Ivydene Gardens Colour Wheel - Bee Pollinated Bloom in Month Gallery:
Site Map

 

Bee-Pollinated Bloom Plant Index.
The 264 bee-pollinated plants in Bee-Pollinated Bloom Plant Index are in addition to the bee-pollinated plants shown as thumbnails in the pages of this Gallery of 12 Flower Colours per month FROM the Circular Colour Wheel below.

Click on the OOO in the Index below to link to those bee-pollinated plants of that flower colour in that month or any of

ACER (Deciduous/Evergreen Shrub/Tree) in March-April
CHAENOMELES SPECIOSA (Herbaceous Perennial) in March-May
CROCUS (Bulb) in September-April
CYDONIA OBLONGA (Deciduous Shrub) in April-June
DAFFODIL (Bulb) in December-May
DAHLIA (Bulb) in June-November
DUTCH HYACINTH (Bulb) in March-April
HEATHERS (Evergreen Shrub) in every month
HEDERA HELIX (Evergreen Climber) in September-November as last major source of nectar and pollen in the year
HELIANTHEMUM (Deciduous Shrub) in June-August - Pollen only collected when the flowers open during sunny weather
HELENIUM (Herbaceous Perennial) in June-October
HELLEBORUS (Herbaceous Perennial) in January-March
HEUCHERA (Evergreen Perennial) in May-September
HIBISCUS (Deciduous Shrub) in August-September
ILEX (Evergreen Tree) in May-June
LAVANDULA (Annual, Herbaceous Perennial or Shrub) in June-July
LAVATERA (Annual, Biennial, or Herbaceous Perennial) in May-August
LEPTOSIPHON (Annual) in June-August
MAGNOLIA GRANDIFLORA (Evergreen Tree) in August-September
MALVA SYLVESTRIS (Biennial) in June-September
MENTHA (Herb) in July-August
NEMOPHILA (Annual) in April-June
NIGELLA (Annual) in July-September
PHILADELPHUS species only with single flowers (Shrub) in June
POLEMONIUM (Herbaceous Perennial) in April-June
PRUNUS CERASIFERA (Deciduous Tree) in February-March
PRUNUS LAUROCERASUS (Evergreen Shrub) in April-June
PYRACANTHA COCCINEA (Evergreen Shrub) in May-June
ROSES (Deciduous Shrub/Climber) in June-October
RUBUS IDAEUS (Raspberry) (Soft Fruit) in May-June
SALVIA SUPERBA (Herbaceous Perennial) in June-September - no bee garden should be without this plant - for those plants.

Enumber indicates Empty Index Page.
Bottom row of Grey is Unusual or Multi-Coloured Flower Colour.

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

OOO E1.

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Blue

OOO

OOO
E11.

OOO
E12.

OOO E13.

OOO
E14.

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Mauve

OOO

OOO

OOO
E24.

OOO
E25.

OOO
E26.

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Purple

OOO
E34.

OOO
E35.

OOO
E36.

OOO
E37

OOO
E38

OOO

OOO
E40

OOO
E41

OOO
E42

OOO

OOO

OOO
Brown

OOO

OOO
E47

OOO
E48

OOO
E49

OOO
E50

OOO
E51

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Cream

OOO
E58

OOO
E59

OOO
E60

OOO
E61

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Green

OOO

OOO
E71

OOO
E72

OOO
E73

OOO
E74

OOO
E75

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
E80

OOO
E81Orange

OOO
E82

OOO
E83

OOO
E84

OOO
E85

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Pink

OOO

OOO
E95

OOO
E96

OOO
E97

OOO
E98

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Red

OOO

OOO
E107

OOO
E108

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
White

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Yellow

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
E133

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Unusual

OOO

OOO
E143

OOO
E144

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bloomsmonth2a

Inner circle of Grey is 12 months of Unusual or Multi-Coloured Flower Colour

Bulb and Perennial Height from Text Border

Brown = 0-12 inches (0-30 cms)

Blue = 12-24 inches (30-60 cms)

Green = 24-36 inches (60-90 cms)

