Ivydene Gardens Blue Wildflowers Note Gallery:
Mauve Flowers with
Habitat of Grassland - Acid, Neutral, Chalk or Maritime Index

Plant Height from Text Border

Blue = 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

Green=24-72 inches (60-180 cms)

Red = 72+ inches (180+ cms)

Plant Soil Moisture from Text Background

Wet Soil

Moist Soil

Dry Soil

Click on thumbnail to change this comparison page to the Plant Description Page of the plant named in the Text box below the photo.
Click on first Underlined Text in Text Box below Thumbnail to transfer to its Family page.

falpinecolflomeadowrue

fseaflot1rocket

fcommonflotdogviolet

fhairyflotviolet

fmarshflot1violet

fteesdaleflot2violet

fwoodflotdogviolet

cseaflo1holly

BUTTER-CUP. Alpine Meadow-Rue
BANKS OF STREAMS

May-Jul

CRUCIF-ER
Sea Rocket
STREAM-SIDE

May-Jul

VIOLET
Common Dog Violet
ALL DRY OR MOIST SOILS

Apr-Jun

VIOLET Hairy Violet
CHALK GRASS-LAND

Mar-May

VIOLET Marsh Violet
MARSH, ACID BOG

Apr-Jul

VIOLET Teesdale Violet
SANDY HILL-SIDE

May

VIOLET Wood Dog Violet
WOODS, HEDGE-BANKS ON CHALK
Mar-May

UMBELL-IFER
Sea Holly
COASTAL SAND DUNES

Jul-Aug

fcolumbinecolflo

fmonkshoodcolflo

fdamesflot1violet

fopiumflotpoppy

 

 

 

 

BUTTER-CUP Columb-ine
CHALK under DAMP GRASS-LAND

May-Jul

BUTTER-CUP Monks-hood
STREAM BANKS, DAMP MEAD-OWS

May-Jun

CRUCIF-ER Dame's Violet
HEDGE-ROWS, RIVER-BANKS

May-Aug

POPPY
Opium Poppy
ROAD-SIDE, WASTE GROUND

Jun-Aug

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Marjorie Blamey's Wild Flowers by Colour by Marjorie Blamey (ISBN 0-7136-7237-4. Published by A & C Black Publishers Ltd in 2005) has illustrations of each wild flower of Britain and Northern Europe split into the following 13 colours.

Instead of colour illustrations, this plant gallery has thumbnail pictures of wild flowers of Britain in the same colour split system:-

White A-D and Habitats of Saltmarshes, Beaches, Rocks and Cliff Tops
White E-P and Other Habitats
White Q-Z and Number of Petals
Cream and Coastal Sandy Shores and Dunes
Yellow A-G and Pollinator
Yellow H-Z and Poisonous Plants
Orange and Habitat of Hedgerows and Road Verges
Red and Habitat of Pinewoods
Pink A-G and Habitats of Lakes, Canals and Rivers
Pink H-Z and Habitats of Marshes, Fens and Bogs
Mauve and Habitat of Grassland - Acid, Neutral or Chalk
Purple and Habitats of Old Buildings and Walls
Blue and Flower Legend
Green and Habitat of Broad-leaved Woods
Brown and Food for Butterfly / Moth
Multi-Coloured and Habitats of Heaths and Moors
Shrub and Small Tree and Habitats of River Banks and Other Freshwater Margins
Seed 1 and Scented Flower, Foliage or Root
Seed 2 and Story of Their Common Names
Non-Flower Plants and Non-Flowering Plant Use
Introduction and Edible Plant Parts
Site Map and Use of Plant
 

Form

Number of Flower Petals

lessershape1meadowrue

cosmoscflobipinnatuspuritygarnonswilliams

irishcflobladderwort

ajugacflo1genevensisfoord2a

aethionemacfloarmenumfoord

anemonecflo1hybridafoord

anemonecflo1blandafoord

Petal-less

1

2

3

4

5

Above 5

Flower Shape - Simple

 

These in this Table are for Ever-green Perennials

anthericumcfloliliagofoord

argemonecflomexicanaflowermissouriplants

geraniumcinereumballerinaflot9

paeoniamlokosewitschiiflot

magnoliagrandifloracflogarnonswilliams

acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord

stachysflotmacrantha

Stars

Bowls

Cups and Saucers

Globes

Goblets and Chalices

Trumpets

Funnels

campanulacochlearifoliapusillacflofoord

clematiscflodiversifoliagarnonswilliams

Ericacarneaspringwoodwhitecflogarnonswilliams

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming

 

 

 

Bells

Thimbles

Urns

Salverform

 

 

 

Flower Shape - Elab--orated

prunellaflotgrandiflora

aquilegiacfloformosafoord

lilliumcflomartagonrvroger

laburnumcflowaterivossiistandardpage

brachyscomecflorigidulakevock

scabiosacflo1columbariawikimediacommons

melancholycflothistle

Tubes, Lips and Straps

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Hats, Hoods and Helmets

Stan-dards, Wings and Keels

Discs and Florets

Pin-Cushions

Tufts

androsacecforyargongensiskevock

androsacecflorigidakevock

argyranthemumfloc1madeiracrestedyellow

agapanthuscflosafricanusbluekevock

 

 

 

Cushion

Umbel

Buttons

Pompoms

 

 

 

Natural Arrange--ments

bergeniamorningredcforcoblands

ajugacfloreptansatropurpurea1

morinacfloslongifoliapershape

eremuruscflo1bungeipershapefoord

amaranthuscflos1caudatuswikimediacommons

clematiscformontanaontrellisfoord

androsacecfor1albanakevock

Bunches, Posies and Sprays

Columns, Spikes and Spires

Whorls, Tiers and Candle-labra

Plumes and Tails

Chains and Tassels

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades

Spheres, Domes and Plates

 

Form for Evergreen Perennials:-

Mat-forming
Prostrate
Mound-forming
Spreading
Clump-forming
Stemless
Upright
Climbing
Arching

These Forms are used for Bulbs with Herbaceous and Evergreen Perennials.

 

Shape for Evergreen Shrubs:-

Columnar
Oval
Rounded
Flattened Spherical
Narrow Conical
Broad Conical
Egg-shaped
Broad Ovoid
Narrow Vase-shape
Fan-shaped
Broad Fan-shape
Narrow Weeping
Broad Weeping
Single-stem Palm
Multi-stem Palm

These Forms and Shapes are also used for Deciduous and Evergreen Shrubs and Trees.

Wildflowers with Mauve Flowers

Wildflower Common Plant Name

Click on Underlined Text
to view that Wildflower Plant Description Page

Scented

Scented Leaves

Flower Photo
to show Number of Flower Petals and either Simple or Elaborated Flower Shape

Flowers Photo
to show Natural Arrangements of how the flowers are arranged

Foliage Photo
to show the shape of each leaf and the arrangement of the leaves on the foliage stem

Form Photo
to show the overall form of the plant


^
|
|

Flowering Months

Click on Underlined Text
to view photos

Habitat

Click on Underlined Text
to view further Natural Habitat details and Botanical Society of the British Isles Distribution Map


Habitat to view further Natural Habitat details and Botanical Society of the British Isles Distribution Map.

Native in:-
1. Western Europe = Portugal, Spain, France, Ireland, Great Britain, Belgium and Holland.
2. Northern Europe = Iceland, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland.
3. Central Europe = Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Poland, Czechoslovakia and Hungary.
4. Mediterranean Europe = Spain, France, Italy, Yugoslavia, Albania, Greece and Turkey.
5. South-East Europe = Yugoslavia, Albania, Greece, Turkey, Bulgaria and Romania, and
6. Soviet Union completes the Regions of Europe

Number of Petals

Without Petals.

1 Petal or Comp-osite of many 1 Petal Flowers as Disc or Ray Floret .

2 Petals.
3 Petals.
4 Petals.
5 Petals.
6 Petals.
Over 6 Petals.

Foliage Colour

Height x Spread in inches (cms)

(1 inch = 2.5 cms,
12 inches = 1 foot = 30 cms,
24 inches = 2 feet,
3 feet = 1 yard,
40 inches = 100 cms)
Click on Underlined
text
to view its Wildflower FAMILY Page

Comment
and
Botanical Name

Click on Underlined Botanical Name
to link to Plant or Seed Supplier

 

See illustration
on Page xxx in Wild Flowers by Colour by Marjorie Blamey. Published in 2005 by A&C Black

 

Botanical Name
Click on Underlined Text in:-
Botanical Name to link to Plant or Seed Supplier

Alpine Meadow-rue
(Arctic Meadow-rue)

falpineflomeadowrue

Flower

May-July

A small, rhizomatous perennial of mountain habitats. It is found on damp rock ledges, at the open edges of stony streams and flushes and in thin grassland. It is a good indicator of substrates which are at least slightly base-rich.
Native in Northern regions or mountains of Central Europe.

Without Petals

Dark Green above, whitish below

6 x 6
(15 x 15)

Buttercup Family

Thalictrum alpinum

Alpine Milk-vetch

 

Native in Central Europe, France, Great Britain, Spain, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Italy, Yugoslavia, Romania and Soviet Union, but not in Hungary.

 

 

 

Astragalus alpinus

Alpine Pennycress
(Penny Cress)

April-July

A perennial, or rarely biennial, herb almost confined in Britain to rocks or soils enriched with lead or zinc, being found on spoil heaps and mine waste and on metalliferous river gravels. It is also found, rarely, on outcrops and scree of limestone and other base-rich rocks, particularly in Scotland.
Native and widespread in Europe.

 

 

 

Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1 Family

Thlaspi alpestre
(Thlaspi alpinum,
Thalspi carule-scens)

Alpine Sow-Thistle
(Alpine Lettuce,
Alpine Blue Sow-thistle, Blue Sow Thistle)

Jul-Sep

A tall perennial of ledges inaccessible to grazing animals on moist, predominantly N.-facing acidic rocks, often where there is late snow-lie.
Native in much of Europe, except in Portugal, Ireland, Belgium, Holland, Iceland, Denmark, Greece and Turkey.

 

 

 

Daisy Catsears Family

Cicerbita alpina
(Lactuca alpina,
Mulgedium alpina)

Autumn Squill

Jul-Sep

Native in Mediterranean Portugal, Great Britain, Germany, Switzerland, Europe, South-East Europe, Hungary and Soviet Union.

 

 

 

Lily Family

Scilla autumnalis

Bird's-eye Primrose

cbirdseyeflo1primrose

May-June

Native in much of Europe, except in Portugal, Ireland, Belgium, Holand, Iceland, Norway, Albania, Greece and Turkey

 

 

6 x 6
(15 x 15)

Primrose Family

Primula farinosa

Bithynian Vetch

 

Native in Mediterranean Europe, Portugal, Great Britain, Bulgaria and Soviet Union.

 

 

 

Vicia bithynica

Black Horehound

 

Native in most of Europe, except Iceland. Introduced in Ireland, Norway and Finland.

 

 

 

Ballota nigra

Blue Fleabane

bluefflosfleabane

Flowers

July onwards

An annual or perennial herb of open, well-drained, skeletal neutral or calcareous soils, often on warm, S.-facing slopes. Habitats include sand dunes, sand-pits, spoil and waste heaps from quarries, railway ballast, industrial waste and cinders. It also grows on rock outcrops, especially of chalk and limestone and on mortared walls.
Native in all Europe, except in Iceland and Turkey.

 

 

 

Daisy Cudweeds Family

Erigeron acer

Butterfly Iris
(Blue Iris)

June-July

A rhizomatous perennial herb which is grown in gardens and is naturalised in grassy places, by ditches, on banks and on roadside verges. It also occurs as a relic of cultivation. Native in Great Britain.

 

 

 

Iris Family

Iris spuria

Columbine

fcolumbinecolflo1

May-July

Native populations of this perennial are found on calcareous soil over limestone rocks in England and Wales. It typically grows in woodland glades and open scrub, by woodland rides and streamsides, in damp grassland and fen, and on scree slopes. Garden escapes can be naturalised in quarries, on roadsides, railway banks and old walls.

5 tubular Petals

Green

36 x 12 (90 x 30)

Buttercup Family

Visited by long-tongued humble-bees for pollen and nectar. A local plant of woods and wet places on calcareous soil or fen peat.

Aquilegia vulgaris

Common Calamint

 

Found on dry banks, usually calcareous; from Yorks, Cumberland and Isle of Man southwards and from Louth and Donegal suthwards in Great Britain.
Native in Central and Southern Europe from France to the Black Sea; North Africa.

 

 

 

Calamintha ascendens
(Cala-mintha officinalis,
Satureja ascendens)

Common Comfrey
(Comfrey)

May onwards

Native in most of Europe: introduced into Iceland.
Used medicinally for healing wounds, etc; the roots were used to make a kind of gum for the treatment of wool before spinning.

 

 

 

Borage Family

Sym-phytum officinale

Common Corn Salad
(Cornsalad,
Lamb's Lettuce,
Corn Salad)

 

Native in all Europe, except in Iceland
Sometimes cultivated as a salad plant.

 

 

 

Valerianella locusta
(Valerianella olitoria)

Common Dog-violet

fcommonflotdogviolet1

 

Native in all Europe, except in Turkey.

 

 

 

Violet Family

Viola riviniana

Common Sea-Lavender
(Sea Lavender)

 

Native in Western Europe (except in Ireland), Denmark, Sweden, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Bulgaria and Romania

 

 

 

Limonium vulgare
(Statice limonium)

Spotted Orchid
(Common Spotted Orchid)

 

Native and widespread in Europe.

 

 

 

Dactyl-orhiza fuchsii (Dacty-lorchis fuchsii,
Orchis fuchsii,
Orchis okellyi)

Water-Plantain
(Common Water-Plantain)

 

Native to all of Europe except Iceland

 

 

 

Alisma plantago-aquatica

Coralroot Bittercress
(Coral-Wort,
Toothwort
,
Coral-root)
coralrootbittercresscflot2a

Flowers

fcoralrootflobittercress
Flower

 

A rhizomatous perennial herb which grows in Britain in two habitats: on dry woodland slopes over chalk in the Chilterns, and in damp woodlands over clay in the Weald. Elsewhere it is an escape from cultivation by roads and in woodland and parkland.
Native in most of Europe, except Portugal, Spain, Ireland, Iceland and Albania.

 

 

24 x 12
(60 x 30)

Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1 Family

Cardamine bulbifera
(Dentaria bulbifera)

Corn Mint

 

Native in most of Europe, except in Portugal, Iceland, Albania and Turkey

 

 

 

Mentha arvensis

Creeping Thistle

creepingfflosthistle

Flowers

June onwards

A perennial herb of over-grazed pastures, hay meadows and rough grassy places, roadsides, arable fields and other cultivated land, and in urban habitats and waste ground. Plants regenerate freely from rhizome fragments which are broken up by ploughing or other disturbance. Native in all Europe; introduced in Iceland.

 

 

 

Daisy Thistle Family

Cirsium arvense
(Carduus arvensis)

Crow Garlic
(Wild Onion)

June-July

Native in all Europe except for Iceland.

 

 

 

Lily Garlic Family

Allium vineale

Lady's Smock
(Cuckoo Flower,
Berro de Prado,
Cardamine des pres, Cressen,
Cressonette,
Meadow Cress,
Saint George,
Saint Jean,
Spinks,
Wiesen-Schaumkraut,
Yabani Tere Otu
)

fladysflotsmock1
 

April-June

A perennial herb of wet grassy places on moderately fertile, seasonally waterlogged soils in woods, wet meadows, fens and flushes. In upland areas it is also found in rush pasture and bryophyte-rich springs. It occasionally persists in gardens and lawns. It is morphologically and cytologically variable, many clones reproducing by rooting from the leaves.
Native in all of Europe, except Iceland.

