Ivydene Gardens Home:
Home Electric Re-wire 2021 Page 3 - Re-wire Narrative 19.04.2021

READING THE TEXT IN RED ON THIS PAGE WILL MAKE IT EASIER FOR YOU TO USE EACH PAGE in my educational website.

 

THE 2 EUREKA EFFECT PAGES FOR UNDERSTANDING SOIL AND HOW PLANTS INTERACT WITH IT OUT OF 17,000:-


 

Explanation of Structure of this Website with User Guidelines Page for those photo galleries with Photos (of either ones I have taken myself or others which have been loaned only for use on this website from external sources)

 

Problems with electrical re-wire in my home, with the knowledge after the event that the client can do nothing about it, since Napid requires you to re-use the same contractor to fix the problems. Would you after reading these pages? Manderson emails to us about re-wire.

We wrote the
concerns about the electrical work on 21.03.21;
Questions concerning electrics on 21.03.21 and
re-wire narrative on 19.04.2021
which had no effect on the credit card company or Napid. So we commisioned the following report to see if that will make any difference.
Pages 10, 11, 12, 13 contain information concerning the condition of the electrical installation of the complete rewiring of my home by Mr Manderson of Manderson Electrical Services Ltd, with the report by a qualified electrician and this statement about the work carried out:-
"The result of my observations and testing, I am recommending that all the fixed wiring be recovered and a complete new fixed wiring installation is installed. Unfortunately the work previously carried out is of such a poor standard I cannot re-use any of it."
Mr Manderson is a Part P Registered Electrician with Napit; Registered Competent Person Electrical; Approved Electrician from Napit; City & Guilds Qualified; Part P Electrical Safety; and Honest & Transparent. His firm was employed to replace all the wiring, power sockets, light switches and lights and make sure that rodents could not attack them to chew through the cables or cause an
electrical problem.
Pages 10 lists 18 electrical faults on the new wiring, re-use of the old wiring, and old wiring that was still either in use or had been cut at the old power socket, at the old light fitting, or old light switch (the plasterers filled an old power socket metal box and short-circuited the fuse - it will be fine in 30 minutes sir; 4 hours later it was still shorting, so presumably that would explain why they switched off one of the fuses in the old fuseboard - see photo on page 15 of the report. As clients; we do appreciate having the opportunity of electrocuting ourselves from their re-wire work) where

  • fault 2 is a Code C1 'Danger Present' and immediate action is required from March 2021, (the electricians testing 2 of the double power sockets installed in the kitchen in 1987 found that they were polarity reversed. This risks a short circuit, shock or fire. They corrected the problem immediately)
  • Faults 4, 12, 14 and 18 are Code C2 and Urgent remedial action required,
  • Faults 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 15, 16, 17 are Code C3 where improvement is recommended

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Problems with trees in pavements in Funchal, Madeira in January/February 2018
PROBLEMS WITH TREES IN PAVEMENTS IN FUNCHAL, MADEIRA IN JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019
Death of tree roots and
Death of tree trunks/branches caused by people.
Solution to problems for trees caused by people using irrigation -
Growth of Pollarded Tree in Hotel Garden in 1 year provides a water solution to this destruction.

Damage to Tree Trunks 1, 2, 3, 4 caused by people,
Damage to Tree Roots caused by people,
Area of Open Ground round trees,
New Trees in pavements 1, 2,
Irrigation of current trees,
Watersprouts on trees,
Crossing Branches in trees,
Utility Equipment with tree Foliage,
Lights on trees,
Bycycle Lane in Pavement,
Public Gardens alongside pavements,
Hotel/Private Gardens alongside pavements,
Current Permeable Pavement Surface round trees and
Irrigation and Fertilising of trees.

Camera Photo Galleries:-
Pavements of Funchal, Madeira
Damage to Trees
1
, 2, 3, 4.

Monitoring of Trees in pavements in Funchal, Madeira from September 2019 to February 2010
1, 2

PROBLEMS WITH TREES IN PAVEMENTS IN ST. PETER PORT, GUERNSEY IN SEPTEMBER 2019
Demise of trees in pavements in St. Peter Port, Guernsey caused by people to their Roots

Medway Proposed New School Comments in September 2019

Mr Manderson of Manderson Electrical Services Ltd was employed to rewire our home, due to rodents eating our cables.
Mr Manderson is a Part P Registered Electrician with Napit; Registered Competent Person Electrical; Approved Electrician from Napit; City & Guilds Qualified; Part P Electrical
Safety; and Honest & Transparent.
His firm was employed to replace all the wiring, power sockets, light switches and lights and make sure that rodents could not attack them to chew through the cables or cause an
electrical problem.

