Ivydene Gardens Bedding Plant Gallery:
Seed Colour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a38a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a38a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a38a2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a38a3

 

Coleus Bedding Trial Index . These Solenostemon are used as bedding for their multi-coloured foliage,

and some annuals for bedding:-


Annuals with Blue to Purple Flowers
Annuals with Red to Pink Flowers
Annuals with Green Flowers
Annuals with Black or Brown Flowers
Annuals with Yellow, and Orange Flowers
Annuals with White Flowers
Low-Growing Annuals
Medium-Growing Annuals
Tall-Growing Annuals
Heat-Tolerant Annuals
Annuals for Moist Soil
Annuals for Shade
Annuals for Indoors
Annuals for Cutting
Annuals that Naturalize
Annuals with Decorative Foliage
Annuals for Edging
Annuals for Fragrance
Annuals for Hanging Baskets
Vining Annuals
Annuals for Coastal Gardens
Annuals with Clump-Forming Habit
Annuals with Compact/Bushy Habit
Annuals with Erect Habit
Annuals with Mounded Habit
Annuals with Spreading or Sprawling Habit
Annuals with Wildflower Meadows
Annuals To Cover Fences
Annuals of Odds and Sods 1, 2

 

The Garden Style Gallery with its subsidiary galleries provide more bedding plants
with annuals and bulbs that can also be used for bedding:-

The following table shows the linkages for the information about the plants
described in Sanders' Encyclopedia of Gardening in The Gardeners' Golden Treasury, revised by A. G. L Hellyer F.L.S, Editor of 'Amateur Gardening', (thirty-first impression of original published in 1895) was published in 1960 by W. H. & L. Collingridge Limited,
between:-

  • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery (in this Table) and Stage 1 Fragrant Plants (in Table on left), then
  • Stage 2 - 3 Infill Plants Index Galleries (in Table on right), then
  • Stage 3a - All Plants Index Gallery with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2 (in this Table)
  • Stage 3b - All2 Plants Index Gallery for Alpines without a Garden for your health and productivity (in this Table)
  • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery (in Table on right)
  • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery (in Table on right) with
    column for Deciduous / Herbaceous plants with the same foliage colour during their growing season and
    column for Evergreen plants with the same foliage colour during the entire year
  • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery (in Table on left)
  • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery (in Table on left)

STAGE 3a ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY
Click on Blue or underlined text to jump to page comparing flower thumbnails of that blue colour in the
Other Plant Photo Galleries. RedPP is Red, Pink, Purple and Other is Unusual or Other Flower Colour.

Plant Type
with links to Other Plant Photo Galleries

ABC

DEF

GHI

JKL

MNO

PQR

STU

VWX

YZ

Alpine in Evergreen Perennial,
Herbaceous Perennial and Rock Garden

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Aquatic

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Annual/ Biennial

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Bamboo

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Bedding, 25
RHS Mixed Border Beds 75 and
Flower Shape, Flower Colour and Bedding Plant Use

1

Blue

1

Green

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

Purple

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Bicolour

Other Flower Colours

White / Colour Bicolour

Bulb, 746 with Use, Flower Colour/Shape of
Allium / Anemone, Colchicum / Crocus, Dahlia, Gladiolus, Narcissus and Tulip

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Climber 71 Clematis, 58 other Climbers with Use, Flower Colour and Shape

1

Blue

1

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Conifer

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Deciduous Shrub 43 with Use and Flower Colour

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Deciduous Tree

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Evergreen Perennial 104 with Use, Flower Colour, Flower Shape and Number of Petals

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Evergreen Shrub 46, Semi-Evergreen Shrub and Heather 74 with Use and Flower Colour

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Evergreen Tree

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Fern with 706 ferns
within 21 types and 41 uses

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Grass

1

1

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

Herbaceous Perennial 91,
RHS Mixed Border Beds 176 and
Peonies 46 with Flower Colour/Shape

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Herb

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Odds and Sods

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Rhododendron, Azalea, Camellia

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Rose with 720 roses within Flower Colour, Flower Shape, Rose Petal Count and Rose Use

1

1

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

 

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Soft Fruit

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Sub-Shrub

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Top Fruit

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Vegetable

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Wildflower 1918 with
Plants used by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterflies in the UK
I am inserting the plants described in Sanders' Encyclopedia of Gardening into STAGE 3a ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY

1

Blue

1

Green

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

Red

1

Purple

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Multi-colour

Cream

Mauve

Brown

Shrub and Small Tree

Botanical Names Page

Common Names Page

Finally, you might be advised to check that the adjacent plants to the one you have chosen for that position in a flower bed are suitable; by checking the entry in Companion Planting - like clicking A page for checking Abies - and Pest Control page if you have a pest to control in this part of the flower bed.
Companion Planting
- A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z
Pest Control using Plants

 

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY
The planning a Rose Garden chapter from Rose Gardens by Jane Fearnley-Whitingstall ISBN 0 7011 3344 9 and
Plant Solutions by Nigel Colborn provides information for this gallery.

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 Reference books for these galleries in Table on left

STAGE 3a ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY
In addition to these 10 galleries, there are links to the Other Plant Photo Galleries in the table above like Bulb , which have plant descriptions accessed by clicking a flower thumbnail in its flower comparison page. Click the respective flower colour - like Green - to change page to that flower colour comparison page. Then, you can also choose these other plants.
It will also state the Plant Combinations for each plant from The Ulimate Visual Guide to Successful Plant Harmony - The Encyclopedia of Planting Combinations by Tony Lord ISBN 1-55209-623-8

STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY
Some extra details about the Cultivation Requirements of Plant:- Outdoor /Garden Cultivation, Indoor / House Cultivation, Cool Green-house Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter, Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year, and Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

 

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERY 1
PAGES

Site Map

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY PAGES Links to pages in Table alongside on the left with Garden Design Topic Pages

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

Plant Type
 

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 with its Cultivation Requirements

Alpines for Rock Garden (See Rock Garden Plant Flowers)

Alpine Shrubs and Conifers

The Alpine Meadow
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

The Alpine Border
1
, 2

Alpine Plants for a Purpose

The Alpines that Dislike Lime 1, 2

Alpines and Walls
Dry Sunny Walls 1a, b
Tops of Walls 2a, b
Dry Shady and Conifers 3a, b

Alpines and
Paving
1
, 2

Sink and Trough gardens
1
, 2

Annual for

----------------



 

 

ANY PLANT TYPE for
Cut Flowers in
January 1, 2
February
March 1, 2
April
May 1, 2
June 1, 2
July 1, 2
August
September
October
November
December

Exposed Sites

Sheltered Sites with Green-house Annuals from 1916

Extra Poor Soil with Half-Hardy Annuals from 1916

Very Rich Soil with Biennials from 1916

Gap-filling in Mixed Borders with Hardy Annuals from 1916

Patio Con-tainers

Cut Flowers
1
, 2, 3 Ever-lasting Flowers with Red Flowers from 1916

Attract-ing bene-ficial insects
1
, 2

Scent / Fra-grance with Annuals for Cool or Shady Places from 1916

Low-allergen Gardens for Hay Fever Sufferers

Annual Plant Pairing Ideas and Colour Schemes with Annuals
1
, 2

Low-Growing Annuals
1
, 2

Medium-Growing Annuals

Tall-Growing Annuals with White Flowers from 1916

Black or Brown Flowers

Blue to Purple Flowers

Green Flowers with Annuals and Biennials from 1916

Red to Pink Flowers and Cut Flowers
Page
1
, 2, 3

White Flowers
1
, 2

Yellow or Orange Flowers
1
, 2

Dec-orative Foliage

Moist Soil

Shade
1
, 2

House-plants with Yellow Flowers from 1916

Edging Beds

Hanging Baskets

Vining Annuals

 

Bedding for

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Autumn/ Winter Bedding

Bedding for Light Sandy Soil

Bedding for Acid Soil

Bedding for Chalky Soil

Bedding for Clay Soil

Black Flowers

Blue Flowers

Orange Flowers

Pink Flowers

Long Flowering

Coloured Leaves

Attract-ive to Wildlife including Bees, Butterflies and Moths

Purple Flowers

Red Flowers

White Flowers

Yellow Flowers

Multi-Coloured Flowers

Aromatic Foliage or Scented Flowers

Bedding Plant Use

Flowers with 2 Petals

Flowers with 3 Petals

Flowers with
4 Petals

Flowers with 5 Petals

Flowers with 6 Petals

Flowers with more than 6 Petals

Use in Hanging Baskets

Flower Simple Shape

Shape of
Stars

Shape of
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Shape of
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

Shape of
Trumpets and Funnels

Shape of
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

Use in Pots and Troughs

Flower Elabo-rated Shape

Shape of
Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Shape of
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Shape of
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

 

Use in
Screen-ing

Use in
Window Boxes

Shape of
Stand-ards, Wings and Keels

Shape of
Discs and Florets

Shape of
Pin-Cushions and Tufts

Shape of
Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

 

Use in Bedding Out

Use in
Filling In

Biennial for

Cottage and Other Gardens
1
, 2

Cut Flower with Biennials for Rock Work from 1916

Patio Con-tainers with Biennials for Pots in Green-house / Con-servatory

Bene-ficial to Wildlife with Purple and Blue Flowers from 1916

Scent with Biennials for Sunny Banks or Borders from 1916

 

 

Bulb for
--------------
Explan-ation Intro to Bulbs
--------------
725 Blue, White, Yellow, Unusual Colour, or Red-Purple-Pink flowering Bulbs in each month they flower.

