Ivydene Gardens Shrub - Evergreen Gallery:
Introduction

" What plants need :- Although this article was written with house plants at Christmas in mind,  it could apply to out door trees and shrubs as they all need the same five growing conditions!

House plants broadly fall in to two groups. Those that are in full flower now when given and have the 'wow' thank you, factor.  Then you have your 'run of the mill' Green foliage plants which might flower at some point, not necessarily showy. But all plants (including outside garden plants) need five things in varying proportions to survive given the right conditions / proportions they will grow well even thrive. To much of any one or take one away and the results are the same, the plant will die! So what are these magic ingredients :-
Light,
Water, 
Food/Soil, 
Heat, 
Co2 (Carbon dioxide) 
Nothing complicated

Light.
To much light and even the toughest plant can get sun burnt if moved from shade into full Sun. Plants get used to their conditions and move them from a shady position to a very light situation and the cells get scorched and they don't recover. New leaves are what they have to grow. The good news is that in Winter and in doors you cant give them to much light.
There is just not enough sunshine with short days and cloud, This then becomes a limiting factor on the plants ability to grow, which again depending on your point of view could be a good thing as the flowers will last longer, if the plant is not growing fast.

Water.
All plants need water, not least, like us they are mostly made up of it! The main problem is the speed at which water is transpired out of the leaf (which is linked to temperature) In most situations weather the pot is wet or not water is drawn out of the leaf faster than the roots can suck it in and move it up the stem and along the leaf from cell to cell. So the edge of leaf will turn brown as the cells dry out, Lack of moisture in the air, with log fires central heating agars belting out the heat all day and night, is the main reason, the plants just cant cope in doors.

Food and soil.
Plants come with there roots in soil and have grown to the size they are from that compost, but it's a fair bet that they are running out of food by the time you get hold of them. So a small amount of liquid feed (usually tomato food) is a good idea. Never feed on to dry compost. The salts and sugars will already be more concentrated in dry compost. So water first with clean tepid water. 

Heat.
Most house plants are more exotic than our garden plants . So they cannot stand any cold tempters. that's below 10'C 50'F by the same token with a lack of humidity they don't want to be over 21'C 70'F It's a combination of the above condition in varying amounts which causes plants to thrive or die.                        

The fifth element all plants need to grow is Carbon dioxide.
For photosynthesis to happen you need all five of these elements in varying amounts; a balance is what we are looking for. And just to make things complicated all the different plants need / require different conditions; this is what makes one plant cope with one situation and another might struggle to survive.

Watering House plants How much and when?
Too much water no water at all the results are the same plants die! No water at all, and the leaves wilt still no water leaves dry up - plant dies  sad but true the answer, water the plant at first sign of wilting great. This time you have one of those pot covers and more water was applied than necessary the poor plant is sanding in water - for two weeks now. Sooner or later the roots start to rot (roots need air as well as water) now if the roots rot they cannot take up any moisture so the foliage starts to wilt you give it a drink (after all its wilting) compounding the situation the plant continues to suffer.

The best way to water , let the plant dry out between watering then soak the soil thoroughly, by plunging the whole plant pot in water for five minuets, this forces the old stale air out of the compost. Then remove and as it drains in the sink, it sucks fresh air back into the now wet compost. Tomorrow you can give it some liquid feed. What ever you do with house plants be confident that what you are doing is right. Changing positions every three days over feeding and dusting only serve to up set them but it wont show for a week or two by which time you don't know which treatment upset them and which was good for them. Put them in one place and let them settle in. The more plants you have the better they all get on as they create there own micro climate of moist air so moisture transpiring from one leaf condensates on the one above, so then the moisture on the leaf dries up and not the water in the leaf. Spraying with a hand mister will do the same job, and is a good idea if you have the time, and you think its too hot. Don't do it if there is no heating in the room in the depths of Winter.

Christmas house plants:-
There are lots of them and they all have their funny little ways so here are some to look out for:-

  • 
 Cyclamen in flower looks great, they like a cool well lit room or conservatory but there are to many stems all coming out of the same spot , splash water in here and within days the hole plant is rotting off. All you can do is pull off the rotting stems and water by standing in 3cm of water for ten minutes twice a week, look at it every day and continue to remove leave and spent flower stalks completely.
  • Poinsettias they could already be dead when you get them! The cold is there enemy below 53'F that's 12'C and the flower parts in the middle of the bracts will be frosted, look carefully there should be globules of nectar. The problem is open air markets or the journey from the garden centre to your car two minutes stood chatting to a friend the cold air will have got to it! Plants that have been frosted (12'C or below) will last till mid January early February those few that are good and are looked after properly will go on 'flowering' until next November when you should throw it away and buy a new one.
  • Azaleas. At Christmas there are always loads of Indian evergreen Azaleas on the market from Holland I don't know how they grow them or what they do to them, but they always seem to be in a state of suspended animation, then again they do last a long time. You can never give these plants too much water. Plunge the clay pot in tepid water for at least 15 minutes three times a week and with global warming they can survive outside next winter.
  • Chrysanthemum  for a six week flowering house plant you can't go wrong just splash some water on once a week."

from Stuart Holder.

 

List of plants for deep shade.

 

"Kristina and Robin Pearce grow an extensive range of Hardy Perennials, Ferns and Grasses for Gardeners and Garden Designers at Worlds End Garden Nursery. We have collections of Aster, Hosta, Geum, Leucanthemum, Monarda Liriope, and Tricyrtis." from Worlds End Garden Nursery. 

 

"Our Plant Finder will help you find the right plant for you and your garden.
You can find plants from 1200 popular plants, or widen your search to include all 7,500 plants in the Plant Finder.
Please note: As many plants are subject to seasonal availability it is always best to call or email prior to any visit." from Joy of Plants

.

."About American Beauties

The American Beauties™ collection of native plants makes it easy to use trees, shrubs, vines, grasses and wildflowers that are beautiful and good for wildlife. Native plant experts and wildlife experts have teamed up to create four gardens guaranteed to bring life to your landscape by providing food and habitat for a variety of desirable critters.

Garden Collections from American Beauties
American Beauties takes the guess work out of native plant gardening by creating four distinct theme gardens that attract beneficial wildlife and contain plants which grow well in varying conditions:-

 

  • Bird Garden
  • The plants in this collection provide seeds, berries, nesting places and cover for all kinds of songbirds. Plus, there are lots of plants in this collection that provide interest four seasons of the year.
  •  
  • Butterfly
  • These colorful plants provide nectar and pollen spring, summer and fall for a parade of butterflies and other pollinators. If you like flowers and have a sunny location, you will be delighted with this collection of plants.
  •  
  • Dry Shade
  • Dry, shady conditions are a challenge for the most accomplished gardeners. This collection of tough, drought resistant native plants thrives in those conditions while providing great cover for all kinds of woodland creatures.
  •  
  • Moist Sun
  • Turn that troublesome low area with wet soil into a garden filed with colorful plants that hang tough in the hot sun. Frogs, dragonflies, birds and other critters will love the food and cover this collection provides.
  •  

American Beauties and NWF
Buying American Beauties brings life to your garden and helps a great cause. Every American Beauties plant sold benefits the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) and their work to create better home landscape environments for you and the colorful garden critters you love. When you purchase an American Beauties plant, 25 cents, 50 cents or $1 will be donated to NWF to help fund their home habitat work and outreach programs.

The American Beauties Partnership
American Beauties, LLC is a partnership between Prides Corner Farms, Lebanon, CT, and North Creek Nurseries, Landenberg, PA, dedicated to promoting native plants to bring life to the garden. Since each region of the country has its own native plants, the eventual goal of the partnership is to grow and distribute American Beauties plants on a regional basis throughout the United States and help promote the message of NWF while doing so." from American Beauties

 

"PlantSense brings sensors and simplified web technology together to help home gardeners grow flourishing fruits, vegetables, flowers, trees and shrubs.

 

Matt Glenn, a guy who likes plants, but has killed more than his fair share of them sat in his hairdresser's chair, he noticed a couple of plants dying in a perfectly sunlit bay window. He asked the woman who cuts his hair, "What's wrong with your plants? That seems like a perfect place for them."

"No matter what plants I put in that window, they die," bemoaned the stylist.

As the scissors clipped, Matt's mind went to work. What if there was a device that could read all the environmental information in any location? What if it could then apply algorithms from botanists to recommend plants suited for those conditions? Matt's background in technology product development, coupled with his desire to solve problems, enabled him to turn his "what if" questions into a how-to company: PlantSense." from Easy Bloom.

There are further details on the Evergreen Shrubs Page of the Plants Section.

The uncredited gallery photographs were provided by Christine Foord and they were photographed by Christine and Ron Foord. The others were provided by D. Rankin of Kevock Garden Plants or by R.V. Roger Ltd.

 

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...Shrubs - Evgr*
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Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly
 

SHRUB - EVERGREEN GALLERY PAGES
Site Map of pages with content (o)

Introduction

FLOWER COLOUR
(o)Blue
(o)Orange
(o)Other Colours
(o)Pink
(o)Red
(o)White
(o)Yellow

FOLIAGE COLOUR
Black
Blue
Brown
Bronze
(o)Green
(o)Grey
(o)Purple
(o)Red
Silver
(o)Variegated White
(o)Variegated Yellow
White
(o)Yellow
(o)4 Season Colour

FORM
(o)Mat-forming
(o)Prostrate
(o)Mound-forming
(o)Spreading
Clump-forming
(o)Upright
Climbing
(o)Arching

SHAPE
Columnar
Oval
(o)Rounded
Flattened Spherical
Narrow Conical
Broad Conical
Egg-shaped
Broad Ovoid
Narrow Vase-shape
Fan-shaped
Broad Fan-shape
Narrow Weeping
Broad Weeping
Single-stem Palm
Multi-stem Palm

FRUIT COLOUR
(o)Fruit

FLOWER BED PICTURES
(o)Garden

7 Flower Colours (Red, Pink and Purple in same Page) per Month in Colour Wheel below. Click on Black or White box in Colour of Month.

colormonth8hpub2a1


Evergreen Shrub Height from Text Border in this Gallery

 

Blue =
0-24 inches
(0-60 cms)

Green=
24-72 inches
(60-180 cms)

Red =
72+ inches
(180+ cms)

Evergreen Shrub Height from Text Border in Evergreen Shrub Gallery

Brown =
0-12 inches
(0-30 cms)

Blue =
12-36 inches
(30-90 cms)

Green =
36-60 inches
(90-150 cms)

Red =
60-120 inches
(150-300 cms)

Black =
120+ inches
(300+ cms)

Evergreen Shrub Soil Moisture from Text Background

 

Wet Soil

Moist Soil

Dry Soil

The Plant Height Border in this Gallery has changed from :-
Blue = 0-2 feet, Green = 2-6 feet, Red = 6+ feet to:-

  • Brown = 0-12 inches (0-30 cms) for Prostrate Creeping Shrubs,
  • Blue = 12-36 inches (30-90 cms) for Dwarf Shrubs,
  • Green = 36-60 inches (90-150 cms) for Small Shrubs,
  • Red = 60-120 inches (150-300 cms) for Medium Shrubs
  • Black = 120+ inches (300+ cms) for Large Shrubs

Click on thumbnail to add the Plant Description Page of the Evergreen Shrub named in the Text box below that photo.
The Comments Row of that Evergreen Shrub Description Page details where that Evergreen Shrub is available from.

 

Evergreen Shrub Name

Flower Colour

Flowering Months

Height x Spread in inches (cms)
(1 inch = 2.5 cms,
12 inches = 1 foot
12 inches = 30 cms,
24 inches = 2 feet,
3 feet = 1 yard,
40 inches = 100 cms)

Foliage Colour

A

Abutilon mega-potamicum
 

Lantern shape with Yellow petals,
Red calyces

abutilonflomegapotamicum

July, August, September,
October, November,
December

72 x 72
(180 x 180)

Bright Green

Andromeda

See Andromeda in Heather Shrub Gallery

B

Berberis
darwinii

Fragrant Orange-Yellow followed by spherical, blue-glaucous, black fruit

berberisflodarwinii1

April, May

144 x 144
(360 x 360)

Spine-toothed Glossy Dark Green

C

Calluna

See Calluna in Heather Shrub Gallery

callunaflotvulgariscoccinea1

Calluna vulgaris 'Coccinea'
 

Camellia
japonica

Red

camelliaflojaponica

April

336 x 300
(840 x 750)

Glossy Dark Green

Choisya
ternata

Fragrant White

choisyafloternata1

April, May

96 x 96
(240 x 240)

Bright Green

Cistus x
purpureus

Dark Pink

cistusflotpurpureus1

June, July, August

36 x 36
(90 x 90)

Dark Green

D

Daboecia

See Daboecia in Heather Shrub Gallery

daboeciaflotcantabricabicolor1a

Daboecia cantabrica bicolor
 

Dryas
octopetala

Creamy-White

dryasflotoctopetala1

June, July

4 x 36
(10 x 90)

Dark Green, leathery and silver underneath

E

Erica

See Erica in Heather Shrub Gallery

ericaflotcarneaspringwoodwhite1a

Erica carnea 'Springwood White'
 

Escallonia

Red

escallonisflot

June, July

72 x 96
(180 x 240)

Glossy dark green

Euonymus
fortunei

...

...

48 x 48
(120 x 120)

Toothed glossy dark green variegated with Yellow

Euonymus
japonicus

Light Yellow

euonymusflotjaponicus1

May, June

144 x 72
(360 x 180)

Toothed glossy dark green

Euphorbia
characias

Yellow-Green

euphorbiaflotcharacias1

April, May, June, July

48 x 48
(120 x 120)

Grey-Green

Euryops
acraeus

Deep Yellow

euryopsflotacraeus1a

June, July

12 x 12
(30 x 30)

Silvery-grey

F

Fremonto-dendron californicum

Bright Yellow

fremontodendronflotcalifornicum1

May, June, July, August, September, October

240 x 144
(600 x 360)

Dark Green

G

Gaultheria
'Shallon'

Pink suffused White

June, July

48 x 60
(120 x 150)

Glossy Dark Green

H

Halimiocistus wintonensis 'Merrist Wood Cream'

Creamy-Yellow

halmiocistusflotwintonensismerristwoodcream1a
 

June, July
 

24 x 36
(60 x 90)

Grey-Green

Heathers

See Heathers in Heather Shrub Gallery

Hebe
albicans

White

hebeflotalbicans1a

June, July
...

24 x 36
(60 x 90)

Grey-Green
...

Hebe
brachysiphon

White

hebeflotbrachysiphon1

June, July, August
...

72 x 72
(180 x 180)

Mid-Green
...

Hebe
'Franciscana'

...

Pink-tinged Purple

hebeflotfranciscana1

July, August, September,
October

36 x 36
(90 x 90)
...

Dull Dark Green
...
...

Hebe
'Great Orme'
...

Bright Pink

hebeflotgreatorme1

July, August, September,
October, November

48 x 48
(120 x 120)
...

Mid-Green
...
...

Hebe 'Youngii'

Violet-Blue

hebecfloyoungii1a

June, July

8 x 24
(21 x 60)

Dark Green

Helianth-emum
'Henfield
Brilliant'

Terracotta-Orange

helianthemumflothenfieldbrilliant1

June, July,
August
...

12 x 12
(30 x 30)
...

Grey-Green
...
...

Helianth-emum lunulatum

Clear Yellow

helianthemumflotlunulatum1a

June, July
...

6 x 10
(15 x 24)

Grey-Green
...

Helianthe-mum 'Old Gold'

Golden-Yellow

helianthemumflotoldgold1a

June, July

12 x 12
(30 x 30)

Grey-Green

Helichrysum splendidum

Dark Yellow

helichrysumflotsplendidum1

September, October

48 x 48
(120 x 120)

Silver-Grey
...

Hibiscus rosa-sinensis

Crimson

hibiscusflotrosasinensis

August, September, October

144 x 96
(360 x 240)

Glossy Dark Green

Hypericum

Yellow

hypericumflot1

...

...

Green

Hypericum moserianum
'Tricolor'

Yellow

hypericumflotmoserianumtricolor1

June, July,
August,
September, October

12 x 24
(30 x 60)
...

Mid Green variegated
with cream, pink
and green

Hypericum polyphyllum

Bright Yellow

hypericumflotpolyphyllum1

June, July, August

8 x 24
(45 x 60)

Blue-Green

I

Iberis saxatilis

White, Purple-tinged
with age

iberisflotsaxatilis1

May, June

6 x 12
(15 x 30)

Dark Green

J

 

 

 

 

 

K

Kalmia
angustifolia

Pale to Deep Red

kalmiaflotangustifolia

June

24 x 60
(60 x 150)

Dark Green

Kalmia ang-ustifolia alba

White

kalmiaflotangustifoliaalba1

June

24 x 60
(60 x 150)

Dark Green

L

Lavatera
'Rosea'

Dark Pink

lavateraflotrosea1

July, August, September

72 x 72
(180 x 180)

Grey-Green

Lonicera
nitida

Creamy-White

loniceraflotnitida1

April, May, June

132 x 120
(312 x 300)

Glossy Dark Green

Lupinus
arboreus

Clear Yellow

lupinusflotarboreus1

June, July, August

72 x 72
(180 x 180)

Grey-Green

M

Mahonia
japonica
 

Fragrant Yellow

mahoniaflotjaponica1

November, December, January, February,
March

84 x 120
(210 x 300)

Dark Green

Myrtus
communis

White

myrtusflotcommunis1

August, September,
October

120 x 120
(300 x 300)

Glossy Dark Green

N

Nandina
domestica

White

nandinaflotdomestica1

August

72 x 60
(180 x 150)

Reddish-Purple when juvenile and in Winter; Light Green in Summer and Autumn

O

Olearia
numulariifolia
...

Fragrant White

oleariaflotnumulariifolia1

August
...
...

72 x 72
(180 x 180)
...

Bright Green juvenile turning Dark Green above, White to Yellow woolly beneath

Olearia x
haastii

White

oleariaflothaastii1

August,
September

60 x 72
(150 x 180)

Glossy Dark Green above, White-felted beneath

Olearia x
scilloniensis

White

oleariaflotscilloniensis1

May

72 x 72
(180 x 180)

Dark Green above, Pale Green and densely-felted beneath

P

Prunus
laurocerasus

Fragrant White

prunusflotlaurocerasus1

May, June

72 x 72
(180 x 180)

Dark Green

Q

 

 

 

 

 

R

Rosmarinus
officinalis

Purple-Blue to White

rosmarinusflotofficinalis1a

May, June, July

60 x 60
(150 x 150)

Aromatic Dark Green

S

 

 

 

 

 

T

Thymus
cilicicus

 

Lilac or Mauve

thymusflotcilicicus1

June, July
...
 

6 x 8
(15 x 21)

Dark Green, finely hairy beneath and at the margins

Thymus polytrichus
 

Pale to Deep Purple, occasionally Off-White

thymusflotpolytrichus1

July, August
 

2 x 24
(6 x 60)

Dark Green fringed with minute hairs

U

 

 

 

 

 

V

Vaccinium
vitis-idaea

White to Deep Pink

vacciniumflotvitisidaea1

June, July

10 x indefinite
(24 x indefinite)

Glossy Dark Green

W

 

 

 

 

 

XYZ

Yucca
gloriosa

Purple-tinged
White

yuccaflotgloriosa1

August,
September

72 x 72
(180 x 180)

Blue-Green maturing to Dark Green

 

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

 

Site design and content copyright ©July 2009. Page structure amended January 2013. Feet changed to inches (cms) July 2015. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

 

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