We wrote the following on the 19.04.2021:-
"Re-wire narrative

Poor advice and professional errors

The brief was to re-wire our home following an infestation of rodents which had damaged wiring and caused lights to fail. This had happened once before and so preventing it happening again was
an absolute priority. We relied upon the professional expertise of the contractor that this could be achieved using cable cladding – Cobex. There was no mention of the lights being left vulnerable
between the fitting and the transformer, but this is obviously the case now we can see how the fittings are attached. (Photo 78 Light hanging in back bedroom). If we had known this in advance,
we may have had second thoughts, given the high cost quoted. No alternative solutions were suggested by Mr Manderson.
We asked that rodent poison be placed throughout the cavities where wires were run and by each light, for added protection and we supplied this. Despite reassurances that this had been done, the
quantity left from the order suggests this is not the case, because only 20 bags have been used despite far more than 20 lights having been fitted.
We also asked that any areas which could not be protected by Cobex should be blocked with wire wool fixed into place with expanding foam. We agreed to supply this material too, but again, it is
clear that not much has been used.
Work started 19th January and was estimated to take 4 to 5 weeks. Mr Mandserson did not attend the week it snowed; he had a day off due to tooth pain, and approximately 9 other days when he
has been elsewhere or undertaking parenting duties. I asked him not to return on the night of 17th March, because we were concerned that the work was not being done in accordance with our specification.
There has been no discussion with us regarding choice of fittings save in the most general terms, ie whether we wanted recessed lights. As some of our ceilings are relatively low, this is what we
have had before and pendant lights would not be practical, so we agreed to recessed LED’s.
We understand that the light switch for the hall by the lounge door should have a sheath round it, but it does not. The wires from this switch would be plastered in, but go into the void outside the
kitchen door. There is no obvious protection (photos 118, 60, 61 and 62), but this void is vulnerable from past experience. Photos 103-111. The light switch by the office door on the second floor
should also have had a sheath.
In the ironing annex next to the lounge, there is an earth wire not affixed to anything, which we understand should be terminated to something to make it safe..
There is a circuit protector on the system, but given the brief, we have been advised that best practice recommendation would be for and AFD on each connection. We understand that this would
be expensive, but would have minimised risk and should have been discussed with us to make a choice.
We have made staged payments, but not received any safety certificates.
In the hall, Photos 50-55 attempt to show what is inside the new ceiling space. The data cables are partly trunked, but there are sizable gaps. Why wasn’t armoured data cable used, which would
have solved the problem?
We already had smoke alarms (both perfectly visible) which were allowed for in the original quote. The contractor then credited their cost back. They were installed with our burglar alarm system
which is wireless, save for a hard wiring from the control panel up through the front bedroom to the outside bell. We understand that there may be an issue with this from a regulatory point of view.
This was not drawn to our attention.
As the contractor kept setting off the alarms, we opted to have them all disabled for the duration of the work, but we do not know whether the wires to the control panel have been interfered with.

Billing issues
Chris requested the fixing of new stud walls, in the rear bedroom for heat insulation, in the front bedroom for sound insulation and in the dining room for sound insulation. These have been fitted
and in the bedrooms, cable runs behind them which does not appear to be sheathed. This may not be an issue, but we do not know if the holes in the ceiling from which the wires drop down have been
filled in. If this is not the case, rodents would have unfettered access to those cables.
In addition, there does not appear to be any insulation behind the bedroom walls; we can see some insulation at the bottom of the dining room wall, but it does not seem to extend right up the
wall from a test hole drilled higher up. This omission was raised with the contractor the day they were put up and he confirmed that he had forgotten. We asked that this be rectified, and reminded
him that it was needed on more than one occasion, but it seems that this was not done. In the meantime, because we did not realise the issue with insulation and protection of the wires, the
walls have been plastered and painted, so potentially involving us in significant additional cost to put right.
In addition to the breach of trust, we have paid to have the walls in the bedrooms plastered; we will have to take the board down, insulate and return the board as well as replastering it again and
decorating the back bedroom.
In the original estimate, each light is costed at £65. This may include an element of labour for connecting new wires to the fitting, but this is not clear. I have detailed below where fittings
appear to have been re-used, but there has been no obvious credit for this.
The lights in the attic landing, office and one in the library have been re-used. Given how invoices have been presented, it is difficult to tell, but fittings were quoted for and there is no obvious credit
for them, so potential over-charge of £325
An additional socket had been fitted that was not allowed for in the original estimate, so potential under payment of £65
Lights in the en-suite quoted for but fittings re-used. One of the existing fittings was faulty and this was pointed out several times. On the last occasion, Mr Manderson said that he did not know if he
could get a matching fitting. Potential over charge £520.
The sensor in the en-suite bathroom which activates the plinth lights has not been replaced. Mr Manderson asked me what it was for on the day work was done there (including moving the light
fittings around because the faulty one is in a different place). I explained and he told me it did not work, but the same evening, I notified him that it did and so it was not necessary to replace it. As
he said he had not noticed the plinth lights and the plinth has clearly not been moved, it is clear that these have not been replaced. 4 plinth lights and one sensor not supplied but quoted for £265.
Main bathroom lights reused. Fittings quoted £130
Front bedroom ceiling lights re-used £390. £130 has been credited for two lights. Wall light fittings would have been reused.

