TREE - DECIDUOUS - GALLERY PAGES
Site Map of pages with content (o)

Introduction

Blue,
White,
Yellow,
Green for Orange and Other Colours with
Red and Pink in one page (shown in the Colour Wheel as Red, Purple and Pink)
Flower Colours per Month in Colour Wheel below in this DECIDUOUS TREE Gallery.

Click on Black or White box in Colour of Month.

 

None of the Deciduous Trees in this Gallery are in flower during Jan-Mar or Aug-Dec.

colormonthbulb9b1a1

 

TREES - DECIDUOUS GALLERY PAGES

FLOWER COLOUR
Blue
Orange
(o)Other Colours
Pink
Red
(o)White
Yellow

FOLIAGE COLOUR
Black
Blue
Brown
Bronze
(o)Green
Grey
Purple
Red
Silver
Variegated White
Variegated Yellow
White
Yellow
(o)Autumn Colour
4 Season Colour
 

 

TREES - DECIDUOUS GALLERY PAGES

SHAPE
(o)Columnar

Oval
(o)Rounded
Flattened Spherical
(o)Narrow Conical
Broad Conical
Egg-shaped
(o)Broad Ovoid
Narrow Vase-shaped
Fan-shaped
Broad Fan-shaped
Narrow Weeping
Broad Weeping
Single-stem Palm
Multi-stem Palm

SEED/ FRUIT COLOUR
(o)Seed

BEDS WITH PICTURES
(o)Garden


Deciduous Tree Height from Text Border in this Gallery
 

Brown =
0-240 inches
(0-600 cms)
with
Deciduous Trees
in Page

A-C

Blue =
240-480 inches
(600-1200 cms)

Green =
480+ inches
(1200+ cms)

Red = Potted
with Climbers and Wall Shrubs for
Large
Pots and Con-tainers
in Pages
1
, 2

Black = Small Garden
with
Tree/Shrub for Small Garden
in Pages
1, 2,
3, 4,
5, 6,
7, 8,
9, 10,
11,12,
13,14,
15,16,
uses of tree/ shrub
 


Deciduous Tree Soil Moisture from Text Background in this Gallery
 

Wet Soil

Moist Soil

Dry Soil


The Plant Height Border in this Gallery has changed from :-

Blue = 0-2 feet (0-24 inches), Green = 2-6 feet (24-72 inches), Red = 6+ feet (72+ inches) to:-

  • Brown = 0-240 inches (0-600 cms) for Small Trees,
  • Blue = 240-480 inches (600-1200) for Medium Trees,
  • Green = 480+ inches (1200+ cms) for Large Trees,
  • Red = Potted Trees - Trees kept in Pots on Patio Area
  • Black = Small Garden - Trees in the ground which are suitable for a Small garden



The Comments Row of that Deciduous Tree Description Page details where that Deciduous Tree is available from.

 

Deciduous Tree Name

Flower Colour

Flowering Months

Height x Spread in inches (cms)
(1 inch = 2.5 cms,
12 inches = 1 foot
12 inches = 30 cms,
24 inches = 2 feet,
3 feet = 1 yard,
40 inches = 100 cms)

Foliage Colour

Use

A

Amelanchier canadensis
(Shadbush)

White

amelanchiercanadensiscflot1a1a

April, May

240 x 120
(600 x 300)

Mid-Green, yellow to orange and red in Autumn

Bears bright red berries, much loved by the birds!

amelanchierflocanadensis1a1a1

Erect form. Broad ovoid shape. Popular small tree that gives a wonderful, year round display. In spring it bears masses of small, white flowers, just as the foliage is emerging to provide a beautiful coppery backdrop. Over the summer the leaves change to bright green before turning to yellows and reds in the autumn.

 

B

Betula pendula
(Birch)

Yellow-Brown Catkins

betulacflopendula1a1a

April, May

720 x 240
(1800 x 600)

Mid-Green becoming Yellow in the Autumn

betulacfol99pendula1a1

Makes an excellent windbreak tree.

betulafruitl1a1a1

Bears small yellow catkins in spring.

betulapforpendula1a1a1a

Narrow Conical form. Pruning Group 1. Native UK plant. Beautiful tree, but don't plant near a vegetable garden as it's seed gets into cabbages and lettuce!!

betulapforpendularvroger1a1a

betulafol1a1a1a1

"This is the variety that you have seen in all the woods and fields throughout the country, however this should not put you off; as it has many uses within the garden. Has a fairly upright habit with pendulous ends to the branches. The bark becomes white and quite warty with age, often with very clear rings all around the trunk. The leaves are diamond shaped and mid green, turning yellow in the autumn. Thrives in poor soils and does not take kindly to feeding or mulching.

C, D, E

 

 

 

 

 

 

F

Fraxinus sieboldiana
(Ash)

Fragrant Creamy-White

fraxinussieboldianaflot9a1a

June, July

240 x 180
(600 x 450)

Dark Green and leaf up to 8 inches long

fraxinuscfol99siebodiana1a1

Rounded form.

fraxinusflosieboldiana1a1a1

fraxinusforsieboldiana1a1a1

Pruning Group 1. Native to central China.

fraxinusfolsieboldiana1a1a1

G, H, I, J, K

 

 

 

 

 

 

L

Liriodendron tulipifera
(Tulip Tree)

Yellow-Green

July

1200 x 600
(3000 x 1500)

Dark Green turns Yellow in Autumn. Easier way of identification is by the dent at the end of the leaf rather than a point.

The real joy of this tree is the wonderful green and orange tulip-shaped flowers borne in profusion during mid summer. Unfortunately you will have to wait until the tree is fairly mature but it is well worth it as there is nothing quite like these flowers.

liriodendronbarktulipifera1a1a1

liriodendronfortulipifera1a1a1

Broadly Columnar shape. Pruning Group 1. Vigorous, upright tree, with deciduous, almost square shaped leaves that turn a brilliant yellow.

liriodendronfoltulipifera1a1a1

M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

 

 

Site design and content copyright ©July 2009. Page structure amended January 2013. Feet changed to inches (cms) July 2015. Completed change from adding a page to mapping and thus changing that page to the desired plant description page and index details, September 2018. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

 

Tree and Shrub Plant Care

Young plants need extra phosphorus (P the second number on the fertilizer bag) to encourage good root development. Apply recommended amount for each plant per label directions; in the soil at time of planting.
Fertilizers that are high in Nitrogen (N), will promote green leafy growth. Excess nitrogen in the soil can cause excessive vegetative growth on plants at the expense of flower bud development. It is best to avoid fertilizing after July, otherwise it can force lush, vegetative growth that will not have a chance to harden off before the onset of the cold weather in October.

Unless a site is completely exposed, light conditions will change during the day and even during the year. The northern and eastern sides of a house receive the least amount of light, with the northern exposure being the shadiest. The western and southern sides of a house receive the most light and have the hottest exposure due to the intense afternoon sun.
For best plant performance, it is desirable to match the correct plant with the available light conditions. Plants which do not receive sufficient light may become pale in color, have fewer leaves and a "leggy" stretched-out appearance. You can also expect plants to grow slower and have fewer blooms when light is less than required. Plants can also receive too much light. If a shade loving plant is exposed to direct sun, it may wilt and/or cause leaves to be sunburned. Full Sun is defined as exposure to more than 6 hours of continuous, direct sun per day.

Types of tree and shrub pruning include: pinching, thinning, shearing and rejuvenating.

  • Pinching is removing the stem tips of a young plant to promote branching. Doing this avoids the need for more severe pruning later on.
  • Thinning involves removing whole branches back to the trunk. This may be done to open up the interior of a plant to let more light in and to increase air circulation that can cut down on plant disease. The best way to begin thinning is to begin by removing dead, damaged or diseased wood. Then remove one of each set of 2 crossing branches - remembering to keep the natural vertical or horizontal orientation of the branch structure.
  • Shearing is leveling the surface of a shrub using hand or electric shears. This is done to maintain the desired shape of a hedge or topiary.
  • Rejuvenating is removal of old branches or the overall reduction of the size of a shrub to restore its original form and size. It is recommended that you do not remove more than one third of a plant at a time. Remember to remove branches from the inside of the plant as well as the outside.
     

 

 

 

 

 

 

A water ring is a mound of compacted soil that is built around the circumference of a planting hole once a shrub/tree has been installed. The water ring helps to direct water to the outer edges of a planting hole, encouraging new roots to grow outward, in search of moisture. The height of the mound of soil will vary from a couple of inches for 10 ltr potted shrubs, to almost a foot for balled and burlapped trees, especially those planted on a slope. Mulching over the ring will help to further conserve moisture and prevent deterioration of the ring itself. Once a plant is established, the water ring may be leveled, but the mulch should continue beneath the plant during each spring and summer.

Water when normal rainfall does not provide the preferred 1 inch (2.5 cms) of moisture most plants prefer per week from March to October. The first two years after a plant is installed, regular watering is important. It is better to water once a week and water deeply using drip irrigation (thoroughly soaking the soil until water has penetrated to a depth of 6 to 7 inches (15-18 cms)), than to water frequently for a few minutes. With container grown plants, apply enough water to allow water to flow through the drainage holes, or preferably put the pot inside a larger pot on pot legs to raise it 1 inch above the bottom of the outside pot with a wick from the bottom of the outer pot up through to the middle of the inner pot and replenish the 1 inch (2.5 cms) depth of water in the outside pot. The outside pot has a hole 2 inches (5 cms) above its base to allow for drainage of excess irrigation water or rain. Water plants early in the day or later in the afternoon to conserve water and cut down on plant stress. Do water early enough so that water has had a chance to dry from plant leaves prior to night fall. This is paramount if you have had fungus problems. Do not wait to water until plants wilt. Although some plants will recover from this, all plants will die if they wilt too much (when they reach the permanent wilting point). Mulches can significantly cool the root zone and conserve moisture.

Waterlogged soil occurs when more water is added to soil than can drain out in a reasonable amount of time. This can be a severe problem where water tables are high or soils are compacted. Lack of air space in waterlogged soil makes it almost impossible for soil to drain. Few plants, except for bog plants, can tolerate these conditions. Drainage can be improved by creating a French Drain (18 inch x 12 inch - 45 x 30 cms - drain lined with Geotextile like Plantex or Weed Control Fabric filled with coarse gravel and the weed control fabric overlaid on the top before mulching the top with 3 inch depth of Bark) in the boggy area and extending this drain alongside an evergreen hedge. The hedge will abstract the water over the whole year. Over-watered plants have the same wilted leaves as under-watered plants. Fungi such as Phytophthora and Pythium affect vascular systems, which cause wilt.

 

Further details about how soil works is in the Soil Topic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clay soil will absorb 40% of its volume in water before it turns from a solid to a liquid. This fact can have a serious effect on your house as subsidence.

A mixture of clay, sand, humus and bacterium is required to make soil with a good soil structure for your plants.

The rain or your watering can provides the method for transportation of nutrients to the roots of your plants. Soil organisms link this recycling of nutrients from the humus to the plant.

Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide and Nitrogen as gas is used and expired by the roots of plants into a soil which has airspace in it in order for those plants to grow.

Understanding the above provides you with an action plan for you to do with your own soil.

 

A more in-depth explaination of how soil works:-

"Plants are in Control

Most gardeners think of plants as only taking up nutrients through root systems and feeding the leaves. Few realize that a great deal of energy that results from photosynthesis in the leaves is actually used by plants to produce chemicals they secrete through their roots. These secretions are known as exudates. A good analogy is perspiration, a human's exudate.

Root exudates are in the form of carbohydrates (including sugars) and proteins. Amazingly, their presence wakes up, attracts, and grows specific beneficial bacteria and fungi living in the soil that subsist on these exudates and the cellular material sloughed off as the plant's root tips grow. All this secretion of exudates and sloughing off of cells takes place in the rhizosphere, a zone immediately round the roots, extending out about a tenth of an inch, or a couple of millimetres. The rhizosphere, which can look like a jelly or jam under the electron microscope, contains a constantly changing mix of soil organisms, including bacteria, fungi, nematodes, protozoa, and even larger organisms. All this "life" competes for the exudates in the rhizosphere, or its water or mineral content.

At the bottom of the soil food web are bacteria and fungi, which are attracted to and consume plant root exudates. In turn, they attract and are eaten by bigger microbes, specifically nematodes and protozoa who eat bacteria and fungi (primarily for carbon) to fuel their metabolic functions. Anything they don't need is excreted as wastes, which plant roots are readily able to absorb as nutrients. How convenient that this production of plant nutrients takes place right in the rhizosphere, the site of root-nutrient absorption.

