120 inches (300+ cms) in height - The Higher Reaches. This is only likely to occur on house walls and other tall buildings with climbers and trained trees/shrubs covering all the way up to 36 inches from the guttering at roof level ( to prevent ingress to the internal roof space or blockage of the guttering). The following pages in this gallery cover The Higher Reaches:
    House-Wall Ramblers
    Non-House-Wall Climbing Twiners
    Non-House-Wall Self-Clinging Climbers

The climbers in the Climber Plant Gallery have been placed into one of these 3 heights with the Text Box Boundary in:-

  • Blue for 0-36 inches (0-90 cms)
  • Green for 36-120 inches (90-300 cms)
  • Red for above 10 feet.

The Climber Plant Gallery splits the climbers into their following ways of climbing:-

  • Ramblers/Scramblers - These climbers lean on other plants or need artificial supports to climb - Roses, Jasmine, Espalier-trained Fruit Tree/Fruit Ramblers. These are suitable for house or building walls where vine-eye and wire or 1 inch square timber trellis support structures can be erected up to 3 feet below the gutter for the climbers to be tied to with natural twine (not plastic or metal wire - stems grow sideways but plastic and metal constrict this, whereas natural twine will eventually rot or be broken by the expanding stem), or they can be trained on chainlink fences, trellis, pergolas or arbours. Herbaceous Clematis has been added since the top growth dies off completely in the Autumn and Non-Climbing Clematis since it will require being tied to a support structure. In this Gallery (Infill3 Plants Index Gallery), these climbers go into the
    3a The Higher Reaches - House-Wall Ramblers Page.
  • Self-Clingers: Aerial Roots - A series of roots are produced along the length of its stems. These attach themselves very strongly to the surfaces they find - Ivy (Hedera).
    Self-Clingers: Sucker Pads - Tendrils are produced along the young growing stems, opposite the leaves. The main tendril stem divides into a number of slender filaments, each of which has a scarcely perceivable pad at its tip.Once the tips have established contact, the tiny pad is much expanded and becomes a significant sucker, which fits so strongly to the surface that if the stem is pulled away the suckers are left behind- Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia).
    Self-Clingers: Twining - Many climbers find support simply by twining their stems around any object they find - Wisteria and Honeysuckle.
    Self-Clingers: Twining Leaf-Stem - Some climbers make do with sensitive leaf stalks which wrap themselves around objects for support - Clematis. Others establish themselves with thorns, hooks, spines and prickles.
    Self-Clingers: Twining Tendrils - A group of climbers climb by producing a series of tendrils. These are touch sensitive and will curl round any small object they come into contact with and thus enable the plant to climb securely on itself or other plants or manmade support structures - Chinese Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus henryana), Sweet Pea and the Pea Family (Leguminosae).
    All these Self-Clingers are suitable for garden walls, chainlink fences, trellis, pergolas or fedges, but not for House-Walls. In this Gallery (Infill3 Plants Index Gallery), these climbers go into the
    3b The Higher Reaches - Non-House-Wall Climbing Twiners Page or
    3c The Higher Reaches - Non-House-Wall Self-Clinging Climbers Page.

 

These are split into the following in the Comparison Pages (since the pages use a fixed template format, then if the Title of the Page has a White Background and its a Twiner you are looking for, the photos will be at the bottom of the page with blanks before it. A Page Title with a Green Background indicates an empty page) :-

  • Ramblers/Scramblers for the Ramblers/Scramblers
  • Self-Clinging Climbers for the Self-Clingers: Aerial Roots and Self-Clingers: Sucker Pads.
  • Twiners for the Self-Clingers: Twining, Self-Clingers: Twining Leaf-Stem and Self-Clingers: Twining Tendrils.

This plant gallery has thumbnail pictures of climber flowers in the following colours per month:-

  • (o)Blue
  • Orange
  • (o)Other Colours
  • (o)Pink
  • (o)Red
  • (o)White
  • (o)Yellow

 

If you click on a thumbnail another window opens with 9 larger images (Flower, Foliage and Form - for Flower, Foliage and Form pages) and the following plant description:-

  • Plant Name
  • Common Name
  • Soil
  • Sun Aspect
  • Soil Moisture
  • Plant Type
  • Height x Spread in feet
  • Foliage
  • Flower Colour in Month(s). Fruit.
  • Comments - Form Type, Pruning Group, Native UK Plant. There are further details on pruning of climbers in the Pruning Page of the Plants Section.