Poor workmanship
One of the lights in the back bedroom has been left hanging, demonstrating that a significant length of the wire is not protected. This has been drawn to the contractors attention.
The lights in the dormer bedroom wardrobe and the front bedroom wardrobe do not work. As these rooms are marked as complete, we would have expected these to have been checked.
Concern about how wires have been fed through the void exposed by lifting the flooring at the first floor landing. Why were they not put through the gap left by a missing floor board? This may have
caused a weakness in the floor. Photo 151
The contractor raised concerns about drilling holes into the dining room ceiling because it was lath and plaster. He mentioned that he had researched it and the dust could carry anthrax if it
contained wool. This was very alarming. It was agreed that a new ceiling could be put up. Once the batons were in place, Chris questioned whether the fittings they were using would still require
drilling into the old ceiling. The contractor agreed that they would, which would completely defeat the object of leaving it intact for safety reasons. Double battening was agreed as a way forward.
We do not know if all of the holes in the old ceiling were re-filled. If not, any rodents which get into the area above the old ceiling will be able to access the new void.
On further consideration of this issue, it might have been possible to turn the batons through 90 degrees, so using them short edge up, but with long screws and avoided the need for double batons.
If Mr Manderson was unhappy about putting in the ceiling, he should have mentioned it and we could have sourced another tradesperson to do it, but he seemed content to do this work.
There is a wire sticking down from the ceiling in the dining room to re-fix a pendant light; when it is moved, there is neither noise or resistance to suggest it is in codex within the void. This is of concern.
The same issue arose in the hall, in that much of that ceiling was also lath and plaster. We agreed to it being replaced. Chris noticed a hole had not been filled in just as it was being covered with new
board. The contractor apologised and asked for the wire wool and expanding foam, which was provided immediately. We cannot be confident that any other holes have been filled in; certainly
no board was taken down to do so and the whole was covered up very quickly. It has been pointed out to us since I asked Mr Manderson to leave the site that the fittings chosen
by the contractor will not sit flush with the ceiling because they are too deep. It is clear too that there is a significant length of wire not protected. We understand now that shorter fittings are
available which would have been more appropriate for our situation, both in terms of what is left unprotected and also how the lights fit within the new ceiling void. We understood that the
lighting in the hall was finished, so not clear if this would be dealt with.
There is a portion of wire unprotected from the ceiling down to the switch outside the dining room door.
The same issue arose with the lounge ceiling. Two sizable channels had been cut to allow wires to be pulled down which revealed lath and plaster. (Photo 23) Given what Mr Manderson
had said about possible toxicity, it was agreed that a new ceiling would be installed. As this was being done, Chris again pointed out that new board was being put up without the holes
being filled in. Again, the contractor apologised and he was reminded that wire wool and foam were provided. Given the speed at which the new board was fixed, we cannot be confident
that holes have not been left which would give easy access for rodents from above the old ceiling down into the new void.
In the cellar, photos 116 and 117 show old wires connected to new lights. (photos 118, and 60 to 62) This is surprising. These wires are not protected. In addition, there are sockets
with plastic trunking tacked to the wall (photo 120-122), leading up into the ceiling, possibly into the new wall in the dining room. There is no evidence these wires are protected. (photo 73).
Why was old wiring reused?
There are bundles of wire from the new fuse box in the cloakroom which seem not to be connected to the new fuse box in the bedroom. It is difficult to see where these wires go and
establish if they are protected.
All of the power to the outside lights has been disconnected, but as we had not agreed a newscheme for outside, we wonder why.
Apart from the kitchen, the power in the rest of the house relies on 2 extension cables and plugs, one for power and lighting on the top 2 floors and one for the ground floor and cellar. This
seems to risk overloading. We are being cautious but have not received any warning about loading the system.

Was this work necessary?

Mr Manderson said he would fit two fuse boxes, one in the cloakroom and one he has positioned in the front bedroom wardrobe. We are not sure why this was necessary, but it has certainly
been costly. And the contractors who have been to the site subsequently agreed that one fuse box would have been quite adequate. One of the boxes is labled, but the other one is not.
We appreciate that there is still work to do, particularly in terms of the kitchen, but we wonder if Mr Manderson would have been able to recall accurately what each fuse is, even if he had
completed the work from17th March when I asked him not to return.
We accept that we agreed to the new ceilings, but this was because we were persuaded that there was significant risk both the contractors safety and our own because of the structure of the
existing ceiling. We question now whether this was true or simply a way of making the job easier and more costly."