At the centre of any viable soil food web are plants. Plants control the food web for their own benefit, an amazing fact that is too little understood and surely not appreciated by gardeners who are constantly interfereing with Nature's system. Studies indicate that individual plants can control the numbers and the different kinds of fungi and bacteria attracted to the rhizosphere by the exudates they produce.

Soil bacteria and fungi are like small bags of fertilizer, retaining in their bodies nitrogen and other nutrients they gain from root exudates and other organic matter. Carrying on the analogy, soil protozoa and nematodes act as "fertilizer spreaders" by releasng the nutrients locked up in the bacteria and fungi "fertilizer bags". The nematodes and protozoa in the soil come along and eat the bacteria and fungi in the rhizosphere. They digest what they need to survive and excrete excess carbon and other nutrients as waste.

The protozoa and nematodes that feasted on the fungi and bacteria attracted by plant exudates are in turn eaten by arthropods such as insects and spiders. Soil arthropods eat each other and themselves are the food of snakes, birds, moles and other animals. Simply put, the soil is one big fast-food restaurant.

Bacteria are so small they need to stick to things, or they will wash away; to attach themselves they produce a slime, the secondary result of which is that individual soil particles are bound together. Fungal hyphae, too, travel through soil particles, sticking to them and binding them together, thread-like, into aggregates.

Worms, together with insect larvae and moles move through the soil in search of food and protection, creating pathways that allow air and water to enter and leave the soil. The soil food web, then, in addition to providing nutrients to roots in the rhizosphere, also helps create soil structure: the activities of its members bind soil particles together even as they provide for the passage of air and water through the soil.

Without this system, most important nutrients would drain from soil. Instead, they are retained in the bodies of soil life. Here is the gardener's truth: when you apply a chemical fertilizer, a tiny bit hits the rhizosphere, where it is absorbed, but most of it continues to drain through soil until it hits the water table. Not so with the nutrients locked up inside soil organisms, a state known as immobilization; these nutrients are eventully released as wastes, or mineralized. And when the plants themselves die and are allowed to decay in situ, the nutrients they retained are again immobilized in the fungi and bacteria that consume them.

Just as important, every member of the soil food web has its place in the soil community. Each, be it on the surface or subsurface, plays a specific role. Elimination of just one group can drastically alter a soil community. Dung from mammals provides nutrients for beetles in the soil. Kill the mammals, or eliminate their habitat or food source, and you wont have so many beetles. It works in reverse as well. A healthy soil food web won't allow one set of members to get so strong as to destroy the web. If there are too many nematodes and protozoa, the bacteria and fungi on which they prey are in trouble and, ultimately, so are the plants in the area.

And there are other benefits. The nets or webs fungi form around roots act as physical barriers to invasion and protect plants from pathogenic fungi and bacteria. Bacteria coat surfaces so thoroughly, there is no room for others to attach themselves. If something impacts these fungi or bacteria and their numbers drop or disappear, the plant can easily be attacked.

 

 

Negative impacts on the soil food web

Chemical fertilizers, pesticides, insecticides, and fungicides affect the soil food web, toxic to some members, warding off others, and changing the environment. Important fungal and bacterial relationships don't form when a plant can get free nutrients. When chemically fed, plants bypass the microbial-assisted method of obtaining nutrients, and microbial populations adjust accordingly. Trouble is, you have to keep adding chemical fertilizers and using "-icides", because the right mix and diversity - the very foundation of the soil food web - has been altered.

It makes sense that once the bacteria, fungi, nematodes and protozoa are gone, other members of the soil food web disappear as well. Earthworms, for example, lacking food and irritated by the synthetic nitrates in soluble nitrogen fertilizers, move out. Since they are major shredders of organic material, their absence is a great loss. Soil structure deteriorates, watering can become problematic, pathogens and pests establish themselves and, worst of all, gardening becomes a lot more work than it needs to be.

If the salt-based chemical fertilizers don't kill portions of the soil food web, rototilling (rotovating) will. This gardening rite of spring breaks up fungal hyphae, decimates worms, and rips and crushes arthropods. It destroys soil structure and eventually saps soil of necessary air. Any chain is only as strong as its weakest link: if there is a gap in the soil food web, the system will break down and stop functioning properly.

Gardening with the soil food web is easy, but you must get the life back in your soils. First, however, you have to know something about the soil in which the soil food web operates; second, you need to know what each of the key members of the food web community does. Both these concerns are taken up in the rest of Part 1" of Teaming with Microbes - The Organic Gardener's Guide to the Soil Food Web by Jeff Lowenfels and Wayne Lewis ISBN-13:978-1-60469-113-9 Published 2010.

This book explains in non-technical language how soil works and how you can improve your garden soil to make it suitable for what you plant and hopefully stop you using chemicals to kill this or that, but use your grass cuttings and prunings to mulch your soil - the leaves fall off the trees, the branches fall on the ground, the animals shit and die on the land in old woodlands and that material is then recycled to provide the nutrients for those same trees, rather than being carefully removed and sent to the dump as most people do in their gardens leaving bare soil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

These 2 photos show how deciduous trees have been used to provide shade from the Sun going through the vertical windows into the Restaurant - which is a conservatory - at Wisley in August 2012 (Photos by H. Kavanagh).

ShadeTreesatWisley1a1a1

ShadeTreesatWisley2a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a46a4a1e1c1a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a46a4a1a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a46a4a1b1a1a

liriodendronforttulipifera1a

 

 

 

 

 

 

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a46a4a1c1a1a

ACID, SAND. Lirio-dendron tulipifera

SUN AND PART SHADE

Jul

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a46a4a1d1a1a

columnarshape1Columnar Tree/Shrub Form

A tree shape designed by nature to be a haven for nesting birds.

Ivydene Gardens Tree - Deciduous Gallery:
Columnar Shape

Topic
Case Studies
Companion Planting

...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants

Garden Construction
Garden Design

...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
Garden Maintenance
Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants

...Poisonous Plants
Soil
...Soil Nutrients
Tool Shed
Useful Data

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
Bulb
Climber

 

Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12

All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index

All Foliage 212
All Spring Foliage 212

All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212
Rock Plant Flowers 53

 

Your chosen Garden Style then changes your Plant Selection Process

Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...Infill2 Plants
...Infill3 Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...
12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...All2 Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position,
Use Index

...Shape, Form
Index

 

Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
 

Deciduous Tree
...Trees -
Deciduous *


Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods

Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Vegetable

Wild Flower

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly

 

STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY

 

Cultivation Requirements of Plant

Outdoor / Garden Cultivation

1

Indoor / House Cultivation

1

Cool Greenhouse (and Alpine House) Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter

1

Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year

1

Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

1

 

Sun Aspect

Full Sun

1

Part Shade

1

Full Shade

1

 

Soil Type

Any Soil

1

Chalky Soil

1

Clay Soil

1

Lime-Free Soil

1

Peaty Soil

1

Sandy Soil

1

Acid Soil

1

Alkaline Soil

1

Badly-drained Soil

1

 

Soil Moisture

Dry

1

Moist

1

Wet

1

 

Position for Plant

Back of Shady Border

1

Back of Shrub Border

1

Bedding

1

Bog Garden

1

Coastal Conditions / Seaside

1

Container in Garden

1

Front of Border

1

Ground Cover 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

1

Ground Cover 24-72 inches (60-180 cms)

1

Ground Cover Over 72 inches (180 cms)

1

Hanging Basket

1

Hedge

1

Hedge - Thorny

1

Pollution Barrier

1

Pond

1

Pot in House, Greenhouse, Conservatory or Stovehouse

1

Raised Bed

1

Rest of Border

1

Rock Garden

1

Scree Bed

1

Speciman on Lawn

1

Sunny Border

1

Tree for Lawn

1

Tree/Shrub for Small Garden

1, 2,
3, 4,
5, 6,
7, 8,
9, 10,
11,12,
13,14,
15,16,
uses of tree/ shrub

Wildflower

1

Windbreak

1

Woodland

1

 