 

 

16 x 12
(40 x 30)

Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2 Family

Cardamine pratensis

Dame's Violet
(Arragone,
Damask Violet,
Dame's Rocket,
Gemeine Nachtviole, Juliana,
Julienne des dames, Matronal,
Nachtviole,
Queen's Gilliflowers, Sweet Dame's Violet, Sweet Rocket,
White Cross,
Wieczornik
)

fdamesflot1violet1

May-August

Native in Spain, France, Austria, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Italy, Yugoslavia, Albania, Romania and Soviet Union: introduced elswhere including in Great Britain - where it is widely naturalized; usually near gardens except in the extreme North.

 

 

36 x 24
(90 x 60)

Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1 Family

Hesperis matronalis

Early Scurvy-Grass
(Danish Scurvy Grass)

fearlyflosscurvygrass

Flowers

February-September

A winter-annual of cliff-tops, sand dunes and sea-walls, and on old walls and pavements in coastal towns; generally preferring open ground on well-drained sandy soils or bare rock. It used to occur on railway ballast, and is now frequent along inland roadsides.

 

 

8 x 12
(20 x 30)

Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1 Family

Cochlearia danica

Dwarf Mallow

June onwards

Native almost throughout Europe.

 

 

 

Mallow Family

Malva neglecta
(Malva rotundifolia)

Pale Wood Violet
(Early Dog-Violet,
Wood Dog-violet)

fwoodflotdogviolet1a1

 

Native and widespread in Europe.

 

 


Violet Family

Viola reichen-bachiana
(Viola sylvestris)

Early Gentian

May-June

Native in calcareous grassland from Cornwall and Wilts to Oxford and Surrey in Great Britain.

 

 

 

Gentian Family

Gentianella anglica
(Gentiana anglica)

Field Gentian
(Feld-Enzian in Germany,
faltgentiana in Sweden
)

fieldfflogentian

Flower

 

Native in much of Europe, except in Portugal, Iceland, Hungary, Albania, Yugoslavia Turkey, Bulgaria and Romania.
The roots contain bitter properties; used in brewing in place of hops.

 

 

 

Gentian Family

Gentianella campestris
(Gentiana campestrs,
Gentianella baltica)

Field Madder

May onwards

Native in all Europe, except in Iceland.

 

 

 

Bedstraw Family

Sherardia arvensis

Field Scabious

 

Native in all Europe, except in Turkey.

 

 

24-36 x
(60-90 x )

Knautia arvensis
(Scabiosa arvensis)

Field Woundwort

 

Native in all Europe (except in Iceland and Turkey): introduced into Norway.

 

 

 

Stachys arvensis

Greater Periwinkle

 

Native in Mediterranean Europe (except in Turkey): introduced elsewhere

 

 

 

Vinca major

Ground Ivy

 

Native in all Europe, except in Iceland.
Used in herbal remedies for coughs and as a tonic and vermifuge.

 

 

 

Glechoma hederacea
(Nepeta hederacea,
Nepeta glechoma)

Hairy Tare

 

Native in all Europe: introduced into Iceland.

 

 

 

Vicia hirsuta

Hairy Violet

fhairyflotviolet1

 

Native in most of Europe (except in Portugal, Iceland and Turkey): introduced into Finland

 

 

 

Violet Family

Viola hirta

Harebell
(Hairbell,
Bluebell of Scotland,
Scottish Bluebell)

harebellfflo1

Flower

 

A rhizomatous perennial herb of dry, open, infertile habitats including grassland, fixed dunes, rock ledges, roadsides and railway banks. It tolerates a wide range of soil pH, being found on both mildly acidic and calcareous substrates, and heavy-metal tolerant races are known.
Native in all Europe, except in Portugal and Turkey.

 

 

6-9 x
(15-22.5 x )

Bellflower Family

Campanula rotundifolia

Ling
(Heather,
Heath)

lingfflos

Flowers

lingffol

Foliage

August-September

A low shrub, often dominant on heaths, moors and nutrient-poor grasslands, and in open woodland on acidic soils, ranging from dry exposed habitats to wet peat bogs. It can colonise newly available habitats.

Native in all Europe, except for Turkey, Hungary, Bulgaria and Albania.
An important plant in the economy of northern peoples; it is used for fuel, bedding, thatching, insulation, dyeing and also as fodder for stock and a honey plant for bees. It is also used for making brushes, brooms, baskets and rope.

 

 

12-24 x 12-24
(30-60 x 30-60)

Heath Family

Calluna vulgaris

Heath Speedwell
(Common Speedwell)

heathfflo5speedwell

Flower from Burham in Kent

May-August

This perennial herb is found in open woods and woodland rides, on banks, in grassland and on heathland. It grows on well-drained, often moderately acidic or leached soils, and in some grasslands is confined to raised ground or anthills.
Native in all Europe.
A bitter and astringent plant used in herbal remedies.

 

 

Figwort - Speedwells Family

Veronica officinalis

Hoary Plantain

hoaryfflosplantain

Flowers

May-August

A perennial herb, characteristic of chalk and limestone soils but also occurring on heavy clay soils. The main habitats are downland grassland and tracks, calcareous pasture and mown grassland (such as churchyards); it is less frequent in hay meadows and on fixed dunes, and is sometimes found in water-meadows which receive calcareous water (Grose, 1957). Seed appears to be short-lived. Native all Europe (except in Portugal and Iceland): introduced into Ireland.

 

 

 

Plantain Family

Plantago media

Sea Stock
(Hoary Stock,
Stock)

May-July

A short-lived perennial, well-naturalised on sea-cliffs, shingle and other habitats by the sea, and occasionally inland where it is more obviously a garden escape. Native in Mediterranean Europe, (except in Albania), Portugal and Great Britain.

 

 

 

Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2 Family

Matthiola incana

Horse Mint

 

Native in all Europe, except in Iceland, Norway and Finland.
Widely used in the past for flavouring and in medicine

 

 

 

Mentha longifolia

Ivy-leaved Speedwell
(Ivy Speedwell)

ivyfflowithstemspeedwell

Flower with stem

March-August

An annual of cultivated and waste ground, woodland rides, hedge banks, walls, banks and gardens, found on sandy, loam or clay soils. V. hederifolia seeds freely, with germination in spring or autumn. Native throughout Europe.

 

 

 

Figwort-Speedwell Family

Veronica hederifolia

Ivy-leaved Toadflax
(Mother of Thousands)

ivyleavedfflotoadflaxbritishflora

Flower

ivyleavedfflostoadflaxbritishflora

Flowers

April onwards

This perennial herb is well-established on old walls and bridges, pavements, and in other well-drained rocky and stony places, often near habitation. It is also found as large, prostrate patches on shingle beaches. It can root from fragments or from nodes, and its seeds germinate readily in brick and stone mortar.
Native in Mediterranean Europe (except in Albania and Turkey), Portugal, Bulgaria, Romania and Soviet Union: introduced into Central Europe, Ireland, Great Britain, Belgium and Holland.

 

 

 

Figwort - Mulleins Family

Linaria cymbalaria
(Cymbalaria muralis)

Lax Sea-Lavender
(Lax-flowered Sea Lavender)

 

Native in muddy salt-marshes in Great Britain northwards to Dumfries and Northumberland.
Native in Western Europe from Brittany to Norway and Sweden.

 

 

 

Limonium humile
(Statice bahusiensis,
Statice rariflora)

Lesser Calamint

 

Native in much of Europe, except Northern Europe, Ireland, Belgium, Holland, Czechoslavakia and Hungary.
Yields an essential oil.

 

 

 

Calamintha nepeta
(Saturreja nepeta)

Lesser Periwinkle

 

Native in most of Europe, except in northern Europe, Ireland and Albania.

 

 

 

Vinca minor

Marsh Pea

June-July

A perennial herb of base-rich fens, reed-beds and fen-meadows; also, rarely, on marshy ground by rivers.
Native in Northern Europe and Central Europe.
Native in fens and damp grassy and bushy places - scattered in England, Wales and Ireland.

 

 

18-36 x
(45-90 x )

Peaflower Vetches/Peas Family

Lathyrus palustris

Bog Violet
(Marsh Violet)


fmarshflot1violet1

 

Native in much of Europe, except in Albania, Greece and Turkey.

 

 

 

Violet Family

Viola palustris

Matted Sea-lavender

 

Native in drier parts of sandy salt-marshes on the coasts of Norfolk and Suffolk.
Native in Spain, France, Italy, Yugoslavia, Greece, Romania and Soviet Union.

 

 

 

Limonium bellidifolium
(Statice reticulata,
Statice caspia,
Statice bellidifolia)

Monkshood
(Common Monkshood)


fmonkshoodcolflo1

Flower

fmonkshoodfol

Foliage

May-June

These tuberous perennial herbs grow on calcareous to slightly acidic soil along stream banks, often in shade, in damp, open woodland and sometimes in damp meadows, and as aliens on roadsides, waste ground and rubbish tips.

7 Petals

All 100 species are highly poisonous and have proved fatal owing to the presence of the powerful and deadly alkaloid aconitin and of associated alkaloids

Light Green

36 x 12 (90 x 30)

Buttercup Family

Pollinated by long-tongued bumble-bees.

Aconitum anglicum (Aconitum napellus)

Shady stream banks in South-West England and in Wales

Menziesia
(Blue Heath,
Blue Mountainheath in USA
,
Mountain Heath)

June

This low shrub occurs in acidic, free-draining sites on steep, usually N.- to E.-facing rocky mountain slopes. It is usually found in dwarf shrub communities, though it sometimes occurs in herb-rich grassland. All sites have a prolonged snow-lie. Flowering is irregular, and seed production generally poor. Native in Northern Europe and Pyrenees.

 

 

 

Heath Family

Phyllodoce caerulea
(Menziesia coerulea,
Bryanthus coeruleus)

Northern Rockcress

June-August

Native. A local plant of alpine rocks in North Wales, Scotland, the inner and Outer Hebrides, and Shetland; Ireland: only on the Galtee Moun-tains and the Glenade Moun-tains. An arctic-alpine, preferring calcareous rocks, on the mountains of Central Europe and in the Fae-roes, Iceland, Sca-ndinavia, Finland, Siberia and North America.

 

 

 

Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2 Family

Cardamin-opsis petraea
(Arabis petraea,
Cardamine petraea,
Arabis hispida)

Opium Poppy

fopiumflotpoppy1

June-August

White or Lilac coloured, with a purple patch at the base of the lilac petals in June-August followed by black or white seeds in seed pods

An annual occurring as a casual garden escape on roadsides, waste ground and rubbish tips, and occasionally in arable fields as a relic of cultivation for poppy seed.
Probably native of Central Europe, now naturalized in most of Europe. Probably native of Central Europe, now naturalized in most of Europe.

Petals 2+2, fugacious - plant parts that wither or fall off before the usual time -, crumpled in bud

Greyish-green, waxy, often hairless, with wavy, coarsely toothed leaves clasping the stem.

24-48 x 12 (60-120 x 30)

Poppy family

Papaver somniferum

The capsule enlarges after flowering and makes a decorative cut flower fresh or dried. Grow in Gravel Garden or Wildflower meadow.

Oxtongue Broomrape
(Picris Broomrape)

June-July

In Grassland on Picris (Ox-tongue)and Crepis (Hawksbeards) species and especially on Picris hieracioides (Hawkweed Ox-Tongue). An annual or perennial occurring mainly on the ledges and fine calcareous debris of coastal chalk cliffs where it parasitises species of Asteraceae, especially Picris hieracioides.
Native in much of Europe, except in Northern Europe, Ireland, Albania and Turkey.

 

 

 

Broomrape Family

Orobanche picridis
(Orobanche loricata, Orobanche artemisiae-campestris)

Pale Butterwort

July onwards

An insectivorous perennial herb which retains its insect-trapping leaves through the winter. It grows on damp bare peat and at the bases of grass, rush or sedge tussocks beside moorland rills, drainage ditches on former bogs, acidic flushes and wet heaths, often in places trampled by livestock or deer.
Native in Western Europe.

 

 

 

Butterwort Family

Pinguicula lusitanica

Pale Toadflax

palefflostoadflax

Flowers

June-September

This rhizomatous perennial herb is found on rough and waste ground, stony and cultivated land, grassy banks and along railway tracks, usually on dry, calcareous or base-rich soils.
Native in Spain, France, Great Britain, Belgium and Italy: introduced into Norway, Sweden, Germany and Switzerland

 

 

 

Figwort - Mulleins Family

Linaria repens

Penny-Royal
(Pennyroyal)

 

Native in most of Europe, except in Northern Europe.
Sometimes used for flavouring and formerly used medicinally.

 

 

 

Mentha pulegium

Peppermint

 

Native and widespread, often from cultivation, except in the north of Europe.
The tops of the plants are distilled to produce peppermint oil which is used in pharmacy, cordials, liquers, and for flavouring.

 

 

 

Mentha x piperita

Rock Sea-lavender

 

Native in maritime cliffs, rocks and stabilized shinglein Great Britain northwards to Wigtown and Lincoln.
Native in France, Spain and Portugal.

 

 

 

Limonium binervosum
(Statice binervosa)

Salsify
(Vegetable Oyster,
Purple Salsify,
Common Salsify,
Oyster Plant,
Jerusalem Star
,
Crocus-leaved goatsbeard)

salsifyfflo2

Flower

June-August

An annual or biennial herb, occasionally escaping from cultivation and naturalised on sea-walls, cliffs, rough grassland and road verges, especially in S.E. England. Elsewhere it is usually only casual. Edible root-food plant.
Native in Mediterranean Europe, Portugal, Bulgaria and Romania: introduced into Central Europe.
The swollen taproot is a useful vegetable, known as White Salsify; the young green shoots can also be eaten.

 

 

 

Daisy Catsears Family

Tragopogon porrifolius

Sand Crocus

sandfflo2crocus

Flower

April

A cormous perennial herb of short, open turf on freely-draining sandy ground and cliff-slopes near the sea. Reproduction is mostly by seed, with division of the corm apparently much less significant. Native in Western (including Great Britain) and Southern Europe.

 

 

 

Iris Family

Romulea columnae
(Romulea parviflora)

Sand Leek

May-August

A bulbous, perennial herb spreading mainly by bulbils in rough grassland and waste ground, on road verges and track sides and by railways. It sometimes occurs in more natural habitats such as sandy river banks, open woodlands on well-drained soils and a variety of coastal situations. Native to most of Europe.

 

 

 

Lily Garlic Family

Allium scorodo-prasum

Sea Aster
(Sea Starwort)

seafflosaster

Flowers

seafforasterbritishflora

Form

July onwards

A short-lived perennial herb occurring at low elevations in ungrazed or lightly grazed saltmarshes, especially along creeksides, and also on muddy sea-banks, tidal river banks and in brackish ditches. In W. Britain and Ireland it also grows amongst rocks and on exposed sea-cliffs. It also occurs very locally in inland saltmarshes and recently it has been recorded beside salt-treated roads. Use as herb in cooking.

 

 

 

Daisy Cudweeds Family

Aster tripolium

Sea Holly

cseaflo1holly1

Flower

fseaflo2holly1

Flower

Jul-Aug

Stiff, hairless, creeping widely, also intense glaucous glabrous and branched perennial occurring mainly on incipient and mobile sand dunes and occasionally on shingle around the coasts of the British Isles north to Shetland.

Native in much of Europe, except in Iceland, Finland, Switzerland, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Hungary.

 

 

 

Umbellifer family

Eryngium maritimum

Sea Pea

 

Native in Western Europe (Except in Belgium and Holland), Northern Europe, Germany and Poland.

 

 

 

Peaflower Vetches/Peas Family

Lathyrus japonicus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Name

Botanical Name

Habitat -

Maritime Grassland

Lesser Celandine , Pilewort

Lesser Celandine , Pilewort is
Ranunculus ficaria
flessercolflocelandine1

Buttercup Family

Visited by various flies and bees, but often setting little seed.

An aestivating perennial herb that grows in woods, hedge banks, meadows, roadsides, maritime grassland, the banks of rivers and streams and shaded waste ground. It prefers damp, loamy or clay soils, and avoids very dry, very acidic or permanently waterlogged sites.

Vigorous groundcover that forms large, dense patches on the forest floor, displacing and preventing other native plants from co-occuring.

Lesser Meadow-rue

Lesser Meadow-rue is
Thalictrum minus
flessercolflomeadowrue

Buttercup Family

Visited by various flies and bees, but often setting little seed.

A morphologically variable, perennial herb found in calcareous or other base-rich habitats where competition is low, including fixed dunes, scrubby banks, rocky lake and river edges, limestone and serpentine cliffs, limestone grassland and pavement and montane rock ledges. It also occurs in other habitats, including churchyards, hedge banks and roadsides, as a garden escape.

3 main habitats of

  • limestone rocks and grassland
  • dunes
  • streamsides or lakeside gravel and shingle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BLUE WILD FLOWER GALLERY
PAGE MENU

 

FLOWER COLOUR Comparison Page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour
NOTE Gallery with Continuation Pages from Page 2

...Blue - its page links in next 4 columns.
Use of Plant with Flowers

...Brown Botanical Names

...Cream Common Names, Coastal and Dunes, Sandy Shores and Dunes

...Green Broad-leaved Woods

...Mauve Grassland - Acid, Neutral, Chalk

...Multi-Cols Heaths and Moors

...Orange Hedgerows and Verges

...Pink A-G Lakes, Canals and Rivers

...Pink H-Z Marshes, Fens, Bogs

...Purple Old Buildings and Walls

...Red Pinewoods

...White A-D Saltmarshes. Shingle Beaches, Rocks and Cliff Tops

...White E-P Other

...White Q-Z Number of Petals


...Yellow A-G Pollinator

...Yellow H-Z Poisonous Parts

...Shrub/Tree River Banks and Other Freshwater Margins

BLUE WILD FLOWER GALLERY
PAGE MENU

 

Lists of:-

Edible Plant Parts.

Flower Legend.

Food for
Butterfly/Moth
.

Flowering plants of Chalk and Limestone Page 1
Page 2

Flowering plants of Acid Soil
Page 1

SEED COLOUR
Seed 1
Seed 2

BLUE WILD FLOWER GALLERY
PAGE MENU

 

Habitat Lists:-

Coastal and Dunes.

Broad-leaved
Woods
.

Grassland - Acid, Neutral, Chalk.

Heaths and Moors.

Hedgerows and Verges.

Lakes, Canals and Rivers.

Marshes, Fens,
Bogs
.

Old Buildings and Walls.

Pinewoods.

River Banks and
other Freshwater Margins
.

Saltmarshes.

Sandy Shores and Dunes.

Shingle Beaches, Rocks and
Cliff Tops
.

Other.
 

BLUE WILD FLOWER GALLERY
PAGE MENU

 

Number of Petals List:-
Without Petals. Other plants
without flowers.
1 Petal or
Composite of
many 1 Petal Flowers as Disc
or Ray Floret .
2 Petals.
3 Petals.
4 Petals.
5 Petals.
6 Petals.
Over 6 Petals.

BLUE WILD FLOWER GALLERY
PAGE MENU

 

Lists of:-

Pollinator.

Poisonous Parts.

Scented Flower, Foliage, Root.

Story of their Common Names.

Use of Plant with Flowers

Use for Non-Flowering Plants

BLUE WILD FLOWER GALLERY
PAGE MENU


Site Map of pages with content (o)

Introduction

What is PL@NTNET?
Pl@ntNet allows you to identify thousands of species of plants thanks to your pictures. The images you send are automatically compared to the thousands of images we have in our botanical databases. A list of plants is then proposed. The last word is yours! Currently, Pl@ntNet has 22 projects: 16 geographical projects, 3 thematic projects on ornamental and cultivated plants, and 3 microprojects.
If you wanna know everything about how to use the app: https://plantnet.org/en/how-why/
Frequently Asked Questions provides answers:-
1. What is the project "World Flora"? - "The Plant List (TPL) was a working list of all known plant species produced by the botanical community in response to Target 1 of the 2002-2010 Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC). TPL has been static since 2013, but was used as the starting point for the Taxonomic Backbone of the World Flora Online (WFO), and updated information can be found at www.worldfloraonline.org."
2. Can I use Pl@ntNet on my computer? - "Yes! the Web version of Pl@ntNet is available at the following address: identify.plantnet.org. "

 

 

WILD FLOWER GALLERY
PAGE MENU

Site Map of pages with content (o)

Introduction

Poisonous Plants


INDEX LINK TO WILDFLOWER PLANT DESCRIPTION PAGE
a-h
i-p
q-z


FLOWER COLOUR
(o)Blue
(o)Brown
(o)Cream
(o)Green
(o)Mauve
(o)Multi-Coloured
Orange
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
(o)Purple
(o)Red
(o)White1
(o)White2
(o)White3
(o)Yelow1
(o)Yelow2
(o)Shrub or Small Tree

SEED COLOUR
(o)Seed 1
(o)Seed 2

BED PICTURES
(o)Bed

HABITAT TABLES
Flowers in
Acid Soil

Flowers in
Chalk Soil

Flowers in
Marine Soil

Flowers in
Neutral Soil

Ferns
Grasses
Rushes
Sedges
 


 

See Explanation of Structure of this Website with User Guidelines to aid your use of this website.

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 1


(o)Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
(o)Arrow-Grass
(o)Arum
(o)Balsam
Bamboo
(o)Barberry
(o)Bedstraw
(o)Beech
(o)Bellflower
(o)Bindweed
(o)Birch
(o)Birds-Nest
(o)Birthwort
(o)Bogbean
(o)Bog Myrtle
(o)Borage
(o)Box
(o)Broomrape
(o)Buckthorn
(o)Buddleia
(o)Bur-reed
(o)Buttercup
(o)Butterwort
(o)Cornel (Dogwood)
(o)Crowberry
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
(o)Daffodil
(o)Daisy
(o)Daisy Cudweeds
(o)Daisy Chamomiles
(o)Daisy Thistle
(o)Daisy Catsears (o)Daisy Hawkweeds
(o)Daisy Hawksbeards
(o)Daphne
(o)Diapensia
(o)Dock Bistorts
(o)Dock Sorrels

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 2


(o)Clubmoss
(o)Duckweed
(o)Eel-Grass
(o)Elm
(o)Filmy Fern
(o)Horsetail
(o)Polypody
Quillwort
(o)Royal Fern
(o)Figwort - Mulleins
(o)Figwort - Speedwells
(o)Flax
(o)Flowering-Rush
(o)Frog-bit
(o)Fumitory
(o)Gentian
(o)Geranium
(o)Glassworts
(o)Gooseberry
(o)Goosefoot
(o)Grass 1
(o)Grass 2
(o)Grass 3
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 1
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 2
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 3 (o)Hazel
(o)Heath
(o)Hemp
(o)Herb-Paris
(o)Holly
(o)Honeysuckle
(o)Horned-Pondweed
(o)Hornwort
(o)Iris
(o)Ivy
(o)Jacobs Ladder
(o)Lily
(o)Lily Garlic
(o)Lime
(o)Lobelia
(o)Loosestrife
(o)Mallow
(o)Maple
(o)Mares-tail
(o)Marsh Pennywort
(o)Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 3


(o)Mesem-bryanthemum
(o)Mignonette
(o)Milkwort
(o)Mistletoe
(o)Moschatel
Naiad
(o)Nettle
(o)Nightshade
(o)Oleaster
(o)Olive
(o)Orchid 1
(o)Orchid 2
(o)Orchid 3
(o)Orchid 4
(o)Parnassus-Grass
(o)Peaflower
(o)Peaflower Clover 1
(o)Peaflower Clover 2
(o)Peaflower Clover 3
(o)Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
(o)Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
Pipewort
(o)Pitcher-Plant
(o)Plantain
(o)Pondweed
(o)Poppy
(o)Primrose
(o)Purslane
Rannock Rush
(o)Reedmace
(o)Rockrose
(o)Rose 1
(o)Rose 2
(o)Rose 3
(o)Rose 4
(o)Rush
(o)Rush Woodrushes
(o)Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
(o)Sandalwood
(o)Saxifrage
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 4


Seaheath
(o)Sea Lavender
(o)Sedge Rush-like
(o)Sedges Carex 1
(o)Sedges Carex 2
(o)Sedges Carex 3
(o)Sedges Carex 4
(o)Spindle-Tree
(o)Spurge
(o)Stonecrop
(o)Sundew
(o)Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
(o)Teasel
(o)Thyme 1
(o)Thyme 2
(o)Umbellifer 1
(o)Umbellifer 2
(o)Valerian
(o)Verbena
(o)Violet
(o)Water Fern
(o)Waterlily
(o)Water Milfoil
(o)Water Plantain
(o)Water Starwort
Waterwort
(o)Willow
(o)Willow-Herb
(o)Wintergreen
(o)Wood-Sorrel
(o)Yam
(o)Yew

 


WILDFLOWER INDEX

See Wildflower Common Name Index link Table ON A PAGE for more wildflower of the UK common names - from Adder's Tongue to the Goosefoot Family - together with their names in languages from America, Finland, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Sweden.
See Wildflower Botanical Name Index link table ON A PAGE for wildflower of the United Kingdom (Great Britain) botanical names, from Adder's Tongue to the Goosefoot Family.
Neither of the above 2 pages will be further updated, due to 1. Running out of space on each of the pages and 2. being replaced by the Botanical Names and Common Names Galleries from July 2020:-
Botanical Names with Common Name, Wild Flower Family, Flower Colour and Form Index of each of all the Wildflowers of the UK in 1965 are in PAGES IN THE GALLERY Brown Wildflower Gallery with page links in the top row.
Common Names with Botanical Name, Wild Flower Family, Flower Colour and Form Index of each of all the Wildflowers of the UK in 1965 are PAGES IN THE GALLERY in Cream Wildflower Gallery with page links in the top row.
Plant description, culture, propagation and photos/illustrations will be provided for every wildflower plant (from February 2021) in these 2 galleries.

After clicking on the WILD FLOWER Common Name INDEX link to Wildflower Family Page; locate that Common name on that Wildflower Family Page, then
Click on Underlined Text in:-
Common Name to view that Plant Description Page
Botanical Name to link to Plant or Seed Supplier
Flowering Months to view photos
Habitat to view further Natural Habitat details and Botanical Society of the British Isles Distribution Map

 

Common Name

Botanical Name

Habitat - Grassland - Acid, Neutral, Chalk.

Acid Grassland

Clustered Clover

 

 

Fenugreek

 

 

Hairy Bird's-foot Trefoil

 

 

Harebell

 

 

Heath Bedstraw

 

 

Spotted Medick

 

 

Tormentil

 

 

Wood Anemone or Wind Flower

Wood Anemone or Wind Flower is
Anemone nemorosa
fwoodcolfloanemone

Buttercup family

The 120 species of Anemone are sharp-tasting plants, poisonous owing to the presence of the narcotic anemonin and dangerous to cattle.

Visited for pollen by various bees and flies.

A rhizomatous perennial, found in woodland, on streamsides, under Pteridium, on hedge banks, in heathy grassland, on open moorland, in scree and on limestone pavement. It has a wide pH tolerance, but in woodlands it is most abundant where the vigour of more competitive species is reduced by acidity, waterlogging or regular coppicing.

Deciduous woodland, hedge-banks and mountains on all but highly acidic or water-logged soils in England Wales and Scotland

Long-Headed Poppy (Long Smooth-headed Poppy)

Long-Headed Poppy (Long Smooth-headed Poppy) is
Papaver dubium
flongflotheadedpoppy1a

Poppy family

Flowers visited by various pollen-collecting insects, especially bees. No nectar. Probably self-sterile.

An annual found principally in arable fields, where it can occur on both light and heavy calcareous soils. It is also found on waste ground by roadsides and railways, and in gardens. The seed is very long-lived. The commonest poppy in the North is also a native weed.

Prefers sandy soil without lime.

Use in Wildflower meadows, Butterfly & Bee Gardens, Cut Flowers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neutral Grassland

Bulbous Buttercup

Bulbous Buttercup is
Ranunculus bulbosus
fbulbouscflobuttercup1

Buttercup family

A perennial herb with a corm-like stem-base, found on well-drained, neutral or calcareous soils in meadows, pastures and dunes. It is absent from highly productive, fertile grassland and from strongly acidic soils.

Avoided by grazing animals but intolerant of trampling.

Common Knapweed

 

 

Dandelion

 

 

Meadow Buttercup

Meadow Buttercup is
Ranunculus acris
fmeadowcolflobuttercup1

Buttercup Family

Pollinated by various insects, especially hover flies and small bees.

A perennial herb of damp meadows and pastures on a wide variety of soils, only avoiding very dry or acid conditions. It is a characteristic plant of unimproved hay and water-meadow communities, and now of relict herb-rich fragments on damp road verges; it also grows on dune grassland, in montane flushes and in tall-herb communities on rock ledges. It is unpalatable to grazing animals, but easily controlled in intensively managed pastures.

Damper Grassland.

Ox-Eye Daisy
(Moon Daisies, Moons, Moon-flowers)

Chrysanthemum leucanthemum
oxeyecflodaisybritishflora1

Daisy - Chamomiles and Mayweeds Family

 

Red Clover

Red Clover is Trifolium pratense
redcflocloverfoord

Peaflower - Clover Family

 

Hairy Buttercup

Hairy Buttercup is Ranunculus sardous
item8a1
Ranunculus sardous. By Kristian Peters, via Wikimedia Commons

Buttercup Family

Visited by flies and small bees

When eaten, it would cause the eater's face to contort in a look resembling scorn (generally followed by death).

An annual of damp coastal pastures, poached pond edges and wet hollows, road verges, farm tracks and gateways. It is generally restricted to thin turf or disturbed areas on damp, neutral, moderately fertile soils.

Jersey Buttercup
(Fan-leaved Buttercup, Fan-leaved Buttercup)

Jersey Buttercup
(Fan-leaved Buttercup) is
Ranunculus flabellatus
(Ranunculus paludosus)
fjerseycolflobuttercup1

Buttercup Family

"All 300 Ranunculus species are acrid and poisonous and are dangerous to cattle, but are ordinarily avoided by allgrazing animals. The poisonous constituent is probably anemonin" from Page 83 of Flora of the British Isles by Clapham, Tutin, Wurburg published by Cambridge at the University Press 1952.

Pollinated by various insects, especially hover flies and small bees.

A winter-green perennial herb which dies down to spindle-shaped tubers after flowering in May. It grows in grassland which is wet in winter, but sun-baked in summer. The number of flowering plants in a population may vary considerably from year to year.

Found only in hot dry banks near St Aubyns, Jersey.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chalk Grassland

Bee Orchid

 

 

Burnt Orchid

 

 

Chalk Milkwort

Polygala calcarea is
Chalk Milkwort

chalkflotgentianmilkwort1a

chalkflot1gentianmilkwort1

Milkwort family

 

Clustered Bellflower

 

 

Common Rockrose

 

 

Cowslip
(Keys, Our Lady's Keys, Keys-of-heaven, Herb Peter, St Peter's-wort, Peter's-keys, Fairy-cups)

Primula veris
ccowslipflo1a

Primrose Family
 

 

Early Gentian

 

 

Fairy Flax

Fairy Flax is
Linum catharticum
ffairycfloflax1

Flax family

 

Field Scabious

 

 

Fritillary

 

 

Frog Orchid

 

 

Green-winged Orchids

 

 

Hairy Violet

Hairy Violet is
Viola hirta
fhairyflotviolet1a

Violet family

 

Lady's Bedstraw

 

 

Meadow Clary

 

 

Common Pasque Flower, Pasque Flower

Common Pasque Flower, Pasque Flower is
Pulsatilla vulgaris,
Anemone pulsatilla
commoncflopasqueflowerfoord

Buttercup family

The plant is a member of the same family as Buttercup and contains the glycoside ranunculin. It has a very bitter taste which produces an immediate burning in the mouth. Fatal in a large amount but there are no records of anyone ever consuming enough because of the taste and effect.

Visited by many bees for pollen and nectar.

A perennial rhizomatous herb of species-rich turf on the slopes of chalk or oolite escarpments, and the banks of ancient earthworks, usually with a South or South-West aspect. Plants produce viable seed, but seedling establishment is rare.

In short turf on chalk and limestone from the Thames to the Humber.

It grows in sparsely wooded pine forests or meadows, often on a sunny sloping side with calcium-rich soil.

Pyramidal Orchid

 

 

Yellow-wort

 

 

Alpine Meadow-Rue

Thalictrum alpinum is
Alpine Meadow-rue
,
Arctic Meadow-rue
falpinecolflomeadowrue1a

Buttercup family

A small, rhizomatous perennial of mountain habitats. It is found on damp rock ledges, at the open edges of stony streams and flushes and in thin grassland. It is a good indicator of substrates which are at least slightly base-rich.

Bulbous Buttercup

Bulbous Buttercup is
Ranunculus bulbosus
fbulbouscflobuttercup1a

Buttercup family

A perennial herb with a corm-like stem-base, found on well-drained, neutral or calcareous soils in meadows, pastures and dunes. It is absent from highly productive, fertile grassland and from strongly acidic soils.

Avoided by grazing animals but intolerant of trampling.

Goldilocks
(Goldilocks Aster)

Goldilocks
(Goldilocks Aster)
Galeatella linosyris and Linosyris vulgaris ,
Chrysocoma linosyris, Crinitaria linosyris, Aster linosyris
goldilockscflo1

Daisy: Cudweeds family

Visited by small insects

A perennial herb of shallow soil in open, grassy habitats on limestone sea-cliffs and rocky slopes, cliff-top grassland and wind-pruned heath overlying limestone. It is a poor competitor, and is usually intolerant of heavy grazing, although in Pembrokeshire it is found in low-growing, sheep-grazed, cliff-top grassland and heath.

Very rare, on 5 dry limestone cliffs along the West coast of England and Wales

Lesser Meadow-rue

Lesser Meadow-rue is
Thalictrum minus
flessercolflomeadowrue1

Buttercup Family

Visited by various flies and bees, but often setting little seed.

A morphologically variable, perennial herb found in calcareous or other base-rich habitats where competition is low, including fixed dunes, scrubby banks, rocky lake and river edges, limestone and serpentine cliffs, limestone grassland and pavement and montane rock ledges. It also occurs in other habitats, including churchyards, hedge banks and roadsides, as a garden escape.

3 main habitats of

  • limestone rocks and grassland
  • dunes
  • streamsides or lakeside gravel and shingle

Pyrenean Columbine, Granny's Bonnet

Pyrenean Columbine, Granny's Bonnet is Aquilegia pyrenaica
pyreneancflocolumbinewikimediacommons
Aquilegia pyrenaica. By Juan José Sánchez from Spain, via Wikimedia Commons.

Buttercup family

This small alpine herb is naturalised only on rock-ledges at the head of Caenlochan Glen, Angus, at an altitude of c. 900 m. It is a very rare casual elsewhere.

This species prefer pastures and rocky places.

Suitable for Rock Garden.

Small-flowered Buttercup

Small-flowered Buttercup is
Ranunculus parviflorus
fsmallcolflofloweredbuttercup1

Buttercup family

An annual of dry disturbed habitats on a range of neutral and calcareous soils. Typical sites include broken turf on cliff edges, open, droughted slopes and banks, rabbit scrapes, tracks, poached gateways, building sites and gardens. The seeds appear to be long-lived, and populations may reappear after disturbance or persist for many years.

Dry grassy banks and path-sides mostly on chalk or limestone.

Variegated Monkshood

Variegated Monkshood is
Aconitum cammarum
variegatedcflomonkshoodwikimediacommons
Aconitum × cammarum. By Danny Steven S. from Spain, via Wikimedia Commons.

Buttercup family

Poisoning by Aconitum may also occur following picking the leaves without wearing gloves; the aconitine toxin is absorbed easily through the skin. In this event, no gastrointestinal effects are seen. Tingling starts at the point of absorption and extends up the arm to the shoulder, after which the heart starts to be affected. The tingling is followed by unpleasant numbness. Treatment is similar to poisoning caused by oral ingestion.

A perennial with annually renewed tuberous rhizomes, found established in damp places on a range of soils, usually in shaded sites or in tall vegetation. Its habitats are more varied than those of other Aconitum taxa and include damp roadsides and pastures, waste ground and moist woodland.

Winter Aconite

Winter Aconite is
Eranthis hyemalis, Helleborus hyemalis
fwintercolfloaconite1

Buttercup family

Visited by hive-bees and flies.

All 8 species of Eranthis have a burning tast and are poisonous owing to the presence of an alkaloid.

A small, tuberous perennial, dying back in summer. It is naturalised, sometimes in large numbers, in open woodland, grassland and scrub associated with habitation, under park trees, in gardens and on road verges.

Glossy Green horizontal foliage appearing after the flowers and dying back by June

Peony, Wild Peony

Peony, Wild Peony is
Paeonia mascula
wildcflopeonywikimediacommons
Paeonia mascula, Hilel mt. (Israel). By Setreset, via Wikimedia Commons.

Peony family

Flowers visited by various insects chiefly for pollen.

A perennial herb which is naturalised on rocky limestone slopes. On Steep Holm (N. Somerset) it grows on the steep eastern slopes of the island, where there is some protection from westerly gales.

Ideal conditions are light (sandy) soils although most peonies can grow in heavy clay soil. The Wild Peony prefers acid and neutral soils, can grow in semi-shade and tolerates drought.

Paeonia mascula flowers for just one week of the year normally in May or June in the Northern Hemisphere.

Long-Headed Poppy (Long Smooth-headed Poppy)

Long-Headed Poppy (Long Smooth-headed Poppy) is
Papaver dubium
flongflotheadedpoppy1

Poppy family

Flowers visited by various pollen-collecting insects, especially bees. No nectar. Probably self-sterile.

An annual found principally in arable fields, where it can occur on both light and heavy calcareous soils. It is also found on waste ground by roadsides and railways, and in gardens. The seed is very long-lived. The commonest poppy in the North is also a native weed.

Prefers sandy soil without lime.

Use in Wildflower meadows, Butterfly & Bee Gardens, Cut Flowers.

Bird-in-a-Bush , Fumewort

Bird-in-a-Bush , Fumewort is
Corydalis solida , Corydalis bulbosa
fbirdflotinabush1

Fumitory family

Further details on Corydalis from book "Bleeding Hearts, Corydalis, and their Relatives" in Plants suitable for small gardens.

Pollinated by long-tongued bees, sef-sterile.

Poisonous and in book CRC World Dictionary of Medicinal and Poisonous Plants: Common Names... by Umberto Quattrocchi.

A tuberous perennial herb found in woodland, hedgerows, churchyards and rough grassland, and on roadsides, river banks and walls. It occurs as a garden escape or throw-out, and often becomes naturalised. Reproduction is by seed and tubers.

Grow in a rock garden. Corydalis are highly useful at the front of a woodland border, with crocus, in front of dicentra or with miniature bulbs such as muscari or scillas. They can also be grown in pots of gritty soil, but keep compost cool and moist in summer. Partnered with hostas or hardy geraniums, they break into leaf after the corydalis vanish.

 

 

 

 

 

 

UKButterflies Larval Foodplants website page lists the larval foodplants used by British butterflies. The name of each foodplant links to a Google search. An indication of whether the foodplant is a primary or secondary food source is also given.

Please note that the Butterfly you see for only a short time has grown up on plants as an egg, caterpillar and chrysalis for up to 11 months, before becoming a butterfly. If the plants that they live on during that time are removed, or sprayed with herbicide, then you will not see the butterfly.
 

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery.

Some UK native butterflies eat material from UK Native Wildflowers and live on them as eggs, caterpillars (Large Skipper eats False Brome grass - Brachypodium sylvaticum - for 11 months from July to May as a Caterpillar before becoming a Chrysalis within 3 weeks in May) chrysalis or butterflies ALL YEAR ROUND.
Please leave a small area in your garden for wildflowers to grow without disturbance throughout the year for the benefit of butterflies, moths and other wildlife who are dependant on them.

Butterfly
Usage of Plants
by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly

 

Topic -
Plant Photo Galleries for Wildflowers

There are 180 families in the Wildflowers of the UK and they have been split up into 22 Galleries to allow space for up to 100 plants per gallery.

Each plant named in each of the Wildflower Family Pages may have a link to:-

its Plant Description Page in its Common Name in one of those Wildflower Plant Galleries and will have links

to external sites to purchase the plant or seed in its Botanical Name,

to see photos in its Flowering Months and

to read habitat details in its Habitat Column.

 

Wild Flower Gallery
with its
flower colour comparison page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour
NOTE Gallery:-
...Blue Note
...Brown Note
...Cream Note
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note

Each of the above 17 Flower Colour Comparison Pages compares the wildflowers with that flower colour in the top section using the thumbnails of the ones that I have. This is followed by a list of all the Wildflowers of the UK that have that same flower colour. Then, in the right hand table is the list of Wildflowers of the UK with that habitat as shown below:-

White A-D
and
Habitats of Saltmarshes, Beaches, Rocks and Cliff Tops

White E-P
and
Other Habitats

White Q-Z
and
Number of Petals
Cream
and
Coastal Sandy Shores and Dunes
Yellow A-G
and
Pollinator

Yellow H-Z
and
Poisonous Plants
Orange
and
Habitat of Hedgerows and Road Verges
Red
and
Habitat of Pinewoods
Pink A-G
and
Habitats of Lakes, Canals and Rivers

Pink H-Z
and
Habitats of Marshes, Fens and Bogs
Mauve
and
Habitat of Grassland - Acid, Neutral or Chalk
Purple
and
Habitats of Old Buildings and Walls
Blue
and
Flower Legend
Green
and
Habitat of Broad-leaved Woods
Brown
and
Food for Butterfly / Moth
Multi-Coloured
and
Habitats of Heaths and Moors
Shrub and Small Tree
and
Habitats of River Banks and Other Freshwater Margins

Seed 1
and
Scented Flower, Foliage or Root

Seed 2
and
Story of Their Common Names

Non-Flower Plants and
Non-Flowering Plant Use

Introduction
and
Edible Plant Parts

Site Map
and
Use of Plant

 

You can find the wild flower in one of the 23 Wild Flower Galleries or the Colour Wheel
Gallery

If

you know its name, use
Wild Flower Plant Index a-h,
Wild Flower Plant Index i-p or
Wild Flower Plant Index q-z

you know which habitat it lives in,
use
Wild Flowers on
Acid Soil
Habitat Table,
on Calcareous
(Chalk) Soil
,
on Marine Soil,
on Neutral Soil,
is a Fern,
is a Grass,
is a Rush, or
is a Sedge

you know which Family it belongs to, use
Wild Flower Family Pages menu below
 

Wild Flower Family Page

(the families within "The Pocket Guide to Wild Flowers" by David McClintock & R.S.R. Fitter, Published in 1956 are not in Common Name alphabetical order and neither are the common names of the plants detailed within each Family. These families within that book will have their details described as shown in the next column starting from page 1 in February 2017 until all the families have been completed on page 307.

This may take a few months of my time before I get to the Adder's Tongue Family on page 307.

The information in the above book is back-referenced to the respective page in "Flora of the British Isles" by A.R. Clapham of University of Sheffield,
T.G. Tutin of University College, Leicester and
E.F. Warburg of University of Oxford printed by Cambridge at the University Press in 1952 for each plant in all the families)

followed by

No. of Plants of that Family

that have a row with their details in their flower colour in this central data table;

and then

the relevant entries in the Habitat Index Pages and other characteristics in other Index Pages in the Page Menu / Index Table on the left
(with over-flow in another table below the flower colour in the central data table and then onto
continuation pages)

within this gallery

Adder's Tongue

Amaranth

Arrow-Grass

Arum

Balsam

Bamboo

Barberry 2

Bedstraw

Beech

Bellflower

Bindweed

Birch

Birds-Nest

Birthwort

Bogbean

Bog Myrtle

Borage

Box

Broomrape

Buckthorn

Buddleia

Bur-reed

Buttercup 45

Butterwort

Cornel (Dogwood)

Crowberry

Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1

Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2

Cypress

Daffodil

Daisy

Daisy Cudweeds

Daisy Chamomiles

Daisy Thistle

Daisy Catsears

Daisy Hawkweeds

Daisy Hawksbeards

Daphne

Diapensia

Dock Bistorts

Dock Sorrels

Clubmoss

Duckweed

Eel-Grass

Elm

Filmy Fern

Horsetail

Polypody

Quillwort

Royal Fern

Figwort - Mulleins

Figwort - Speedwells

Flax

Flowering-Rush

Frog-bit

Fumitory 3

Gentian

Geranium

Glassworts

Gooseberry

Goosefoot

Grass 1

Grass 2

Grass 3

Grass Soft Bromes 1

Grass Soft Bromes 2

Grass Soft Bromes 3

Hazel

Heath

Hemp

Herb-Paris

Holly

Honeysuckle

Horned-Pondweed

Hornwort 2

Iris

Ivy

Jacobs Ladder

Lily

Lily Garlic

Lime

Lobelia

Loosestrife

Mallow

Maple

Mares-tail

Marsh Pennywort

Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)

Mesem-bryanthemum

Mignonette

Milkwort

Mistletoe

Moschatel

Naiad

Nettle

Nightshade

Oleaster

Olive

Orchid 1

Orchid 2

Orchid 3

Orchid 4

Parnassus-Grass

Peaflower

Peaflower Clover 1

Peaflower Clover 2

Peaflower Clover 3

Peaflower Vetches/Peas

Peony 1

Periwinkle

Pillwort

Pine

Pink 1

Pink 2

Pipewort

Pitcher-Plant

Plantain

Pondweed

Poppy 9

Primrose

Purslane

Rannock Rush

Reedmace

Rockrose

Rose 1

Rose 2

Rose 3

Rose 4

Rush

Rush Woodrushes

Saint Johns Wort

Saltmarsh Grasses

Sandalwood

Saxifrage

Seaheath

Sea Lavender

Sedge Rush-like

Sedges Carex 1

Sedges Carex 2

Sedges Carex 3

Sedges Carex 4

Spindle-Tree

Spurge

Stonecrop

Sundew

Tamarisk

Tassel Pondweed

Teasel

Thyme 1

Thyme 2

Umbellifer 1

Umbellifer 2

Valerian

Verbena

Violet

Water Fern

Waterlily 3

Water Milfoil

Water Plantain

Water Starwort

Waterwort

Willow

Willow-Herb

Wintergreen

Wood-Sorrel

Yam

Yew

Total 65

 

Plants used by the Butterflies follow the Plants used by the Egg, Caterpillar and Chrysalis as stated in
A Butterfly Book for the Pocket by Edmund Sandars.
Published by Oxford University Press London: Humphrey Milford in 1939.

and

The Butterflies of Britain & Ireland New Revised Edition by Jeremy Thomas & Richard Lewington.
Published by Bloomsbury Natural Hstory in 2016. ISBN 978 0 95649 026 1.
 

Plant Name

Butterfly Name

Egg/ Caterpillar/ Chrysalis/ Butterfly

Plant Usage

Plant Usage Months

Alder Buckthorn

Brimstone

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg under leaf.

Eats leaves.
---

10 days in May-June
28 days.
12 days.

Aspen

Large Tortoiseshell

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches encircling the branch of the food plant.
Feeds on leaves.
Hangs suspended from stem.

Hatches after 18-22 days in April.
30 days in May
9 days in June.

Black Medic

Common Blue

Egg,

Caterpillar


Chrysalis

Groups of eggs on upper side of leaf.
Eats buds and flowers.


Base of food plant.

-
-
Spend winter at the base of the food plant. They resume feeding in March.
2 weeks

Common Birdsfoot Trefoil

Chalk-Hill Blue

Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg at base of plant.
Eats leaves.
---

Late August-April
April-June
1 Month

Common Birdsfoot Trefoil

Common Blue

Egg,

Caterpillar


Chrysalis

Groups of eggs on upper side of leaf.
Eats buds and flowers.


Base of food plant.

-
-
Spend winter at the base of the food plant. They resume feeding in March.
2 weeks

Common Birdsfoot Trefoil

Wood White

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg laid on underside of leaflets or bracts.
Eats leaves.
---

7 days in June.

32 days in June-July.
July-May.

Bitter Vetch

Wood White

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg laid on underside of leaflets or bracts.
Eats leaves.
---

7 days in June.

32 days in June-July.
July-May.

Borage

Queen of Spain Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar


Chrysalis

1 egg laid under the leaf or on top of the flower.
Eats leaves, then before pupating it eats the bloom and leaves of the pansies.
---

7 days in August.

23 days in August-September.

3 weeks in September

Bramble

Holly Blue

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

 

1 egg on underside of a flower bud on its stalk.
Eats flower bud.
---

 

7 days.

28-42 days.
18 days. Early September to Late April for second generation.

Buckthorn

Holly Blue

Egg,


Caterpillar
Chrysalis

 

1 egg on underside of a flower bud on its stalk.
Eats flower bud.
---


 

7 days.


28-42 days.
18 days. Early September to Late April for second generation.

Buckthorn -
Alder Buckthorn and Common Buckthorn

Brimstone

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg under leaf.

Eats leaves.
---

10 days in May-June.

28 days.
12 days.

Burdocks

Painted Lady

Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf.
Eats leaves.
---

2 weeks
7-11days
7-11 days

Cabbages - ELarge White eats all cruciferous plants, such as cabbages, mustard, turnips, radishes, cresses, nasturtiums, wild mignonette and dyer's weed

Large White
 

Egg,


Caterpillar
Chrysalis

40-100 eggs on both surfaces of leaf.

Eats leaves.
---
 

May-June and August-Early September. 4.5-17 days.
30-32 days
14 days for May-June eggs, or overwinter till April

Cabbages

Small White

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg on underside of leaf.

Eats leaves.
---
 

May-June and August. 7 days.
28 days
21 days for May-June eggs, or overwinter till March

Cabbages:-
Charlock,
Cuckoo Flower (Lady's Smock),
Hedge-Mustard,
Garlic-Mustard,
Yellow Rocket (Common Winter-Cress),
Watercress

Green-veined White

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis


 

1 egg on underside of leaf.

Eats leaves.
---


 

July or August; hatches in 3 days.
16 days.
14 days in July or for caterpillars of August, they overwinter till May.

Cabbages:-
Charlock,
Creeping Yellow-cress,
Cuckoo Flower (Lady's Smock),
Dame's Violet,
Hedge-Mustard,
Horseradish,
Garlic-Mustard,
Lady's Smock,
Large Bittercress,
Rock-cress (Common Winter-Cress),
Yellow Rocket (Common Winter-Cress),
Watercress,
Wild Turnip

Orange Tip

Egg,

Caterpillar

Chrysalis

1 egg laid in the tight buds and flowers.
Eats leaves, buds, flowers and especially the seed pods.
---

May-June 7 days.

June-July 24 days.

August-May

Cherry with
Wild Cherry,
Morello Cherry and
Bird Cherry

Large Tortoiseshell

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches encircling the branch of the food plant.
Feeds on leaves.
Hangs suspended from stem.

Hatches after 18-22 days in April.
30 days in May.
9 days in June.

Clovers 1, 2, 3

Common Blue

Egg,

Caterpillar


Chrysalis

Groups of eggs on upper side of leaf.
Eats buds and flowers.


Base of food plant.

-
-
Spend winter at the base of the food plant. They resume feeding in March.
2 weeks.

Clovers 1, 2, 3

Pale Clouded Yellow

Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf.
Eats leaves.

 

10 days in May-June.
July-August.
17 days in August-September.

Clovers 1, 2, 3

Clouded Yellow

Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf.
Eats leaves.
 

6 days in May-June.
30 days.
18 days in July-August.

Cocksfoot is a grass

Large Skipper

Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg under leaf.
Eats leaves.
---


11 Months
3 weeks from May

Cow-wheat

(Common CowWheat, Field CowWheat)

Heath Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar



Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches on the under side of the leaves.
Feeds on leaves until end of August. Hibernates on dead leaves until March. Eats young leaves until June.
---

Hatches after 16 days in June.
June-April



25 days in June.

Currants
(Red Currant,
Black Currant and Gooseberry)

Comma

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

Groups of eggs on upper side of leaf.
Eats leaves.
---

 

Devilsbit Scabious

Marsh Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar



Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches on the under side of the leaves.
Feeds on leaves until late August. Hibernates on dead leaves until March. Eats leaves until May.
---

Hatches after 20 days in July.
July-May.



15 days in May.

Dog Violet with
Common Dog Violet,
Heath Dog Violet and
Wood Dog Violet

Silver-washed Fritillary

Egg,
Caterpillar



Chrysalis

1 egg on oak or pine tree trunk
Hibernates in a crevice in the bark of the tree trunk.
Moves out of tree to eat Dog Violet leaves.
On rock or twig.

15 days in July.
August-March.

March-May.

Late June-July

Dog Violet with
Common Dog Violet,
Heath Dog Violet and
Wood Dog Violet

Pearl-bordered Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar



Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf or stem.

Feeds on leaves until July. Hibernates on dead leaves until March. Eats young leaves until May.
---

Hatches after 15 days in May-June.
July-May.



9 days in June.

Dog Violet with
Common Dog Violet,
Heath Dog Violet and
Wood Dog Violet

Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar



Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf or stem.

Feeds on leaves until July. Hibernates in dead leaves until March. Eats young leaves until April.
---

Hatches after 10 days in May-June.
June-April



April-June.

Dogwood

Holly Blue

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

 

1 egg on underside of a flower bud on its stalk.
Eats flower bud.
---

 

7 days.

28-42 days.
18 days. Early September to Late April for second generation.

Elm and Wych Elm

Large Tortoiseshell

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches encircling the branch of the food plant.
Feeds on leaves.
Hangs suspended from stem.

Hatches after 18-22 days in April.
30 days in May.
9 days in June.

False Brome is a grass (Wood Brome, Wood False-brome and Slender False-brome)

Large Skipper

Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg under leaf.
Eats leaves.
---

...
11 Months
3 weeks from May

Foxglove

Marsh Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar



Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches on the under side of the leaves.
Feeds on leaves until late August. Hibernates on dead leaves until March. Eats leaves until May.
---

Hatches after 20 days in July.
July-May



15 days in May.

Fyfield Pea

Wood White

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg laid on underside of leaflets or bracts.
Eats leaves.
---

7 days in June.

32 days in June-July.
July-May.

Garden Pansy

Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar


Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf or stem.
Feeds on leaves until July. Hibernates in dead leaves until March. Eats young leaves until April.
---

Hatches after 10 days in May-June.
June-April


April-June.

Gorse

Holly Blue

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

 

1 egg on underside of a flower bud on its stalk.
Eats flower bud.
---

 

7 days.

28-42 days.
18 days. Early September to Late April for second generation.

Heartsease

Queen of Spain Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar


Chrysalis

1 egg laid under the leaf or on top of the flower.
Eats leaves, then before pupating it eats the bloom and leaves of the pansies.
---

7 days in August.

23 days in August-September.

3 weeks in September

Hogs's Fennel

Swallowtail

Egg,


Caterpillar


Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf. 5 or 6 eggs may be deposited by separate females on one leaf.
Eats leaves, and moves to stems of sedges or other fen plants before pupating.
---

14 days in July-August.


August-September.


September-May.

Holly

Holly Blue

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

 

1 egg on underside of a flower bud on its stalk.
Eats flower bud.
---

 

7 days.

28-42 days.
18 days. Early September to Late April for second generation.

Honesty (Lunaria biennis)

Orange Tip

Egg,

Caterpillar

Chrysalis

1 egg laid in the tight buds and flowers.
Eats leaves, buds, flowers and especially the seed pods.
---

May-June 7 days.

June-July 24 days.

August-May

Honeysuckle

Marsh Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar



Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches on the under side of the leaves.
Feeds on leaves until late August. Hibernates on dead leaves until March. Eats leaves until May.
---

Hatches after 20 days in July.
July-May.



15 days in May.

Hop

Comma

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

Groups of eggs on upper side of leaf.
Eats leaves.
---

 

Horseshoe vetch

Adonis Blue




Chalk-Hill Blue


Berger's Clouded Yellow

Egg,
Caterpillar

Chrysalis

Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis

Egg,


Caterpillar

Chrysalis

1 egg under leaf.
Eats leaves.

---

1 egg at base of plant.
Eats leaves.
---

1 egg on leaf.


Eats leaves.

---

1 then
June-March or September to July
3 weeks.

Late August-April.
April-June
1 Month

8-10 days in Late May-June or Middle August-September
June-July or September to October
8-15 days

Ivy

Holly Blue

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

 

1 egg on underside of a flower bud on its stalk.
Eats flower bud.
---

 

7 days.

28-42 days.
18 days. Early September to Late April for second generation.

Kidney Vetch

Chalk-Hill Blue

Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis
Butterfly

1 egg at base of plant.
Eats leaves.
---
Eats nectar.

Late August-April.
April-June
1 Month
20 days

Lucerne

Pale Clouded Yellow



Clouded Yellow

Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis


Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf.
Eats leaves.



1 egg on leaf.
Eats leaves.
---

10 days in May-June.
July-August.
17 days in August-September.

6 days in May-June.
30 days.
18 days in July-August.

Mallows

Painted Lady

Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf.
Eats leaves.
---

2 weeks
7-11days
7-11 days

Melilot

Clouded Yellow

Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf.
Eats leaves.
 

6 days in May-June.
30 days.
18 days in July-August.

Mignonettes

Small White

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg on underside of leaf.

Eats leaves.
---
 

May-June and August. 7 days.
28 days
21 days for May-June eggs, or overwinter till March

Milk Parsley

Swallowtail

Egg,


Caterpillar


Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf. 5 or 6 eggs may be deposited by separate females on one leaf.
Eats leaves, and moves to stems of sedges or other fen plants before pupating.
---

14 days in July-August.


August-September


September-May

Narrow-leaved Plantain (Ribwort Plantain)

Heath Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar



Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches on the under side of the leaves.
Feeds on leaves until end of August. Hibernates on dead leaves until March. Eats young leaves until June.
---

Hatches after 16 days in June.
June-April.



25 days in June.

Narrow-leaved Plantain (Ribwort Plantain)

Glanville Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar



Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches on the under side of the leaves.
Feeds on leaves until middle of August. Hibernates on dead leaves until March. Eats leaves until April-May.
---

Hatches after 16 days in June.
June-April.



25 days in April-May.

Nasturtium from Gardens

Small White

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg on underside of leaf.

Eats leaves.
---
 

May-June and August. 7 days.
28 days.
21 days for May-June eggs, or overwinter till March

Oak Tree

Silver-washed Fritillary

Egg,
Caterpillar



Chrysalis

1 egg on tree trunk
Hibernates in a crevice in the bark of the tree trunk.
Moves out of tree to eat Dog Violet leaves.
On rock or twig.

15 days in July.
August-March.

March-May.

Late June-July

Mountain pansy,
Seaside Pansy,
Field Pansy and Cultivated Pansy.
 

Queen of Spain Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar

 

Chrysalis

1 egg laid under the leaf or on top of the flower.
Eats leaves of borage, sainfoin and heartsease, then before pupating it eats the bloom and leaves of the pansies.
---

7 days in August.

23 days in August-September
 

3 weeks in September

Pine Tree

Silver-washed Fritillary

Egg,
Caterpillar



Chrysalis

1 egg on tree trunk.
Hibernates in a crevice in the bark of the tree trunk.
Moves out of tree to eat Dog Violet leaves.
On rock or twig.

15 days in July.
August-March.

March-May.

Late June-July

Plantains

Marsh Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar



Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches on the under side of the leaves.
Feeds on leaves until late August. Hibernates on dead leaves until March. Eats leaves until May.
---

Hatches after 20 days in July.
July-May



15 days in May.

Poplar

Large Tortoiseshell

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches encircling the branch of the food plant.
Feeds on leaves.
Hangs suspended from stem.

Hatches after 18-22 days in April.
30 days in May.
9 days in June.

Restharrow

Common Blue

Egg,

Caterpillar


Chrysalis

Groups of eggs on upper side of leaf.
Eats buds and flowers.


Base of food plant.

-
-
Spend winter at the base of the food plant. They resume feeding in March.
2 weeks

Rock-rose

Brown Argus

Egg,
Caterpillar

1 egg under leaf.
Eats leaves.

 

Sainfoin

Queen of Spain Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar


Chrysalis

1 egg laid under the leaf or on top of the flower.
Eats leaves, then before pupating it eats the bloom and leaves of the pansies.
---

7 days in August.

23 days in August-September

3 weeks in September

Common Sallow (Willows, Osiers)

Large Tortoiseshell

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches encircling the branch of the food plant.
Feeds on leaves.
Hangs suspended from stem

Hatches after 18-22 days in April.
30 days in May.
9 days in June.

Sea Plantain

Glanville Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar



Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches on the under side of the leaves.
Feeds on leaves until middle of August. Hibernates on dead leaves until March. Eats leaves until April-May.
---

Hatches after 16 days in June.
June-April



25 days in April-May.

Snowberry

Holly Blue

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

 

1 egg on underside of a flower bud on its stalk.
Eats flower bud.
---
 

7 days.

28-42 days.
18 days. Early September to Late April for second generation.

Spindle-tree

Holly Blue

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

 

1 egg on underside of a flower bud on its stalk.
Eats flower bud.
---

 

7 days.

28-42 days.
18 days. Early September to Late April for second generation.

Stinging Nettle

Comma




Painted Lady



Peacock

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

Egg
Caterpillar
Chrysalis

Egg,


Caterpillar

Chrysalis

Groups of eggs on upper side of leaf.
Eats leaves.
---

1 egg on leaf.
Eats leaves.
---

Dense mass of 450-500 eggs on the under side of leaves over a 2 hour period.
Eats leaves, and moves to another plant before pupating.
---






2 weeks in June.
7-11 days.
7-11 days.

14 days in April-May.


28 days.

13days.

Storksbill

Brown Argus

Egg,
Caterpillar

1 egg under leaf.
Eats leaves.

 

Thistles

Painted Lady

Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf.
Eats leaves.
---

2 weeks
7-11days
7-11 days

Trefoils 1, 2, 3

Clouded Yellow

Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf.
Eats leaves.
 

6 days in May-June.
30 days.
18 days in July-August.

Vetches

Common Blue

Egg,

Caterpillar


Chrysalis

Groups of eggs on upper side of leaf.
Eats buds and flowers.


Base of food plant.

-
-
Spend winter at the base of the food plant. They resume feeding in March.
2 weeks

Vetches

Wood White

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg laid on underside of leaflets or bracts.
Eats leaves.
---

7 days in June.

32 days in June-July.
July-May.

Violets:-
Common Dog Violet,
Hairy Violet,
Heath Dog-violet

Pale Dog violet
Sweet Violet

Dark Green Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar


Chrysalis

1 egg on underside of leaf or on stalk.
Hibernates where it hatches.
Eats leaves.

Base of food plant.

July-August for 17 days.

Spends winter on plant until end of March. Eats leaves until end of May.
4 weeks.

Violets:-
Common Dog Violet,
Hairy Violet,
Heath Dog-violet

Pale Dog violet
Sweet Violet

High Brown Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar

Chrysalis

1 egg on stem or stalk near plant base.
Feed on young leaves, stalks and stems
---

July to hatch in 8 months in March.
9 weeks ending in May.

4 weeks

Vipers Bugloss

Painted Lady

Egg,
Caterpillar
Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf.
Eats leaves.
---

2 weeks.
7-11days.
7-11 days

Whitebeam
(White Beam)

Large Tortoiseshell

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches encircling the branch of the food plant.
Feeds on leaves.
Hangs suspended from stem.

Hatches after 18-22 days in April.
30 days in May.
9 days in June.

Wild Angelica

Swallowtail

Egg,


Caterpillar


Chrysalis

1 egg on leaf. 5 or 6 eggs may be deposited by separate females on one leaf.
Eats leaves, and moves to stems of sedges or other fen plants before pupating.
---

14 days in July-August.


August-September.


September-May

Willow
(Bay Willow)

Large Tortoiseshell

Egg,

Caterpillar
Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches encircling the branch of the food plant.
Feeds on leaves.
Hangs suspended from stem.

Hatches after 18-22 days in April.
30 days in May.
9 days in June.

Wood-Sage

Marsh Fritillary

Egg,

Caterpillar



Chrysalis

Eggs laid in batches on the under side of the leaves.
Feeds on leaves until late August. Hibernates on dead leaves until March. Eats leaves until May.
---

Hatches after 20 days in July.
July-May.



15 days in May.

 

Plants used by the Butterflies

Plant Name

Butterfly Name

Egg/ Caterpillar/ Chrysalis/ Butterfly

Plant Usage

Plant Usage Months

Asters
in gardens

Comma

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

 

Runner and Broad Beans in fields and gardens

Large White


Small White

Butterfly

Eats nectar

April-June or July-September.

March-May or June-September

Aubretia in gardens

Clouded Yellow

Butterfly

Eats nectar

May-June or August till killed by frost and damp in September-November

Birch

Holly Blue

Butterfly

Eats sap exuding from trunk.

April-Mid June and Mid July-Early September for second generation.

Common Birdsfoot Trefoil

Chalk-Hill Blue

Wood White

Marsh Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

20 days.


May-June.

30 days in May-June.

Bitter Vetch

Wood White

Butterfly

Eats nectar

May-June

Bluebell

Holly Blue




Pearl-bordered Fritillary

Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar

April-Mid June and Mid July-Early September for second generation.


June.



June-August.

Bramble

Comma

Silver-washed Fritillary

High Brown Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

July-October.

7 weeks in July-August.



June-August

Buddleias
in gardens

Comma

Peacock

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

July-October.

July-May

Bugle

Wood White

Pearl-bordered Fritillary

Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary

Heath Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar

May-June.

June.



June-August.



June-July.

Cabbage and cabbages in fields

Large White


Small White


Green-veined White

Orange Tip

Butterfly

Eats nectar

April-June or July-September.

March-May or June-September.

A Month during May-June or second flight in late July-August.

May-June for 18 days.

Charlock

Painted Lady

Butterfly

Eats nectar

July-October

Clovers 1, 2, 3

Adonis Blue



Chalk-Hill Blue

Painted Lady

Peacock

Large White


Small White

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

1 Month during Mid-May to Mid-June or during August-September

20 days in August.


July-October.

July-May.

April-June or July-September.

March-May or June-September

Clovers 1, 2, 3

Pale Clouded Yellow


Clouded Yellow


Berger's Clouded Yellow


Queen of Spain Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar

May-June or August till killed by frost and damp in September-November

May-June or August till killed by frost and damp in September-November.

1 Month in May-June or August till killed by frost and damp in September-November.

May-September.

Cow-wheat
(Common CowWheat, Field CowWheat)

Heath Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar

June-July

Cuckoo Flower (Lady's Smock)

Wood White

Butterfly

Eats nectar

May-June

Dandelion

Holly Blue



Marsh Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar

April-Mid June and Mid July-Early September for second generation.

30 days in May-June.

Fleabanes

Common Blue

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

3 weeks between May and September

Germander Speedwell (Veronica chamaedrys - Birdseye Speedwell)

Heath Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar

June-July

Greater Knapweed

Comma

Peacock

Clouded Yellow


Brimstone

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

July-October.

July-May.

May-June or August till killed by frost and damp in September-November.

12 months

Hawkbit

Marsh Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar

30 days in May-June.

Heartsease

Queen of Spain Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar

May-September

Hedge Parsley

Orange Tip

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

May-June for 18 days.

Hemp agrimony

Comma

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

July-October

Horseshoe vetch

Adonis Blue

Chalk-Hill Blue

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

1 Month.

20 days

Ivy

Painted Lady

Brimstone

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

Hibernates during winter months in its foliage.

July-October.

October-July

Lucerne

Painted Lady

Large White


Small White


Pale Clouded Yellow


Clouded Yellow


Berger's Clouded Yellow

Butterfly

Eats nectar

July-October.

April-June or July-September.

March-May or June-September

May-June or August till killed by frost and damp in September-November.

May-June or August till killed by frost and damp in September-November.

1 Month in May-June or August till killed by frost and damp in September-November

Marigolds in gardens

Clouded Yellow

Butterfly

Eats nectar

May-June or August till killed by frost and damp in September-November

Marjoram

Adonis Blue



Chalk-Hill Blue

Common Blue

Clouded Yellow

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

1 Month during Mid-May to Mid-June or during August-September.

20 days in August.


3 weeks in May-September.

May-June or August till killed by frost and damp in September-November

Michaelmas Daisies
in gardens

Comma

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

July-October

Mignonettes

Large White


Small White

Butterfly

Eats nectar

April-June or July-September.

March-May or June-September

Narrow-leaved Plantain (Ribwort Plantain)

Heath Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar

June-July

Nasturtiums in gardens

Large White


Small White

Butterfly

Eats nectar

April-June or July-September

March-May or June-September

Oak Tree

Holly Blue

Butterfly

Eats sap exuding from trunk.

April-Mid June and Mid July-Early September for second generation.

Primroses

Pearl-bordered Fritillary

Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar

June.



June-August.

Ragged Robin

Wood White

Heath Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar

May-June.

June-July.

Scabious

Painted Lady

Peacock

Butterfly

Eats nectar

July-October.

July-May

Sedum

Peacock

Butterfly

Eats nectar

July-May

Teasels

Silver-washed Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar

7 weeks in July-August.

Thistles -
Creeping Thistle, Dwarf Thistle, Marsh Thistle, Meadow Thistle, Melancholy Thistle, Milk Thistle,
Musk Thistle, Seaside Thistle, Scotch Thistle, Spear Thistle, Tuberous Thistle, Welted Thistle, Woolly Thistle

Comma

Painted Lady

Peacock

Swallowtail

Clouded Yellow


Brimstone

Silver-washed Fritillary

High Brown Fritillary

Dark Green Fritillary

Queen of Spain Fritillary

Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

July-October.

July-October.

July-May.

May-July.

May-June or August till killed by frost and damp in September-November.

12 months.

7 weeks in July-August



June-August.


July-August for 6 weeks.


May-September.



June-August.

Thymes

Common Blue

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

3 weeks between May and September

Trefoils 1, 2, 3

Adonis Blue



Chalk-Hill Blue

Glanville Fritillary

Butterfly

 

Eats nectar.
 

1 Month during Mid-May to Mid-June or during August-September

20 days in August.


June-July

Vetches

Chalk-Hill Blue

Glanville Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar.

20 days in August.


June-July.

Violets

Pearl-bordered Fritillary

Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar

June.



June-August.

Wood-Sage

Heath Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats nectar

June-July

Apple/Pear/Cherry/Plum Fruit Tree Blossom in Spring

Peacock

Butterfly

Eats Nectar

April-May

Rotten Fruit

Peacock

Butterfly

Drinks juice

July-September

Tree sap and damaged ripe fruit, which are high in sugar

Large Tortoiseshell

Butterfly

Hibernates inside hollow trees or outhouses until March. Eats sap or fruit juice until April.

10 months in June-April

Wild Flowers

Large Skipper

Brimstone

Silver-washed Fritillary.

Queen of Spain Fritillary

Butterfly

Eats Nectar

June-August


12 months.

7 weeks in July-August.



May-September

Links to the other Butterflies:-

Black Hairstreak uses Blackthorn, Privet, Guelder Rose, and Wayfaring tree
Brown Hairstreak uses Blackthorn, Bramble flowers and tops of Ash trees for males to congregate in
Camberwell Beauty It is not believed that it breeds in the UK, but butterflies swarm over from European Countries depending on the weather.
Chequered Skipper uses False Brome, Hairy Brome Grass, Bugle

I have detailed the use of plants by these eggs, caterpillars, chrysalis and butterfly in full with either photos of those butterflies, etc or illustrations from Sandars. It shows that they do use plants all year round and I will insert the information of their Life Histories into the remainder of the Butterfly Description Pages but I will put no further information in this table or the Butterfly Name with its use of plants table. Please see what a council did to destroy the native habitat, so that children could ride bicyles anywhere in the park in the row below.
Dingy Skipper
Duke of Burgundy
Essex Skipper
Gatekeeper
Grayling
Green Hairstreak
Grizzled Skipper
Hedge Brown
Large Blue
Large Heath
Long-tailed Blue
Lulworth Skipper
Marbled White
Mazarine Blue
Meadow Brown
Monarch
Northern Brown Argus
Purple Emperor
Purple Hairstreak
Red Admiral
Ringlet
Scotch Argus
Short-tailed Blue
Silver-spotted Skipper
Silver-studded Blue
Small Copper
Small Heath
Small Mountain Ringlet
Small Skipper
Small Tortoiseshell
Speckled Wood
Wall Brown
White Admiral
White-letter Hairstreak

Details of what plant is used by each of the different 'egg, caterpillar, chrysalis or butterfly' unit and for how long is given in the table on the left.

 

The following is an excerpt from my Comments about the proposed destruction of the wildlife habitats at Cobtree Manor Park in the summer of 2010 from my Mission Statement page:-

"We would be sorry to lose the butterflies on the bluebells, bramble and ivy that would be restricted to only the very small area of proposed Wildlife Meadow by the Woods at the bottom of a hill with water springs on it. The wildlife is now being excluded from all the other areas by the "pruning", so that the nettles, brambles etc which had for instance the butterfly life cycle included; are now being ruthlessly removed to create a garden, not a park, with neat little areas."

When you look at the life history graphs of each of the 68 butterflies of Britain, you will see that they use plants throughout all 12 months - the information of what plant is used by the egg, caterpillar, chrysalis or butterfly is also given in the table on the left. With this proposed removal of all plants required for butterflies etc to live in and pro-create; at least once a year by the autumn or spring clearing up, you destroy the wildlife in this park as is done in every managed park in the world. Please leave something for the wildlife to live in without disturbance; rather than destroy everything so children can ride their bicycles anywhere they want when the park is open during the day and they are not at school.
 

Topic - Over 1060 links in this table to a topic in a topic folder or page within that folder of this website
Case Studies
...Drive Foundations
Ryegrass and turf kills plants within Roadstone and in Topsoil due to it starving and dehydrating them.
CEDAdrive creates stable drive surface and drains rain into your ground, rather than onto the public road.
8 problems caused by building house on clay or with house-wall attached to clay.
Pre-building work on polluted soil.

Companion Planting
..A, B , C , D , E ,
..F , G , H , I , J , K ,
..L, M , N , O , P , Q ,
..R, S , T , U , V , W ,
..X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants
to provide a Companion Plant to aid your selected plant or deter its pests

Garden
Construction

with ground drains
Garden Design
...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed
Borders

......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
......Camera photos of Plant supports
Garden
Maintenance

Glossary with a tomato teaching cauliflowers
Home
Library of over 1000 books
Offbeat Glossary with DuLally Bird in its flower clock.

Plants
...in Chalk
(Alkaline) Soil
......A-F1, A-F2,
......A-F3, G-L, M-R,
......M-R Roses, S-Z
...in Heavy
Clay Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...in Lime-Free
(Acid) Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...in Light
Sand Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z.
...Poisonous Plants.
...Extra Plant Pages
with its 6 Plant Selection Levels

Soil
...
Interaction between 2 Quartz Sand Grains to make soil
...
How roots of plants are in control in the soil
...
Without replacing Soil Nutrients, the soil will break up to only clay, sand or silt
...
Subsidence caused by water in Clay
...
Use water ring for trees/shrubs for first 2 years.

Tool Shed with 3 kneeling pads
Useful Data with benefits of Seaweed

Topic -
Plant Photo Galleries
with Plant Botanical Index

...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z

If the plant type below has flowers, then the first gallery will include the flower thumbnail in each month of 1 of 6 or 7 flower colour comparison pages of each plant in its subsidiary galleries, as a low-level Plant Selection Process
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape


Bulb Index
A1, 2, 3, B, C1, 2,
D, E, F, G, Glad,
H, I, J, K, L1, 2,
M, N, O, P, Q, R,
S, T, U, V, W, XYZ
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus with its 40 Flower Colours
......European A-E
......European F-M
......European N-Z
......Eur Non-classified
......American A
......American B
......American C
......American D
......American E
......American F
......American G
......American H
......American I
......American J
......American K
......American L
......American M
......American N
......American O
......American P
......American Q
......American R
......American S
......American T
......American U
......American V
......American W
......American XYZ
......Ame Non-classified
......Australia - empty
......India
......Lithuania
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
...Each of the above ...Bulb Galleries has its own set of Flower Colour Pages
...Flower Shape
...Bulb Form

...Bulb Use

...Bulb in Soil


Further details on bulbs from the Infill Galleries:-
Hardy Bulbs
...Aconitum
...Allium
...Alstroemeria
...Anemone

...Amaryllis
...Anthericum
...Antholyzas
...Apios
...Arisaema
...Arum
...Asphodeline

...Asphodelus
...Belamcanda
...Bloomeria
...Brodiaea
...Bulbocodium

...Calochorti
...Cyclobothrias
...Camassia
...Colchicum
...Convallaria 
...Forcing Lily of the Valley
...Corydalis
...Crinum
...Crosmia
...Montbretia
...Crocus

...Cyclamen
...Dicentra
...Dierama
...Eranthis
...Eremurus
...Erythrnium
...Eucomis

...Fritillaria
...Funkia
...Galanthus
...Galtonia
...Gladiolus
...Hemerocallis

...Hyacinth
...Hyacinths in Pots
...Scilla
...Puschkinia
...Chionodoxa
...Chionoscilla
...Muscari

...Iris
...Kniphofia
...Lapeyrousia
...Leucojum

...Lilium
...Lilium in Pots
...Malvastrum
...Merendera
...Milla
...Narcissus
...Narcissi in Pots

...Ornithogalum
...Oxalis
...Paeonia
...Ranunculus
...Romulea
...Sanguinaria
...Sternbergia
...Schizostylis
...Tecophilaea
...Trillium

...Tulip
...Zephyranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs
...Acidanthera
...Albuca
...Alstroemeri
...Andro-stephium
...Bassers
...Boussing-aultias
...Bravoas
...Cypellas
...Dahlias
...Galaxis,
...Geissorhizas
...Hesperanthas

...Gladioli
...Ixias
...Sparaxises
...Babianas
...Morphixias
...Tritonias

...Ixiolirions
...Moraeas
...Ornithogalums
...Oxalises
...Phaedra-nassas
...Pancratiums
...Tigridias
...Zephyranthes
...Cooperias

Uses of Bulbs:-
...for Bedding
...in Windowboxes
...in Border
...naturalized in Grass
...in Bulb Frame
...in Woodland Garden
...in Rock Garden
...in Bowls
...in Alpine House
...Bulbs in Greenhouse or Stove:-
...Achimenes
...Alocasias
...Amorpho-phalluses
...Arisaemas
...Arums
...Begonias
...Bomareas
...Caladiums

...Clivias
...Colocasias
...Crinums
...Cyclamens
...Cyrtanthuses
...Eucharises
...Urceocharis
...Eurycles

...Freesias
...Gloxinias
...Haemanthus
...Hippeastrums

...Lachenalias
...Nerines
...Lycorises
...Pencratiums
...Hymenocallises
...Richardias
...Sprekelias
...Tuberoses
...Vallotas
...Watsonias
...Zephyranthes

...Plant Bedding in
......Spring

......Summer
...Bulb houseplants flowering inside House during:-
......January
......February
......March
......April
......May
......June
......July
......August
......September
......October
......November
......December
...Bulbs and other types of plant flowering during:-
......Dec-Jan
......Feb-Mar
......Apr-May
......Jun-Aug
......Sep-Oct
......Nov-Dec
...Selection of the smaller and choicer plants for the Smallest of Gardens with plant flowering during the same 6 periods as in the previous selection


Climber in
3 Sector Vertical Plant System
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...A,B,C,D,E,F,G,
...H,I,J,K,L,M,N,
...O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,
...V,W,X,Y,Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evergreen
...Heather Shrub
...Heather Index
......Andromeda
......Bruckenthalia
......Calluna
......Daboecia
......Erica: Carnea
......Erica: Cinerea
......Erica: Others
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evergreen
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous
Perennial

...A1,2,B,C,D,E,F,G,
...H,I,J,K,L,M,N,
...O,P1,2,Q,R,S,T,U,
...V,W,XYZ,
...Diascia Photo Album,
...UK Peony Index

...P -Herbaceous
...Peony
...Flower Shape
...RHS Wisley
......Mixed Border
......Other Borders
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron

Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use - page links in row 6. Rose, RHS Wisley and Other Roses rose indices on each Rose Use page
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Pruning Methods
Photo Index
R 1, 2, 3
Peter Beales Roses
RV Roger
Roses

Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable
Wild Flower and
Butterfly page links are in next row


Topic -
Butterflies in the UK mostly use native UK wildflowers.

Butterfly Species.

Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly Usage
of Plants.

Plant Usage by
Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly.

Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown Botanical Names
...Cream Common Names
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note

Poisonous
Wildflower Plants.


You know its name, use
Wild Flower Plant Index a-h, i-p, q-z.
You know which habitat it lives in, use
on
Acid Soil,
on
Calcareous
(Chalk) Soil
,
on
Marine Soil,
on
Neutral Soil,
is a
Fern,
is a
Grass,
is a
Rush, or
is a
Sedge.
You have seen its flower, use Comparison Pages containing Wild Flower Plants and Cultivated Plants in the
Colour Wheel Gallery.

Each plant named in each of the 180 Wildflower Family Pages within their 23 Galleries may have a link to:-
1) its Plant Description Page in its Common Name column in one of those Wildflower Plant Galleries and will have links,
2) to external sites to purchase the plant or seed in its Botanical Name column,
3) to see photos in its Flowering Months column and
4) to read habitat details in its Habitat Column.

WILD FLOWER FAMILY PAGE MENU
(o)Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
(o)Arrow-Grass
(o)Arum
(o)Balsam
Bamboo
(o)Barberry
(o)Bedstraw
(o)Beech
(o)Bellflower
(o)Bindweed
(o)Birch
(o)Birds-Nest
(o)Birthwort
(o)Bogbean
(o)Bog Myrtle
(o)Borage
(o)Box
(o)Broomrape
(o)Buckthorn
(o)Buddleia
(o)Bur-reed
(o)Buttercup
(o)Butterwort
(o)Cornel (Dogwood)
(o)Crowberry
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
(o)Daffodil
(o)Daisy
(o)Daisy Cudweeds
(o)Daisy Chamomiles
(o)Daisy Thistle
(o)Daisy Catsears (o)Daisy Hawkweeds
(o)Daisy Hawksbeards
(o)Daphne
(o)Diapensia
(o)Dock Bistorts
(o)Dock Sorrels
(o)Clubmoss
(o)Duckweed
(o)Eel-Grass
(o)Elm
(o)Filmy Fern
(o)Horsetail
(o)Polypody
Quillwort
(o)Royal Fern
(o)Figwort - Mulleins
(o)Figwort - Speedwells
(o)Flax
(o)Flowering-Rush
(o)Frog-bit
(o)Fumitory
(o)Gentian
(o)Geranium
(o)Glassworts
(o)Gooseberry
(o)Goosefoot
(o)Grass 1
(o)Grass 2
(o)Grass 3
(o)Grass Soft
Bromes 1

(o)Grass Soft
Bromes 2

(o)Grass Soft
Bromes 3

(o)Hazel
(o)Heath
(o)Hemp
(o)Herb-Paris
(o)Holly
(o)Honeysuckle
(o)Horned-Pondweed
(o)Hornwort
(o)Iris
(o)Ivy
(o)Jacobs Ladder
(o)Lily
(o)Lily Garlic
(o)Lime
(o)Lobelia
(o)Loosestrife
(o)Mallow
(o)Maple
(o)Mares-tail
(o)Marsh Pennywort
(o)Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
(o)Mesem-bryanthemum
(o)Mignonette
(o)Milkwort
(o)Mistletoe
(o)Moschatel
Naiad
(o)Nettle
(o)Nightshade
(o)Oleaster
(o)Olive
(o)Orchid 1
(o)Orchid 2
(o)Orchid 3
(o)Orchid 4
(o)Parnassus-Grass
(o)Peaflower
(o)Peaflower
Clover 1

(o)Peaflower
Clover 2

(o)Peaflower
Clover 3

(o)Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
(o)Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
Pipewort
(o)Pitcher-Plant
(o)Plantain
(o)Pondweed
(o)Poppy
(o)Primrose
(o)Purslane
Rannock Rush
(o)Reedmace
(o)Rockrose
(o)Rose 1
(o)Rose 2
(o)Rose 3
(o)Rose 4
(o)Rush
(o)Rush Woodrushes
(o)Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
(o)Sandalwood
(o)Saxifrage
Seaheath
(o)Sea Lavender
(o)Sedge Rush-like
(o)Sedges Carex 1
(o)Sedges Carex 2
(o)Sedges Carex 3
(o)Sedges Carex 4
(o)Spindle-Tree
(o)Spurge
(o)Stonecrop
(o)Sundew
(o)Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
(o)Teasel
(o)Thyme 1
(o)Thyme 2
(o)Umbellifer 1
(o)Umbellifer 2
(o)Valerian
(o)Verbena
(o)Violet
(o)Water Fern
(o)Waterlily
(o)Water Milfoil
(o)Water Plantain
(o)Water Starwort
Waterwort
(o)Willow
(o)Willow-Herb
(o)Wintergreen
(o)Wood-Sorrel
(o)Yam
(o)Yew


Topic -
The following is a complete hierarchical Plant Selection Process

dependent on the Garden Style chosen
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

 


Topic -
Flower/Foliage Colour Wheel Galleries with number of colours as a high-level Plant Selection Process

All Flowers 53 with
...Use of Plant and
Flower Shape
- page links in bottom row

All Foliage 53
instead of redundant
...(All Foliage 212)


All Flowers
per Month 12


Bee instead of wind pollinated plants for hay-fever sufferers
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers
per Month
12
...Index

Rock Garden and Alpine Flowers
Rock Plant Flowers 53
INDEX
A, B, C, D, E, F,
G, H, I, J, K, L,
M, NO, PQ, R, S,
T, UVWXYZ
...Rock Plant Photos

Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours
per Month Index

...All Plants Index


Topic -
Use of Plant in your Plant Selection Process

Plant Colour Wheel Uses
with
1. Perfect general use soil is composed of 8.3% lime, 16.6% humus, 25% clay and 50% sand, and
2. Why you are continually losing the SOIL STRUCTURE so your soil - will revert to clay, chalk, sand or silt.
Uses of Plant and Flower Shape:-
...Foliage Only
...Other than Green Foliage
...Trees in Lawn
...Trees in Small Gardens
...Wildflower Garden
...Attract Bird
...Attract Butterfly
1
, 2
...Climber on House Wall
...Climber not on House Wall
...Climber in Tree
...Rabbit-Resistant
...Woodland
...Pollution Barrier
...Part Shade
...Full Shade
...Single Flower provides Pollen for Bees
1
, 2, 3
...Ground-Cover
<60
cm
60-180cm
>180cm
...Hedge
...Wind-swept
...Covering Banks
...Patio Pot
...Edging Borders
...Back of Border
...Poisonous
...Adjacent to Water
...Bog Garden
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Winter-Flowering
...Fragrant
...Not Fragrant
...Exhibition
...Standard Plant is 'Ball on Stick'
...Upright Branches or Sword-shaped leaves
...Plant to Prevent Entry to Human or Animal
...Coastal Conditions
...Tolerant on North-facing Wall
...Cut Flower
...Potted Veg Outdoors
...Potted Veg Indoors
...Thornless
...Raised Bed Outdoors Veg
...Grow in Alkaline Soil A-F, G-L, M-R,
S-Z
...Grow in Acidic Soil
...Grow in Any Soil
...Grow in Rock Garden
...Grow Bulbs Indoors

Uses of Bedding
...Bedding Out
...Filling In
...Screen-ing
...Pots and Troughs
...Window Boxes
...Hanging Baskets
...Spring Bedding
...Summer Bedding
...Winter Bedding
...Foliage instead of Flower
...Coleus Bedding Photos for use in Public Domain 1

Uses of Bulb
...Other than Only Green Foliage
...Bedding or Mass Planting
...Ground-Cover
...Cut-Flower
...Tolerant of Shade
...In Woodland Areas
...Under-plant
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Covering Banks
...In Water
...Beside Stream or Water Garden
...Coastal Conditions
...Edging Borders
...Back of Border or Back-ground Plant
...Fragrant Flowers
...Not Fragrant Flowers
...Indoor
House-plant

...Grow in a Patio Pot
...Grow in an Alpine Trough
...Grow in an Alpine House
...Grow in Rock Garden
...Speciman Plant
...Into Native Plant Garden
...Naturalize in Grass
...Grow in Hanging Basket
...Grow in Window-box
...Grow in Green-house
...Grow in Scree
...Naturalized Plant Area
...Grow in Cottage Garden
...Attracts Butterflies
...Attracts Bees
...Resistant to Wildlife
...Bulb in Soil:-
......Chalk
......Clay
......Sand
......Lime-Free (Acid)
......Peat

Uses of Rose
Rose Index

...Bedding 1, 2
...Climber /Pillar
...Cut-Flower 1, 2
...Exhibition, Speciman
...Ground-Cover
...Grow In A Container 1, 2
...Hedge 1, 2
...Climber in Tree
...Woodland
...Edging Borders
...Tolerant of Poor Soil 1, 2
...Tolerant of Shade
...Back of Border
...Adjacent to Water
...Page for rose use as ARCH ROSE, PERGOLA ROSE, COASTAL CONDITIONS ROSE, WALL ROSE, STANDARD ROSE, COVERING BANKS or THORNLESS ROSES.
...FRAGRANT ROSES
...NOT FRAGRANT ROSES


Topic -
Camera Photo Galleries showing all 4000 x 3000 pixels of each photo on your screen that you can then click and drag it to your desktop as part of a Plant Selection Process:-

RHS Garden at Wisley

Plant Supports -
When supporting plants in a bed, it is found that not only do those plants grow upwards, but also they expand their roots and footpad sideways each year. Pages
1
, 2, 3, 8, 11,
12, 13,
Plants 4, 7, 10,
Bedding Plants 5,
Plant Supports for Unknown Plants 5
,
Clematis Climbers 6,
the RHS does not appear to either follow it's own pruning advice or advice from The Pruning of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers by George E. Brown.
ISBN 0-571-11084-3 with the plants in Pages 1-7 of this folder. You can see from looking at both these resources as to whether the pruning carried out on the remainder of the plants in Pages 7-15 was correct.

Narcissus (Daffodil) 9,
Phlox Plant Supports 14, 15

Coleus Bedding Foliage Trial - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, Index

National Trust Garden at Sissinghurst Castle
Plant Supports -
Pages for Gallery 1

with Plant Supports
1, 5, 10
Plants
2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9,
11, 12
Recommended Rose Pruning Methods 13
Pages for Gallery 2
with Plant Supports
2
,
Plants 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Dry Garden of
RHS Garden at
Hyde Hall

Plants - Pages
without Plant Supports
Plants 1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Nursery of
Peter Beales Roses
Display Garden

Roses Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Nursery of
RV Roger

Roses - Pages
A1,A2,A3,A4,A5,
A6,A7,A8,A9,A10,
A11,A12,A13,A14,
B15,
B16,B17,B18,B19,
B20,
B21,B22,B23,B24,
B25,
B26,B27,B28,B29,
B30,
C31,C32,C33,C34,
C35,
C36,C37,C38,C39,
C40,
C41,CD2,D43,D44,
D45,
D46,D47,D48,D49,
E50,
E51,E52,F53,F54,
F55,
F56,F57,G58,G59,
H60,
H61,I62,K63,L64,
M65,
M66,N67,P68,P69,
P70,
R71,R72,S73,S74,
T75,
V76,Z77, 78,

Damage by Plants in Chilham Village - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4

Pavements of Funchal, Madeira
Damage to Trees - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13
for trees 1-54,
14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
for trees 55-95,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, 33, 34, 35,
36, 37,
for trees 95-133,
38, 39, 40,
41, 42, 43, 44, 45,
for trees 133-166

Chris Garnons-Williams
Work Done - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Identity of Plants
Label Problems - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11

Ron and Christine Foord - 1036 photos only inserted so far - Garden Flowers - Start Page of each Gallery
AB1 ,AN14,BA27,
CH40,CR52,DR63,
FR74,GE85,HE96,

Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens - 1187
A 1, 2, Photos - 43
B 1, Photos - 13
C 1, Photos - 35
D 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
Photos - 411
with Plants causing damage to buildings in Chilham Village and Damage to Trees in Pavements of Funchal
E 1, Photos - 21
F 1, Photos - 1
G 1, Photos - 5
H 1, Photos - 21
I 1, Photos - 8
J 1, Photos - 1
K 1, Photos - 1
L 1, Photos - 85
with Label Problems
M 1, Photos - 9
N 1, Photos - 12
O 1, Photos - 5
P 1, Photos - 54
Q 1, Photos -
R 1, 2, 3,
Photos - 229
S 1, Photos - 111
T 1, Photos - 13
U 1, Photos - 5
V 1, Photos - 4
W 1, Photos - 100
with Work Done by Chris Garnons-Williams
X 1 Photos -
Y 1, Photos -
Z 1 Photos -
Articles/Items in Ivydene Gardens - 88
Flower Colour, Num of Petals, Shape and
Plant Use of:-
Rock Garden
within linked page


 

 

Topic -
Fragrant Plants as a Plant Selection Process for your sense of smell:-

Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an Acid Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
1
, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3
Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves
1
, 2
Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5
Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit
1
, 2, 3
Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2
Night-scented Flowering Plants
1
, 2
 


Topic -
Website User Guidelines


My Gas Service Engineer found Flow and Return pipes incorrectly positioned on gas boilers and customers had refused to have positioning corrected in 2020.
 

BROWN WILD FLOWER GALLERY PAGE MENUS

Botanical Name with Common Name, Wild Flower Family, Flower Colour and Form Index of each of all the Wildflowers of the UK in 1965:- AC, AG,AL,AL,AN,
AR,AR,AS,BA,
BR,BR,CA,CA,
CA,CA,CA,CA,
CA,CE,CE,CH,
CI,CO,CR,DA,
DE,DR,EP,EP,
ER,EU,FE,FO,
GA,GA,GE,GL,
HE,HI,HI,HY,
IM,JU,KI,LA,
LE,LI,LL,LU,LY, ME,ME,MI,MY,
NA,OE,OR,OR,
PA,PH,PL,PO,
PO,PO,PO,PU,
RA,RH,RO,RO,
RU,SA,SA,SA,
SC,SC,SE,SI,
SI,SO,SP,ST,
TA,TH,TR,TR,
UR,VE,VE,VI

Extra Botanical Names have been added within a row for a different plant. Each Extra Botanical Name Plant will link to an Extras Page where it will be detailed in its own row.

EXTRAS 91,
 

CREAM WILD FLOWER GALLERY PAGE MENUS


Common Name with Botanical Name, Wild Flower Family, Flower Colour and Form Index of each of all the Wildflowers of the UK in 1965:- AC,AL,AS,BE,
BL,BO,BR,CA,
CL,CO,CO,CO,
CR,DA,DO,EA,
FE,FI,FR,GO,
GR,GU,HA,HO,
IR,KN,LE,LE,
LO,MA,ME,MO,
NA,NO,PE,PO,
PY,RE,RO,SA,
SE,SE,SK,SM,
SO,SP,ST,SW,
TO,TW,WA,WE,
WI,WO,WO,YE

Extra Common Names have been added within a row for a different plant. Each Extra Common Name Plant will link to an Extras Page where it will be detailed in its own row.

EXTRAS 57,58,
59,60,

Wildflowers with Mauve Flowers

Wildflower Common Plant Name

Click on Underlined Text
to view that Wildflower Plant Description Page

 

 

 

Scented

 

Scented Leaves

Flowering Months

Click on Underlined Text
to view photos

Habitat
 

Click on Underlined Text
to view further Natural Habitat details and Botanical Society of the British Isles Distri-bution Map

Number of Petals

Without Petals.

1 Petal or Comp-osite of many 1 Petal Flowers as Disc or Ray Floret .

2 Petals.
3 Petals.
4 Petals.
5 Petals.
6 Petals.
Over 6 Petals.

Foliage Colour

Height x Spread in inches (cms)

(1 inch = 2.5 cms,
12 inches = 1 foot = 30 cms,
24 inches = 2 feet,
3 feet = 1 yard,
40 inches = 100 cms)
Click on Underlined
text
to view its Wildflower FAMILY Page

Comment
and
Botanical Name

Click on Underlined Botanical Name
to link to Plant or Seed Supplier

 

Click on Underlined
/NOTE
to view Wildflower Plant NOTE Page

Sea Rocket
(Cakilier,
Caquillier maritime, Oruga Maritima,
Roqueta de mar, Roquette-de-mer, Strandrauke
)


fseaflorocket

Flower

June-August

An annual, predominately found on sandy seashores and on fore-dunes. It is often very frequent along the winter storm tide-line where there is a good source of nutrients. It is rarer on shingle beaches and is only an occasional casual elsewhere. Seeds are dispersed by tides.

Native on coasts of all Europe, except Belgium and Iceland: introduced in Austria.

 

 

6 x 24
(15 x 60)

Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2 Family

Cakile maritima
(Eruka marina)

Slender Speedwell
(Creeping Speedwell)

slenderfflosspeedwell

Flowers

April-June

A perennial herb of lawns and churchyards, and also found on roadsides, paths, grassy banks and streamsides. It is self-incompatible, rarely setting seed in our area but often spreads from fragments after mowing.
Native of Asia Minor; becoming widely naturalized in Europe.

 

 

 

Figwort - Speedwells Family

Veronica filiformis

Small-Flowered Cranesbill
(sparvnäva in Sweden, kleine ooievaarsbek in Dutch,
Small Geranium in USA)

smallfloweredffloscranesbill

Flowers

May onwards

An annual of cultivated land, open summer-droughted grasslands, roadsides and waste places, thriving in well-drained, sandy soils.
Widespread in Europe.

 

 

 

Geranium Family

Geranium pusiillum

Small Scabious

 

Native in much of Europe(except in Northern Europe, Ireland, Greece and Turkey), Denmark and Sweden.

 

 

 

Scabiosa columbaria

Smooth Tare

 

Native almost throughout Europe.

 

 

 

Vicia tetra-sperma

Spear Mint
(Spearmint)

 

Native in much of Europe, except in Ireland, Iceland, Finland, Albania and Bulgaria.
Widely used as a culinary herb.

 

 

 

Mentha spicata

Spreading Bellflower

June-July

A biennial herb of dry, well-drained, sunny sites on fairly infertile sandy or gravelly soils. It is found in open woodland, on banks and rock outcrops. Reproduction is by seed, which needs disturbed sites for germination, but which is long-lived, allowing the plant to reappear after long absences.
Native in most of Europe, except Portugal, Ireland, Iceland and Turkey: introduced to Denmark, Norway and Sweden

 

 

 

Bellflower Family

Campanula patula

Roast-Beef Plant
(Gladdon,
Stinking Iris)

roastfflo1beefplant

Flower

roastffrusbeefplant

Seed

June

A perennial herb, highly tolerant of drought and shade, found in hedge banks and woods, and on sheltered scrubby sea-cliffs, mostly on calcareous substrates. Reproduction is by seed and by rhizomatous extension.

Native in Western Europe including Great Britain, except Holland and Belgium.

 

 

 

Iris Family

Iris foetid-issima

Teesdale Violet

fteesdaleflot2violet1a

 

 

 

 

 

Violet Family

Viola rupestris

Thistle Broomrape

 

 

 

 

 

Orobanche pallidiflora

Vervain

 

Native in much of Europe (except in Iceland): introduced into Ireland, Norway, Sweden and Finland.
Used in herbal remedies.

 

 

 

Verbena officinalis

Water Lobelia

waterfflolobelia

Flower

waterfforlobelia

Form

July-August

A small, rosette-forming perennial herb of oligotrophic lakes with acidic substrates. It is slow-growing, with little ability to withstand shade or competition and is therefore confined to shallow water less than 2 metres deep. Reproduction and dispersal is by seed, which can remain viable for thirty years. 0–745 m (Llyn Bâch, Caerns.).

Native in stony lakes and tarns with acid water. Locally common in Wales, the Lake District and most of Scotland and Ireland. Native in Western Europe from Brittany northwards to circa 68 degrees in Scandininavia.

 

 

 

Lobelia dortmanna

Water Mint

 

Native in all Europe: introduced into Iceland.

 

 

 

Mentha aquatica

Water Violet

 

 

 

 

 

Hottonia palustris

Whorled Clary

 

Native in Western Europe

 

 

 

Carum verticill-atum

Wild Candytuft
(Candytuft,
Bittere Schleifenblume, Bitterer Bauernsenf, Carraspique,
Clown's Mustard, Grutzblume,
Rocket Candytuft, Teraspic,
Thlaspi Blanc
,
Annual Candytuft)

fwildflocandytuft

Flower

fwildfloscandytuft

Flowers

fwildfolcandytuft

Foliage

fwildforcandytuft

Form

May-August

An annual, rarely biennial, herb of bare, open ground on S.-facing slopes on chalk, being found in bare places in grassland, particularly rabbit scrapes, and in quarries. It also occurs as an arable weed, and as a casual in a wide variety of ruderal habitats. Lowland. Can be used in homeopathic remedy.

Native in Western Europe (except in Ireland), Germany, Switzerland and Italy: introduced into Austria, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hugary, Yugoslavia, Romania and Soviet Union.

 

 

9 x 6
(23 x 15)

Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2 Family

Iberis amara
(Iberis coronaria)

Wild Clary
(Clary)

 

Native in much of Western Europe and Mediterranean Europe.

 

 

 

Salvia hormin-oides
(Salvia verbenaca)

Wild Leek

July-August

A robust, bulbous perennial herb of rank vegetation in sandy and rocky places near the sea, especially in old fields and hedge banks, on sheltered cliff-slopes, by paths and tracks and in drainage ditches and other disturbed places. Var. ampeloprasum reproduces mainly by seed, whereas the other varieties spread mainly by bulbils. Lowland.

Native to Southern Europe and West Asia, but not to Great Britain.

 

 

 

Lily Garlic Family

Allium ampelo-prasum

Teazel
(Teasel,
Wild Teasel,
Fuller's Teasel)

 

Native in most of Europer: introduced into Northern Europe.
Cultivated forms were extensively grown in the past for their dry fruit hads which were used to raise the nap on woollen cloth.

 

 

78 x
(200 x )

Teasel Family

Dipsacus sylvestris
(Dipsacus fullonum)

Winter Heliotrope
(Scented coltsfoot)

winterffloheliotropebritishflora

Flower taken by BritishFlora

winterfforheliotrope

Form

November-March

This dioecious rhizomatous perennial herb is naturalised on streamsides, banks, rough ground and roadsides, where it sometimes forms large, very persistent stands.

Native in Portugal, Spain, France and Italy: introduced into ireland and Great Britain.

 

 

 

Daisy Family

Petasites fragrans

Bitter Vetch
(Wood Bitter-vetch)

 

Native in Western Europe (except in Holland), Denmark, Norway, Germany and Switzerland.

 

 

 

Vicia orobus

Wood Calamint

 

Native in most of Europe, except Northern Europe, Ireland and Turkey

 

 

 

Calamintha sylvatica
(Satureja sylvatica,
Calamintha intermedia)

Wood Crane's-bill
(Wood Cranesbill,
Wald-Storchschnabel in Germany,
midsom-marblomster in Sweden,
Woodland Geranium in USA,
Bodziszek lesny in Poland)


woodfflo2cranesbill

Flower

woodffolcranesbill

Foliage

woodfforcranesbill

Form

June-July

A stoutly rhizomatous perennial herb of hay meadows, ungrazed damp woodlands, streamsides and mountain rock ledges, and in many areas a characteristic feature of laneside hedge banks and verges.

Native in much of Europe, except in Portugal, Greece and Turkey.

 

 

 

Geranium Family

Geranium sylvaticum

Wood Speedwell

April-July

A perennial herb of damp basic to mildly acidic soils in long-established, mixed deciduous woodland, scrub and shaded hedge banks. It is found on loamy and sandy soils and on heavy clay.

Native and widespread in Europe, except in the north.

 

 

 

Figwort - Speedwells Family

Veronica montana

Wood Vetch

 

Native in most of Europe, except in Portugal, Iceland, Belgium, Holland, Greece, Turkey and Bulgaria.

 

 

 

Vicia sylvatica

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cultural Needs of Plants
from Chapter 4 in Fern Grower's Manual by Barbara Joe Hoshizaki & Robbin C. Moran. Revised and Expanded Edition. Published in 2001 by Timber Press, Inc. Reprinted 2002, 2006. ISBN-13:978-0-
88192-495-4.

"Understanding Fern Needs
Ferns have the same basic growing requirements as other plants and will thrive when these are met. There is nothing mysterious about the requirements - they are not something known only to people with green thumbs - but the best gardeners are those who understand plant requirements and are careful about satisfying them.
What, then, does a fern need?

All plants need water.
Water in the soil prevents roots from drying, and all mineral nutrients taken up by the roots must be dissolved in the soil water. Besides water in the soil, most plants need water in the air. Adequate humidity keeps the plant from drying out. Leaves need water for photosynthesis and to keep from wilting.
All green plants need light to manufacture food (sugars) by photosynthesis. Some plants need more light than others, and some can flourish in sun or shade. Most ferns, however, prefer some amount of shade.
For photosynthesis, plants require carbon dioxide, a gas that is exhaled by animals as waste. Carbon dioxide diffuses into plants through tiny pores, called stomata, that abound on the lower surface of the leaves. In the leaf, carbon dioxide is combined with the hydrogen from water to form carbohydrates, the plant's food. This process takes place only in the presence of light and chlorophyll, a green pigment found in plant cells. To enhance growth, some commercial growers increase the carbon dioxide level in their greenhouses to 600ppm (parts per million), or twice the amount typically found in the air.
Plants need oxygen. The green plants of a plant do not require much oxygen from the air because plants produce more oxygen by photosynthesis than they use. The excess oxygen liberated from the plants is used by all animals, including humans. What do plants do with oxygen? They use it just as we do, to release the energy stored in food. We use energy to move about, to talk, to grow, to think - in fact, for all our life processes. Although plants don't talk or move much, they do grow and metabolize and must carry on all their life processes using oxygen to release the stored energy in their food.
Roots need air all the time. They get it from the air spaces between the soil particles. Overwatering displaces the air between soil particles with water, thereby removing the oxygen needed by the roots. This reduces the root's ability to absorb mineral nutrients and can foster root-rot.
Plants need minerals to grow properly. The minerals are mined from the soil by the plant's root system. If a certain mineral is missing, such as calcium needed for developing cell walls, then the plant will be stunted, discoloured, or deformed.
Some plants tolerate a wide range of temperatures, whereas others are fussy. If the temperature is too high or low, the machinery of the plant will not operate satisfactorily or will cease entirely.

The basic needs of plants are not hard to supply, but growing success depends on attending to these needs with care and exactitude. The remainder of this chapter is devoted to a discussion of these requirements, with the exception of mineral needs, which are discussed in Chapter 5."

 

It is worth remembering that especially with roses that the colour of the petals of the flower may change - The following photos are of Rosa 'Lincolnshire Poacher' which I took on the same day in R.V. Roger's Nursery Field:-

poacherrose1garnonswilliams

Closed Bud

poacherrose2garnonswilliams

Opening Bud

poacherrose3garnonswilliams

Juvenile Flower

poacherrose4garnonswilliams

Older Juvenile Flower

poacherrose5garnonswilliams

Middle-aged Flower - Flower Colour in Season in its
Rose Description Page is
"Buff Yellow, with a very slight pink tint at the edges in May-October."

poacherrose6garnonswilliams

Mature Flower

poacherrose7garnonswilliams

Juvenile Flower and Dying Flower

poacherrose8garnonswilliams

Form of Rose Bush

There are 720 roses in the Rose Galleries; many of which have the above series of pictures in their respective Rose Description Page.

So one might avoid the disappointment that the 2 elephants had when their trunks were entwined instead of them each carrying their trunk using their own trunk, and your disappointment of buying a rose to discover that the colour you bought it for is only the case when it has its juvenile flowers; if you look at all the photos of the roses in the respective Rose Description Page!!!!

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