Neither Napit nor our credit card company were interested in the above. At the end of each of
their complaint forms, they recommend that the offender repairs the damage.

So we employed Taylor Electrical Limited to inspect, test and produce the following report on only the condition of the elecrical installation of the current electrical system (not on whether the new electrical work
done was done according to the contract) on 11.07.2021:-
Details on Pages
10, 11, 12, 13 contain information concerning the complete rewiring of my home by Mr Manderson of Manderson Electrical Services Ltd, with the report by a qualified electrician
and this statement about the work carried out:-
"The result of my observations and testing, I am recommending that all the fixed wiring be recovered and a complete new fixed wiring installation is installed. Unfortunately the work previously 
carried out is of such a poor standard I cannot re-use any of it."
Mr Manderson is a Part P Registered Electrician with Napit; Registered Competent Person Electrical; Approved Electrician from Napit; City & Guilds Qualified; Part P Electrical Safety; and
Honest & Transparent. His firm was employed to replace all the wiring, power sockets, light switches and lights and make sure that rodents could not attack them to chew through the cables
or cause an electrical problem.

The above is repeated below with its relevant photos:-


Text for this row
 


Photo taken by Chris Garnons-Williams In 1 Eastmoor Farm Cottages.

 


Photo taken by Chris Garnons-Williams In 1 Eastmoor Farm Cottages.

 


Photo taken by Chris Garnons-Williams In 1 Eastmoor Farm Cottages.

 

Poor advice and professional errors

The brief was to re-wire our home following an infestation of rodents which had damaged wiring and caused lights to fail. This had happened once before and so preventing it happening again was an absolute priority. We relied upon the professional expertise of the contractor that this could be achieved using cable cladding – Cobex. There was no mention of the lights being left vulnerable between the fitting and the transformer, but this is obviously the case now we can see how the fittings are attached. (Photo 78 Light hanging in back bedroom). If we had known this in advance,
we may have had second thoughts, given the high cost quoted.
No alternative solutions were suggested by Mr Manderson.

IMG0078web

Photo 78

IMG0118web

Photo 118

We asked that rodent poison be placed throughout the cavities where wires were run and by each light, for added protection and we supplied this. Despite reassurances that this had been done, the quantity left from the order suggests this is not the case, because only 20 bags have been used despite far more than 20 lights having been fitted.
We also asked that any areas which could not be protected by Cobex should be blocked with wire wool fixed into place with expanding foam. We agreed to supply this material too, but again, it is clear that not much has been used.
Work started 19th January and was estimated to take 4 to 5 weeks. Mr Mandserson did not attend the week it snowed; he had a day off due to tooth pain, and approximately 9 other days when he has been elsewhere or undertaking parenting duties. I asked him not to return on the night of 17th March, because we were concerned that the work was not being done in accordance with our specification.
There has been no discussion with us regarding choice of fittings save in the most general terms, ie whether we wanted recessed lights. As some of our ceilings are relatively low, this is what we have had before and pendant lights would not be practical, so we agreed to recessed LED’s.
We understand that the light switch for the hall by the lounge door should have a sheath round it, but it does not. The wires from this switch would be plastered in, but go into the void outside the kitchen door. There is no obvious protection (photos 118, 60, 61 and 62), but this void is vulnerable from past experience. Photos 103-111. The light switch by the office door on the second floor
should also have had a sheath.

IMG0060web

Photo 60

 

IMG0061web

Photo 61

IMG0062web

Photo 62

IMG0103web

Photo 103

 

IMG0104web

Photo 104

IMG0105web

Photo 105

IMG0106web

Photo 106

 

IMG0107web

Photo 107

IMG0108web

Photo 108

IMG0109web

Photo 109

 

IMG0110web

Photo 110

IMG0111web

Photo 111

IMG0050web

Photo 50

In the ironing annex next to the lounge, there is an earth wire not affixed to anything, which we understand should be terminated to something to make it safe..
There is a circuit protector on the system, but given the brief, we have been advised that best practice recommendation would be for and AFD on each connection. We understand that this would be expensive, but would have minimised risk and should have been discussed with us to make a choice.
We have made staged payments, but not received any safety certificates.
In the hall, Photos 50-55 attempt to show what is inside the new ceiling space. The data cables are partly trunked, but there are sizable gaps. Why wasn’t armoured data cable used, which would have solved the problem?
We already had smoke alarms (both perfectly visible) which were allowed for in the original quote. The contractor then credited their cost back. They were installed with our burglar alarm system which is wireless, save for a hard wiring from the control panel up through the front bedroom to the outside bell. We understand that there may be an issue with this from a regulatory point of view.
This was not drawn to our attention.
As the contractor kept setting off the alarms, we opted to have them all disabled for the duration of the work, but we do not know whether the wires to the control panel have been interfered with.