Use of Plant

Pollen or nectar for Bees

1

Hosts to Butterflies

1

Encouraging birds / wildlife, providing food and shelter

1

Bee-Pollinated plants for Hay Fever Sufferers

1

Berries / Fruit

1

Dry Site in Full Sun

1

Dry Shade

1

Filtering noise

1

Flower Arrange-ments

1

Fragrant Flower

1

Language of Flowers

1

Low maintenance

1

Moist Shade

1

Moist and swampy Sites

1

Nitrogen fixing plants

1

Not Fragrant Flower

1

Rabbit-Resistant

1

Speciman Plant

1

Thornless

1

Tolerant of Poor Soil

1

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Plant Foliage

Aromatic Foliage

1

Autumn Foliage

1

Finely Cut Leaves

1

Large Leaves

1

Yellow Variegated Foliage

1

White Variegated Foliage

1

Red / Purple Variegated Foliage

1

Silver, Grey and Glaucous Foliage

1

Sword-shaped Leaves

1

 

 

Flower Shape

Number of Flower Petals

Petal-less
lessershapemeadowrue2a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

1 Petal

1

2 Petals

1

3 Petals
irisflotpseudacorus1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

4 Petals
aethionemacfloarmenumfoord1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

5 Petals
anemonecflo1hybridafoord1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Above 5
anemonecflo1blandafoord1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

 

Flower Shape - Simple

Stars
anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Bowls
 

1

Cups and Saucers
euphorbiacflo1wallichiigarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Globes
paeoniamlokosewitschiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Goblets and Chalices
paeoniaveitchiiwoodwardiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Trumpets
acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Funnels
stachysflotmacrantha1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Bells
digitalismertonensiscflorvroger1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Thimbles
fuchsiaflotcalicehoffman1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Urns
ericacarneacflosspringwoodwhitedeeproot1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Salverform

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

 

Flower Shape - Elaborated

Tubes, Lips and Straps
prunellaflotgrandiflora1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets
aquilegiacfloformosafoord1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Hats, Hoods and Helmets
acanthusspinosuscflocoblands1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Standards, Wings and Keels
lathyrusflotvernus1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Discs and Florets
brachyscomecflorigidulakevock1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Pin-Cushions
echinaceacflo1purpurealustrehybridsgarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Tufts
centaureacfloatropurpureakavanagh1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Cushion
androsacecforyargongensiskevock1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Umbel
agapanthuscflos1campanulatusalbidusgarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Buttons
argyranthemumflotcmadeiracrestedyellow1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Pompoms
armeriacflomaritimakevock1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

 

Natural Arrangements

Bunches, Posies, Sprays
bergeniamorningredcforcoblands1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Columns, Spikes and Spires
ajugacfloreptansatropurpurea1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Whorls, Tiers and Candelabra
lamiumflotorvala2a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Plumes and Tails
astilbepurplelancecflokevock1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Chains and Tassels
 

1

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades
 

1

Spheres, Domes (Clusters), Plates and Drumsticks
androsacecfor1albanakevock1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Shrub, Tree Shape

Columnar
ccolumnarshape1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Oval
covalshape1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Rounded or Spherical
croundedshape1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Flattened Spherical
cflattenedsphericalshape1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Conical / Narrow Pyramidal
cnarrowconicalshape1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Conical / Broad Pyramidal
cbroadpyramidalshape1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Ovoid /
Egg-Shaped

ceggshapedshape1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Ovoid
cbroadovoidshape1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Vase-shaped / Inverted Ovoid
cnarrowvaseshapedshape1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Fan-Shaped /Vase-Shaped
cfanshapedshape1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Fan-Shaped / Broad Vase-Shaped
cbroadfanshapedshape1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Weeping
cnarrowweepingshape1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Weeping
cbroadweepingshape1a1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Palm

1

 

Conifer Cone

1

 

Form

Arching

1

Climbing

1

Clump-Forming

1

Mat-Forming

1

Mound-Forming

1

Prostrate

1

Spreading

1

Stemless

1

Upright

1

 

Poisonous Plant

1

 

STAGE 1
GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY

 

Fragrant Plants adds the use of another of your 5 senses in your garden:-
Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark
1
, 2, 3

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4

Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
1
, 2, 3

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves
1
, 2, 3

Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves
1
, 2

Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5

Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit
1
, 2, 3

Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2

Night-scented Flowering Plants
1
, 2

Scented Aquatic Plants
1


Plants with Scented Fruits
1


Plants with Scented Roots
1
, 2

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood
1


Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums
1


Scented Cacti and Succulents
1


Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell
1
, 2
 

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERY 3

Fan-trained Shape
fantrainedshape2a1a1a1a1a

From Rhododendrons, boxwood, azaleas, clematis, novelties, bay trees, hardy plants, evergreens : novelties bulbs, cannas novelties, palms, araucarias, ferns, vines, orchids, flowering shrubs, ornamental grasses and trees book, via Wikimedia Commons

 

Ramblers Scramblers & Twiners by Michael Jefferson-Brown (ISBN 0 - 7153 - 0942 - 0) describes how to choose, plant and nurture over 500 high-performance climbing plants and wall shrubs, so that more can be made of your garden if you think not just laterally on the ground but use the vertical support structures including the house as well.