Red = 36-72 inches (90- 180 cms)

Black = 72+ inches (180+ cms)

Shrub Height from Text Border

Brown = 0-12 inches (0-30 cms)

Blue = 12-36 inches (30-90 cms)

Green = 36-60 inches (90- 150 cms)

Red = 60-120 inches (150- 300 cms)

Black = 120+ inches (300+ cms)

Tree Height from Text Border

Brown = 0-240 inches (0- 600 cms)

Blue = 240- 480 inches (600- 1200 cms)

Green = 480+ inches (1200 + cms)

Red = Potted

Black = Use in Small Garden

Climber Height from Text Border

 

Blue = 0-36 inches (0-90 cms)

Green = 36-120 inches (90-300 cms)

Red = 120+ inches (300+ cms)

 

Bamboo, Bedding, Conifer, Fern, Grass, Herb, Rhododendron, Rose, Soft Fruit, Top Fruit, Vegetable and Wildflower Height from Text Border

Blue = 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

Green = 24-72 inches (60- 180 cms)

Red = 72+ inches (180+ cms)

 

Plant Soil Moisture from Text Background

Wet Soil

Moist Soil

 

Dry Soil

BEE-POLLINATED BLOOM IN MONTH PLANT INDEX GALLERY PAGES

Site Map

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines


Site design and content copyright ©July 2013. Amended Menus July 2015. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

"Soils vary enormously in characteristics, but the size of the particles that make up a soil defines its gardening characteristics:

  • Clay: less than 0.002mm
  • Silt: 0.002-0.05mm
  • Sand: 0.05-2mm
  • Stones: bigger than 2mm in size
  • Chalky soils also contain calcium carbonate or lime

The dominating particle size gives soil its characteristics and because the tiny clay particles have a huge surface area for a given volume of clay they dominate the other particles:

Clay soils have over 25 percent clay. Also known as heavy soils, these are potentially fertile as they hold nutrients bound to the clay minerals in the soil. But they also hold a high proportion of water due to the capillary attraction of the tiny spaces between the numerous clay particles. They drain slowly and take longer to warm up in spring than sandy soils. Clay soils are easily compacted when trodden on while wet and they bake hard in summer, often cracking noticeably.

Sandy soils have high proportion of sand and little clay. Also known as light soils, these soils drain quickly after rain or watering, are easy to cultivate and work. They warm up more quickly in spring than clay soils. But on the downside, they dry out quickly and are low in plant nutrients, which are quickly washed out by rain. Sandy soils are often very acidic.

Silt soils, comprised mainly of intermediate sized particles, are fertile, fairly well drained and hold more moisture than sandy soils, but are easily compacted

Loams are comprised of a mixture of clay, sand and silt that avoid the extremes of clay or sandy soils and are fertile, well-drained and easily worked. They can be clay-loam or sandy-loam depending on their predominant composition and cultivation characteristics.

Peat soils are mainly organic matter and are usually very fertile and hold much moisture. They are seldom found in gardens.

Chalky or lime-rich soils may be light or heavy but are largely made up of calcium carbonate and are very alkaline." from Royal Horticultural Society

.

There are other pages on Plants which bloom in each month of the year in this website:-

 

 

 

Besides the plants in the
British Floral Sources of importance to Honey Bees
and
Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers
the following 3 sets of Bee-pollinated plants are suitable for Hay-fever Sufferers; except for the 2 grasses :-

  • This Bee-pollinated Bloom in Month gallery compares 13 flower colour photos per month for many plants from the other Galleries, by clicking on the 1 in the relevant Flower per month Colour in the Colour Wheel down on the right,
  • the Bee-pollinated Index Gallery provides the tabular index of another 265 plants with the relevant colour in that respective month:-
    • 51 ANNUALS
    • 2 ANNUAL - VEGETABLE
    • 4 AQUATIC PLANTS
    • 11 BIENNIALS
    • 21 BULBS, CORMS, OR RHIZOMES
    • 4 CLIMBERS
    • 31 DECIDUOUS SHRUBS
    • 26 DECIDUOUS TREES
    • 10 EVERGREEN PERENNIALS
    • 22 EVERGREEN SHRUBS
    • 2 EVERGREEN TREES
    • 2 GRASSES which cause hayfever
    • 4 SEMI-EVERGREEN SHRUBS
    • 66 HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS
    • 9 PERENNIAL HERBS
      followed by
  • Click on these extra bee-pollinated plant names:-