 

IMG0051web

Photo 51

IMG0052web

Photo 52

IMG0053web

Photo 53

 

IMG0054web

Photo 54

IMG0055web

Photo 55

IMG0151web

Photo 151

Poor workmanship
One of the lights in the back bedroom has been left hanging, demonstrating that a significant length of the wire is not protected. This has been drawn to the contractors attention.
The lights in the dormer bedroom wardrobe and the front bedroom wardrobe do not work. As these rooms are marked as complete, we would have expected these to have been checked.
Concern about how wires have been fed through the void exposed by lifting the flooring at the first floor landing. Why were they not put through the gap left by a missing floor board? This may have
caused a weakness in the floor. Photo 151

 

IMG0023web

Photo 23

The contractor raised concerns about drilling holes into the dining room ceiling because it was lath and plaster. He mentioned that he had researched it and the dust could carry anthrax if it contained wool. This was very alarming. It was agreed that a new ceiling could be put up. Once the batons were in place, Chris questioned whether the fittings they were using would still require drilling into the old ceiling. The contractor agreed that they would, which would completely defeat the object of leaving it intact for safety reasons. Double battening was agreed as a way forward.
We do not know if all of the holes in the old ceiling were re-filled. If not, any rodents which get into the area above the old ceiling will be able to access the new void.
On further consideration of this issue, it might have been possible to turn the batons through 90 degrees, so using them short edge up, but with long screws and avoided the need for double batons.
If Mr Manderson was unhappy about putting in the ceiling, he should have mentioned it and we could have sourced another tradesperson to do it, but he seemed content to do this work.
There is a wire sticking down from the ceiling in the dining room to re-fix a pendant light; when it is moved, there is neither noise or resistance to suggest it is in codex within the void. This is of concern.
The same issue arose in the hall, in that much of that ceiling was also lath and plaster. We agreed to it being replaced. Chris noticed a hole had not been filled in just as it was being covered with new board. The contractor apologised and asked for the wire wool and expanding foam, which was provided immediately. We cannot be confident that any other holes have been filled in; certainly no board was taken down to do so and the whole was covered up very quickly. It has been pointed out to us since I asked Mr Manderson to leave the site that the fittings chosen by the contractor will not sit flush with the ceiling because they are too deep. It is clear too that there is a significant length of wire not protected. We understand now that shorter fittings are available which would have been more appropriate for our situation, both in terms of what is left unprotected and also how the lights fit within the new ceiling void. We understood that the
lighting in the hall was finished, so not clear if this would be dealt with.
There is a portion of wire unprotected from the ceiling down to the switch outside the dining room door.
The same issue arose with the lounge ceiling. Two sizable channels had been cut to allow wires to be pulled down which revealed lath and plaster. (Photo 23) Given what Mr Manderson had said about possible toxicity, it was agreed that a new ceiling would be installed. As this was being done, Chris again pointed out that new board was being put up without the holes being filled in. Again, the contractor apologised and he was reminded that wire wool and foam were provided. Given the speed at which the new board was fixed, we cannot be confident that holes have not been left which would give easy access for rodents from above the old ceiling down into the new void.

IMG0116web

Photo 116

In the cellar, photos 116 and 117 show old wires connected to new lights. (photos 118, and 60 to 62) This is surprising. These wires are not protected. In addition, there are sockets
with plastic trunking tacked to the wall (photo 120-122), leading up into the ceiling, possibly into the new wall in the dining room. There is no evidence these wires are protected. (photo 73).
Why was old wiring reused?
There are bundles of wire from the new fuse box in the cloakroom which seem not to be connected to the new fuse box in the bedroom. It is difficult to see where these wires go and establish if they are protected.
All of the power to the outside lights has been disconnected, but as we had not agreed a newscheme for outside, we wonder why.
Apart from the kitchen, the power in the rest of the house relies on 2 extension cables and plugs, one for power and lighting on the top 2 floors and one for the ground floor and cellar. This seems to risk overloading. We are being cautious but have not received any warning about loading the system.

IMG0117web

Photo 117

 

IMG0118web1

Photo 118

IMG0060web1

Photo 60

IMG0061web1

Photo 61

 

IMG0062web1

Photo 62

IMG0120web

Photo 120

IMG0121web

Photo 121

 

IMG0122web

Photo 122

IMG0073web

Photo 73

Was this work necessary?

