Ivydene Gardens Plants:
Top Fruit Plant List

"Grow Grafting Service – A specialist service unique to Brogdale.

Brogdale is the home of the national fruit collection and Grow is the on site specialist nursery and garden centre that for many years have accessed the collection to produce heritage apples and pears from the thousands of varieties on offer.

For a lot of customers the desire to own a heritage variety stems from tasting the fruit at one of our festivals or a resonant memory from there past. People recognise that within the spectrum of fruit flavours we are exposed to just a small portion when purchasing fruit from commercial sources like supermarkets. Another reason to access this process is create area specific orchards, most counties and countries have locally bred fruits and it is wonderful to re-establish this link.

Also we provide a service to graft from a tree you want to preserve, last year (2012) nearly 600 trees were ‘duplicated’ for a variety of customers. Sometimes the trees were of an unknown variety but obviously had personal significance; an added advantage was to start afresh as a young tree with a modern rootstock." from Grow at Brogdale.

Choosing a top fruit tree instead of a tree from the tree list provides you with a plant of a size that is suitable for most current gardens. These trees also produce edible fruit.

 

The size of the tree required

This is controlled by the fruit tree rootstock chosen. Apples from Very Dwarfing on M27 at 5-6 feet ultimate height to Very Vigorous on M25 with 25-30 feet ultimate height. Ultimate heights for other fruit trees given in their header row.

 

Varieties for ease of management

Choose varieties with good disease resistance

 

Earlies, mids, lates.

Choose varieties that can be eaten from August, or store well until Spring.

 

Triploids

Triploids will require 2 other pollinators.

 

Dwarfing trees

These need the best soil and a permanent stake.

 

Trained top fruit trees

If space is limited and a 'sunny' wall or fence is available, 'trained' forms of top fruit tree such as cordons, espaliers and fans are ideal.

 

Best time to plant

The best time to plant is during the dormant season from mid-November to mid-March. Bare rooted plants have to be planted at this time, with no competition from other plants for 2 feet radius from their trunk. Container grown trees can in theory be planted anytime, but particular attention to watering will be neccessary; if planted from Spring to Summer.

 

Site

The ideal site would be a well sheltered South facing slope. More vigorous rootsocks have more root to provide better anchorage on exposed sites. All fruit trees need good light to produce good quality fruit, and a site facing South or West is best. However, Pears and Apples will fruit when facing East. Morello Cherries and Cooking Apples will all produce some fruit on a site facing North.

Soil
Most fruits prefer a fairly neutral soil, pH of 6.5. Dwarfing rootstocks should only be planted in the best soils. Most vigorous rootstocks can cope with a less than ideal soil.
Where possible, it is best to improve planting sites a month before the trees arrive. Sandy soil should have plenty of organic matter incorporated ( such as leaf compost from your garden, spent mushroom compost or bark from Gardenscape) to increase the water retention of the soil. On heavy clay soils try to incorporate a 2" layer of horticultural grit and organic matter to aerate, and improve drainage through flocculation.

"Grow Your Own Fruit" by Ken Muir, Honeypot Farm, Weeley Heath, Clacton-On-Sea, Essex. CO16 9BJ Tel: 01255 830181 provides the information on cultural practices in a clear and concise manner

, as does "The RHS Encyclopedia of Practical Gardening FRUIT" by Harry Baker ISBN 1 85732 905 8.
"Success with Growing Fruit in containers" by Peter Himmelhuber ISBN 1-85391-797-4 shows which varieties of these fruits can be grown in pots with cultural practice information.

Pollination
Most apples , pears and older varieties of cherry are not self-fertile. They need to be pollinated by a different variety that blossoms at the same time.

  • Unless varieties are self-fertile, they will need a pollinator in the same or adjacent groups. These are diploid varieties. e.g Charles Ross is an apple variety in Group 3, preferably it needs to be pollinated by another in Group 3, but may also be pollinated by a variety in an adjacent Group 2 or 4.
  • Triploid varieties eg Bramley produce sterile pollen and cannot pollinate any other variety. To produce fruit, the triplod will need two pollinators, so you will need 3 trees all from the same or adjacent flowering Groups.
  • More modern varieties of cherry are self-fertile, so they can set fruit by themselves, which is indicated in the list.
  • Some cherries are incompatible with others and need what are called 'universal donors' as pollinators; the newer self-fertile varieties are very effective for this and this is indicated in the list.

Top Fruit Tree Form. Tree Form refers to the way in which the tree has been trained:-

  • Bush. Two year old Bush trees are trained as open centre (goblet shaped) trees with a clear stem of 2ft (0.6m).

    Suitable for relatively small trees on semi-dwarfing rootstocks for small and medium sized gardens.

  • Centre Leader. The centre leader has been maintained on these trees to allow training into dwarf pyramid and spindle bush forms.

    Suitable for trees on dwarfing rootstocks for small gardens or restricted spaces.

    These trees would require permanent support with a long stake.
  • Cordon. Cordons are single stem trees with short branches or spurs bearing fruit. They are usually planted as oblique cordons at an angle of 45-60 degrees to the ground, but can also be planted as vertical cordons sometimes referred to as minarettes (available from Ken Muir). They need a set of horizontal wires up to about 6ft (1.8m) for support. They also need appropriate summer pruning to maintain the cordon form.

    Cordons are very useful for small gardens, or for planting along fences.

  • Espalier (2 Tier). Espalier trees consist of a vertical stem and a set of horizontal arms or tiers extending either way bearing short lateral branches or spurs on which fruit is produced. The arms would typically be 18 inches (0.5m) apart. Two tier espaliers will have two sets of arms already partly trained and a continuing centre leader which would allow more sets of arms to be trained if required. They need a set of horizontal wires for support. They also need appropriate summer pruning to maintain and develop the form.

    Espaliers are very useful as a decorative feature on walls and fences.

  • Family Tree. Family trees have more than one variety of fruit grafted onto one rootsock, eg three different varieties of apple. The varieties are selected to cross pollinate so there is no need for a separate tree as a pollinator.

    They are useful for small gardens where there is room for only one tree.

  • Fan. Fan trained trees have been trained with several branches starting near the ground all in the same plane forming a fan shape. They need a set of horizontal wires for support. They also need appropriate summer pruning to maintain and develop the form.

    Fans are very useful as a decorative feature on walls and fences.

  • Half Standard. Half standard trees are trained as open centre (goblet shaped) trees with a clear stem of 4-5ft (1.3m-1.5m).

    Suitable for medium sized trees on semi-vigorous rootstocks for large or medium sized gardens.

  • Maiden. Maidens are untrained one year old trees. Some varieties naturally produce branches in the first year. These are known as feathered maidens. Other varieties do not and are referred to as maiden whips. Typically maiden apples, pears and cherries are 4-6ft (1.3-1.8m) in height. Maiden plums may be taller.
  • Standard. Standard trees are trained as open centre (goblet shaped) trees with a clear stem of about 6ft (1.8m).

    Suitable for large trees on vigorous rootstocks for large gardens and old fashioned orchards.