 

 

 

Each Text Description below each of the Thumbnails in the Flower Colour/Month Comparison Pages in this Gallery gives you the:-

  • soil type it prefers,
  • plant name,
  • sun aspect,
  • soil moisture in the background colour,
  • plant type,
  • months of flowering and
  • height of the plant in the border colour

of that plant. Click on the centre of each Thumbnail to add the full description and larger photos of that plant.
 

 

 

 

"Want To Keep Bees?

Learn how to become a beekeeper and save the honey bees:

Bees are pollinators vital to our food chain. One third of the food we eat would not be available but for bees. Bees are under threat and need your support.

Beekeeping can be a fascinating hobby, a profitable sideline, or a full-time occupation. You may want to keep bees for the delicious fresh honey they produce, for the benefits of their valuable services as pollinators, or perhaps simply for the enjoyment of learning more about one of nature’s most interesting insects. Almost anyone can keep bees.

If you want to learn more, come & join one of our courses; next one starts mid Jan 2016 and learn the basics of beekeeping as well as being supported through your first year.

Surrey Bees also takes an active part in the education of children in Beekeeping though visits to locals schools. We also invite young beekeepers to attend and pass the BBKA Junior Assessment. We support local schools educating them in the importance of bees as well as covering the Skills section of the Duke of Edinburgh Award.

See also our Junior Summer Camps for junior beekeepers to meet the bees and extract their own honey in July.

If you have never done beekeeping before, this is a wonderful opportunity to get first-hand experience as well as confidence and knowledge to help you become a beekeeper, with honey in your first year. To enquire about available places please complete the enquiry form and one of the team will contact you to discuss preferred available course dates and venues. You’ll be amazed how easy it is!

If you do not have a Bee suit they can be provided." from Courses Page of Surrey Bees Training (SBT).

 

For Hay Fever sufferers, it is better to have bee-pollinated plants than wind-pollinated plants, since the pollen spread by that wind is what causes their suffering. The plants in this gallery are bee-pollinated and they should be used in preference to grasses etc when using the selection procedure below.

 

 

The Introduction Page of the Plants Topic provides a system of how to choose your plants for your garden with the following diagram to create a suitable list of plants.

 

Instructions for use of the following diagram:-

Click inside yellow box to link to that Page in Plants Topic for that list of plants

Click inside green box to link to that
Photo Gallery Site Map Page with its Index for lists of plants
or
view flower colour per month comparison pages using its links on their flower colour per month Colour Wheel, followed by clicking on thumbnail to review its added Plant Description Page.

The Galleries - specified below - contain the Index listing all the plants in their respective Sub-Galleries in each page and the flower colour comparison per month of all its plants (the Bamboo Gallery compares Cane colour). The Sub-Galleries - besides containing the relevant Plant Description Pages (links to them in the Site Map) - also compare the flower colour, foliage colour, habit/shape, fruit/seeds and in flowerbeds/landscape.

 

A swarm of honey bees in a tree:-

surreybees1

Photo kindly supplied by Lorraine Ragosa-Rout, Surrey Bees Training Principal Operations Manager.

plantselectionprocedure2a1a1

 

A swarm of honey bees from a hive:-

 

surreybees2

 

Photo kindly supplied by Lorraine Ragosa-Rout, Surrey Bees Training Principal Operations Manager.

 

You can click on its:-

  • Empty pages of Blue, Red, Unusual and Multi-Coloured, White and Yellow from this Gallery are listed below:-

There are no Empty Pages

 

Once the swarm has been moved to a hive, one of its jobs besides looking after the queen bee is to create honey combs:-

surreybees3

Photo kindly supplied by Ms C. Cunningham, Surrey Bees Training Event Coordinator.