Mr Manderson said he would fit two fuse boxes, one in the cloakroom and one he has positioned in the front bedroom wardrobe. We are not sure why this was necessary, but it has certainly been costly. And the contractors who have been to the site subsequently agreed that one fuse box would have been quite adequate. One of the boxes is labled, but the other one is not.
We appreciate that there is still work to do, particularly in terms of the kitchen, but we wonder if Mr Manderson would have been able to recall accurately what each fuse is, even if he had completed the work from 17th March when I asked him not to return.
We accept that we agreed to the new ceilings, but this was because we were persuaded that there was significant risk both the contractors safety and our own because of the structure of the existing ceiling. We question now whether this was true or simply a way of making the job easier and more costly."

 

This website is being created by Chris Garnons-Williams of Ivydene Horticultural Services from it's start in 2005.

I am requesting free colour photographs of any plants grown in or sold in the United Kingdom to add to the plants in the Plant Photographic Galleries and Butterfly photographs for the Butterfly on Plant Photographic Galleries.

 

Site design and content copyright ©April 2007. Page structure amended October 2012. Page structure changed February 2019 for pages concerning Trees in pavements alongside roads in Madeira. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

It should be remembered that nothing is sold from this educational site, it simply tries to give you the best advice on what to use and where to get it (About Chris Garnons-Williams page details that no payment or commision to or from any donor of photos or adverts I place on the site in the Useful Data or other sections is made to Chris Garnons-Williams or Ivydene Horticultural Services). This website is a hobby and not for direct commercial gain for Ivydene Horticultural Services. There is no Google Adscenes or Search Facility in this website.

The information on this site is usually Verdana 14pt text and all is in tabular form. This can be downloaded and sorted using WORD or other word-processing software into the order that you personally require, especially for soil subsidence, the Companion Planting Tables and the pages in the Plants section. This would be suitable for use in education as well.

I put jokes in at various places to give you a smile.

 

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M 1, Photos - 9
N 1, Photos - 12
O 1, Photos - 5
P 1, Photos - 54
Q 1, Photos -
R 1, Photos - 229
S 1, Photos - 111
T 1, Photos - 13
U 1, Photos - 5
V 1, Photos - 4
W 1, Photos - 100
Photos of
Work Done by Chris Garnons-Willams are also in the W pages
X 1, Photos -
Y 1, Photos -
Z 1, Photos -


Articles/Items in Ivydene Gard
ens - 88


and in
Flower Shape and Plant Use of

Bedding
Bulb
Evergreen Perennial
Herbaceous Perennial
Rose
Evergreen Shrub
Deciduous Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Deciduous Tree
Annual
Fern
Wildflower

with
1. Why the perfect soil for general use is composed of 8.3% lime, 16.6% humus, 25% clay and 50% sand
within the SOIL TEXTURE, and
2. Why you are continually losing the SOIL STRUCTURE if you leave bare earth between plants so your soil - will revert to clay, chalk, sand or silt - unless you replace that lost humus with an organic mulch.

 

Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape

Bulb
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn Bulb
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer Bulb
...Narcissus
...Spring Bulb
...Tulip
...Winter
...Each of the above ...Bulb Galleries has its own set of Flower Colour Pages
...Flower Shape
Climber
...Clematis
...Climbers

Colour Wheels with number of Colours
Colour Wheel
...All Flowers 53
...All Flowers per Month 53
...
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...All Foliage 212
...Rock Plant Flowers 53
 

Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Deciduous
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Deciduous
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...A,B,C,D,E,F,G,
...H,I
,J,K,L,M,N,
...O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,
...V,W,X,Y,Z

...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evergreen
...Heather Shrub
...Heather Index
......Andromeda
......Bruckenthalia
......Calluna
......Daboecia
......Erica: Carnea
......Erica: Cinerea
......Erica: Others
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evergreen
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous
Perennial

...A1,2,B,C,D,E,F,G,
...H,I,J,K,L,M,N,
...O,P1,2,Q,R,S,T,U,
...V,W,XYZ,
...Diascia Photo Album,
...UK Peony Index

...P -Herbaceous
...Peony
...Flower Shape
...RHS Wisley
......Mixed Border
......Other Borders
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use
...
Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple Gallery Intro
...Cherry Gallery Intro
...Pear Gallery Intro
Vegetable
Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour

NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown
Note
...Cream Note
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note
Poisonous
Wildflower Plants

............

Topic - Flower/Foliage Colour
Colour Wheel Galleries

Following your choice using Garden Style then that changes your Plant Selection Process
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

or
you could use these Flower Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53
...Use of Plant and
...Flower Shape

All Flowers per Month 12
with its
Explanation of
Structure of this Website with

...User Guidelines
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index
Rock Garden and Alpine Flower Colour Wheel with number of colours
Rock Plant Flowers 53
...Rock Plant Photos

or
A Foliage Colour Wheel using 212 web-safe colours instead of the best Colour Wheel of 2058 colours in the Pantone Goe System
All Foliage 212

or
Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index

............