  • Step-over. Step-overs are trees on very dwarfing rootstocks with a single horizontal branch typically 18-24 inches (0.4-0.6m) above the ground. Pruned to create fruiting spurs along its whole length.

    They are useful for planting along the edge of paths and borders.

    They need appropriate summer pruning to maintain and develop the form.

 

Keepers Nursery of Gallants Court, East Farleigh, Maidstone, Kent ME15 0LE (Tel: 01622 726465   Fax: 0870 705 2145) produce over 600 varieties of fruit trees. Their website www.keepers-nursery.co.uk can provide further details including colour photographs of most of the following trees in this page.

The following bare-root trees from 'Grow' at Brogdale Farm, Brogdale Road, Faversham, Kent. ME13 8XZ (Tel: 01795 531 888) would be supplied between November and April, which is their time for lifting and planting bare-root trees, through Brogdale Horticultural Trust at www.brogdale.org.
"A little history . . .
The National Fruit Collections were first established in Chiswick, London in the early 1800s by the Horticultural Society (now the Royal Horticultural Society) under the guidance of Thomas Andrew Knight. The origin of the Collections stemmed from a need to establish correct nomenclature and accurate cultivar descriptions of temperate fruits grown in the UK.The first catalogue, published in 1826 and followed by a more detailed edition in 1831, listed some 1400 apples, 677 pear and 360 gooseberry cultivars, although many of these have subsequently been proved synonyms.The National Fruit Trials and the Collections were established in 1921 at Wisley, Surrey, being initially managed by A.M. Rawes and subsequently by J.M.S. Potter from 1936. The Collections were relocated from Wisley to Brogdale between 1952 and 1954, when the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) assumed complete funding. The present day Collections were largely built up from this time onwards under the direction of J.M.S. Potter until 1972, and by successive Directors of Brogdale.In 1988 the Collections were registered with the National Council for the Conservation of Plants and Gardens (NCCPG) under the National Collections Scheme.

One of the largest collections of apples in the world!
Currently The National Fruit Collections at Brogdale are the largest fruit collection in the world growing on one site and comprise over 4,000 fruit varieties: around 2,000 apples, 500 pears, 280 cherries, 300 plums, 50 hazelnuts, 150 gooseberries, 200 currants (black, red, white and pink), as well as small collections of vines, quinces, medlars and apricots.The Collections are our national fruit heritage: the varieties that have been grown in gardens and orchards for centuries and which have shaped local communities and our landscapes. They are a living gene bank, which forms part of the UK’s contribution to global food security and both a national and international genetic resource.The Collections belong to Defra (Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) which funds their maintenance and curatorship. From 1 April 2008 the contract holders are the University of Reading in partnership with FAST (Farm Advisory Service team).Grow manage the propagation of heritage varieties for the public and orchards as well as run the onsite nursery and growing garden centre. We care passionately about the longevity of the collection and work with local schools and Local Authorities to plant community orchards and individual garden spaces that further increase the planting of unique & heritage fruits." from Grow at Brogdale.

Apple Rootstock

Ultimate Height

M27

5-6 feet

M9

8-10 feet

M26

10-15 feet

MM106

14-18 feet

M25

25-30 feet

Uses

Vertical cordons,
Patio tree,
Stepover,
Dwarf Bush.

Oblique cordon,
Stepover,
Bush,
Central Leader,
Pyramid

Oblique cordon,
Stepover,
Bush,
Central Leader,
Pyramid,
Small Espalier.

Double Cordon.,
Half Standard,
Espalier,
Fan,
Bush,
Central Leader.

Standards

Fruiting in

2-3 years

3-4 years

3-4 years

4-5 years

6-7 years

Full cropping
Potential

4-5 years
4.5-7Kg

5-6 years
13.5-20Kg

5-6 years
25-30Kg

7-8 years
40-50Kg

8-9 years
75-120Kg

Planting Distance

5-6 feet

8-10 feet

10-12 feet

14-18 feet

30 feet

Soil/Site

Requires a good deep fertile loam, clean ground, Not for heavy (Clay) soils

Requires a good deep fertile loam, clean ground, no competition from other plants. Not for heavy (Clay) soils

Requires a good deep fertile loam. Not for heavy (Clay) soils

Can tolerate heavier soils and more exposed sites.

Will tolerate most sites and soils. Good pest and disease resistance. Not the tree to plant if space is limited.

Stake

Permanent stake

Permanent stake

for 5 years

for 5 years

for 5 years

Apple Name
(Malus domestica) available from Brogdale Horticultural Trust
www.brogdale.org

Cooker/Dessert

Pollination Group Number

Tree Form Availability
Rootstock.Height.
M27..........5-6
M9...........8-10
M26........10-15
MM106....14-18
M25.........25-30

Pick month/
Keep till Month

Description

Adams Pearmain

Dessert

2

M9- Maiden, M25-Standard

Pick Early October/

Keep Nov-March

Red-Brown, with a rich aromatic, nutty flavour. Excellent keeper. Attractive blossom.

Annie Elizabeth

Cooker

4

MM106-Maiden
M25-Standard

Pick October/

Keep February

Orange with a red flush. Large fruit with a sweet flavour. A good keeper and ideal for stewing. Remains popular with northern gardeners. Keeps shape when cooked.

Ashmeads Kernel

Dessert

5

M9-Maiden
MM106-Half Standard
M25-Standard Espalier

Pick October/

Keep February

Connoisseur's choice. Attractive red flowers and green or yellow flushed fruit with a taste of Fruit Drops.Good cropping but erratic due possibly to cold Spring.

Bardsey

Dessert

3

M25-Standard

Pick October/

Keep January

The 'sainted' apple found growing on Bardsey Island in Wales in 1998. This pink over cream, lemon scented apple is unique and very disease resistant.

Beauty of Bath

Dessert

2

MM106-Maiden
M25-Standard

Pick August/

Do not Keep

Bright red flush on yellow, pink stained flesh. Sweet and juicy when ripe. Overripe it will taste fermented. Can 'drop' before being ripe.

Blenheim Orange

Dessert/Cooker

3 Triploid

MM106-Maiden
M27-Bush
MM106-Half Standard Stepover

Pick October/

Keep January

Orange-red apple. Sweet nutty flavour. Good with cheese and for Apple Charlotte. Biennial in heavy fruit production.

Bountiful

Cooker

2

MM106-Maiden
M27-Bush
Stepover

Pick September/

Keep November

An apple that keeps its shape when cooked. Soft, juicy and sweet.Resistant to mildew.

Braeburn

Dessert

4

MM106
M26-Bush
Stepover
 

Pick October/

Keep March

Crisp, firm, aromatic fruit. Excellent all round quality, requires a sheltered sunny spot.

Bramley

Cooker

3 Triploid

M27-Bush
M9-Maiden
M26-Small Espalier
MM106-Espalier
M25
MM106-Half Standard

Pick October/

Keep March

The most popular cooker. Greenish-yellow with a strong acid flavour. Vigorous growth. First trees planted commercially in Kent in 1890.

Charles Ross

Dessert/Cooker

3

M27-Maiden
M26
MM106
M9-Bush
 

Pick September/

Keep December

Easy to grow eating apple. Best used early for cooking. Sweet flavoured with an orange red flush. Good chalk tolerance and scab resistance. A valued garden apple.

Claygate Pearmain

Dessert

2

MM106-Maiden
M25 Standard

Pick October/

Keep February

Rich and aromatic with a nutty taste. Combines the qualities of Blenheim and Ribston. Flushed orange-red over greenish-yellow background. Good cropping.

Court Pendu Plat

Dessert

5

M9-Maiden
M25-Standard

Pick October/

Keep March

Greenish-yellow flushed orange/red. Rich and fruity pineapple flavour. Good frost resistance and keeps flavour when stored. Among top ten Victorian dessert apples.

Cox

Dessert

3
Self-fertile

M26-Maiden
M27-Bush
M9
Stepover
MM106
Espalier

Pick October/

Keep January

A very self-fertile form. For less than ideal Cox growing conditions. Spicy, honeyed, nutty, pear-like aromatic flavour.

Cornish Aromatic

Dessert

4

M25-Maiden

Pick October/

Keep January

Bright Red with russeting. Sweet, sharp pear drop and spice flavour. Light crop.

D'arcy Spice

Dessert

3

M25-Standard

Pick October/

Keep

Bright green becoming gold with red flush. Hot, spicy nutmeg flavour. Erratic cropping.

Devonshire Quarrenden

Dessert

2

MM106-Bush
M25 Standard

Pick August/

Keep September

Dark, bright red-crimson fruit with distinct strawberry/wine flavour. Soon goes soft once picked.

Discovery

Dessert

3

M26-Maiden
M9-Bush
M26
MM106-Half Standard

Pick August/

Does not Keep

Bright red flush. Crisp and juicy with a hint of strawberry. Disease resistant. Slow to bear.

Egremont Russet

Dessert

2

M9-Maiden
M26
Stepover
MM106
Espalier
M27-Bush
M9-Cordon
M25-Standard

Pick October/

Keep December

The most popular Russet, with cream-tinged-yellow firm flesh and a sweet and nutty flavour. Makes an upright tree with very good frost and disease resistance, so suitable for organic growing. A good pollinator.

Ellison's Orange

Dessert

4

M26-Maiden
MM106
 

Pick September/

Keep October

Striped red juicy apple. Intense flavour turning to aniseed when ripe. Good scab and frost resistance. Good crop.

Fiesta

Dessert

3

M27-Maiden
M26
MM106-Espalier
M27-Bush
MM106
MM106-Half Standard
M9-Cordon
Stepover

Pick October/

Keep January

Rich aromatic and sweet 'Cox' like flavour. Heavy crops, good frost resistance makes this an ideal variety for Northern areas. Grown commercially in Kent.

Gala

Dessert

4

M26-Maiden

Pick October/

Keep January

A reliable cropper with good crisp, refreshing well flavoured fruit. Prone to canker and scab.

George Cave

Dessert

2

MM106-Bush
MM106-Espalier

Pick August/

Does not Keep

White flesh with a strong, sweet-sharp taste.

Golden Noble

Cooker

4

MM106-Maiden
M25-Standard

Pick October/

Keep March

One of the best cookers. Sharp and well flavoured but needing little sugar. Ideal for pies. Keeps well. A tip-bearing variety. Resistant to scab and mildew.

Golden Pippin

Dessert Cooker

2

M25-Standard

Pick October/

Keep January

Gold with russet dots. A sweet flavour with a lemon tang. Cooks well.

Great Expectations

Dessert

5

MM106-Bush

Pick October/

Keep November

Small and russeted with a superb flavour and very attractive blossom. Spreading tree.

Greensleaves

Dessert

3

M26-Bush
MM106-Espalier

Pick September/

Does not Keep

Excellent garden tree and apple. Pale, greenish-yellow, with a crisp, tangy flavour. Very easy to grow. Eat from the tree. Heavy cropper

Grenadier

Cooker

3

M26-Bush

Pick September/

Does not Keep

A heavy cropping cooking apple with greeny-yellow fruit. Cooks to a creamy, sharp puree.

Herefordshire Russet

Dessert

3

MM106-Maiden
M25
M9-Bush
M26
MM106-Half Standard

Pick September/

Keep January

An excellent new variety (2004) of russet with a rich and aromatic Cox-like flavour. Stores well.

Howgate Wonder

Cooker

3

MM106-Bush
M25-Standard

Pick October/

Keep March

Large yellow red-striped cooker, with a light flavour. Keeps shape well when cooked. Spreading tree. Resistant to mildew.

James Grieve

Dessert/ Cooker

3

MM106-Maiden
M25
M27-Bush
M26
MM106
Espalier
M9-Cordon

Pick September/

Keep October

Red-flushed-stripes over pale green. Crisp and juicy with good flavour. Can be picked early and used as a cooker. A reliable cropper. Resistant to mildew. Spreading tree.

Jupiter

Dessert

3

M26-Bush

Pick October/

Keep January

Large and Cox-like with a more robust flavour. Sweet and juicy flesh. Biennial fruiting.

Katy

Dessert

3

M26-Maiden
M9

Pick September/

Does not Keep

Heavy crops of bright red early fruit with sweet strawberry flavoured firm flesh. A good pollinator. Once picked, soon goes soft. Syn Katja.

Kidd's Orange Red

Dessert

3

M26-Maiden
MM106
M26-Bush
MM106

Pick October/

Keep January

Yellow with red stripes. Sweet, crisp and aromatic. A good Cox alternative. Needs plenty of autumn sunshine to build up flavours.

Laxton's Superb

Dessert

4

MM106-Maiden
Cordon

Pick October/

Keep November

Will grow where Cox fails to thrive, and has some of its rich complexity of flavour. It is sweet with a fine textured quite juicy flesh. Spreading tree instead of normal upright apple tree growth.

Limelight

Dessert

4

M9-Maiden
MM106

Pick September/

Keep November

Excellent garden variety; a crisp and refreshing green apple with a good disease resistance.

Lord Derby

Cooker

3

M26-Maiden
MM106
Espalier
MM106-Bush

Pick October/

Keep December

A good strong tasting cooking apple for pies beautiful flowers. Good for northern areas. Good cropping.

Lord Lambourne

Dessert

2

MM106-Maiden
M26-Bush
MM106
MM106-Half Standard

Pick September/

Keep November

Bright striped fruit, moderatley sweet and aromatic with some strawberry flavour. A good garden apple. Tip-bearing. Resistant to mildew.

Mabbot's Pearmain

Dessert

3

MM106-Bush

Pick September/

Keep December

Thickly speckled russetted apple over an orange-red flush. A sharp refeshing taste of fruit. Heavy cropping.

Meridian

Dessert

3

M26-Maiden
MM106

Pick September/

Keep March

A large Red Falstaff x Cox cross, with a juicy aromatic flavour. A heavy cropping disease-resistant variety, which also has good keeping qualities.