The Gardener's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Climbers & Wall Shrubs - A Guide to more than 2000 varieties including Roses, Clematis and Fruit Trees by Brian Davis. (ISBN 0-670-82929-3) provides the lists for 'Choosing the right Shrub or Climber' together with Average Height and Spread after 5 years, 10 years and 20 years.

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3


Gardening with Alpines by Stanley B. Whitehead. Garden Book Club.
Published in 1962. It provides most of the data about the Alpines.

Plant Solutions 1000+ suggestions for every garden situation by Nigel Colborn ISBN
13:978
0 00 719312 7, provides many of the plants for the pages in these Galleries.

Essential Annuals The 100 Best for Design and Cultivation. Text by Elizabeth Murray. Photography by Derek Fell. ISBN 0-517-66177-2, provides data about annuals.

Indoor Bulb
Growing by
Edward Pearson
. Published by Purnell & Sons, Ltd in 1953. It provides the data about Indoor Bulbs and Bulbs in
Window-boxes.

Colour All The
Year In My Garden
: A selection of choice varieties - annuals, biennials, perennials, bulbs, climbers and trees and shrubs - that will give a continuity of colour
in the garden throughout the year. Edited by C.H. Middleton. Gardening Book
from Ward, Lock & Co published in 1938, provides plant data for a calendar of plants in bloom throughout the year and for those in the smallest garden.
The Book of Bulbs by S. Arnott, F.R.H.S. Printed by
Turnbull & Spears, Edinburgh in 1901. This provides data about Hardy Bulbs, Half-Hardy Bulbs, Greenhouse and Stove Bulbs.

Collins Guide to
Bulbs by Patrick
M. Synge
. ISBN
0 00 214016-0
First Edition 1961, Second Edition 1971, Reprinted 1973. This provides data on bulbs for bedding, bulbs in the border, bulbs naturalised in grass, bulbs in the woodland garden, bulbs in the rock garden, bulbs in pans in the alpine house, bulbs in the greenhouse, bulbs in bowls and the bulb frame.

Annuals & Biennials, the best annual and biennial plants and their uses in the garden by Gertrude Jekyll published in 1916 and
republished by Forgotten Books in 2012
(Forgotten Books
is a London-based book publisher specializing in the restoration of old books, both fiction and non-fiction. Today we have
372,702 books available to read online, download as ebooks, or
purchase in print.).

Cut Flowers All The Year from The New Illustrated
Gardening Encyclopedia
by Richard Sudell, printed before May 1935 for the plant names in each month, followed by details for culture and propagation.

Mr. Middleton's Garden Book by
Daily Express Publication,
reprinted 1941
for the individual
cultivar names with evergreen/
deciduous, flower colour, flower month and height.

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Tree and Shrubs in Garden Design -

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Clay Soils (neutral to slightly acid)

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Dry Acid Soils

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Shallow Soil over Chalk

Trees and Shrubs tolerant of both extreme Acidity and Alkalinity

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Damp Sites

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Industrial Areas

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Cold Exposed Areas

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Seaside Areas

Shrubs suitable for Heavy Shade

Shrubs and Climbers suitable for NORTH- and EAST-facing Walls

Shrubs suitable for Ground Cover

Trees of Pendulous Habit

Trees and Shrubs of Upright or Fastigiate Habit

Trees and Shrubs with Ornamental Bark or Twigs

Trees and Shrubs with Bold Foliage

Trees and Shrubs for Autumn Colour

Trees and Shrubs with Red or Purple Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Golden or Yellow Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Grey or Silver Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Variegated Foliage

Trees and Shrubs bearing Ornamental Fruit

Trees and Shrubs with Fragrant or Scented Flowers

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Foliage

Flowering Trees and Shrubs for Every Month:-
Jan
, Feb, Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov, Dec

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