Topic -
Butterflies in the UK mostly use native UK wildflowers.

Butterfly Species.

Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly Usage

of Plants.

Plant Usage
by
Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly.

followed by all the Wild Flower Family Pages:-

There are 180 families in the Wildflowers of the UK and they have been split up into 22 Galleries to allow space for up to 100 plants per gallery.

Each plant named in each of the Wildflower Family Pages may have a link to its Plant Description Page in its Common Name in one of those Wildflower Plant Galleries and will have links to external sites to purchase the plant or seed in its Botanical Name, to see photos in its Flowering Months and to read habitat details in its Habitat Column.


57(o)58 Crucifer (Cabbage/ Mustard) 1
indicates 57 Plant Description Pages with photos and 58 plants with photos in that Crucifer Family Page 1:-

Wild Flower

ad borage gallery
...(o)2 Adder's Tongue
...Amaranth
...(o)3 Arrow-Grass
...(o)4 Arum
...1(o)1 Balsam
...Bamboo
...2(o)2 Barberry
...(o)10 Bedstraw
...(o)7 Beech
...(o)12 Bellflower
...(o)5 Bindweed
...(o)4 Birch
...(o)1 Birds-Nest
...(o)1 Birthwort
...(o)2 Bogbean
...(o)1 Bog Myrtle
...(o)23 Borage

box crowberry gallery
...1(o)1 Box
...(o)11 Broomrape
...2(o)2 Buckthorn
...(o)1 Buddleia
...(o)1 Bur-reed
...29(o)30 Buttercup
...(o)6 Butterwort
...6(o)6 Clubmoss
...(o)2 Cornel (Dogwood)
...(o)1 Crowberry

cabbages gallery
...57(o)58 Crucifer (Cabbage/ Mustard) 1
...(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2

cypress cud gallery
...Cypress
...(o)4 Daffodil
...(o)23 Daisy
...(o)21 Daisy Cudweeds
...(o)16 Daisy Chamomiles
...3(o)22 Daisy Thistle
...(o)17 Daisy Catsears

hawk dock gallery
...(o)5 Daisy Hawkweeds
...(o)5 Daisy Hawksbeards
...(o)2 Daphne
...(o)1 Diapensia
...(o)10 Dock Bistorts
...(o)7 Dock Sorrels

duckw fern gallery
...(o)4 Duckweed
...(o)1 Eel-Grass
...(o)2 Elm

figwort fum gallery
...(o)24 Figwort - Mulleins
...(o)21 Figwort - Speedwells
...2(o)2 Filmy Fern
...(o)4 Flax
...(o)1 Flowering-Rush
...(o)3 Frog-bit
...7(o)7 Fumitory

g goosefoot gallery
...1(o)10 Gentian
...(o)16 Geranium
...(o)4 Glassworts
...(o)2 Gooseberry
...(o)13 Goosefoot

grasses123 gallery
...(o)8 Grass 1
...(o)8 Grass 2
...(o)8 Grass 3

g brome gallery
...(o)8 Soft Bromes 1
...(o)8 Soft Bromes 2
...(o)9 Soft Bromes 3

h lobelia gallery
...(o)2 Hazel
...(o)15 Heath
...(o)1 Hemp
...(o)1 Herb-Paris
...(o)1 Holly
...(o)7 Honeysuckle
...(o)1 Horned-Pondweed
...2(o)2 Hornwort
...5(o)5 Horsetail
...(o)9 Iris
...(o)1 Ivy
...(o)1 Jacobs Ladder
...(o)17 Lily
...(o)7 Lily Garlic
...(o)2 Lime
...(o)2 Lobelia

l olive gallery
...(o)1 Loosestrife
...(o)5 Mallow
...(o)4 Maple
...(o)1 Mares-tail
...(o)1 Marsh Pennywort
...1(o)1 Melon (Gourd/ Cucumber)
...(o)2 Mesembry-anthemum
...3(o)3 Mignonette
...3(o)3 Milkwort
...(o)1 Mistletoe
...(o)1 Moschatel
...Naiad
...4(o)4 Nettle
...(o)7 Nightshade
...(o)1 Oleaster
...(o)3 Olive

orchid parn gallery
...(o)22 Orchid 1
...(o)22 Orchid 2

peaflowers gallery
...(o)20 Peaflower
...(o)31 Peaflower Clover
...(o)18 Peaflower Vetches/Peas
...(o)1 Parnassus-Grass

peony pink gallery
...Peony
...(o)1 Periwinkle
...Pillwort
...Pine
...7(o)23 Pink 1
...7(o)24 Pink 2