Orange Gofff

Cooker

2

MM106-Bush

Pick September/

Keep December

Good for fruit jams and sauces, an orange fleshed dual purpose apple, which keeps its shape when cooked. Was used to 'help' marmalade producers in Dundee until practice stopped by Adulteration Act.

Orleans Reinette

Dessert

4

M26-Bush
MM106
M25-Standard

Pick September/

Keep December

Golden-yellow fruit flushed red, with nutty aromatic sweet firm flesh. Dual purpose. Makes sweet baked apple using early fruit. Needs warm spot for good flavour.

Peasgood Nonesuch

Cooker/Dessert

3

MM106-Bush
M25-Standard
MM106-Espalier

Pick September/

Keep December

Pale green with broken red stripes and an orange flush. Good for baking and salads. Spreading tree. Resistant to mildew , red spider and partly to scab.

Pitmaston Pine Apple

Dessert

3

MM106
M25-Standard

Pick September/

Keep December

A small conical apple with a distinctive taste of pineapple blended with honey and musk. Upright tree. Crops heavily and biennially.

Queen Cox

Dessert

3

M9-Maiden

Pick September/

Keep January

Cox's Orange (Queen) is a more highly coloured variety of Cox's Orange Pippin. An intense aromatic flavour.

Red Devil

Dessert

3
Self-fertile

M27-Maiden
M26
Small Espalier
MM106
Espalier

Pick September/

Keep December

Good garden variety with scarlet flush. Good fruity strawberry flavour. Disease resistant. Raised in Faversham, Kent. Heavy cropper.

Falstaff (Red)

Dessert

3
Self-fertile

M27-Maiden
Stepover
M9
M26
Small Espalier
M9-Bush
M9-Cordon
MM106-Half Standard
MM106-Espalier

Pick October/

Keep March

Fruity, well-balanced flavour. Crisp and juicy. One of the heaviest yielding apples. Can be stored easily and eaten throughout the winter. Frost resistant. Planted commercially in kent.

Red Millers Seedling

Dessert

2

MM106-Bush

Pick August/

Does not Keep

Medium pale yellow with bright red flush. Crisp, soft white sweet flesh. heavy cropping biennally.

Red Windsor

Dessert

2
Self-fertile

M27-Maiden
M9
M26
Small Espalier
MM106
Espalier
M9-Bush
M9-Cordon

Pick September/

Keep October

Superb Cox-like flavour. A good cropping garden variety.

Reinne de Reinettes

Cooker

3

M25-Maiden
M26-Bush

Pick Early October/

Keep December

Sweet with plenty of acidity. Keeps shape when cooked. Ideal for 'Tarte Tartin'. Syn. King of the Pippins. Upright tree with good disease resistance.

Ribston Pippin

Dessert

2

MM106-Maiden
M26-Bush

Pick October/

Keep January

Yellow, flushed brown/orange fruit. Intense rich aromatic flavour. Juicy and firm. Sharper than Cox. Upright tree. Resistant to scab.

Rosemary Russet

Dessert

3

M25-Maiden
 

Pick October/

Keep March

Pale Yellow flushed bright reddish-brown. Intensely flavoured of Acid Drops. Upright tree. Good cropper.

Saturn

Dessert

3
Self-fertile

M27-Maiden
M9
M26
MM106

Pick September

Keep February

Very resistant to scab. Heavy crops of attractive red blushed conical fruit. Firm flesh and sweet flavour.

Scrumptious

Dessert

3
Self-fertile

M27-Maiden
M9
M26
Small Espalier
MM106
Espalier

Pick Mid September/

Does not Keep

Frost and disease resistant, fragrant and honey. Eat straight from tree. Doesn't drop.

Spartan

Dessert

3

M26-Bush
MM106-Half Standard

Pick October/

Keep January

Popular eater. Fruit dark red, sweet, crisp and juicy. Easy to grow.

Sunset

Dessert

3

M27-Maiden
M26
Cordon
MM106
Espalier
M9-Bush
M9-Cordon

Pick September/

Keep December

Similar to Cox, but more disease resistant. Sharp intense flavour. Heavy cropper. Excellent garden apple.

Sweet Society

Dessert

4

M26-Maiden
 

Pick September/

Keep January

Selected by the Royal Horticultural Society to celebate their bi-centennial. An attractive slightly small Cox type apple with superb aromatic eating qualities.

Tydeman's Late Orange

Dessert

3

MM106-Maiden

Pick October/

Keep October

Orange/Red colour with some russeting. Firm and sweet. Rich and aromatic. Trouble free. Heavy cropping. If fruit is not thinned, then the fruit will be small.

Winter Gem

Dessert

3

M27-Bush
M26
Stepover
Espalier
MM106-Half Standard

Pick October/

Keep February

Heavy cropping. Handsome orange/red flushed over gold. Tasty, rich and aromatic.

Worcester Pearmain

Dessert

3

M27-Maiden
MM106
M25
M26-Bush
MM106-Half Standard

Pick September/

Keep October

Reliable heavy crop of delicious orange-red fruit. Firm and juicy flesh. Very sweet flavour with a hint of strawberry. Distinctive blossom- almond opening to silvery white.

Yellow Ingestrie

Dessert

1

M25-Maiden

Pick September/

Keep October

Greenish-yellow fruit turning yellow. Sharp, fruity and firm. Spreading tree. Good cropping. Ideal for wiring onto evergreens to make Kissing Boughs and sprays.

 

Cider apples are grown as standard trees to produce the maximum yield for juice production.

Brogdale Horticultural Trust has an Apple National Collection of 2111 varieties and has a Cider Apple Weekend Event each September and Cider Fest Evening Event each October.

Cider Apple Name
(Malus domestica) available from Brogdale Horticultural Trust
www.brogdale.org

Pollination Group Number

Tree Form Availability
Rootstock.Height.
M27..........5-6
M9...........8-10
M26........10-15
MM106....14-18
M25.........25-30

Pick month

Description

Dabinett

5

M25-Maiden

Pick November

The most reliable cider variety producing high quality juice. Produces bittersweet cider with 'soft, full bodied, astringency'.

Herefordshire Redstreak

5

M25-Maiden

Pick November

A very famous cider apple. Flesh is a vibrant red streak colour as the name suggests.

Harry Masters Jersey

5

M25-Maiden

Pick October

Known as port wine. A full bittersweet cider taste with soft astringency.

Tom Putt

3

M25-Maiden

Pick September

Bright red with streaks. Firm, crisp and sharp. Sweet when cooked. Scab resistant. Widely planted in West Midlands in 1920s.

 

Pears flower early and so are liable to damage by spring frosts and cold winds. It is best to grow them as Minarettes, Cordons and Espaliers on warm South, South-West or West facing walls or fences.

Brogdale Horticultural Trust has a Pear National Collection of 522 varieties. Self-guided walks with a Plant Centre and Tea rooms are available every day.

Pear and Quince Rootstock

Quince 'C' (QC)
Dwarfing

Quince 'A' (QA)
Semi-vigorous

PYC
Very vigorous

Ultimate height for a Bush tree

6-10 feet

8-10 feet

30 feet

Half Standard

N/A

Maximum 16 feet

25-30 feet

Uses

Cordon
Bush
Central Leader

Fan
Cordon
Bush
Central Leader
Half Standard
Espalier

Standard Tree

Fruiting

4 years

4 years

6-7 years

Full cropping
Potential

6-7 years
20-30Kgs

7 years
40-50 Kgs

8-9 years
75-120 Kgs

Planting Distance

6-10 feet

10-15 feet

30 feet

Staking

Permanently

5 years

5 years

Soil

Fertile soil which does not dry out too quickly

Most fertile medium to heavy soils

Less than ideal soil conditions.

Pear Name
(Malus domestica) available from Brogdale Horticultural Trust
www.brogdale.org

Pollination Group Number

Tree Form Availability Rootstock. Ultimate Height
QC........................6-10
QA........................8-10
PYC..........................30

Pick month/
Keep till Month

Description

Beth

3

QA-Bush
QC-Cordon

Pick September/

Does not Keep

Pale green turning pale yellow. Small and sweet. Good for gardens.

Beurre Hardy

4

QC-Bush
QA-Maiden
QA-Half Standard

Pick September/

Keep October

Medium large and light green. Tender and juicy, rose-water flavour.

Concorde

4

QC-Maiden
QA-Bush
QC-Cordon
Espalier

Pick September/

Keep November

Medium to large fruit. Pale green turning yellow. Sweet and juicy flesh with a pleasant mild flavour.

Conference

3
Self-fertile

QA-Maiden
QC
PYC
QA-Half Standard
QC-Cordon

Pick September/

Keep November

Medium yellow-green. Sweet, juicy, good cropper.

Doyenne du Comice

4

QA-Bush
QC
Espalier

Pick October/

Keep December

Large, pale green fruit. Rich, juicy superb flavour. Needs good pollinator such as Concorde.

Durondeau

3

PYC-Maiden

Pick September/

Keep November

Attractive medium fruit with a juicy sweet flavoured flesh. Needs a moist soil . The flowers resist frost well making it good for the north.

Emile D'Heyst

2

QA-Maiden

Pick September/

Keep November

One of the most reliable croppers even in the north. Light green medium sized fruit with a firm yellowish green flesh. Sweet, juicy and sub-acid flavour.

Jargonelle

1

PYC-Maiden

Pick August/

Does not Keep

Suitable for growing anywhere North or South in the United Kingdom. Good frost and disease resistance. The yellow flesh is tender and juicy. Tip bearer.

Louise Bonne of Jersey

2

QA-Maiden

Pick September/

Keep October

Small/medium in size. Pale yellowish-green fruit with a dark red flush. Melting sweet white flesh. Reliable cropper.

Packham's Triumph

3

QA-Bush

Pick October/

Keep December

Medium to large bright fruit if thinned. Compact growing tree.

Williams

3

QC-Bush
QA-Maiden
QC-Cordon

Pick August/

Does not Keep

Medium size fruit. Sweet and juicy. Regular cropping but does not keep.

 

Sweet Cherries crop best under conditions of light rainfall, 2 feet deep of fertile, well-drained soil. They flower early and so require protection against spring frosts. Best grown as a Dwarf Bush tree.

Brogdale Horticultural Trust has a Cherry National Collection of 320 varieties and has a Cherry Blossom Week Event each April and Cherry Week Event each July.

Sweet Cherry Rootstock

G5
Dwarfing

Colt
Semi-vigorous

Ultimate Height

10 feet

20 feet

Uses

Dwarf Bush Tree
Container Tree

Bush
Half Standard
Fan-Trained

Fruiting

3 years

3-4 years

Full cropping
Potential

3 years
10-12 Kgs

5 years
20-25 Kgs

Staking

Permanently

5 years

Soil

Requires good, fertile, deep loam

Tolerant of lighter, chalky or heavier clay soils

Sweet Cherry Name
(Prunus avium) available from Brogdale Horticultural Trust
www.brogdale.org

Pollinator

Tree Form Availability Rootstock. Height
G5.............10
Colt............20
 

Pick month
 

Description

Celeste

Self-fertile

Colt-Bush

 

Sweet cherry. Dark red fruits of excellent eating quality. A naturally compact growth habit.

Lapins

Self-fertile

G5-Maiden

Pick Late July

Sweet cherry. Large dark red fruit. A good garden tree with an upright habit.

Merton Glory

Pollinated by either Stella or Sunburst

G5-Maiden
Colt
Fan

Pick Early July

Sweet cherry. Very large heart-shaped, white with pink flush. A sweet fruit making a shapely compact tree.

Morello

Self-fertile

G5-Maiden
Colt

Pick July

Acid cherry. Large dark red cooking cherry. Acid flavour. Very hardy and good for north walls.

Penny

Pollinated by Stella, Sunburst or Merton Glory

G5-Maiden

Pick Mid-Late August

Sweet cherry. A new dark cherry from East Malling. Quite large, firm and a reliable cropper when young.

Stella

Self-fertile

G5-Maiden
Colt
Fan

Pick Late July

Sweet cherry. Dark sweet and juicy fruit. Reliable cropper.

Summer Sun

Pollinated by Stella and Summer Sun

G5-Maiden
Colt
Fan

 

Sweet cherry. A sweet red cherry with a compact growth habit. Suitable for cold exposed areas.

Sunburst

Self-fertile

G5-Maiden
Colt
Fan

Pick Mid-July

Sweet cherry. Georgeous flavour.

Sweetheart

Self-fertile

G5-Maiden

Pick Early August

Sweet cherry. Firm red cherries with a good flavour. Fruits when young.

Sylvia

Pollinated by Celeste

Colt-Maiden

Pick Early August

Sweet cherry. Large dark red fruit. A compact variety with attractive leaves.

 

Height in inches (cms):-

25.4mm = 1 inch
304.8mm = 12 inches
12 inches = 1 foot
3 feet = 1 yard
914.4mm = 1 yard

I normally round this to
25mm = 1 inch
300mm = 30 cms = 12 inches =1 foot,
900 mm = 3 feet = 1 yard and
1000mm = 100 cms = 1 metre = 40 inches

Site design and content copyright ©December 2006. Page structure changed September 2012. Height x Spread in feet changed to Height x Spread in inches (cms) June 2015. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

 

PLANTS PAGE
MENU
Introduction
Site Map
 

PLANT USE
Plant Selection
Level 1
Attracts Bird/Butterfly
Photos - Butterfly

Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers
Photos - Bloom per Month

Groundcover Height
0-24 inches
(0-60 cms)

24-72 inches
(60-180 cms)

Above 72 inches
(180 cms)

 

Poisonous Cultivated and UK Wildflower Plants with Photos
or
Cultivated Poisonous Plants

or
Wildflower Poisonous Plants


Rabbit-Resistant Plant
Flower Arranging
Wildflower
Photos - Wildflowers

 


PLANTS FOR SOIL
Plant Selection
Level 2
Info - Any Soil
Plants - Any Soil A-F
Plants - Any Soil G-L
Plants - Any Soil M-R
Plants - Any Soil S-Z

Info
- Chalky Soil
Plants - Chalky Soil A-F
Plants - Chalky Soil G-L
Plants - Chalky Soil M-R
Plants - Chalky Soil S-Z

Info - Clay Soil
Plants - Clay Soil A-F
Plants - Clay Soil G-L
Plants - Clay Soil M-R
Plants - Clay Soil S-Z

Info - Lime-Free Soil
Plants - Lime-Free Soil A-F
Plants - Lime-Free Soil G-L
Plants - Lime-Free Soil M-R
Plants - Lime-Free Soil S-Z

Info - Sandy Soil
Plants - Sandy Soil A-F
Plants - Sandy Soil G-L
Plants - Sandy Soil M-R
Plants - Sandy Soil S-Z

Info - Peaty Soils
Plants - Peaty Soil A-F
Plants - Peaty Soil G-L
Plants - Peaty Soil M-R
Plants - Peaty Soil S-Z

Following parts of Level 2a,
Level 2b,
Level 2c and
Level 2d are included in separate columns
together with
Acid Soil,
Alkaline Soil,
Any Soil,
Height and Spread,
Flowering Months and
Flower Colour in their Columns,
and also
Companion Plants to aid this plant Page,
Alpine Plant for Rock Garden Index Page
Native to UK WildFlower Plant in its Family Page in this website

and/or
Level 2cc
in the Comment Column
within each
of the Soil Type Pages of
Level 2

PLANTS PAGE MENU

 


Plant Selection by Plant Requirements
Level 2a
Sun aspect, Moisture


Plant Selection by Form
Level 2b
Tree Growth Shape
Shrub/Perennial Growth Habit


Plant Selection by Garden Use
Level 2c
Bedding
Photos - Bedding
Bog Garden
Coastal Conditions
Containers in Garden
Front of Border
Hanging Basket
Hedge
Photos - Hedging
Pollution Barrier
Rest of Border
Rock Garden
Photos - Rock Garden
Thorny Hedge
Windbreak
Woodland


Plant Selection by Garden Use
Level 2cc Others
Aquatic
Back of Shady Border
Crevice Garden
Desert Garden
Raised Bed
Scree Bed
Specimen Plant
Trees for Lawns
Trees for Small Garden
Wildflower
Photos - Wildflowers


Plant Selection by Plant Type
Level 2d
Alpine
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Herbac Per
Photos - RHS Herbac
Photos - Rock Garden
Annual
Bamboo
Photos - Bamboo
Biennial

Bulb
Photos - Bulb
Climber
Photos - Climber
Conifer
Deciduous Rhizome
Deciduous Shrub
Photos - Decid Shrub
Evergreen Perennial
Photos - Evergr Per
Evergreen Shrub
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Fern
Photos - Fern
Fruit Plant
Grass
Herb
Herbaceous Perennial
Photos - Herbac Per
Remaining Top Fruit
Soft Fruit
Sub-Shrub
Top Fruit
Tuber
Vegetable
Photos - Vegetable

 

 

 

 

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

PLANTS PAGE MENU

 


REFINING SELECTION
Plant Selection by
Flower Colour
Level 3a
Blue Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Wild Flower

Orange Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Wild Flower

Other Colour Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Wild Flower

Red Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Decid Shrub
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Herbac Per
Photos - Rose
Photos - Wild Flower

White Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Decid Shrub
Photos - Decid Tree
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Herbac Per
Photos - Rose
Photos - Wild Flower

Yellow Flowers
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Bulb
Photos - Climber
Photos - Decid Shrub
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Evergr Shrub
Photos - Herbac Per
Photos - Rose
Photos - Wild Flower


Photos - 53 Colours in its Colour Wheel Gallery

Photos - 12 Flower Colours per Month in its Bloom Colour Wheel Gallery


Plant Selection by Flower Shape
Level 3b
Photos - Bedding
Photos - Evergr Per
Photos - Herbac Per


Plant Selection by Foliage Colour
Level 3c
Aromatic Foliage
Finely Cut Leaves
Large Leaves
Other
Non-Green Foliage 1
Non-Green Foliage 2
Sword-shaped Leaves

 


PRUNING
Plant Selection by Pruning Requirements
Level 4
Pruning Plants

 


GROUNDCOVER PLANT DETAIL
Plant Selection Level 5
Plant Name - A
Plant Name - B
Plant Name - C
Plant Name - D
Plant Name - E
Plant Name - F
Plant Name - G
Plant Name - H
Plant Name - I
Plant Name - J
Plant Name - K
Plant Name - L
Plant Name - M
Plant Name - N
Plant Name - O
Plant Name - P
Plant Name - Q
Plant Name - R
Plant Name - S
Plant Name - T
Plant Name - U
Plant Name - V
Plant Name - W
Plant Name - XYZ

 


Then, finally use
COMPANION PLANTING to
aid your plant selected or to
deter Pests
Plant Selection Level 6

 

To locate mail-order nursery for plants from the UK in this gallery try using search in RHS Find a Plant.

To locate plants in the European Union (EU) try using Search Term in Gardens4You and Meilland Richardier in France.

To locate mail-order nursery for plants from America in this gallery try using search in Plant Lust.

To locate plant information in Australia try using Plant Finder in Gardening Australia.

 

The following details come from Cactus Art:-

"A flower is the the complex sexual reproductive structure of Angiosperms, typically consisting of an axis bearing perianth parts, androecium (male) and gynoecium (female).    

Bisexual flower show four distinctive parts arranged in rings inside each other which are technically modified leaves: Sepal, petal, stamen & pistil. This flower is referred to as complete (with all four parts) and perfect (with "male" stamens and "female" pistil). The ovary ripens into a fruit and the ovules inside develop into seeds.

Incomplete flowers are lacking one or more of the four main parts. Imperfect (unisexual) flowers contain a pistil or stamens, but not both. The colourful parts of a flower and its scent attract pollinators and guide them to the nectary, usually at the base of the flower tube.

partsofaflowersmallest

 

Androecium (male Parts or stamens)
It is made up of the filament and anther, it is the pollen producing part of the plant.
Anther This is the part of the stamen that produces and contains pollen. 
Filament This is the fine hair-like stalk that the anther sits on top of.
Pollen This is the dust-like male reproductive cell of flowering plants.

Gynoecium (female Parts or carpels or pistil)
 It is made up of the stigma, style, and ovary. Each pistil is constructed of one to many rolled leaflike structures.
Stigma
This is the part of the pistil  which receives the pollen grains and on which they germinate. 
Style
This is the long stalk that the stigma sits on top of ovary. 
Ovary
The part of the plant that contains the ovules. 
Ovule
The part of the ovary that becomes the seeds. 

Petal 
The colorful, often bright part of the flower (corolla). 
Sepal 
The parts that look like little green leaves that cover the outside of a flower bud (calix). 
(Undifferentiated "Perianth segment" that are not clearly differentiated into sepals and petals, take the names of tepals.)"

 

 

 

The following details come from Nectary Genomics:-

"NECTAR. Many flowering plants attract potential pollinators by offering a reward of floral nectar. The primary solutes found in most nectars are varying ratios of sucrose, glucose and fructose, which can range from as little a 8% (w/w) in some species to as high as 80% in others. This abundance of simple sugars has resulted in the general perception that nectar consists of little more than sugar-water; however, numerous studies indicate that it is actually a complex mixture of components. Additional compounds found in a variety of nectars include other sugars, all 20 standard amino acids, phenolics, alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenes, vitamins, organic acids, oils, free fatty acids, metal ions and proteins.

NECTARIES. An organ known as the floral nectary is responsible for producing the complex mixture of compounds found in nectar. Nectaries can occur in different areas of flowers, and often take on diverse forms in different species, even to the point of being used for taxonomic purposes. Nectaries undergo remarkable morphological and metabolic changes during the course of floral development. For example, it is known that pre-secretory nectaries in a number of species accumulate large amounts of starch, which is followed by a rapid degradation of amyloplast granules just prior to anthesis and nectar secretion. These sugars presumably serve as a source of nectar carbohydrate.

WHY STUDY NECTAR? Nearly one-third of all worldwide crops are dependent on animals to achieve efficient pollination. In addition, U.S. pollinator-dependent crops have been estimated to have an annual value of up to $15 billion. Many crop species are largely self-incompatible (not self-fertile) and almost entirely on animal pollinators to achieve full fecundity; poor pollinator visitation has been reported to reduce yields of certain species by up to 50%."

 

The following details about DOUBLE FLOWERS comes from Wikipedia:-

"Double-flowered" describes varieties of flowers with extra petals, often containing flowers within flowers. The double-flowered trait is often noted alongside the scientific name with the abbreviation fl. pl. (flore pleno, a Latin ablative form meaning "with full flower"). The first abnormality to be documented in flowers, double flowers are popular varieties of many commercial flower types, including roses, camellias and carnations. In some double-flowered varieties all of the reproductive organs are converted to petals — as a result, they are sexually sterile and must be propagated through cuttings. Many double-flowered plants have little wildlife value as access to the nectaries is typically blocked by the mutation.

 

There is further photographic, diagramatic and text about Double Flowers from an education department - dept.ca.uky.edu - in the University of Kentucky in America.

 

"Meet the plant hunter obsessed with double-flowering blooms" - an article from The Telegraph.

 

THE 2 EUREKA EFFECT PAGES FOR UNDERSTANDING SOIL AND HOW PLANTS INTERACT WITH IT OUT OF 15,000:-


Explanation of Structure of this Website with User Guidelines Page for those photo galleries with Photos
(of either ones I have taken myself or others which have been loaned only for use on this website from external sources)

Choose 1 of these different Plant selection Methods:-

 

1. Choose a plant from 1 of 53 flower colours in the Colour Wheel Gallery.

 

2. Choose a plant from 1 of 12 flower colours in each month of the year from 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery.

 

3. Choose a plant from 1 of 6 flower colours per month for each type of plant:-

Aquatic
Bedding
Bulb
Climber
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Wild Flower

 

4. Choose a plant from its Flower Shape:-

Shape, Form
Index

Flower Shape

 

5. Choose a plant from its foliage:-

Bamboo
Conifer
Fern
Grass
Vegetable

 

6. There are 6 Plant Selection Levels including Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers in
Plants Topic.

 

or

 

7. when I do not have my own or ones from mail-order nursery photos , then from March 2016, if you want to start from the uppermost design levels through to your choice of cultivated and wildflower plants to change your Plant Selection Process then use the following galleries:-

  • Create and input all plants known by Amateur Gardening inserted into their Sanders' Encyclopaedia from their edition published in 1960 (originally published by them in 1895) into these
    • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery,
      then
    • Stage 2 - Infill Plants Index Gallery being the only gallery from these 7 with photos (from Wikimedia Commons) ,
      then
    • Stage 3 - All Plants Index Gallery with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2
    • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery,
    • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery with
    • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery and
    • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery
    • Unfortunately, if you want to have 100's of choices on selection of plants from 1000's of 1200 pixels wide by up to 16,300 pixels in length webpages, which you can jump to from almost any of the pages in these 7 galleries above, you have to put up with those links to those choices being on
      • the left topic menu table,
      • the header of the middle data table and on
      • the page/index menu table on the right of every page of those galleries.

There are other pages on Plants which bloom in each month of the year in this website:-

 

 


Topic
Case Studies
...Drive
...Foundations

Companion Planting
...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants

Garden Construction
Garden Design
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants Garden Maintenance
Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants *
...Poisonous Plants
Soil
...Soil Nutrients
Tool Shed
Useful Data

................

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape

Bulb
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
Climber
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evgr
...Heather Shrub
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evgr
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
...P -Herbaceous
...RHS Wisley
...Flower Shape
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable

Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour
NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown Note
...Cream Note
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note
Poisonous
Wildflower Plants

............

Topic - Flower/Foliage Colour
Colour Wheel Galleries

Following your choice using Garden Style then that changes your Plant Selection Process
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

or
you could use these Flower Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12
with its
Explanation of
Structure of this Website with

...User Guidelines
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index
Rock Garden and Alpine Flower Colour Wheel with number of colours
Rock Plant Flowers 53

...Rock Plant Photos

or
these Foliage Colour Wheels structures, which I have done but until I can take the photos and I am certain of the plant label's validity, these may not progress much further
All Foliage 212

All Spring Foliage 212
All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212

or
Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index

............

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly
Usage of Plants
by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly

Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly usage of
Plant A-C
Plant C-M
Plant N-W
Butterfly usage of Plant

followed by all the Wild Flower Family Pages:-

There are 180 families in the Wildflowers of the UK and they have been split up into 22 Galleries to allow space for up to 100 plants per gallery.

Each plant named in each of the Wildflower Family Pages may have a link to:-

its Plant Description Page in its Common Name in one of those Wildflower Plant Galleries and will have links

to external sites to purchase the plant or seed in its Botanical Name,

to see photos in its Flowering Months and

to read habitat details in its Habitat Column.

 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 1


(o)Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
(o)Arrow-Grass
(o)Arum
(o)Balsam
Bamboo
(o)Barberry
(o)Bedstraw
(o)Beech
(o)Bellflower
(o)Bindweed
(o)Birch
(o)Birds-Nest
(o)Birthwort
(o)Bogbean
(o)Bog Myrtle
(o)Borage
(o)Box
(o)Broomrape
(o)Buckthorn
(o)Buddleia
(o)Bur-reed
(o)Buttercup
(o)Butterwort
(o)Cornel (Dogwood)
(o)Crowberry
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
(o)Daffodil
(o)Daisy
(o)Daisy Cudweeds
(o)Daisy Chamomiles
(o)Daisy Thistle
(o)Daisy Catsears (o)Daisy Hawkweeds
(o)Daisy Hawksbeards
(o)Daphne
(o)Diapensia
(o)Dock Bistorts
(o)Dock Sorrels

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 2


(o)Clubmoss
(o)Duckweed
(o)Eel-Grass
(o)Elm
(o)Filmy Fern
(o)Horsetail
(o)Polypody
Quillwort
(o)Royal Fern
(o)Figwort - Mulleins
(o)Figwort - Speedwells
(o)Flax
(o)Flowering-Rush
(o)Frog-bit
(o)Fumitory
(o)Gentian
(o)Geranium
(o)Glassworts
(o)Gooseberry
(o)Goosefoot
(o)Grass 1
(o)Grass 2
(o)Grass 3
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 1
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 2
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 3 (o)Hazel
(o)Heath
(o)Hemp
(o)Herb-Paris
(o)Holly
(o)Honeysuckle
(o)Horned-Pondweed
(o)Hornwort
(o)Iris
(o)Ivy
(o)Jacobs Ladder
(o)Lily
(o)Lily Garlic
(o)Lime
(o)Lobelia
(o)Loosestrife
(o)Mallow
(o)Maple
(o)Mares-tail
(o)Marsh Pennywort
(o)Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 3


(o)Mesem-bryanthemum
(o)Mignonette
(o)Milkwort
(o)Mistletoe
(o)Moschatel
Naiad
(o)Nettle
(o)Nightshade
(o)Oleaster
(o)Olive
(o)Orchid 1
(o)Orchid 2
(o)Orchid 3
(o)Orchid 4
(o)Parnassus-Grass
(o)Peaflower
(o)Peaflower Clover 1
(o)Peaflower Clover 2
(o)Peaflower Clover 3
(o)Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
(o)Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
Pipewort
(o)Pitcher-Plant
(o)Plantain
(o)Pondweed
(o)Poppy
(o)Primrose
(o)Purslane
Rannock Rush
(o)Reedmace
(o)Rockrose
(o)Rose 1
(o)Rose 2
(o)Rose 3
(o)Rose 4
(o)Rush
(o)Rush Woodrushes
(o)Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
(o)Sandalwood
(o)Saxifrage
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 4


Seaheath
(o)Sea Lavender
(o)Sedge Rush-like
(o)Sedges Carex 1
(o)Sedges Carex 2
(o)Sedges Carex 3
(o)Sedges Carex 4
(o)Spindle-Tree
(o)Spurge
(o)Stonecrop
(o)Sundew
(o)Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
(o)Teasel
(o)Thyme 1
(o)Thyme 2
(o)Umbellifer 1
(o)Umbellifer 2
(o)Valerian
(o)Verbena
(o)Violet
(o)Water Fern
(o)Waterlily
(o)Water Milfoil
(o)Water Plantain
(o)Water Starwort
Waterwort
(o)Willow
(o)Willow-Herb
(o)Wintergreen
(o)Wood-Sorrel
(o)Yam
(o)Yew

 

It is worth remembering that especially with roses that the colour of the petals of the flower may change - The following photos are of Rosa 'Lincolnshire Poacher' which I took on the same day in R.V. Roger's Nursery Field:-

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot91a1a1a1

Closed Bud

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot92a1a1a1

Opening Bud

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot93a1a1a1

Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot94a1a1a1

Older Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot95a1a1a1

Middle-aged Flower - Flower Colour in Season in its
Rose Description Page is
"Buff Yellow, with a very slight pink tint at the edges in May-October."

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot96a1a1a1

Mature Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot97a1a1a1

Juvenile Flower and Dying Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot98a1a1a1

Form of Rose Bush

There are 720 roses in the Rose Galleries; many of which have the above series of pictures in their respective Rose Description Page.

So one might avoid the disappointment that the 2 elephants had when their trunks were entwined instead of them each carrying their trunk using their own trunk, and your disappointment of buying a rose to discover that the colour you bought it for is only the case when it has its juvenile flowers; if you look at all the photos of the roses in the respective Rose Description Page!!!!

 

Plant Selection by Flower Colour

Blue Flowers

Bedding.
Bulb.
Climber.
Evergr Per.
Evergr Shrub.
Wild Flower.
 

Orange Flowers

Bedding.

Wild Flower.

Other Colour Flowers

Bedding.

Bulb.
Climber.
Evergr Per.
Evergr Shrub.
Wild Flower.

Red Flowers

Bedding.

Bulb.
Climber.
Decid Shrub.
Evergr Per.
Evergr Shrub.
Herbac Per.
Rose.
Wild Flower.

White Flowers

Bedding.

Bulb.
Climber.
Decid Shrub.
Decid Tree.
Evergr Per.
Evergr Shrub.
Herbac Per.
Rose.
Wild Flower.
 

Yellow Flowers

Bedding.
Bulb.
Climber.
Decid Shrub.
Evergr Per.
Evergr Shrub.
Herbac Per.
Rose.
Wild Flower.
 

 

 

Fragrant Plants adds the use of another of your 5 senses in your garden:-
Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves.

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark.

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil
.

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
.

Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
.

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers.

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves.

Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves.

Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers.

Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit.

Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers.

Night-scented Flowering Plants.

Scented Aquatic Plants.

Plants with Scented Fruits.

Plants with Scented Roots.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums.

Scented Cacti and Succulents.

Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell.
 

Flower Perfume Group:-

Indoloid Group.

Aminoid Group with scent - Hawthorn.

Heavy Group with scents -
Jonquil and
Lily.

Aromatic Group with scents - Almond,
Aniseed, Balsamic,
Carnation, Cinnamon, Clove,
Spicy and
Vanilla.

Violet Group.

Rose Group.

Lemon Group with scent -
Verbena.

Fruit-scented Group with scents -
Apricot,
Fruity,
Green Apple,
Orange, Pineapple,
Ripe Apple , Ripe Banana and
Ripe Plum.

Animal-scented Group with scents -
Cat,
Dog,
Ferret,
Fox,
Goat,
Human Perspiration,
Musk,
Ripe Apple and
Tom Cat.

Honey Group.

Unpleasant Smell Group with scents -
Animal,
Fetid,
Fishy,
Foxy,
Fur-like,
Garlic,
Hemlock,
Manure,
Nauseating,
Perspiration,
Petrol,
Putrid,
Rancid,
Sickly,
Skunk,
Stale Lint,
Sulphur and
Urinous.

Miscellaneous Group with scents -
Balm,
Brandy,
Cedar,
Cloying,
Cowslip,
Cucumber,
Damask Rose, Daphne,
Exotic,
Freesia,
Fur-like,
Gardenia,
Hay-like,
Heliotrope, Honeysuckle,
Hops,
Hyacinth,
Incense-like, Jasmine,
Laburnham,
Lilac,
Lily of the Valley, Meadowsweet, Mignonette,
Mint,
Mossy,
Muscat,
Muscatel,
Myrtle-like,
Newly Mown Hay, Nutmeg,
Piercing,
Primrose,
Pungent,
Resinous, Sandalwood, Sassafras,
Seductive,
Slight,
Soft,
Stephanotis,
Sulphur,
Starch,
Sweet,
Sweet-briar,
Tea-rose,
Treacle and
Very Sweet.