 

Before the charge of the Light Brigade brings that stampede of gardeners on their unwilling donkeys dragging loads of plants in the carts behind them, it may be worth considering the following facts of the gardener who is going to tend those newly-planted plants and the horizontal location where they (the plants not the gnome gardeners) are planted:-

  • PLANTS FOR SHADY SITES
  • PLANTS FOR SUNNY SITES
  • PLANTS ON RAISED BEDS FOR WHEELCHAIR USERS OR OTHERS WHO DO NOT WISH TO BEND TO THE GROUND OR KNEEL ON IT

 

PLANTS FOR SHADY SITES

 

 

 

 

North - Knows the points of the Compass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

North-facing

 

 

 

 

West - Woman

West-facing

House

East-facing

East - Every

 

 

 

 

South-facing

 

 

 

 

 

 

South - Silly

 

 

 

Shady sites are those that never get the sun, such as

  • a north-facing wall in the northern hemisphere (Many climbers and shrubs suitable for growing up walls are found in woodland conditions in the wild where they may not feel that much sun hitting them directly. This site despite being cool may also be quite dry because the wall or fence may create a rain-shadow. The predominant winds in much of the UK are from the south-west and other quarters, rather than from the north; and therefore the plants growing on or by the north wall are not likely to be buffeted by too much wind.
    Plants next to a north-facing fence or hedge will suffer without sun, be cool and quite dry from its rain-shadow and besides the wind coming through the hedge may also suffer from eddying winds),
  • or
  • those that get the morning sun but are then sunless for the rest of the day, such as those that are east-facing (On walls that only get the morning sun there is less chance of the bricks soaking up heat, storing it and releasing it during the colder periods of the night in cool spells, which is important for plants towards the end of the winter and in spring when they are in growth and more vulnerable to cold damage. Like the north-facing site, in Britain, the ground that is close to the house on the east will in the rain-shadow and may escape the main load of any shower or storm. humus, in the form of peat, compost or other form of organic matter, will help to provide food as well as acting like a sponge in retaining water. Over Britain winds from the east are not as frequent as those from the south or west. Persistent strong winds in freezing conditions can badly scorch evergreens such as conifers.).

 

PLANTS FOR SUNNY SITES

 

 

 

 

North - Knows the points of the Compass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

North-facing

 

 

 

 

West - Woman

West-facing

House

East-facing

East - Every

 

 

 

 

South-facing

 

 

 

 

 

 

South - Silly

 

 

 

Walls and fences that face the sun or receive the sun for a large part of the day are the most favoured ones, particularly in terms of warmth and light. The drawback is that there could be very dry soil conditions. In the northern hemisphere, the wall that faces the west should be the most favoured of all, since it may escape some of the fiercest sun and will be fractionally less exposed to the coldest winds than most of the other sites.

 

WHAT YOU NEED TO DO FOR THE SOIL WITHIN THE 18 INCHES (45 CMS) WIDTH OF YOUR VERTICAL PLANT SYSTEM
The ground within 18 inches (45 cms) of the house or boundary hedge is likely to become very dry due to the rain-shadow, plants nearby taking up the moisture, sun beating down on the soil and wind. The minimum that you can do is contained in the Action Plan for You to do with your soil in that area, with further details from In Soil Formation - What is Soil Texture Page, How are Chemicals stored and released from Soil? Page and A more in depth explaination of how soil works. From this information in those pages, you can collect rain-water from the down-pipes and replenish the humus every year under the different conditions created by the different ground areas next to those vertical areas like walls, hedges, fences etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ivydene Gardens Infill3 Plants Index Gallery:
Climber - 3 Sector Vertical Plant System

 

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

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Ramblers Scramblers & Twiners by Michael Jefferson-Brown (ISBN 0 - 7153 - 0942 - 0) describes how to choose, plant and nurture over 500 high-performance climbing plants and wall shrubs, so that more can be made of your garden if you think not just laterally on the ground but use the vertical support structures including the house as well.

The Gardener's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Climbers & Wall Shrubs - A Guide to more than 2000 varieties including Roses, Clematis and Fruit Trees by Brian Davis. (ISBN 0-670-82929-3) provides the lists for 'Choosing the right Shrub or Climber' together with Average Height and Spread after 5 years, 10 years and 20 years.

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