Some of these gallery photographs were provided by
Christine Foord and they were photographed by Christine and Ron Foord
and others were provided by
R. V. Roger ,
D. Rankin of Kevock Garden Plants ,
Deeproot Plant Base ,
Nigel Coe and Gee Tee Bulb Company.

 

and then start filling them:-

surreybees4

Photo kindly supplied by Lorraine Ragosa-Rout, Surrey Bees Training Principal Operations Manager.

before sealing the tops:-

surreybees5

Photo kindly supplied by Ms C. Cunningham, Surrey Bees Training Event Coordinator.

and the workers toiling round the open bee queen cell:-

surreybees6

Photo kindly supplied by Ms C. Cunningham, Surrey Bees Training Event Coordinator.

The consequence of not having enough frames in May 2014:-

surreybees7

Photo kindly supplied by Lorraine Ragosa-Rout, Surrey Bees Training Principal Operations Manager.

 

Very important information for car drivers:-

Oscar's 2,000 mile Purr-fect Trip in The Unadulterated Cat by Terry Pratchett:-

"Oscar's 2,000 mile Purr-fect Trip says the heading in the local paper. Or something like that. At least once every year. In every local paper. It's a regular like 'Row over Civic Site'or 'Storm as Schools Probe Looms'.

So many stories like this have turned up that researchers from the Campaign for Real Cats have been, well, researching.

The astonishing truth has not been suspected, possibly because not many people in this country have more than one local paper. But, from hundreds of cuttings sent in by Campaign members, it finally emerged.

They're all the same cat. Not the same type of cat. The same cat.

It's a smallish black and white tom. Never mind about the variety of names, which are only of significance to humans, although interestingly the name Oscar does seem to crop up rather a lot. Careful anaysis of dozens of pictures of The Travelling Cat blinking in the flashlight's glare has proved it.

It appeared to do a minimum of 15,000 miles last year, much of it in car engine compartments, where only its piteous mewling alerts the driver when he stops off for a coffee.

Confirmation will not be achieved until Oscar has been tracked down by researchers armed with a truckload of painful equipment, but the current, rather interesting, theory is that what initially appears to be this piteous mewling is in fact a stream of directions on the lines of 'left, here, I said left, left you twerp, all right, keep going until we get to the trading estate and then you can pick up the A370...'

Oscar is, in fact, trying to get somewhere. The process is a bit hit and miss, and possibly he has underestimated the size of the country and the number of vehicles in it, but he's keeping at it. Certainly, in the best tradition of Real Cats everywhere, he's doing anything rather than get out and walk."

 

It is of course possible that this cat has travelled abroad and back again:-

  • Although the cat does not travel with his passport, I am surprised that the driver of each car crossing the border has not put this cat into quarantine, - paid for a new cat passport, microfiched it and attached that microfiche to the cats collar for the next border control to check - and then waited until it is out of quarantine before continueing their combined journey.
  • The driver is also responsible for paying the cross-channel fare for this cat, since that cat is dependent on him having driven his car in order to keep this cat warm whilst being transported to that ferry.
  • If the cat changes vehicles and comes back with a different driver, then that driver may be fined for bringing in an illegal immigrant. It may be possible to eject the cat , if each driver ejects his passengers and luggage, before steam-cleaning the inside and outside of his or her vehicle, before entering the port to go onto a ferry or respective railway station for train transportation. This might persuade the cat to leave that vehicle. If it does not leave, the the driver could be prosecuted for subjecting the cat to cruelty in spraying it with steam.
  • Of course if it has been found that the cat has not been fed, watered and well-looked after, then the driver may face prosecution.
  • In conclusion, it might be safer not to use your car to travel anywhere.
     

 

THE 2 EUREKA EFFECT PAGES FOR UNDERSTANDING SOIL AND HOW PLANTS INTERACT WITH IT OUT OF 15,000:-


Explanation of Structure of this Website with User Guidelines Page for those photo galleries with Photos
(of either ones I have taken myself or others which have been loaned only for use on this website from external sources)

 

or

 

when I do not have my own or ones from mail-order nursery photos , then from March 2016, if you want to start from the uppermost design levels through to your choice of cultivated and wildflower plants to change your Plant Selection Process then use the following galleries:-

  • Create and input all plants known by Amateur Gardening inserted into their Sanders' Encyclopaedia from their edition published in 1960 (originally published by them in 1895) into these
    • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery,
      then
    • Stage 2 - Infill Plants Index Gallery being the only gallery from these 7 with photos (from Wikimedia Commons) ,
      then
    • Stage 3 - All Plants Index Gallery with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2
    • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery,
    • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery with
    • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery and
    • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery
    • Unfortunately, if you want to have 100's of choices on selection of plants from 1000's of 1200 pixels wide by up to 16,300 pixels in length webpages, which you can jump to from almost any of the pages in these 7 galleries above, you have to put up with those links to those choices being on
      • the left topic menu table,
      • the header of the middle data table and on
      • the page/index menu table on the right of every page of those galleries.

 

 

I hope that you find that the information in this website is useful to you:-

I like reading and that is shown by the index in my Library, where I provide lists of books to take you between designing, maintaining or building a garden and the hierarchy of books on plants taking you from

There are these systems for choosing plants as shown in

  • Plants topic
  • Garden Style Index Gallery
  • Colour Wheel of All Flowers 53 flower colours
  • Colour Wheel of All Flowers per Month 53 flower colours
  • Flower Shape
  • This All Bee-Pollinated Flowers gallery compares 13 flower colour photos per month for many plants from the other Galleries, by clicking on the 1 in the relevant Flower per month Colour in the Colour Wheel down on the right,
  • the Bee-pollinated Index Gallery provides the tabular index of another 264 plants with the relevant colour in that respective month:-
    • 51 ANNUALS
    • 2 ANNUAL - VEGETABLE
    • 4 AQUATIC PLANTS
    • 11 BIENNIALS
    • 21 BULBS, CORMS, OR RHIZOMES
    • 4 CLIMBERS
    • 31 DECIDUOUS SHRUBS
    • 26 DECIDUOUS TREES
    • 9 EVERGREEN PERENNIALS
    • 22 EVERGREEN SHRUBS
    • 2 EVERGREEN TREES
    • 2 GRASSES which cause hayfever
    • 4 SEMI-EVERGREEN SHRUBS
    • 66 HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS
    • 9 PERENNIAL HERBS

82 rock garden plants (with photos) suitable for small garden areas; split into:-

2 ALLIUM and ANEMONE Bulbs
3 BULBS - Spring Catalogue. For planting in February/ May
2 BULBS - Late Summer Catalogue. For planting in July/ September
7 BULBS - Autumn Catalogue. For planting in September/ November
2 Bulbs - Winter Catalogue. For planting in November/ March
35 COLCHICUM AND CROCUS BULBS.
0 DECIDUOUS SHRUBS
30 EVERGREEN PERENNIALS
1 EVERGREEN SHRUBS
0 HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS
0 ROSES
in the Rock Plant Flowers Gallery.
All the remaining rock garden plants detailed in the Rock Garden Plant Index pages in the Rock Plant Flowers are waiting to receive photos, before they can be added to the 1 of the 52 Rockgarden Colour Wheel - Flowers Pages and then the above list.

I am taking photos of rock garden plants suitable for small gardens and if they do not have their own Plant Description Page in this website, then each photo of each plant will be located at the bottom of the relevant 1 of 52 Rockgarden Flower Colour Wheel pages. Usually a link in *** to that page of 35 will be included in the Name field of the respective Index Page, for:-

15 BULBS, CORMS and TUBERS
4 EVERGREEN SUBSHRUBS
7 EVERGREEN PERENNIALS
2 EVERGREEN SHRUBS
7 HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS
Then a link using More Photos Page links to the Rock Plant Photos Gallery for each of the above 35 Rock Garden Plants

 

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