p rockrose gallery
...Pipewort
...(o)1 Pitcher-Plant
...(o)6 Plantain
...26(o)27 Polypody
...(o)4 Pondweed
...8(o)8 Poppy
...16(o)16 Primrose
...3(o)3 Purslane
...Quillwort
...Rannock Rush
...2(o)2 Reedmace
...4(o)4 Rockrose

rose12 gallery
...(o)30 Rose 1
...(o)23 Rose 2
...1(o)1 Royal Fern

rush saxi gallery
...(o)1 Rush
...(o)1 Rush Woodrushes
...9(o)9 Saint Johns Wort
...Saltmarsh Grasses
...(o)1 Sandalwood
...(o)1 Saxifrage

sea sedge2 gallery
...Seaheath
...1(o)3 Sea Lavender
...(o)2 Sedge Rush-like
...(o)1 Sedges Carex 1
...1(o)1 Sedges Carex 2

sedge3 crop gallery
...(o)1 Sedges Carex 3
...(o)1 Sedges Carex 4
...(o)1 Spindle-Tree
...(o)13 Spurge
...(o)1 Stonecrop

sun thyme gallery
...(o)1 Sundew
...1(o)1 Tamarisk
...Tassel Pondweed
...(o)4 Teasel
...(o)20 Thyme 1
...(o)21 Thyme 2

umb violet gallery
...15(o)15 Umbellifer 1
...15(o)15 Umbellifer 2
...(o)5 Valerian
...(o)1 Verbena
...11(o)11 Violet

water yew gallery
...1(o)1 Water Fern
...2(o)2 Waterlily
...1(o)1 Water Milfoil
...1(o)1 Water Plantain
...2(o)2 Water Starwort
...Waterwort
...(o)9 Willow
...(o)1 Willow-Herb
...(o)5 Wintergreen
...(o)1 Wood-Sorrel
...Yam
...Yew

The Site Map Page that you link to from the Menu in the above row for the Wildflower Gallery contains all the native UK plants which have their Plant Description Pages in the other 22 Wildflower Galleries. It also has Wildflower Index Pages, Flower Colour Comparison Pages and links to the 180 Wildflower Family Pages as shown in the menu above.


 

 

Links to external websites like the link to "the Man walking in front of car to warn pedestrians of a horseless vehicle approaching" would be correct when I inserted it after March 2007, but it is possible that those horseless vehicles may now exceed the walking pace of that man and thus that link will currently be br
ok en .... .....

My advice is Google the name on the link and see if you can find the new link. If you sent me an email after clicking Ivydene Horticultural Services text under the Worm Logo on any page, then; as the first after March 2010 you would be the third emailer since 2007, I could then change that link in that 1 of the 15,743 pages. Currently (August 2016), I can receive but not send emails, so please provide phone number/country or full postal address if reply required.

 


Other websites provide you with cookies - I am sorry but I am too poor to afford them. If I save the pennies from my pension for the next visitor, I am almost certain in March 2023, that I could afford to make that 4th visitor to this website a Never Fail Cake. I would then be able to save for more years for the postage.

 

It is worth remembering that especially with roses that the colour of the petals of the flower may change - The following photos are of Rosa 'Lincolnshire Poacher' which I took on the same day in R.V. Roger's Nursery Field:-

x11rosalincolnshirepoacherflot9a

Closed Bud

x11rosalincolnshirepoacherflot92a

Opening Bud

x11rosalincolnshirepoacherflot93a

Juvenile Flower

x11rosalincolnshirepoacherflot94a

Older Juvenile Flower

x11rosalincolnshirepoacherflot95a

Middle-aged Flower - Flower Colour in Season in its
Rose Description Page is
"Buff Yellow, with a very slight pink tint at the edges in May-October."

x11rosalincolnshirepoacherflot96a

Mature Flower

x11rosalincolnshirepoacherflot97a

Juvenile Flower and Dying Flower

x11rosalincolnshirepoacherflot98a

Form of Rose Bush

There are 720 roses in the Rose Galleries; many of which have the above series of pictures in their respective Rose Description Page.

So one might avoid the disappointment that the 2 elephants had when their trunks were entwined instead of them each carrying their trunk using their own trunk, and your disappointment of buying a rose to discover that the colour you bought it for is only the case when it has its juvenile flowers; if you look at all the photos of the roses in the respective Rose Description Page!!!!

 

Fragrant Plants adds the use of another of your 5 senses in your garden:-

Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves.

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark.

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil
.

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soi
l.

Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
.

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers.

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves.

Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves.

Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers.

Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit.

Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers.

Night-scented Flowering Plants.

Scented Aquatic Plants.

Plants with Scented Fruits.

Plants with Scented Roots.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums.

Scented Cacti and Succulents.

Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell.