Ivydene Gardens Adder's Tongue to Borage Wild Flower Families Gallery:
Adder's Tongue Family

Click on Underlined Text in:-

Common Name to view that Plant Description Page
Botanical Name to link to Plant or Seed Supplier
Flowering Months to view photos
Habitat to view further Natural Habitat details and Botanical Society of the British Isles Distribution Map

Adder's Tongue Family plant table with its Common Name - Botanical Name. Flowering Months Range. Habitat with link to that Wild Flower Gallery:-

Common Name

Botanical Name

Flowering Months

Habitat

Adder's Tongue

Ophioglossum vulgatum

May-August

Grassland.
A rhizomatous, deciduous fern found on mildly acidic to base-rich soils in open woodland, meadows and damp pastures, and on sand dunes, under Pteridium on heaths, and on peat in regularly mown fen. 0-660 m (Burnhope Seat, Cumberland).

addersfflotongue

addersfflostongue

addersffoltongue

addersffortongue

Flower on 19 May

Sporangia from Eccles in Kent on 14 June

Foliage on 19 May

Form from Eccles in Kent on 14 June

Early Adder's Tongue (Least Adder's Tongue)

Ophioglossum lusitanicum

January-April

Cliffs
A small, rhizomatous, summer-deciduous fern, growing in open therophyte communities and parched acidic grassland on sea-cliffs and rock promontories. It prefers thin peaty soils, but is also found over shallow blown sand over acidic rocks. All sites are unshaded and exposed, but are warm and S.- or S.W.-facing. Lowland.

Moonwort
(Common Moonwort)

Botrychium lunaria

June-August

Grassland and Rocks (Rock-ledges).
A small fern, often occurring singly or in small populations. It prefers well-drained sites, usually with a high base-content, although it can occur on more acidic substrates. Habitats include meadows, pastures, open woodland, sand dunes and grassy rock ledges. It can also colonise slag heaps and quarry spoil. 0-1065 m (Ben Lawers, Mid Perth)

moonwortfflo

moonwortfflos

moonwortffol

moonwortffor

Spike from Einodsbach on 15 July

Sporangia from Inverkirkaig in Sutherland on 20 June

Foliage from Inverkirkaig in Sutherland on 20 June

Form from Nairn on 24 June

Plymouth Pear

Pyrus cordata

May

Hedges In Britain, this small deciduous tree is restricted to just a few hedgerows in Devon and Cornwall. Reproduction is by suckering; fruit-set varies greatly from year to year, and production of fertile seed is negligible. Lowland.

Alter-Natives Wholesale Nursery, Waipu, NZ is a wholesale nursery open to the public and trade. They grow 240 species of New Zealand Native plants for landscaping and revegetation in several sizes of tube, pot and bag. Their services include Landscape Design and Implementation as well as Revegetation Planting, together with Native Plants recommended for Effluent Fields.

The following is from their Information Sheet on "

Botanical Names Explained

It's a complex world out there and the botanists don't seem to make it any easier! And there is nothing more confusing than listening to a bunch of gardeners talk in streams of apparently meaningless gobbledy-gook. Who do they think they are?

But hold on a minute, don't put it down to garden snobbery. Botanical names give us clues about plants, their relatives, their cultural needs and they are well worth learning.

Botanical, Latin or Scientific Names?

All plants have a unique name and this is often called the scientific name, botanical or the 'Latin name' as many are based on Latin. Many botanical names are derived from Greek, a persons name (the discoverer, sponsor or someone-else altogether!), are descriptive or give the place of origin of the plant. For this reason we prefer to use the term 'botanical name' rather than 'Latin name'.

The system we use today is based on that developed by Linneaus, a Swedish naturalist, developed in the 18th century. Botanical names all have two main parts: a generic or family name and a specific or species name. Thus, the human world we have the Brown family, and we have John, Jane and Mary Brown within that. In the plant world we have the celmisia family, Celmisia, and its member Celmisia semicordata, Celmisia spectabilis, etc.

Plants have names, just like people. The difference between the human naming convention and that of plants is that each pant generic or family name occurs only once. Specific names may occur a number of times (e.g. reptans or alba) but, coupled with the generic name, each plant has a unique name. Think of all the New Zealand plants that are Something haastii or Something chathamica!

Why Not Common Names? Many gardeners and most plant nurseries prefer botanical names as they avoid the confusion that common names can cause. Common names can be very local, some plants don't have a common name, and others have more than one.

More than one plant has the same common name; in the UK an 'Ash' is actually a Fraxinus while in the USA it is really a Sorbus; and an Aconite can be the late summer flowering, deep blue flowered perennial Aconitum or the tiny winter flowering bulb Eranthis hyemalis. In NZ a ‘Mingimingi’ can be either Coprosma propingqua, Cyathodes juniperina or Cyathodes robusta which also comes with either a white fruit or a red fruit.

And then there are the plants that have more than one common name; the climbing pest Clematis vitalba is known as Old Man's Beard and Traveller's Joy; Bergamont and Bee's Balm are both Monarda didyma; and Erythronium as Trout Lilies and Dogs Tooth Violets.

Parts of Botanical Names

The way the name is built up is based on Latin grammar rules. Each plant family name (eg. 'Cordyline') is a noun and has a gender (i.e. is male or female). Species within each family are adjectives ('australis', 'indivisa', etc.).

Botanical names are usually written in italics as in Cordyline indivisa.

Sometimes, perhaps too often for gardeners' liking, the scientists will change a botanical name and thus we get Brachyglottis monroi (syn. Senecio monroi) where the name in brackets is the previous or, occasionally, less well-known name. This is also known as the 'synonym'.

The great value in understanding the botanical name comes from following the family trees through and using the other, descriptive clues in the name. Celmisia spectabilis is a very showy or spectacular celmisia, Coprosma prostrata and Cotoneaster horizontalis are prostrate growers, and Cercis chinensis comes from China and Cercis canadensis from Canada; Geum montanum comes from the mountains; Prunus autumnalis flowers in the autumn.

So while sometimes it does seem as if 'It's all Greek to me!', it really is worth finding out the botanical name.

Using the botanical rather than a common name is not garden snobbery. It is simple good sense, and it saves the confusion common names can cause, unless it is as unpronounceable as Paeonia mlokosewitschii, named for Frederich Mlokosewitch who found it, but known almost universally as 'Molly the Witch'.

The Structure of Plant Families

Plant Orders

A step up from the botanical name we have plant orders. These are larger families of plants.

A plant order is a family of different genera that are sufficiently similar, e.g. Magnoliaceae or Ranunculaceae are plant orders that contain many different genera that share a key characteristic(s).

The plant order is not included in the botanical name, except in scientific situations or in gardening textbooks and plant dictionaries where it gives us clues that clematis, ranunculus and hellebores, all members of Ranunculaceae, have something in common.

Genera

The genera or genus a plant family such as the New Zealand family of pohutukawa and rata trees is Metrosideros, and within this genus we find Metrosideros excelsa, Metrosideros umbellata, Metrosideros robusta, etc

Species

A species is those plants that are the same and produce viable offspring. Plants within a species can vary in small ways, such as differences leaf colouration resulting from environment, climate and soil. And, so, within species you can have subspecies, varieties, cultivars and hybrids.

Variety

Differences in climate, soils, and aspect can cause these differences to be sufficiently distinct that botanists will distinguish between different varieties (often shown as 'var.') within a species. Clianthus puniceus var. maximus differs from the so-called 'typical' form Clianthus puniceus.

Subspecies

When there is no overlap in the geographical distribution of the plants, the variety may be called a subspecies (often shown as 'ssp.', as in Crocus biflorus ssp. crewei). These are still able to produce offspring when two subspecies within the same plant species are brought together.

Cultivars

Sometimes gardeners may select a particular plant because of leaf colour form or flower. This selection is still genetically identical to these within the species and must be propagated vegetatively (cuttings, division etc) to continue the desired attribute, as seed grown progeny may not 'come true', that is, they may not carry the particular attribute sought.

These plants are called cultivars and the cultivar name is shown in inverted commas, e.g. Astelia chathamica 'Silver Spear'.

Hybrids

Where different species within a family or different families produce offspring, the new plants are called hybrids. Hellebores are very promiscuous in this way. Apart from physically separating parent plants or hand pollinating it is all too easy to end up with hybrids rather than the species plants you may covet.

These plants are shown as a 'cross' such as Corokia x virgata 'Bronze King', where virgata is not a species but a hybrid between two of the Hamamelis species. Camellia x williamsii 'Donation' is a hybrid where Camellia williamsii is known to be a parent. Hybrids can also be 'intersectional hybrids', that is, they occur between different genera as in x Cupressocyparis, a cross between Chamaecyparis and Cupressus.

Some Botanical Terms Explained

The descriptive clues in botanical names are rewarding if you translate or understand the terms themselves.

Some names relate to flower colour, others to habit, and others to origin.

Some of the most common terms are listed here, as well as some specially New Zealand botanical terms.

A

alba white
albicans becoming white
albiflorus white flower
alpina alpine
angustifolius narrow leaved
apetala has no petals
arachnoides spider or spider webs e.g. Sempervivium arachnoideum, the house leek has spider web like appearance
• arboreus or aborescens tree like appearance
• arenaria of sand, referring to plants from sandy places
• argentea or argyraea silver or silvery
• atro dark coloured as in 'atropurpureum'
• attenuata narrows to a point
• aurantica orange
aurea or aureus gold or golden
• australis southern
• azurea azure or sky blue

B

• banksii named for Sir Joseph Banks, botanist on Captain Cook's voyages
• bellidioides daisy-like appearance, referring to bellis, the daisy
• bicolour two coloured
• bidwillii named for John Bidwill, early New Zealand alpine plant enthusiast
• Brachyglottis short tongued, referring to the short ray florets
• buchananii named for John Buchanan, early New Zealand botanist

C

• caerulea dark blue

• caerulecens bluish, blue tinged

• campanulatus bell shaped

• canadensis of Canada or North-eastern America

• canina of dogs, usually means inferior plant (the Romans were not dog-lovers!)

• cardinalis scarlet, cardinal red

• carnea deep pink

• cataria of cats, eg Nepeta cataria, catmint

• carractae of waterfalls

• chathamicus/chathamica of the Chatham Islands

• chinensis of China

• chlorantha green flowered

• cinerea ash colour, greyish

• coccineum scarlet

• columaris columnar

• colensoi named for William Colenso, early botanist

• confertiflora flowers that are crowded together

• cordata heart shaped

• crassifolius/crassifolia/crassifolium with thick leaves

• cunnihamii named for Allan Cunningham, early botanist

D

• decora beautiful

• delayavi for Abbe Jean Marie Delavay missionary and collector

• dieffenbachii for Dr Ernst Dieffenbach, naturalist

• discolor two different colours

• dissecta deeply cut, usually of a leaf

• domestica cultivated

• davidii for Pere Arman David, missionary plant collector

• Dracanena female dragon

E

• Echinops a hedgehog, spiky

• Echium vipers ( a snake)

• Erodium heron's bill, referring to the shape of the seedpods

• excelsa/excelsum/excelsus tall

• eximia exceptional

F

• fibrosa fibrous

• flava clear yellow

• florida flowering

• -florus of flowers

• foetidus smelling, stinking

• -folius of leaves

• forestii for George Forest, Scottish plant collector

• fragrans/fragrantissima fragrant

• frutcosa shrubby

• fulvida tawny coloured

H

• haastii for Julius von Haast, explorer

• hastata spear shaped

• hookeri for Sir William or Sir Joseph Hooker, directors of Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

• hortensia of gardens

• horizontalis flat, horizontal

• humilis low growing

 

G

• Geranium crane's bill, referring to the shape of the seedpods

• gracilis graceful

• graminea grass-like

I

• ilicifolia holly-like (from Ilex or Holly)

• incana grey

• indica of India

• insignis notable

• -issima very (as in 'bellissima')

• isophylla equal sized leaves

• ixioides ixia like

J

• japonica of Japan

• jucundum attractive example

K

• kirkii for Thomas Kirk, botanist

L

• laetus/laetum milky

• latifolius/latifolia broad leaved

• lessonii/lessoniana for Pierre Lesson surgeon and botanist

• lineata striped, with lines

• lucida/lucens shining, bright

• lutea yellow

• lutescens becoming yellow

• lyallii for David Lyall, surgeon

M

• macrantha having large flowers

• marcrocarpa having large fruit

• marcophylla having large leaves

• meleagris spotted like a guinea fowl as in Fritillaria meleagris

• melissa honey bee

• microphylla very small leaved

• monroi for Sir David Monro, plant collector

• montana/montanum of the mountains

• moschatum musky scented

• myosotis mouse's ear

N

• nigra black

• novae-zelandiae of New Zealand

O

• officinalis sold as a herb

• orientalis eastern

P

• paniculata having flowers in panicles

• Pelargonium stork's bill, referring to the shape of the seedpods

• petriei for Donald Petrie, plant collector

• praecox early, of flowering

• procumbens prostrate

• procurrens spreading

• prolifera prolific or free flowering

• prostrata prostrate or lying on the ground

• pumila/pumilo dwarf

• purpurea purple (Echinea purpurea)

• purpurascens purplish, tinged purple

R

• Ranunculus frog, because both like marshy, boggy ground

• recta upright

• reflexa bent backwards

• reptans or repens creeping

• richardii for Achille Richard, French botanist

• rigens/rigida rigid or stiff habit

• roseum rose colour

• rotundata rounded

• rotundifolia having round-shaped leaves

• rubra/rubrum red

• rugosa/rugosum wrinkled

• rupestris growing in rocks

S

• salicina/salicifolia willow like

• sanguinea blood red

• scandens climbing

• serotina late flowering or late ripening

• serpens creeping

• spictata in spikes

• stans/stricta erect or upright

• supine supine or prostrate

T

• trigida spotted like a tiger

U

• umbellatus flowers appearing to be in umbels

• ursinum a bear, referring to shaggy appearance

V

• vernus of spring

• viridis/virens green

• viridfolius green leaved

• versicolor multi coloured

• vulgaris common

Z

• Zebrina zebra, referring to the stripes

Botanical Terms - New Zealand Plant Names

New Zealand plants are special. Many are unique to our island country and found nowhere else in the world.

The descriptive clues in botanical names are rewarding if you translate or understand the terms themselves. The names of our plants reflect their discoverers, place of origin and our history.

A

• Aciphylla the Spaniard for the sharp, needle leaves

• Agathis the kauri, from agathis 'ball of thread' for the distinctive cones

• Arthropodium the rengarenga lily, from 'arthro' a joint and 'podion' stalk (has jointed pedicels)

• Astelia stem-less

• australis southern, as in Cordyline australis

B

• banksii named for Sir Joseph Banks, botanist on Captain Cook's voyages

• bidwillii named for John Bidwill, early New Zealand alpine plant enthusiast

• buchananii named for John Buchanan, early New Zealand botanist

C

• Celmisia mountain daisies, after Celmisios in Greek mythology

• chathamicus/chathamica of the Chatham Islands

• Clianthus kaka beak, from 'kleos' glory and 'anthos' flower for the distinctive flowers

• colensoi named for William Colenso, early botanist

• Coprosma smelling of manure

• Cordyline the cabbage tree, meaning a club as the large and fleshy roots resemble

• Corokia from the Maori name 'Korokio'

• cunnihamii named for Allan Cunningham, early botanist

D

• Dicksonia the tree fern, for James Dickson a Scottish nurseryman and naturalist

• dieffenbachii for Dr Ernst Dieffenbach, naturalist

• Dracophyllum the grass trees, from 'draco' dragon and 'phyllum' leaf

G

• Griselinia the broadleaf, for Franseco Griselini, naturalist

H

• haastii for Julius von Haast, explorer

• Hebe for the Greek Goddess of youth 'Hebe'

• Hoheria for the Moari name 'Houhere'

• hookeri for Sir William or Sir Joseph Hooker, directors of Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

K

• kirkii for Thomas Kirk, early botanist

 

L

• Leptospermum the manuka, 'leptos' or slender and ' sperma' or seed for the narrow seeds

• lessonii/lessoniana for Pierre Lesson, surgeon and botanist

• lyallii for David Lyall, surgeon

M

• Metrosideros the rata and pohutukawa for their very hard wood; 'metra' heartwood and 'sideros' iron hard

• monroi for Sir David Monro, plant collector

• Muehlenbeckia after Muehlenbeck, a French physician and botanist

• Myosotidium the Chatham Island Forget-me-not, for Myosotis the European forget- me-not

N

• Nothofagus native beech, from 'nothos' false and 'fagus' the beech

• novae-zelandiae meaning 'of New Zealand'

 

O

• Olearia because it resembles an olive tree (Olea)

 

P
• Pachystegia the Marlborough Rock Daisy, from 'pakys' or thick for the thick leaves
• Phormium New Zealand flax, from 'phormoin' or a mat, a reference to the traditional Maori weaving of flax and flax fibres
• Pittosporum for the sticky seeds, as 'pitta' means pitch or tar and 'sporum' seeds
• Plagianthus 'plagios' oblique and 'anthhos' flower for the asymmetrical flowers
• Podocarpus the totara, from 'podos' foot and 'karpos' fruit for the stalked fruit
• Pseudopanax lancewoods and the five-finger, from 'pseudo' false and 'panax' a related genus

R
• richardii for Achille Richard, French botanist

S
• sinclairii Andrew Sinclair an early plant collector
• solandri Daniel Solander botanist on the Cook voyages
• Sophora the kowhai, from 'sophera' the Arabic name for a tree with pea shaped flowers

T
• traversii William Travers early plant collector, lawyer and politician

W
• williamsii for William Williams, Bishop of Waiapu in the nineteenth century

X

• Xeronema Poor Knights Lily, from 'xeros' dry

"

 

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Botanical Name
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Lists of:-
Edible Plant Parts.
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Food for
Butterfly/Moth
.

Habitat Lists:-
Approaching the
Coast (Coastal)
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Woods
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Grassland - Acid, Neutral, Chalk.
Heaths and Moors.
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other Freshwater Margins
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Number of Petals List:-
Without Petals. Other plants
without flowers.
1 Petal or
Composite of
many 1 Petal Flowers as Disc
or Ray Floret .
2 Petals.
3 Petals.
4 Petals.
5 Petals.
6 Petals.
Over 6 Petals.

Lists of:-
Pollinator.
Poisonous Parts.
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Story of their Common Names.
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ADDER'S TONGUE TO BORAGE WILD FLOWER GALLERY
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Introduction *

 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 1


(o)Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
(o)Arrow-Grass
(o)Arum
(o)Balsam
Bamboo
(o)Barberry
(o)Bedstraw
(o)Beech
(o)Bellflower
(o)Bindweed
(o)Birch
(o)Birds-Nest
(o)Birthwort
(o)Bogbean
(o)Bog Myrtle
(o)Borage
(o)Box
(o)Broomrape
(o)Buckthorn
(o)Buddleia
(o)Bur-reed
(o)Buttercup
(o)Butterwort
(o)Cornel (Dogwood)
(o)Crowberry
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
(o)Daffodil
(o)Daisy
(o)Daisy Cudweeds
(o)Daisy Chamomiles
(o)Daisy Thistle
(o)Daisy Catsears (o)Daisy Hawkweeds
(o)Daisy Hawksbeards
(o)Daphne
(o)Diapensia
(o)Dock Bistorts
(o)Dock Sorrels

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 2


(o)Clubmoss
(o)Duckweed
(o)Eel-Grass
(o)Elm
(o)Filmy Fern
(o)Horsetail
(o)Polypody
Quillwort
(o)Royal Fern
(o)Figwort - Mulleins
(o)Figwort - Speedwells
Family

(o)Flax
(o)Flowering-Rush
(o)Frog-bit
(o)Fumitory
(o)Gentian
(o)Geranium
(o)Glassworts
(o)Gooseberry
(o)Goosefoot
(o)Grass 1
(o)Grass 2
(o)Grass 3
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 1
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 2
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 3 (o)Hazel
(o)Heath
(o)Hemp
(o)Herb-Paris
(o)Holly
(o)Honeysuckle
(o)Horned-Pondweed
(o)Hornwort
(o)Iris
(o)Ivy
(o)Jacobs Ladder
(o)Lily
(o)Lily Garlic
(o)Lime
(o)Lobelia
(o)Loosestrife
(o)Mallow
(o)Maple
(o)Mares-tail
(o)Marsh Pennywort
(o)Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 3


(o)Mesem-bryanthemum
(o)Mignonette
(o)Milkwort
(o)Mistletoe
(o)Moschatel
Naiad
(o)Nettle
(o)Nightshade
(o)Oleaster
(o)Olive
(o)Orchid 1
(o)Orchid 2
(o)Orchid 3
(o)Orchid 4
(o)Parnassus-Grass
(o)Peaflower
(o)Peaflower Clover 1
(o)Peaflower Clover 2
(o)Peaflower Clover 3
(o)Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
(o)Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
Pipewort
(o)Pitcher-Plant
(o)Plantain
(o)Pondweed
(o)Poppy
(o)Primrose
(o)Purslane
Rannock Rush
(o)Reedmace
(o)Rockrose
(o)Rose 1
(o)Rose 2
(o)Rose 3
(o)Rose 4
(o)Rush
(o)Rush Woodrushes
(o)Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
(o)Sandalwood
(o)Saxifrage
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 4


Seaheath
(o)Sea Lavender
(o)Sedge Rush-like
(o)Sedges Carex 1
(o)Sedges Carex 2
(o)Sedges Carex 3
(o)Sedges Carex 4
(o)Spindle-Tree
(o)Spurge
(o)Stonecrop
(o)Sundew
(o)Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
(o)Teasel
(o)Thyme 1
(o)Thyme 2
(o)Umbellifer 1
(o)Umbellifer 2
(o)Valerian
(o)Verbena
(o)Violet
(o)Water Fern
(o)Waterlily
(o)Water Milfoil
(o)Water Plantain
(o)Water Starwort
Waterwort
(o)Willow
(o)Willow-Herb
(o)Wintergreen
(o)Wood-Sorrel
(o)Yam
(o)Yew

 

 

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Poisonous Plants


INDEX LINK TO WILDFLOWER PLANT DESCRIPTION PAGE
a-h
i-p
q-z


FLOWER COLOUR
(o)Blue
(o)Brown
(o)Cream
(o)Green
(o)Mauve
(o)Multi-Coloured
Orange
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
(o)Purple
(o)Red
(o)White1
(o)White2
(o)White3
(o)Yelow1
(o)Yelow2
(o)Shrub or Small Tree

SEED COLOUR
(o)Seed 1
(o)Seed 2

BED PICTURES
(o)Bed

HABITAT TABLES
Flowers in
Acid Soil

Flowers in
Chalk Soil

Flowers in
Marine Soil

Flowers in
Neutral Soil

Ferns
Grasses
Rushes
Sedges

 

See current Wildflower Common Name Index link Table for more wildflower of the UK common names together with their names in languages from America, Finland, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Sweden.

See current Wildflower Botanical Name Index link table for wildflower of the United Kingdom (Great Britain) botanical names.

 

WILD FLOWER Common Name INDEX link to Wildflower Family Page; then

Click on Underlined Text in:-

Common Name to view that Plant Description Page
Botanical Name to link to Plant or Seed Supplier
Flowering Months to view photos
Habitat to view further Natural Habitat details and Botanical Society of the British Isles Distribution Map

 

A

G

M

S

Abraham, Isaac and Jacob
Abura-na
Acker-Hellerkraut
Ackersenf
Adder's Tongue
Adder's-tongue Spearwort
Agriao
Alder
Alder Buckthorn
Alliare officinale
Allysum
Alpen-Gemskresse
Alpine Arctic Cudweed
Alpine Blue Sow-thistle
Alpine Clubmoss
Alpine coltsfoot
Alpine Fleabane
Alpine Forget-me-not
Alpine Lady Fern
Alpine Meadow-Rue
Alpine Penny-Cress
Alpine Rock-Cress
Alpine Sow-Thistle
Alpine Woodsia
American Bellbine
American Land-Cress
American Water Cress
American Wintercress
Annual Delpinium
Arragone
Arrow Bamboo
Asarabacca
Ash of Jerusalem
Atinian Elm
Austrian Field Cress
Austrian Yellow Cress
Autumn Hawkbit
Averill
Awlwort

Gallant Soldier
Garden Arabis
Garden Cress
Garden Golden-Rod
Garden Radish
Garlic Mustard
Garlic Pennycress
Gazon de Marie
Gemeine Nachtviole
German Tea Chamomile
Giant Bellflower
Giant Butterwort
Giant Goldenrod
Giant Horsetail
Gibbous Duckweek
Gillflower
Glanz-Rauke
Goatsbeard
Globe Flower
Gold of Pleasure
Golden Buttons
Golden Marguerite
Golden-Rod
Golden Samphire
Golden-Scaled Male Fern
Goldilocks
Goldilocks Aster
Goldilocks Buttercup
Goldlack
Goosegrass
Goose Tongue
gordaldo

Grand Passerage
Grauer Bastardsenf
Graukresse
Gray Northern Woodsia
Green Spleenwort
Great Bindweed
Great Broomrape
Great Duckweed
Great False Leopardbane
Great Horsetail
Great Lettuce
Great Sea Stock
Greater Bladderwort
Greater Dodder
Greater Hawkbit
Greater Prickly Lettuce
Greater Spearwort
Greater Yellow Cress
Green Alkanet
Green Amaranth
Green Hellebore
Green Houndstongue
Green Pigweed
Groundsel
Grutzblume
Gtodek
Gymnocarpium robertianum

Ma chieh
Madwort
Magellan Ragwort
Maidenhair Fern
Maidenhair Spleenwort
Male Fern
March Everlasting
Marguerite Daisy
Marsh Arrow-Grass
Marsh Bedstraw
Marsh Clubmoss
Marsh Cress
Marsh Cudweed
Marsh Fern
Marsh Horsetail
Marsh Marigold
Marsh Ragwort
Marsh Sow-Thistle
Marsh Yellow Cress
Mary's Cushion
Mastuerzo Montesino
Matronal
Matthiole sinuee
Mauer-Doppelsame
Mauer-Felsenblumchen
Mayweed
May-weed Chamomile
Meadow Buttercup
Meacan-Each
Meadow Cress
Meadow False Fleabane
Mediterranean Radish
Medium-flowered Winter-cress
Meerkohl
Meerrettich
Metake
Mexican Daisy
Mexican Fleabane
Michaelmas Daisy
milfoil
Mithridate Mustard
Mittleres Barbarakraut
Mizu-Garashi
Monkshood
Moonwort
Moretti's Sea Radish
Mostarda-Preta
Mostaza Blanca
Mostaza Negra
Mostaza Silvestre
Mother's Heart
Mountain Bamboo
Mountain Bladder Fern
Mountain Clubmoss
Mountain Cudweed
Mountain Everlasting
Mountain Groundsel
Mountain Male-fern
Mountain Mustard
Mountain Rock Cress
Mouse-Ear Cress
Mousetail
Moutarde blanche
Moutarde des champs
Moutarde noire
Mugwort
Muli

Saat-Leindotter
Sagesse des chirurgiens
Saint George
Saint Geourges
Saint Jean

Saint Martins Buttercup
Salad Cress Plain Leaf
Salad Mustard
Salad Rape
Salgam
Salsify
Sand Quillwort
Sanguinary
Santa Barbara Daisy

Saracen's Woundwort
Scaly Male Fern
Scented coltsfoot
Scented Mayweed
Scentless Chamomile
Scentless Mayweed
Schmalblattriger Doppelsame
Schmalwand
Schwarzer
Schwarzer Senf
Scilly Buttercup
Scots Elm
Scottish Filmy Fern
Scottish Wormwood
Scurvy Grass
Sea Alyssum
Sea Arrow-Grass
Sea Aster
Sea Bindweed
Sea grass
Sea-green Whitlow Grass
Sea Kale
Sea Mayweed
Sea Rocket
Sea Radish
Sea Ragwort
Sea Spleenwort
Sea Starwort
Sea Stock
Sea Wormwood
Selada-Air
Senf
Senfspinat
Sessile Oak
Shady Horsetail
Shaggy Soldier
Sheepsbit
Shepherd's Cress
Shepherd's Purse
Shepherd's Purse (rubella)
Silver Birch
Silver cineraria
Silver Ragwort
Simmara
Simon's Bamboo
Singer's Plant
Siyah Hardel
Skunk Cabbage
Slender Bedstraw
Slender Marsh Bedstraw
Slender Wart Cress
Small Alison
Small Balsam
Small Bladderwort
Small Bugloss
Small Bur-Reed
Small Cudweed
Small Fleabane
Small-Flowered Buttercup
Small-flower Galinsoga
Small-flowered Land-Cress
Small-flowered Wintercress
Small Goosegrass
Small-Leaf Elm
Small-leaved Elm
Small Male Fern
Small Quillwort
Small tumbleweed mustard
Smith's Cress
Smith's Pepperwort
Smooth Bedstraw
Smooth Catsear
Smooth Sow-Thistle
Smooth three-ribbed Goldenrod
Sneezeweed
Sneezewort
Sneezewort Yarrow

Snowdrop
Snowflake
Soft Comfrey
Soft Shield Fern
soldier's woundwort
Son-before-father
Sophienrauke
Spanish Chestnut Spoonwort
Spiked Rampion
Spiny Annual Sow-thistle
Spiny Cocklebur
spiny cockleburr
Spinks
Spotless watermeal
Spotted Catsear
Spreading Bellflower
Spring Quillwort
Spring-Schaumkraut
Spring Snowflake
Squinancywort
St. James' wort
St John's Plant
St. Sophia's Herb
Stagshorn Clubmoss
Star Duckweed
Steinkraut
Stengelum-fassendes
Hellerkraut

Sterile Watercress
Sticky Groundsel
Stiff Clubmoss
Stinkende Kresse
Stinking Chamomile
Stinking Groundsel
Stinking Hellebore
Stink Weed
Stinkweed
Stoloniferous Pussytoes
Strandrauke
Strong-scented Lettuce
Summer Snowflake
Suterisi
Swamp Lantern
Sweet Alison
Sweet Alyssum
Sweet Chestnut
Sweet Dame's Violet
Sweet Flag
Sweet Rocket
Swinecress
Swine Cress
Swollen Duckweed

 

B

H

N

T

 

Bai jie
Ball Mustard
Baneberry
Barbarakraut
Barbaree
Barbenkraut
Barberry
Barestem
Bargeman's Cabbage
Bastard Cabbage
Bastard Cress
Bastard Pellitory
Bathurst burr
Bauernsenf
Bayirturpu
Beach Wormwood
Bedstraw Broomrape
Beech
Beech Fern
Beggar-Ticks
Behaarte Gansekresse
Belle Isle Cress
Bell Rose
Berro
Berro de Prado
Besenrauke
Big-seed False Flax
Bird Rape
Birthwort
Bitter Cress
Bittere Schleifenblume
Black Mustard
Black Spleenwort
Bladder Fern
Bloodtwig Dogwood
Blue Anemone
Blue-eyed-Mary
Blue Fleabane
Bogbean
Blue Sow Thistle
Bog Myrtle
Borage
Boreal Fleabane
Boston Daisies
Boston Horsetail
Bourse de cure
Bourse de Judas
Box
Bracken
Branched Bur-Reed
Branched Horsetail
Brass buttons
Brauner Senf
Breckland Mugwort
Breitblattrige
Bristly Hawkbit
Bristly Ox-Tongue
Bristol Rock-Cress
Brittle Bladder Fern
Broad Buckler Fern
Broad-leaved Bamboo
Broad-leaved Cudweed
Broad-leaved Ragwort
Broad-Leaf Peppergrass
Bronkors
Brown-Leaved Watercress
Brown Mustard
Buchanweed
Bulbous Buttercup
Bulbulotu
Bunias d'orient
Butterbur
Butterfly-Bush
Buttonweed

Habb Ar Rashad
Hairy Bamboo
Hairy Bittercress
Hairy Brassica
Hairy Buttercup
Hairy Galinsoga
Hairy Rock-Cress
Hairy Rocket
Halim
Hard Fern
Hard Shield Fern
Harebell
Hartstongue
hawkweed
Hawkweed Ox-Tongue
Hay-Scented Buckler Fern
Heath Bedstraw
Heath Cudweed
Heath Groundsel
Hederich
Hedge Bedstraw
Hedge Bindweed
Hedge Garlic
Hedge Mustard
Herb-Barbaras
Herbe Aux Charpentiers
Herbe aux cuillere
Herbe de Saint Barbe
Hemp Agrimony
Hierba De Santa Barbara
Herb-Sophia
Hierba del Ajo
Highland Cudweed
Highland Fleabane
Hill mustard
Himalayan Balsam
Himalayan Bamboo
Hirtentaschelkraut
Hoary Alison
Hoary-Alyssum
Hoary Cress
Hoary False Alyssum
Hoary Groundsel
Hoary Mustard
Hoary Ragwort
Hoary Stock
Hoary Whitlowgrass
Hohe Rauke
Holly Fern
Holm Oak
Horse Chestnut
Horse-Radish
Houndstongue
Hsi ming
Hurf Al May
Hutchinia
Hutchinsia
Hutchinsia alpina
Hybrid Watercress

Nabo
Nachtviole

Narihira Bamboo
Narihiradake
Narrow Buckler Fern
Narrow Cudweed
Narrow-fruited Water-cress
Narrow-Leaved Bittercress
Narrow-leaved Eel-Grass
Narrow-leaved Lungwort
Naveterinary
Nettle-leaved Bellflower
Narrow-Leaved Pepperwort
New York Aster
New Zealand Bittercress
Nodding Bur-Marigold
Northern Bedstraw
Northern Beech Fern
Northern Buckler Fern
Northern Fir-moss
Northern Rock-Cress
Northern Water Forgetmenot
Northern Yellow-cress
Norwegian Cudweed
Norwegian Mugwort
nosebleed plant

Tall rocket
Tall Sisymbrium
Tall Wormwood
Tambouret des champs
Tansy
Tenby Daffodil
Teraspic
Thale Cress
Thlaspi Blanc
Thoroughwort Penny cress
thousand-leaf
thousand-seal

Three-lobed Crowfoot
Thread-leaved Water-Crowfoot
Thyme Broomrape
Todrilal
Toothwort
Touch-Me-Not Balsam
Tower Cress
Tower-cress
Tower Mustard
Tower Rock-cress
Traveller's Joy
Treacle Mustard
Trifid Bur-Marigold
Trumpet narcissus
Tuberous Comfrey
Tufted Forget-me-not
Tumble Mustard
Tumbling Mustard
Tunbridge Filmy Fern
Turkey Oak
Turkish "Rocket"
Turm-Gansenkresse
Turnipweed
Twisted Whitlow-Grass

 

C

I

O

U

 

Cakilier
Camelina
Camelina pilosa
Cameline ciliee
Canadian Fleabane
Canadian Goldenrod
Canadian horseweed
Canapicchia glaciale
Candytuft
Canola Oil Plant

Canterbury Bell
Caquillier maritime
Cardamine des pres
Carraspique
Carrot Broomrape
catsear
Cat's-foot
Celery-leaved Buttercup
Chalice flower
Chamois Cress
Changing Forget-me-not
Charlock
Ch'ing chieh
Chimakizasa
Chinese Mugwort
Chou
Choux-Marin
Cleavers
Cliff Clubmoss
Clove-Scented Broomrape
Clown's Mustard
Clustered Bellflower
Cochleaire
cocklebur
Coclearia
Coeur de cure
Col Marina
Coltsfoot
Columbine
Colza
Colza Oil Plant
Common Amaranth
Common Annual Sow-thistle
Common Blue-sow-thistle
Common Buckthorn
Common Broomrape
Common Buckler Fern
Common Butterwort
Common Catsear
Common Chamomile
Common Clubmoss
Common Comfrey
Common Cudweed
Common Dodder
Common Dog Mustard
Common Duckweed
Common Dutch Agrimony
Common Eel-Grass
Common Elm
Common Fleabane
Common Foreget-me-not
Common Giant Mustard
Common Gromwell
Common Horsetail
Common Lungwort
Common Meadow-Rue
Common Moonwort
Common Penny-Cress
Common Pepperwort
Common Polypody
Common Quillwort
Common Ragwort
Common Salsify Common Scurvy-Grass
Common Spleenwort
Common Wart Cress
Common Water-crowfoot
Common Whitlow-Grass
Common Winter-Cress
common yarrow
Common Yellow Rocket
Confused Michaelmas-daisy
Copper Beech
Coralroot Bittercress
Coral-Wort
Corn Buttercup
Corn Chamomile
Corn Cleavers
Corn Daisy
Corn Gromwell
Corn Marigold
Corn Sow-Thistle
Cornish Bellflower
Cotswold Penny-Cress
Cotton weed
Cottonweed
Couve-Marinha
Cranson
Cranson officinal
Creamy Butterbur
Creases
Creasy Greens
Creeping Bellflower
Creeping Buttercup
Creeping Forget-me-not
Creeping Spearwort
Creeping Water Forgetmenot
Creeping Yellow Cress
Creeping Yellow Field Cress
Cressen
Cresson
Cresson alenois
Cresson d'eau
Cresson de fontaine
Cresson des fontaines
Cresson des jardins
Cresson de terre
Cressonette
Crested Buckler Fern
Crisp Rockbrake
Crocus-leaved goatsbeard
Crosswort
Crowberry
Crystal Carpet
Cucharita
Cuckold's Beggar-ticks
Cuckoo Flower
Cape Cudweed

Immergrunes Felsenblumchen
Indian Balsam
Indian Fountain Bamboo
Indian Posey
Inflated Duckweed
Intermediate Polypody
Interrupted Clubmoss
Inundated Clubmoss
Irish Bladderwort
Irish Fleabane
Isle of Man Cabbage
Italian Alder
Italian Wild Radish
Ivory Bells
Ivy Broomrape
Ivy Duckweed
Ivy-leaved Bellflower
Ivy-leaved Crowfoot
 

Oak Fern
Oblong Woodsia
Old-man-in-the-Spring

old man's pepper
Oranda-Garashi

Orange Balsam
Oregon Grape
Oriental Borage
Orientalis Rauke
Ornamental Cabbage
Ornamental Cress
Ornamental Kale
Oruga Maritima
Ox-eye Chamomile
Ox-Eye Daisy
Oxford Ragwort
Oxtongue Broomrape
Oyster Plant

Ukonnauris
Unbranched Bur Reed
Upland Cress
Upland Scurvy-Grass
Upright Hedge Bedstraw

 

D

J

P

V

 

Daffy-down-dilly
Daisy
Damask Violet
Dame's Rocket
Dame's Violet
Dandakorn
dandelion
Danish Scurvy Grass
Devil's Beggar-ticks
devil's nettle
Disc mayweed
Dittander
Dogberry
Dogwood
Downy Birch
Drave blanchatre
Drave printaniere
Dutch Rush
Dune Cabbage
Durmast Oak
Dwarf Birch
Dwarf Cornel
Dwarf Cudweed
Dwarf Eel-Grass
Dyer's Chamomile
Dyer's Weed
Dyer's Woad

Jack-by-the-Hedge
Jack-Go-To-Bed-At-Noon
Japanese Sweet Coltsfoot
Jersey Buttercup
Jersey Cudweed
Jersey Fern
Jersey Forget-me-not
Jerusalem Ash
Jerusalem Star
Jewel-Weed
Ji cai
Jim Hill Mustard
Jointed Charlock
Johnny-go-to-bed-at-noon
Joseph and Mary
Juliana
Julienne des dames
Juniper

Pale Butterwort
Pale Forget-me-not
Pale Madwort
Paris Daisies
Parsley Fern
Pasque Flower
Passerage des Champs
Pearl Everlasting
Pearl-flowered Life Everlasting
Pedunculate Oak
Penny Cress
Pennycress
Peppergrass
Pepperwort
Perennial Cress
Perennial Peppercress
Perennial Pepperweed
Perennial Sow Thistle
Perennial Wall Rocket
Perfoliate Pennycress
Pestilence Wort
Pfeilkresse
Pheasant's Eye
Pigweed
Pineapple Weed
Pink Shepherd's Purse
Piperisa
Ploughman's Spikenard
Plymouth Pear
Pond Water-crowfoot
Prairie Sagewort
Prickly Comfrey
Prickly Lettuce
Prickly Sow-Thistle
Pszonak drobnokwiatowy
Purple Beech
Purple Clematis
Purple Coltsfoot
Purple Gromwell
Purple Salsify
Purple Toothwort
Purple Viper's Bugloss
Pyrenean Columbine

Variegated Horsetail
Variegated Monkshood

Various-leaved Crowfoot
Vegetable Oyster
Venus's Looking-Glass
Verschieden-blattrige Kresse
Viper's Bugloss
Viper's Grass
Virgins Bower

 

E

K

Q

W

 

Early Adder's Tongue
Early Cress
Early Forgetmenot
Early Golden-Rod
Early Scurvy-Grass
Early Winter-Cress
Early Yellow Rocket
Eastern Marsh Ragwort
Eastern Rocket
Echte Brunnenkresse
Echtes Barbarakraut
Elecampane
Elecampane inula
English Elm
English Scurvy-Grass
Erba Barbara
Erbe Sophia
Erismo
Erva Adheira
Erva-De-Santa-Barbara
Erva-Pimenteira
Erysimum
European Goldenrod
European Pellitory
Evergreen Oak

Kasikotu
Kelch-Steinkraut
Khardal Aswad
Killarney Fern
Knapweed Broomrape
Knoblauchsrauke
Kresse
Krodde

Queen's Gilliflowers

Wall Bedstraw
Wall Daisy
Wall Lettuce
Wall Rocket
Wall Rue
Wall Whitlow-Grass
Wallflower
Wallflower Cabbage
Warty Cabbage
Watercress
Water Crowfoot
Water Forget-me-not
Water Hawthorn
Water Horsetail
Wavy Bittercress
Wayside Cudweed
Weedy Cudweed
Wegrauke
Western Polypody
Western Skunk Cabbage
White Alyssum
White Amaranth
White Butterbur
White Comfrey
White Cross
White Mustard
White Pigweed
White Tansy
Whitetop
Wild Arugula
Wild Cabbage
Wild Candytuft
Wild Daffodil
Wild Madder
Wild Mustard
Wild Pellitory
Wild Radish
Wild Rauke
Wild Rocket
Wild Roquette
Wild Turnip
Wild Wallflower
Willow-leaf Lettuce
Willowleaf Yellowhead
Wilson's Filmy Fern
Wieczornik
Wiesen-Schaumkraut
Wilde Sumpfkresse
Winter Aconite
Winter Cress
Winter Heliotrope
Winterkresse
Woad
Wood Anemone
Wood cudweed
Wood Forget-me-not
Wood Goldilocks
Wood Horsetail
Woodland Ragwort
Woodruff
Wormseed Wallflower
Wormwood
Wych Elm

 

F

L

R

XYZ

 

Fair-maid-of-France
false dandelion

False Flax
False London Rocket
False Mayweed
Fan-leaved Buttercup
Fan WEED
Fat Duckweed
Feld-Kresse
Fen Bedstraw
Feverfew
Field Bindweed
Field Cress
Field Elm
Field Fleawort
Field Forget-me-not
Field Gromwell
Field Horsetail
Field Madder
Field Mustard
Field Pennycress
Field Peppergrass
Field Pepperweed
Field Pepperwort
Field Sagebrush
Field Sagewort
Field Southernwood
Field Wormwood
Finkensame
flatweed
Fir Clubmoss
Fleur de Nostra-Dama
Flixweed
Floating Bur-Reed
Flor de pasque
Forked Spleenwort
French Meadow-Rue
French Weed
Fringed Quickweed
Fringed Water-Lily
Fruhes Barbarakraut
Fruhlings-Hungerblumchen

Lady Fern
Lady's Bedstraw

Lady's Smock
Lanceolate Spleenwort
Land Cress
Land Quillwort
Large Bindweed
Large Bittercress
Large Cuckoo Pint
Larkspur
Late Goldenrod
Lauch-Hellerkraut
Lauchkraut
Lauchrauch
Least Adder's Tongue
Least Bur-Reed
Least Lettuce
Leindotter
Lemon-Scented Fern
Lent cock
Lent Lilly
Lent Rose
Leopardsbane
Lepidio
Least Duckweed
Least Pepperwort
Lesser Bladderwort
Lesser Celandine
Lesser Clubmoss
Lesser Duckweed
Lesser Hawkbit
Lesser Meadow-Rue
Lesser Spearwort
Lesser Swinecress
Life everlasting
Limestone Polypody
Little Clubmoss
Loddon Lily
Loffelkraut
London Rocket
Long-Leaved Scurvy-Grass
Long-rooted Cat's Ear
Lords and Ladies
Lundy Cabbage
Lut Putiah

Rabanillo
Rabanillo Blanco
Rabaniza
Rabano Picante
Rabano-Picanto
Rabano Rusticano
Rabano Silvestre
Raifort
Raifort Cran
Raiz-Forte

Rampion Bellflower
Rape
Rapeseed
Raphanus landra
Ravenelle
Red Cole
Red-Tipped Cudweed
Rigid Buckler Fern
River Water-Crowfoot
Roadside Pennycress
Rock Clubmoss
Rock Cress
Rock Whitlow-Grass
Rocket Candytuft
Rocket Cress
Rocket Larkspur
rooted catsear
Rootless duckweed
Roqueta de mar
Roquette-de-mer
Rosy Cress
Rotliches Hirtentaschelkraut
Rough Comfrey
Rough-fruited Buttercup
Rough Hawkbit
Rough Horsetail
Round-Headed Rampion
Round-leaved Crowfoot
Royal Fern
Runch
Russian Comfrey
Rusty-Back
Rusty Cliff Fern
Rzezuszka

Yabani Hardal
Yabani Tere Otu
Yarrow

Yarrow Broomrape
Yellow Anemone
Yellow Birdsnest
Yellow Chamomile
Yellow Cress
Yellow crowbell
Yellow Field Cress
Yellow Mustard
Yellow Rocket
Yellow Skunk Cabbage
Yellow Watercress
Yellow Whitlow-Grass
Zachenschotchen
Zurron de Pastor
Zweiknotiger Krahenfuss
Zwerg-Steppenkresse

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

 

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Menus and Master changed January 2016.
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