Indoor Bulbs for
Dec-ember
January
February

Indoor Bulbs for
March
April
May

Indoor
Bulbs for
June
July
August

Indoor Bulbs for Sep-tember
October
November

Bulbs in Window-boxes
1
, 2

Bulbs in the Border

Bulbs natural-ised in Grass

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Dec-Jan
Feb-Mar

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Apr-May
Jun-Aug 1, 2, 3, 4

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Sep-Oct
Nov-Dec

Any Plant Type Blooming in Smallest of Gardens

Bulbs for the Bulb Frame

Bulbs in the Wood-land Garden

Bulbs in the Rock Garden

Bulbs in Green-house or Stove

Achi-menes, Alocasias, Amorpho-phalluses, Aris-aemas, Arums, Begonias, Bomar-eas, Calad-iums

Clivias,
Colo-casias, Crinums, Cyclam-ens, Cyrt-anthuses, Euchar-ises, Urceo-charis, Eurycles

Freesias, Gloxinias, Hae-manthus, Hipp-eastrums

Lachen-alias, Nerines, Lycorises, Pen-cratiums, Hymen-ocallises, Richardias, Sprekelias, Tuberoses, Vallotas, Watsonias, Zephy-ranthes

Bulbs in Bowls

Bulbs in the Alpine House

Hardy Bulbs

Aconitum, Allium, Alstroe-meria, Anemone 1, 1a

Amaryllis, Antheri-cum, Antholy-zas, Apios, Arisaema, Arum, Aspho-deline,

Aspho-delus, Belam-canda, Bloom-eria, Brodiae, Bulbo-codium

Calo-chorti, Cyclo-bothras, Camassia, Col-chicum, Con-vallaria,
Forcing Lily of the Valley, Corydalis, Crinum, Crosmia, Mon-tbretia , Crocus

Cyclamen, Dicentra, Dierama, Eranthis, Eremurus, Ery-thrnium, Eucomis

Fritillaria, Funkia, Gal-anthus, Galtonia, Gladiolus, Hemero-callis

Hya-cinth, Hya-cinths in Pots,
Scilla, Pusch-kinia, Chion-odoxa, Chiono-scilla, Muscari

Iris,
Kniphofia, Lapey-rousia, Leucojum

Lilium,

Lilium in Pots, Malvastrum, Merendera, Milla, Narcissus, Narcissi in Pots

Orni-thogalum, Oxalis, Paeonia, Ran-unculus, Romulea, Sanguin-aria,
Stern-bergia,
Schi-zostylis, Teco-philaea, Trillium

Tulip,
Zephy-ranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs

Acidan-thera, Albuca, Alstroe-meri, Andro-stephium, Bassers, Boussing-aultias, Bravoas, Cypellas, Dahlias, Galaxis,
Geis-sorhizas, Hesper-anthas

Gladioli, Ixias,
Sparaxises, Babianas, Morphixias, Tritonias

Ixio-lirions, Moraeas, Orni-thogal-ums, Oxalises, Phaedra-nassas,
Pan-cratiums, Tigridias, Zephyr-anthes, Cooper-ias

Bulbs for Bedding

Plant each Bedding Plant with a Ground, Edging or Dot Plant for
Spring
1
, 2
or
Summer
1
, 2

Single Flowers provide honeybees with pollen to collect for the protein in a bee's diet, whereas double flowers do not provide this pollen.

 

"The archetypal flower reads from outside in – sepals (often green), then petals, male stamen and finally the central female parts.

In the single dahlia stamens with their yellow pollen which is available for honeybees to collect, can be seen clearly.  Pollen provides most of the protein in a bee’s diet.

Double flowers, stamens have been transformed into extra petals for a fuller, showier bloom.  The lack of pollen means pollination cannot occur and the flower remains open for longer, waiting.  Both of these features have made double flowers attractive to horticulturists and much energy has been put into breeding double varieties.  Highly bred cultivars are much more likely to be doubles than their species (natural) counterparts.  Plants with the name ‘flore pleno’ should ring warning bells as it means ‘with a full flower’ and will almost certainly mean it is a double.

Nectaries (rarely visible) store nectar which provides the carbohydrate part of a bee’s diet.  They are easier to access in single flowers than in doubles.

Some plant species are good honey bee plants in their single form but not when bred as doubles:  Hawthorn (Crataegus ‘Paul’s Scarlet‘), Japanese anemones (Anemone x hybrida), Geums – semi-double cultivars ‘Miss Bradshaw’ and ‘Lady Stratheden’, Cinquefoil (Potentilla), Clematis (such as the strange ‘Viennetta’) and Hollyhock (Alcea rosea).

For rose fans you may want to learn that only the species roses (Dog rose Rosa canina and R. rugosa) offer food (pollen only) for honeybees. It is understandable that having as much colour, for as long as possible, has been a priority in British gardens prone as they are to the blanketing green of a wet summer.  The fact that plant breeding has followed the demand of gardeners makes simple economic sense.  It is nature that is beginning to suffer however.  Breeding away pollen serves neither the plant species, as it can’t reproduce itself, nor the insects whose main source of protein it is.

The question is, can designers influence public taste sufficiently for nurseries to change their ways or would it put the breeders out of a job?" from Beeginner Beekeeper.

 

Anagallis monellii 'Skylover Blue' has Single Flowers

anagalisflocskylover1a

whereas Dahlia 'Blue Wish' has Double Flowers (details about Double Flowers in row further down), which has many more petals:-

dahliaflobluewishgarnonswilliams1a

 

The following details come from Cactus Art:-

"A flower is the the complex sexual reproductive structure of Angiosperms, typically consisting of an axis bearing perianth parts, androecium (male) and gynoecium (female).    

Bisexual flower show four distinctive parts arranged in rings inside each other which are technically modified leaves: Sepal, petal, stamen & pistil. This flower is referred to as complete (with all four parts) and perfect (with "male" stamens and "female" pistil). The ovary ripens into a fruit and the ovules inside develop into seeds.

Incomplete flowers are lacking one or more of the four main parts. Imperfect (unisexual) flowers contain a pistil or stamens, but not both. The colourful parts of a flower and its scent attract pollinators and guide them to the nectary, usually at the base of the flower tube.

partsofaflower

Androecium (male Parts or stamens)
It is made up of the filament and anther, it is the pollen producing part of the plant.
Anther This is the part of the stamen that produces and contains pollen. 
Filament This is the fine hair-like stalk that the anther sits on top of.
Pollen This is the dust-like male reproductive cell of flowering plants.

Gynoecium (female Parts or carpels or pistil)
 It is made up of the stigma, style, and ovary. Each pistil is constructed of one to many rolled leaflike structures. Stigma This is the part of the pistil  which receives the pollen grains and on which they germinate. 
Style This is the long stalk that the stigma sits on top of. 
Ovary The part of the plant that contains the ovules. 
Ovule The part of the ovary that becomes the seeds. 

Petal 
The colorful, often bright part of the flower (corolla). 
Sepal 
The parts that look like little green leaves that cover the outside of a flower bud (calix). 
(Undifferentiated "Perianth segment" that are not clearly differentiated into sepals and petals, take the names of tepals.)"

 

 

 

The following details come from Nectary Genomics:-

"NECTAR. Many flowering plants attract potential pollinators by offering a reward of floral nectar. The primary solutes found in most nectars are varying ratios of sucrose, glucose and fructose, which can range from as little a 8% (w/w) in some species to as high as 80% in others. This abundance of simple sugars has resulted in the general perception that nectar consists of little more than sugar-water; however, numerous studies indicate that it is actually a complex mixture of components. Additional compounds found in a variety of nectars include other sugars, all 20 standard amino acids, phenolics, alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenes, vitamins, organic acids, oils, free fatty acids, metal ions and proteins.

NECTARIES. An organ known as the floral nectary is responsible for producing the complex mixture of compounds found in nectar. Nectaries can occur in different areas of flowers, and often take on diverse forms in different species, even to the point of being used for taxonomic purposes. Nectaries undergo remarkable morphological and metabolic changes during the course of floral development. For example, it is known that pre-secretory nectaries in a number of species accumulate large amounts of starch, which is followed by a rapid degradation of amyloplast granules just prior to anthesis and nectar secretion. These sugars presumably serve as a source of nectar carbohydrate.

WHY STUDY NECTAR? Nearly one-third of all worldwide crops are dependent on animals to achieve efficient pollination. In addition, U.S. pollinator-dependent crops have been estimated to have an annual value of up to $15 billion. Many crop species are largely self-incompatible (not self-fertile) and almost entirely on animal pollinators to achieve full fecundity; poor pollinator visitation has been reported to reduce yields of certain species by up to 50%."

 

Further details on other plants, which are bee-pollinated rather than wind-pollinated:-

Bee-Pollinated Bloom Plant Index.
The 264 bee-pollinated plants in Bee-Pollinated Bloom Plant Index are in addition to the bee-pollinated plants shown as thumbnails in the pages of Bee-Pollinated Bloom Plant Galleries of 12 Flower Colours per month FROM the Circular Colour Wheel below.

Click on the OOO in the Index below to link to those bee-pollinated plants of that flower colour in that month or any of

ACER (Deciduous/Evergreen Shrub/Tree) in March-April
CHAENOMELES SPECIOSA (Herbaceous Perennial) in March-May
CROCUS (Bulb) in September-April
CYDONIA OBLONGA (Deciduous Shrub) in April-June
DAFFODIL (Bulb) in December-May
DAHLIA (Bulb) in June-November
DUTCH HYACINTH (Bulb) in March-April
HEATHERS (Evergreen Shrub) in every month
HEDERA HELIX (Evergreen Climber) in September-November as last major source of nectar and pollen in the year
HELIANTHEMUM (Deciduous Shrub) in June-August - Pollen only collected when the flowers open during sunny weather
HELENIUM (Herbaceous Perennial) in June-October
HELLEBORUS (Herbaceous Perennial) in January-March
HEUCHERA (Evergreen Perennial) in May-September
HIBISCUS (Deciduous Shrub) in August-September
ILEX (Evergreen Tree) in May-June
LAVANDULA (Annual, Herbaceous Perennial or Shrub) in June-July
LAVATERA (Annual, Biennial, or Herbaceous Perennial) in May-August
LEPTOSIPHON (Annual) in June-August
MAGNOLIA GRANDIFLORA (Evergreen Tree) in August-September
MALVA SYLVESTRIS (Biennial) in June-September
MENTHA (Herb) in July-August
NEMOPHILA (Annual) in April-June
NIGELLA (Annual) in July-September
PHILADELPHUS species only with single flowers (Shrub) in June
POLEMONIUM (Herbaceous Perennial) in April-June
PRUNUS CERASIFERA (Deciduous Tree) in February-March
PRUNUS LAUROCERASUS (Evergreen Shrub) in April-June
PYRACANTHA COCCINEA (Evergreen Shrub) in May-June
ROSES (Deciduous Shrub/Climber) in June-October
RUBUS IDAEUS (Raspberry) (Soft Fruit) in May-June
SALVIA SUPERBA (Herbaceous Perennial) in June-September - no bee garden should be without this plant - for those plants.

Enumber indicates Empty Index Page.
Bottom row of Grey is Unusual or Multi-Coloured Flower Colour.

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

OOO E1.

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Blue

OOO

OOO
E11.

OOO
E12.

OOO E13.

OOO
E14.

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Mauve

OOO

OOO

OOO
E24.

OOO
E25.

OOO
E26.

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Purple

OOO
E34.

OOO
E35.

OOO
E36.

OOO
E37

OOO
E38

OOO

OOO
E40

OOO
E41

OOO
E42

OOO

OOO

OOO
Brown

OOO

OOO
E47

OOO
E48

OOO
E49

OOO
E50

OOO
E51

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Cream

OOO
E58

OOO
E59

OOO
E60

OOO
E61

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Green

OOO

OOO
E71

OOO
E72

OOO
E73

OOO
E74

OOO
E75

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
E80

OOO
E81Orange

OOO
E82

OOO
E83

OOO
E84

OOO
E85

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Pink

OOO

OOO
E95

OOO
E96

OOO
E97

OOO
E98

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Red

OOO

OOO
E107

OOO
E108

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
White

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Yellow

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
E133

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Unusual

OOO

OOO
E143

OOO
E144

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bloomsmonth2a

Inner circle of Grey is 12 months of Unusual or Multi-Coloured Flower Colour

Bulb and Perennial Height from Text Border

Brown = 0-12 inches (0-30 cms)

Blue = 12-24 inches (30-60 cms)

Green = 24-36 inches (60-90 cms)

Red = 36-72 inches (90- 180 cms)

Black = 72+ inches (180+ cms)

Shrub Height from Text Border

Brown = 0-12 inches (0-30 cms)

Blue = 12-36 inches (30-90 cms)

Green = 36-60 inches (90- 150 cms)

Red = 60-120 inches (150- 300 cms)

Black = 120+ inches (300+ cms)

Tree Height from Text Border

Brown = 0-240 inches (0- 600 cms)

Blue = 240- 480 inches (600- 1200 cms)

Green = 480+ inches (1200 + cms)

Red = Potted

Black = Use in Small Garden

Climber Height from Text Border

 

Blue = 0-36 inches (0-90 cms)

Green = 36-120 inches (90-300 cms)

Red = 120+ inches (300+ cms)

 

Bamboo, Bedding, Conifer, Fern, Grass, Herb, Rhododendron, Rose, Soft Fruit, Top Fruit, Vegetable and Wildflower Height from Text Border

Blue = 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

Green = 24-72 inches (60- 180 cms)

Red = 72+ inches (180+ cms)

 

Plant Soil Moisture from Text Background

Wet Soil

Moist Soil

 

Dry Soil

"Soils vary enormously in characteristics, but the size of the particles that make up a soil defines its gardening characteristics:

  • Clay: less than 0.002mm
  • Silt: 0.002-0.05mm
  • Sand: 0.05-2mm
  • Stones: bigger than 2mm in size
  • Chalky soils also contain calcium carbonate or lime

The dominating particle size gives soil its characteristics and because the tiny clay particles have a huge surface area for a given volume of clay they dominate the other particles:

Clay soils have over 25 percent clay. Also known as heavy soils, these are potentially fertile as they hold nutrients bound to the clay minerals in the soil. But they also hold a high proportion of water due to the capillary attraction of the tiny spaces between the numerous clay particles. They drain slowly and take longer to warm up in spring than sandy soils. Clay soils are easily compacted when trodden on while wet and they bake hard in summer, often cracking noticeably.

Sandy soils have high proportion of sand and little clay. Also known as light soils, these soils drain quickly after rain or watering, are easy to cultivate and work. They warm up more quickly in spring than clay soils. But on the downside, they dry out quickly and are low in plant nutrients, which are quickly washed out by rain. Sandy soils are often very acidic.

Silt soils, comprised mainly of intermediate sized particles, are fertile, fairly well drained and hold more moisture than sandy soils, but are easily compacted

Loams are comprised of a mixture of clay, sand and silt that avoid the extremes of clay or sandy soils and are fertile, well-drained and easily worked. They can be clay-loam or sandy-loam depending on their predominant composition and cultivation characteristics.

Peat soils are mainly organic matter and are usually very fertile and hold much moisture. They are seldom found in gardens.

Chalky or lime-rich soils may be light or heavy but are largely made up of calcium carbonate and are very alkaline." from Royal Horticultural Society

.

 

The following details about DOUBLE FLOWERS comes from Wikipedia:-

"Double-flowered" describes varieties of flowers with extra petals, often containing flowers within flowers. The double-flowered trait is often noted alongside the scientific name with the abbreviation fl. pl. (flore pleno, a Latin ablative form meaning "with full flower"). The first abnormality to be documented in flowers, double flowers are popular varieties of many commercial flower types, including roses, camellias and carnations. In some double-flowered varieties all of the reproductive organs are converted to petals — as a result, they are sexually sterile and must be propagated through cuttings. Many double-flowered plants have little wildlife value as access to the nectaries is typically blocked by the mutation.

 

There is further photographic, diagramatic and text about Double Flowers from an education department - dept.ca.uky.edu - in the University of Kentucky in America.

 

"Meet the plant hunter obsessed with double-flowering blooms" - an article from The Telegraph.

 

"From elaborate public garden designs and street planters to the smallest front garden, bedding plants provide a temporary decorative seasonal display for beds, borders, containers and hanging baskets. Bedding can be grown from seed, bought as young seedlings (plug plants) or purchased as pot-grown specimens, often in multi-packs and cellular trays, ready for planting." from Bedding plants and displays page by the Royal Horticultural Society.

Some of the Mail-order suppliers of bedding plants:-

  • Suttons Seeds with potted plants and plug plants for the Winter, Spring and Summer in the UK
  • Unwins with plug plants for the Spring and Summer in the UK
  • Van Meuwen with bulbs and plug plants for annual bedding plants in the UK

 

BEDDING PLANT GALLERY PAGES

Site Map of pages with content (o)

Introduction

FOLIAGE COLOUR
(o)Black
.Blue
(o)Brown
(o)Bronze
(o)Green
.Grey
(o)Purple
(o)Red
.Silver
(o)Variegated
.White
.Yellow

SEED COLOUR
Seed with EXTRA Plant INDEX of Extra Plants in Extra Pages of Bloom and Blooms Calendar Galleries.

BEDS WITH PICTURES
Garden

 


Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

BEDDING PLANT GALLERY PAGES

Single Flowers provide honeybees with pollen to collect for the protein in a bee's diet, whereas double flowers do not provide this pollen. Use bedding attractive to Wildlife including Bees, Butterflies and Moths.

Flower Colour

Bicolour

Blue

Green

Orange

Other Colours

Pink

Purple

Red

White

White / Bicolour

Yellow

 

 

 

Flower Simple Shape

3 Petals

4 Petals

5 Petals

6 Petals

Stars

Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Globes, Goblets and Chalices

irisflotpseudacorus1a

aethionemacfloarmenumfoord1a1

anemonecflo1hybridafoord1a1

 

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a1a

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1a1a1a1a

paeoniamlokosewitschiiflot1a1a

Trumpets and Funnels

Bells, Thimbles and Urns

 

Single Flower provides pollen for bees

 

2 Petals

 

acantholinumcflop99glumaceumfoord

digitalismertonensiscflorvroger1a1

 

anagalisflotcskylover1a1

 

cupheacflollaveakavanagh1a

 

Flower Elabor-ated Shape

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Hats, Hoods and Helmets

Standards, Wings and Keels

Discs and Florets

Pin-cushions and Tufts

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

prunellaflotgrandiflora1a

aquilegiacfloformosafoord1a1

acanthusspinosuscflocoblands1a1

lathyrusflotvernus1a1

brachyscomecflorigidulakevock1a1

echinaceacflo1purpurealustrehybridsgarnonswilliams1a1

argyranthemumflotcmadeiracrestedyellow1a1

Bedding Plant Use

Bedding Out

Filling In

Screen-ing

Pots and Troughs

Window Boxes

Hanging Baskets

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Winter Bedding

Foliage instead of Flower


Bedding Photos for use in Public Domain 1

 

Bedding Plant Height from Text Border Gallery

Blue =
0-24 inches
(0-60 cms)

Green =
24-72 inches
(60-180 cms) or
Green =
24-72 inches
(60-180 cms)

Red =
72+ inches
(180+ cms)
 

Bedding Plant Soil Moisture from Text Background

 

Wet Soil

Moist Soil

Dry Soil

Click on thumbnail to change this Comparison Page to the Plant Description Page of the Bedding Plant named in the Text box below that photo.


The Comments Row of that Bedding Plant Description Page details where that Bedding Plant is available from.

 

 

Bedding Plant INDEX .

See also the Bedding Plant INDEX of the Bedding in the Mixed Borders of the Royal Horticultural Society Garden at Wisley in 2013. This gallery also compares the Flower Colours, Foliage Colours, Bedding Use and Flower Shape of the bedding plants in those Mixed Borders.

Bedding Plant Name.

/
Link to Genus Details
 

Flower Colour

Bicolour.
Blue.
Orange.
Other Colours of Flowers.
Pink.
Purple.
Red.
White.
White/Colour Bicolour Flowers.
Yellow.

Flowering Months

Foliage Colour

Black.
Brown.
Bronze.
Green.
Purple.
Red.
Varie-gated.
 

Height x Spread in inches (cms)
(1 inch = 2.5 cms,
12 inches = 1 foot
12 inches = 30 cms,
24 inches = 2 feet,
3 feet = 1 yard,
40 inches = 100 cms)

Bedding Use

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets.
 

Number of Petals

2 Petals.
3 Petals.
4 Petals.
5 Petals
.
6 Petals.
Stars.
 

Simple Flower Shape

Bowls, Cups and Saucers.
Globes, Goblets and Chalices.
Trumpets and Funnels.
Bells, Thimbles and Urns.
Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

Elaborat-ed Flower Shape

Tubes, Lips and Lobes.
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets.
Discs and Florets.
Pin-cushions and Tufts.
Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

A

Agastache 'Bolero'

/Agastache

Agastachecflobolerogarnonswilliams1

July, August, September

Agastachecfolbolerogarnonswilliams

14 x 14 (35 x 35)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Agastache 'Rose Mint'

Agastachecflorosemintgarnonswilliams1

July, August, September, October

Agastachecfolrosemintgarnonswilliams

24 x 36 (60 x 90)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Anagalis monellii 'Skylover Blue'

/Anagalis

anagalisflotcskylover

June, July, August

anagalisfoltcskylover

12 x 12
(30 x 30)

Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets.

5 Petals

Single Flower provides pollen for bees

 

Antirrhinum 'Bronze Dragon'

/Antir-
rhinum

antirrhinumcflobronzedragongarnonswilliams1

June,
July, August, September

antirrhinumcfolbronzedragongarnonswilliams

12 x 12 (30 x 30)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets.

6 Petals

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Antirrhinum 'Lavender Ribbon'

antirrhinumcflolavenderribbonkavanagh1

June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

antirrhinumcfollavenderribbongarnonswilliams

18 x 15 (45 x 38)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

5 Petals

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Argyran-hemum 'Chelsea Girl'

/Argyran-hemum

argyranthemumcflogracilechelseagirlkavanagh1a1

April, May, June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

argyranthemumcfolgracilechelseagirlkavanagh

24 x 24 (60 x 60)

Filling In
Pots and Troughs

Stars

 

Discs and Florets

Argyran-themum frutescens 'Madeira Camara'

argyranthemumfloscmadeiracamara2a1a

June, July, August

Green

18 x 18
(45 x 45)

Bedding Out
Filling In
Pots and Troughs

Stars

 

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

Argyra-nthemum 'Madeira Cherry Red'

argyranthemumsflotcmadeiracherryred1

June, July, August

Green

18 x 18
(45 x 45)

Bedding Out
Filling In
Pots and Troughs

Stars

 

Discs and Florets.

Argyran-themum frutescens 'Madeira Machio'

argyranthemumfloscmadeiramachio1a1

June, July, August

Green

18 x 18
(45 x 45)

Bedding Out
Filling In
Pots and Troughs

Stars

 

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

Argyran-themum frutescens 'Madeira Santana'

argyranthemumfloscmadeirasantana1a1

June, July, August

Green

18 x 18
(45 x 45)

Bedding Out
Filling In
Pots and Troughs

Stars

 

Discs and Florets.

Argyran-themum frutescens 'Madeira Monte'

argyranthemumfloscmadeiramonte1a1

June, July, August

Green

18 x 18
(45 x 45)

Bedding Out
Filling In
Pots and Troughs

Stars

 

Discs and Florets.

Argyran-themum frutescens 'Madeira Crested Merlot'

argyranthemumflotcmadeiracrestedmerlot

June, July, August

Green

18 x 18
(45 x 45)

Bedding Out
Filling In
Pots and Troughs

Stars

 

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

Argyran-themum frutescens 'Madeira Crested Pink'

argyranthemumsflotcmadeiracrestedpink

June, July, August

Green

18 x 18
(45 x 45)

Bedding Out
Filling In
Pots and Troughs

Stars

 

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

Argyran-themum frutescens 'Madeira Crested Yellow'

argyranthemumsflotcmadeiracrestedyellow

June, July, August

Green

18 x 18
(45 x 45)

Bedding Out
Filling In
Pots and Troughs

Stars

 

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

Argyran-themum frutescens 'Madeira Double White'

argyranthemumfloscmadeiradoublewhite

June, July, August

Green

18 x 18
(45 x 45)

Bedding Out
Filling In
Pots and Troughs

Stars

 

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

Argyran-themum frutescens Light Pink'

argyranthemumsflotcmadeiralightpink

June, July, August

Green

18 x 18
(45 x 45)

Bedding Out
Filling In
Pots and Troughs

Stars

 

Discs and Florets.

Argyrant-hemum 'Petite Pink'

argyranthemumcflopetitepinkgirlgarnonswilliams1a1

April, May, June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

argyranthemumcfolpetitepinkgarnonswilliams

20 x 20 (50 x 50)

Bedding Out
Filling In
Pots and Troughs
Window Boxes

Stars

 

Discs and Florets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B

Bacopa 'Abunda Blue' with 'Abunda White', 'Abunda Colossal Lavender' and 'Abunda Colossal White'

/Bacopa

bacopaflocabundablue5petal1

June, July, August, September

Dark Green

5.5 x 16
(14 x 40)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets.

5 Petals

Single Flower provides pollen for bees

 

Bidens ferulifolia 'Golden Eye'

/Bidens

bidenscfloferulifoliagoldeneyegarnonswilliams1

July, August, Septem-ber, October

bidenscfolferulifoliagoldeneyegarnonswilliams

7 x 18 (18 x 45)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets.

5 Petals

Single Flower provides pollen for bees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C

Canna 'Phasion'

/Canna

cannacflophasiongarnonswilliams1

June, July, August, Septem-ber

cannacfolphasiongarnonswilliams

64 x 20 (160 x 50)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

5 Petals

Trumpets and Funnels.

 

Coleus
'Kong Rose
'

/Coleus

---

---

coleusfoltckongrose1a

coleusfortcwithhandkongrose1a

18 x 18
(45 x 45)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.

Used for its foliage.

---

---

---

Coleus
'Kong Scarlet
'

---

---

coleusfoltckongscarlet1

coleussfoltckongscarlet1a

18 x 20
(45 x 50)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.

Used for its foliage.

---

---

---

Cosmos bipinnatus 'Purity'

/Cosmos

cosmoscflobipinnatuspuritygarnonswilliams1

June, July, August, Septem-ber, October, Novem-ber

cosmoscfolbipinnatuspuritygarnonswilliams

40 x 16 (100 x 40)

Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

Tubes, Lips and Lobes.

Cosmos bipinnatus 'Rubenza'

cosmoscflobipinnatusrubenzakavanagh1

June, July, August, Septem-ber

cosmoscfolbipinnatusrubenzakavanagh

30 x 16
(75 x 40)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

Tubes, Lips and Lobes.

Cosmos x dahlia 'Mexican Black'

/Cosmos x dahlia 'Mexican Black'

cosmoscfloxdahliamexicanblackgarnonswilliams1

July, August, Septem-ber, October, Novem-ber

cosmoscfolxdahliamexicanblackgarnonswilliams

36 x 24
(90 x 60)

Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

Bowls, Cups and Saucers.

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

 

Cosmos sulphureus (Dwarf Ladybird)

cosmoscflosulphureusgarnonswilliams1

June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

cosmoscfolsulphureusgarnonswilliams

24-72 x 12 -36
(60-180 x 30-90)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

 

Discs and Florets

Cuphea llavea

/Cuphea

cupheacflollaveakavanagh2

May, June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

cupheacfolllaveagarnonswilliams

30 x 36 (75 x 90)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs. Hanging Baskets.

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

D

Dahlia 'Abacus Sol'

/Dahlia

dahliacfloabacussolgarnonswilliams1a

July, August, Septem-ber, October

dahliacfolabacussolgarnonswilliams

36 x 12 (90 x 30)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

Discs and Florets

Dahlia
'Arabian Night
'

There are photos and text description on this Dahlia and more than 44 other Dahlias in the Dahlia Gallery of this website.

dahliacflo1aarabiannightgarnonswilliams1

July, August, Septem-ber, October, November

dahliacfol1arabiannightgarnonswilliams

20 x 48
(50 x 120)

Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

 

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

Dahlia
'Blue Wish'

dahliacflobluewishgarnonswilliams1

June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

dahliacfolbluewishgarnonswilliams1

48 x 24
(120 x 60)

Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

 

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

Dahlia
'Blyton Royal Velvet'

dahliacflo1blytonroyalvelvetgarnonswilliams1

June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

dahliacfolblytonroyalvelvetgarnonswilliams1

48 x 24
(120 x 60)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

 

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

Dahlia
'David Howard'

dahliacflodavidhowardgarnonswilliams1a

July, August, Septem-ber, October

dahliacfoldavidhowardgarnonswilliams1

36 x 30 (90 x 75)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

 

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

Dahlia 'Fascination'

dahliacflofascinationgarnonswilliams1

May, June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

dahliacfolfascinationgarnonswilliams1

30 x 20
(75 x 50)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

 

Discs and Florets.

Dahlia 'Jessica'

dahliacflojessicagarnonswilliams1

June to First Frost

dahliacfoljessicagarnonswilliams1

56 x 20
(140 x 50)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

 

Pin-cushions and Tufts

Dahlia
'Josie Gott'

dahliacflojosiegottgarnonswilliams1

July, August, September

dahliacfoljosiegottgarnonswilliams1

48 x 24
(120 x 60)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

 

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

Dahlia 'Knockout'

dahliacfloknockoutgarnonswilliams1

July, August, Septem-ber, October

dahliacfolknockoutgarnonswilliams1

27 x 24 (73 x 60)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

 

Dahlia
'Moonfire'

dahliacflo1moonfiregarnonswilliams1

June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

dahliacfolmoonfiregarnonswilliams1

24 x 20
(60 x 50)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.

Stars

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

 

Dahlia
'Tessbrooke Audrey'

dahliacfloteesbrookeaudreygarnonswilliams1

July, August, Septem-ber, October

dahliacfolteesbrookeaudreygarnonswilliams1

48 x 24
(120 x 60)

Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

Discs and Florets.

Dahlia 'Tiptoe'

dahliacflotiptoegarnonswilliams1

July, August, Septem-ber, October

dahliacfoltiptoegarnonswilliams1

40 x 12
(100 x 30)

Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

 

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

Dahlia
'Twyning's After Eight'

dahliacflotwiningsaftereightgarnonswilliams1

July, August, Septem-ber

dahliacfol1twiningsaftereightgarnonswilliams1

30 x 18 (75 x 45)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

Discs and Florets.

Dianthus barbatus 'Kaleid-oscope Mixed'

/Sweet Williams

British National Carnation Society

dianthuscflo1barbatuskaleidoscopekavanagh1

May, June, July, August, Septem-ber

dianthuscfolbarbatuskaleidoscopekavanagh1

24 x 12
(60 x 30)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets.

5 Petals

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

Discs and Florets.

Dianthus
'Kiwi Class Act'

/The Great North Carnation Society

dianthusflosckiwiclassact1

June, July, August, September, October

Steel-Grey

6 x 6
(15 x 15)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets.

Stars

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

Dianthus 'Kiwi Double North'

/North American Dianthus Society

dianthussflotckiwidoublenorth

June, July, August, September, October

Steel-Grey

6 x 6
(15 x 15)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets.

Stars

 

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

Dianthus 'Kiwi Raspberry Ripple'

/Under-planting Companion for Roses in Australia

dianthussflotckiwiraspberryripple1

June, July, August, September, October

Steel-Grey

6 x 6
(15 x 15)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets.

Stars

 

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

Diascia personata

/Diascia

diasciacflopersonatakavanagh1

May, June, July, August, Septem-ber, October, November

diasciacfolpersonatakavanagh1

36 x 18
(90 x 45)

Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

5 Petals

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets.

Diascia 'Whisper Dark Coral'

diasciaflotcwhisperdarkcoral1

June, July, August, September, October

Mid Green

11 x 12
(27 x 30)

Screening.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets.

5 Petals

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets.

Diascia 'Whisper Tangerine'

diasciaflotcwhispertangerine

June, July, August, September, October

Mid Green

11 x 12
(27 x 30)

Screening.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets.

5 Petals

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

E

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F

Fuchsia
'Alice Hoffman
'

/Fuchsia

Pink and White

fuchsiaflocalicehoffman

July, August, September, October

Bronze-Green

fuchsiafoltcalicehoffman

25 x 18
(63 x 45)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.

Stars

Bells, Thimbles and Urns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G

Geranium 'Blue Star'

/Geranium

geraniumcflowlassovianumbluestargarnonswilliams1

June, July, August, September

geraniumcfolwlassovianumbluestargarnonswilliams

16 x 28 (40 x 70)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets.

5 Petals

Globes, Goblets and Chalices

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

H

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L

Lepechinia hastata

/Lepechinia

lepechiniacflohastatagarnonswilliams1

August, Septemb-er, October, November

lepechiniacfolhastatagarnonswilliams1

48 x 36 (120 x 90)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

4 Petals

Trumpets and Funnels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

N

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O

Osteosp-ermum 'Sunny Cecil'
(Sunny Series)

See other varieties from the Sunny Series

osteopspermumcflo1sunnycecilgarnonswilliams1

May, June, July, August

osteospermumcfolsunnycecilgarnonswilliams1

10 x 10
(25 x 25)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets.

Stars

 

Discs and Florets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P

Pelargonium 'Mystery'

/Pelargonium

pelargoniumcflo1mysterygarnonswilliams1

June, July, August, Septem-ber, October, November

pelargoniumcfolmysterygarnonswilliams1

16 x 12 (40 x 30)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets, House-plant

6 Petals

Single Flower provides pollen for bees.

 

Penstemon 'Countess of Dalkeith'

also called Penstemon
'Purple and White'

penstemoncflocountessofdalkeithgarnonswilliams1

June, July, August, Septem-ber, October, November

penstemoncfolcountessofdalkeithgarnonswilliams1

30 x 18
(75 x 45)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

5 Petals

Trumpets and Funnels.

 

Penstemon Fujiyama 'Yayama'

(Plant Breeders Rights apply = 'Yayama')

penstemoncflofukiyamayayamakavanagh1

May, June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

penstemoncfolfukiyamayayamakavanagh1

24 x 18
(60 x 45)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

5 Petals

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Penstemon 'George Home'

/Penstemon

penstemoncflogeorgehomegarnonswilliams1a

May, June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

penstemoncfolgeorgehomegarnonswilliams1a

30 x 18 (75 x 45)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

5 Petals

Trumpets and Funnels.

 

Penstemon 'Pennington Gem'

penstemoncflopenningtongemgarnonswilliams1

May, June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

penstemoncfolpenningtongemgarnonswilliams1

40 x 20
(100 x 50)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

5 Petals

Trumpets and Funnels.

 

Penstemon
'Port Wine'

penstemoncfloportwinegarnonswilliams

May, June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

penstemoncfolportwinegarnonswilliams

28 x 20 (70 x 50)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.

5 Petals

Trumpets and Funnels.

 

Penstemon 'Sour Grapes'

penstemoncflosourgrapesgarnonswilliams

May, June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

penstemonfolsourgrapesgarnonswilliams

24 x 18
(60 x 45)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets

5 Petals

Trumpets and Funnels.

 

Penstemon Vesuvius Yasius'
(Volcano Series)

penstemoncflovesuviusyasiusgarnonswilliams

May, June, July, August, Septem-ber, October

penstemoncfolvesuviusyasiusgarnonswilliams

24 x 14
(60 x 35)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets

5 Petals

Trumpets and Funnels.

 

Penstemon 'White Bedder'

penstemoncflowhitebedderkavanagh

July, August, Septem-ber, October

penstemoncfolwhitebedderkavanagh

24 x 18
(60 x 45)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.

5 Petals

Trumpets and Funnels.

 

Pyrethrum roseum
'Duro'

/Pyrethrum

pyrethrumcflo1roseumdurogarnonswilliams1

July, August

pyrethrumcfolsumroseumdurogarnonswilliams1

30 x 18
(75 x 45)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

 

Discs and Florets.

Phygelius 'Funfare Wine'

/Phygelius

Magenta

phygeliusfloc1funfarewine

May, June, July, August, September, October

Light Green

18 x 18
(45 X 45)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets

5 Petals

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Q

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R

Rudbeckia hirta
'Cherry Brandy'

/Rudbeckia

rudbeckiacflohirtacherrybrandygarnonswilliams1

July, August, September, October

rudbeckiacfolhirtacherrybrandygarnonswilliams1

24 x 16
(60 x 40)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

Stars

 

Discs and Florets.

S

Salvia
atrocyanea

/Salvia

salviacfloatrocyaneagarnonswilliams1

July, August, September, October

salviacfolatrocyaneagarnonswilliams1

80 x 80 (200 x 200)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia involucrata 'Boutin'

salviacfloinvolucrataboutingarnonswilliams1

July, August, Septem-ber, October, November

salviacfolinvolucrataboutingarnonswilliams1

60 x 40
(150 x 40)

Filling In.
Screening.

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia 'Diablo'

/Robin's Salvias website is made from 100% recycled pixels

salviacflo1blepharophylladiablogarnonswilliams1

June, July, August, September, October

salviacfolblepharophylladiablogarnonswilliams1

24 x 24
(60 x 60)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia elegans 'Honey Melon'

salviacfloeleganshoneymelongarnonswilliams1

July, August, September, October

salviacfoleleganshoneymelongarnonswilliams1

24 x 24
(60 x 60)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia coccinea 'Summer Jewel Pink'

salviacfloscoccineasummerjewelpinkgarnonswilliams1

June, July, August, September, October

salviacfolcoccineasummerjewelpinkgarnonswilliams1

18 x 16 (45 x 40)

Bedding Out.
Filling In
.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia coccinea 'Summer Jewel Red'

salviacflosummerjewelredgarnonswilliams

June, July, August, September, October

salviacfolsummerjewelredgarnonswilliams

18 x 12 (45 x 30)

Bedding Out.
Filling In
.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia coccinea 'Forest Fire'

salviacflococcineaforestfiregarnonswilliams

July, August, September, October

salviacfolcoccineaforestfiregarnonswilliams

24 x 24
(60 x 60)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Hanging Baskets

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia greggii 'Purple Queen'

salviacflopurplequeengarnonswilliams

June, July, August, September, October

salviacfolpurplequeengarnonswilliams

18 x 12
(45 x 30)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia guaranitica 'Black and Blue'

salviacfloguaranticablackandbluegarnonswilliams1

July, August, September, October

salviafoltcblackandblue1a1a1a

100 x 36
(250 x 90)

Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia x jamensis
'Hot Lips'

(Salvia microphylla 'Hot Lips')

salviacflo1xjamensishotlipsgarnonswilliams

July, August, September, October

salviacfolxjamensishotlipsgarnonswilliams

30 x 36
(75 x 90)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia
involucrata 'Joan'

salviacfloinvolucratajoankavanagh

June, July, August, September, October

salviacfolinvolucratajoankavanagh

60 x 60 (150 x 150)

Filling In.
Screening.

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia microphylla var. microphylla 'Newby Hall'

salviacflo1microphyllanewbyhallgarnonswilliams

June, July, August, September, October, Novem-ber, December

salviacfolmicrophyllanewbyhallgarnonswilliams

56 x 24 (140 x 60)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Screening.
 

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia leucantha 'Midnight'

salviacflos1leucanthamidnightgarnonswilliams

May, June, July, August, September, October, Novem-ber

salviacfolleucanthamidnightgarnonswilliams

48 x 48
(120 x 120)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia patens

salviacflo1patenskavanagh

July, August, September

salviacfolpatenskavanagh

24 x 12
(60 x 30)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia
'Phyllis Fancy
'

salviacflophyllisfancygarnonswilliams

September, October, Novem-ber

salviacfolphyllisfancygarnonswilliams

84 x 84
(210 x 210)

Filling In.
Screening.

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia jamensis
'Sierra San Antonio'

salviacflosierrasanantoniogarnonswilliams

June, July, August, September, October

salviacfolsierrasanantoniogarnonswilliams

30 x 36 (75 x 90)

Bedding Out.
Filling In
.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia
'Silke's Dream'

salviacflosilkesdreamgarnonswilliams

July, August, September, October, Novem-ber

salviacfolsilkesdreamgarnonswilliams

36 x 36
(90 x 90)

Bedding Out.
Filling In.
Screening.
Pots and Troughs.

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Salvia splendens 'Salsa Purple'

salviacflosplendenssalsapurplegarnonswilliams

May, June, July, August, September

salviacfolsplendenssalsapurplegarnonswilliams

14 x 12
(35 x 30)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets

2 Petals.

 

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T

Tanacetum coccineum 'Duro'

/Tanacetum (Tansy)

tanacetumcflo1coccineumdurogarnonswilliams1

June, July, August, September

tanacetumcfol1coccineumdurogarnonswilliams1

24 x 18
(60 x 45)

Bedding Out.
Filling In
.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.

Stars

 

Discs and Florets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

V

Verbena 'Homestead Purple'

/Verbena

verbenacflohomesteadpurplegarnonswilliams1

June, July, August, September, October

verbenafolhomesteadpurplegarnonswilliams1

12 x 16
(30 x 40)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets

5 Petals

Single Flower provides pollen for bees

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

Verbena
'La France'

verbenacflos1lafrancekavanagh1

June, July, August, September

verbenacfol1lafrancekavanagh1

18 x 24
(45 x 60)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets

5 Petals

Single Flower provides pollen for bees

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

Verbena Seabrook's Lavender ('Sealav')

verbenacflos1seabrookslavendersealavgarnonswilliams1

May, June, July, August, September

verbenacfolseabrookslavendersealavgarnonswilliams1

18 x 20
(45 x 50)

Filling In.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets

5 Petals

Single Flower provides pollen for bees

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

Verbena 'Claret'

verbenacflo1claretgarnonswilliams

June, July, August, September

verbenacfolclaretgarnonswilliams

8 x 18 (20 x 45)

Bedding Out.
Filling In
.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets

5 Petals

Single Flower provides pollen for bees

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

Verbena
x hybrida
'St George'

verbenacflosxhybridasaintgeorgegarnonswilliams

June, July, August, September

verbenacfolxhybridasaintgeorgegarnonswilliams

10 x 16 (25 x 40)

Bedding Out.
Filling In
.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets

5 Petals

Single Flower provides pollen for bees

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons.

W

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Y

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Z

Zinnia marylandica 'Zahara Starlight Rose'

/Zinnia

zinniacflozaharastarlightrosegarnonswilliams1

July, August, September, October

zinniacfolzaharastarlightrosegarnonswilliams1

18 x 18
(45 x 45)

Bedding Out.
Filling In
.
Pots and Troughs.
Window Boxes.
Hanging Baskets

Stars

 

Discs and Florets

 

 

The following details about BEDDING comes from Wikipedia:-
"Bedding, in horticulture, refers to the temporary planting of fast-growing plants into flower beds to create colourful, temporary, seasonal displays, during spring, summer or winter. Plants used for bedding are generally annuals, biennials or tender perennials; succulents are gaining in popularity.

Some bedding plants are also referred to as "patio plants" because they are widely used in pots and other containers positioned on patios, terraces, decking and other areas around houses. Larger tender "conservatory plants" may also be moved out from greenhouses or conservatories and planted out in borders (or stood in their pots in sheltered positions) for the warmer months, then returned to shelter for the winter.

The modern bedding plant industry breeds and produces plants with a neat, dwarf habit, which flower uniformly and reliably. They are bred primarily for use in large-scale bedding schemes where uniformity and predictability is of paramount importance, but this is often achieved by losing the plants' individual character, and has been criticised by such notable plantsmen as the late Christopher Lloyd, who championed an informal style of bedding.

 

 

Bedding plants
There exists a huge range of plants specifically grown to produce a period of flower colour throughout the spring and summer, and (usually) discarded after flowering. They may conveniently be divided into four groups:-

  • Hardy annuals sown directly into the ground early in the season (poppy, stock, sunflower, clarkia, godetia, eschscholzia, nigella, dianthus)
  • Tender annual or perennial plants treated as half-hardy annuals - sown under glass in late winter in heat, or purchased as young plants, and hardened-off outdoors when all danger of frost has passed (begonia, lobelia, petunia, argyranthemum, chrysanthemum, pelargonium, nicotiana, cosmos, fuchsia)
  • Hardy biennial plants, or perennials treated as biennial, sown in one year to flower the next, and discarded after flowering (antirrhinum, polyanthus, wallflower, daisy, foxglove, some dianthus, some poppies, campanula, delphinium, aubrieta, aquilegia, cornflower, pansies)
  • Corms, rhizomes, bulbs and tubers, planted each year and lifted after the plant has died down and stored in winter, or discarded (tulip, narcissus, hyacinth, gladiolus, dahlia, canna)

Types of bedding
Formal bedding, as seen in parks and large gardens, where whole flower beds are replanted two or three times a year, is a costly and labour-intensive process. Towns and cities are encouraged to produce impressive displays by campaigns such as "Britain in Bloom".

Spring bedding
Plants used for spring bedding are often biennials (sown one year to flower the next), or hardy, but short-lived, perennials. Spring-flowering bulbs such as tulips are often used, typically with forget-me-nots, wallflowers, winter pansies and polyanthus.

Summer bedding
Plants used for summer bedding are generally annuals or tender perennials. They become available (often as what are referred to as "plug plants") in nurseries and garden centres during spring, to be gradually "hardened off" (acclimatised to outdoor conditions) by the purchaser and finally planted out around the time that the last frosts are expected. Experienced gardeners keep an eye on the weather forecasts at that time of year and are on standby to protect their bedding displays overnight with horticultural fleece (or the older alternatives of net curtains or newspaper) if frost threatens.

Carpet bedding
Carpet bedding employs two or more contrasting plant cultivars with a neat, dwarf habit and distinct colouring (of flower or foliage) to create geometric displays. It is often used to form such things as lettering, logos or trademarks, coats of arms, or floral clocks. Suitable plants are rosette-forming succulents such as Echeveria or fairly slow-growing or mat-forming foliage plants, such as coloured-leaved Alternanthera cultivars, which are tolerant of clipping; such plants may also be used in three-dimensional sculptural forms or pseudo-topiary.

Winter bedding
Planted in autumn to give a display until early spring, the plants used for winter bedding are mainly hardy perennials. As it has to be planted at the same time of year as spring bedding does, winter bedding tends to be less commonly seen, except in containers such as windowboxes. Some are short-lived and will be discarded after their first display; others may be used as a source of cuttings for the next year. Winter-hardy ornamental vegetables such as cultivars of kale and cabbage with coloured or variegated foliage are increasingly common. Primula cultivars (polyanthus and primroses) are commonly used, as are winter-flowering heathers and Viola × wittrockiana, winter pansies. Variegated evergreens such as cultivars of Vinca minor (lesser periwinkle), Euonymus fortunei and Hedera helix (ivies) are also popular."

 

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

Site design and content copyright ©March 2008. Page structure amended December 2012. Added RHS Mixed Border Bedding Plants February-March 2014. Feet changed to inches (cms) July 2015. Bedding Index updated December 2015. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

 

Topic
Plants detailed in this website by
Botanical Name

A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, Q, R, S, T, U,
V, W, X, Y, Z ,
Bulb
A1
, 2, 3, B, C1, 2,
D, E, F, G, Glad,
H, I, J, K, L1, 2,
M, N, O, P, Q, R,
S, T, U, V, W, XYZ ,
Evergreen Perennial
A
, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, Q, R, S, T, U,
V, W, X, Y, Z ,
Herbaceous Perennial
A1
, 2, B, C, D, E, F,
G, H, I, J, K, L, M,
N, O, P1, 2, Q, R,
S, T, U, V, W, XYZ,
Diascia Photo Album,
UK Peony Index

Wildflower
Botanical Names,
Common Names ,

will be
compared in:- Flower colour/month
Evergreen Perennial
,
F
lower shape Wildflower Flower Shape and
Plant use
Evergreen Perennial Flower Shape,
Bee plants for hay-fever sufferers

Bee-Pollinated Index
Butterfly
Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis, Butterfly Usage
of Plants.
Chalk
A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, QR, S, T, UV,
WXYZ
Companion Planting
A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, Q, R , S, T,
U ,V, W, X, Y, Z,
Pest Control using Plants
Fern Fern
1000 Ground Cover A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, Q, R, S, T, U,
V, W, XYZ ,
Rock Garden and Alpine Flowers
A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M,
NO, PQ, R, S, T,
UVWXYZ

Rose Rose Use

These 5 have Page links in rows below
Bulbs from the Infill Galleries (next row), Camera Photos,
Plant Colour Wheel Uses,
Sense of Fragrance, Wild Flower


Case Studies
...Drive Foundations
Ryegrass and turf kills plants within Roadstone and in Topsoil due to it starving and dehydrating them.
CEDAdrive creates stable drive surface and drains rain into your ground, rather than onto the public road.
8 problems caused by building house on clay or with house-wall attached to clay.
Pre-building work on polluted soil.

Companion Planting
to provide a Companion Plant to aid your selected plant or deter its pests

Garden
Construction

with ground drains

Garden Design
...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed
Borders

......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
......Camera photos of Plant supports
Garden
Maintenance

Glossary with a tomato teaching cauliflowers
Home
Library of over 1000 books
Offbeat Glossary with DuLally Bird in its flower clock.

Plants
...in Chalk
(Alkaline) Soil
......A-F1, A-F2,
......A-F3, G-L, M-R,
......M-R Roses, S-Z
...in Heavy
Clay Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...in Lime-Free
(Acid) Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...in Light
Sand Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z.
...Poisonous Plants.
...Extra Plant Pages
with its 6 Plant Selection Levels

Soil
...
Interaction between 2 Quartz Sand Grains to make soil
...
How roots of plants are in control in the soil
...
Without replacing Soil Nutrients, the soil will break up to only clay, sand or silt
...
Subsidence caused by water in Clay
...
Use water ring for trees/shrubs for first 2 years.

Tool Shed with 3 kneeling pads
Useful Data with benefits of Seaweed

Topic -
Plant Photo Galleries
If the plant type below has flowers, then the first gallery will include the flower thumbnail in each month of 1 of 6 colour comparison pages of each plant in its subsidiary galleries, as a low-level Plant Selection Process

Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape

Bulb
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus with its 40 Flower Colours
......European A-E
......European F-M
......European N-Z
......European Non-classified
......American A,
B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M,
N, O, P, Q, R, S,
T, U, V, W, XYZ
......American Non-classified
......Australia - empty
......India
......Lithuania
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
...Each of the above ...Bulb Galleries has its own set of Flower Colour Pages
...Flower Shape
...Bulb Form

...Bulb Use

...Bulb in Soil


Further details on bulbs from the Infill Galleries:-
Hardy Bulbs
...Aconitum
...Allium
...Alstroemeria
...Anemone

...Amaryllis
...Anthericum
...Antholyzas
...Apios
...Arisaema
...Arum
...Asphodeline

...Asphodelus
...Belamcanda
...Bloomeria
...Brodiaea
...Bulbocodium

...Calochorti
...Cyclobothrias
...Camassia
...Colchicum
...Convallaria 
...Forcing Lily of the Valley
...Corydalis
...Crinum
...Crosmia
...Montbretia
...Crocus

...Cyclamen
...Dicentra
...Dierama
...Eranthis
...Eremurus
...Erythrnium
...Eucomis

...Fritillaria
...Funkia
...Galanthus
...Galtonia
...Gladiolus
...Hemerocallis

...Hyacinth
...Hyacinths in Pots
...Scilla
...Puschkinia
...Chionodoxa
...Chionoscilla
...Muscari

...Iris
...Kniphofia
...Lapeyrousia
...Leucojum

...Lilium
...Lilium in Pots
...Malvastrum
...Merendera
...Milla
...Narcissus
...Narcissi in Pots

...Ornithogalum
...Oxalis
...Paeonia
...Ranunculus
...Romulea
...Sanguinaria
...Sternbergia
...Schizostylis
...Tecophilaea
...Trillium

...Tulip
...Zephyranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs
...Acidanthera
...Albuca
...Alstroemeri
...Andro-stephium
...Bassers
...Boussing-aultias
...Bravoas
...Cypellas
...Dahlias
...Galaxis,
...Geissorhizas
...Hesperanthas

...Gladioli
...Ixias
...Sparaxises
...Babianas
...Morphixias
...Tritonias

...Ixiolirions
...Moraeas
...Ornithogalums
...Oxalises
...Phaedra-nassas
...Pancratiums
...Tigridias
...Zephyranthes
...Cooperias

Uses of Bulbs:-
...for Bedding
...in Windowboxes
...in Border
...naturalized in Grass
...in Bulb Frame
...in Woodland Garden
...in Rock Garden
...in Bowls
...in Alpine House
...Bulbs in Green-house or Stove:-
...Achimenes
...Alocasias
...Amorpho-phalluses
...Arisaemas
...Arums
...Begonias
...Bomareas
...Caladiums

...Clivias
...Colocasias
...Crinums
...Cyclamens
...Cyrtanthuses
...Eucharises
...Urceocharis
...Eurycles

...Freesias
...Gloxinias
...Haemanthus
...Hippeastrums

...Lachenalias
...Nerines
...Lycorises
...Pencratiums
...Hymenocallises
...Richardias
...Sprekelias
...Tuberoses
...Vallotas
...Watsonias
...Zephyranthes

...Plant Bedding in
......Spring

......Summer
...Bulb houseplants flowering during:-
......January
......February
......March
......April
......May
......June
......July
......August
......September
......October
......November
......December
...Bulbs and other types of plant flowering during:-
......Dec-Jan
......Feb-Mar
......Apr-May
......Jun-Aug
......Sep-Oct
......Nov-Dec
...Selection of the smaller and choicer plants for the Smallest of Gardens with plant flowering during the same 6 periods as in the previous selection

Climber in
3 Sector Vertical Plant System
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evergreen
...Heather Shrub
...Heather Index
......Andromeda
......Bruckenthalia
......Calluna
......Daboecia
......Erica: Carnea
......Erica: Cinerea
......Erica: Others
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evergreen
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous
Perennial

...P -Herbaceous
...Peony
...Flower Shape
...RHS Wisley
......Mixed Border
......Other Borders
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron

Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use - page links in row 6. Rose, RHS Wisley and Other Roses rose indices on each Rose Use page
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Pruning Methods
Photo Index
R 1, 2, 3
Peter Beales Roses
RV Roger
Roses

Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable
Wild Flower and
Butterfly page links are in next row

Topic -
UK Butterfly:-
...Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly Usage
of Plants.
...Plant Usage by
Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly.

Both native wildflowers and cultivated plants, with these
...Flower Shape,
...
Uses in USA,
...
Uses in UK and
...
Flo Cols / month are used by Butter-flies native in UK


Wild Flower
with its wildflower flower colour page, space,
data page(s).
...Blue Site Map.
Scented Flower, Foliage, Root.
Story of their Common Names.
Use of Plant with Flowers.
Use for Non-Flowering Plants.
Edible Plant Parts.
Flower Legend.
Flowering plants of
Chalk and
Limestone 1
, 2.
Flowering plants of Acid Soil
1.
...Brown Botanical Names.
Food for
Butterfly/Moth.

...Cream Common Names.
Coastal and Dunes.
Sandy Shores and Dunes.
...Green Broad-leaved Woods.
...Mauve Grassland - Acid, Neutral, Chalk.
...Multi-Cols Heaths and Moors.
...Orange Hedge-rows and Verges.
...Pink A-G Lakes, Canals and Rivers.
...Pink H-Z Marshes, Fens, Bogs.
...Purple Old Buildings and Walls.
...Red Pinewoods.
...White A-D
Saltmarshes.
Shingle Beaches, Rocks and Cliff Tops.
...White E-P Other.
...White Q-Z Number of Petals.
...Yellow A-G
Pollinator.
...Yellow H-Z
Poisonous Parts.
...Shrub/Tree River Banks and other Freshwater Margins. and together with cultivated plants in
Colour Wheel.

You know its
name:-
a-h, i-p, q-z,
Botanical Names, or Common Names,
habitat:-
on
Acid Soil,
on
Calcareous
(Chalk) Soil
,
on
Marine Soil,
on
Neutral Soil,
is a
Fern,
is a
Grass,
is a
Rush,
is a
Sedge, or
is
Poisonous.

Each plant in each WILD FLOWER FAMILY PAGE will have a link to:-
1) its created Plant Description Page in its Common Name column, then external sites:-
2) to purchase the plant or seed in its Botanical Name column,
3) to see photos in its Flowering Months column and
4) to read habitat details in its Habitat Column.
Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
Arrow-Grass
Arum
Balsam
Bamboo
Barberry
Bedstraw
Beech
Bellflower
Bindweed
Birch
Birds-Nest
Birthwort
Bogbean
Bog Myrtle
Borage
Box
Broomrape
Buckthorn
Buddleia
Bur-reed
Buttercup
Butterwort
Cornel (Dogwood)
Crowberry
Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
Daffodil
Daisy
Daisy Cudweeds
Daisy Chamomiles
Daisy Thistle
Daisy Catsears Daisy Hawkweeds
Daisy Hawksbeards
Daphne
Diapensia
Dock Bistorts
Dock Sorrels
Clubmoss
Duckweed
Eel-Grass
Elm
Filmy Fern
Horsetail
Polypody
Quillwort
Royal Fern
Figwort - Mulleins
Figwort - Speedwells
Flax
Flowering-Rush
Frog-bit
Fumitory
Gentian
Geranium
Glassworts
Gooseberry
Goosefoot
Grass 1
Grass 2
Grass 3
Grass Soft
Bromes 1

Grass Soft
Bromes 2

Grass Soft
Bromes 3

Hazel
Heath
Hemp
Herb-Paris
Holly
Honeysuckle
Horned-Pondweed
Hornwort
Iris
Ivy
Jacobs Ladder
Lily
Lily Garlic
Lime
Lobelia
Loosestrife
Mallow
Maple
Mares-tail
Marsh Pennywort
Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
Mesem-bryanthemum
Mignonette
Milkwort
Mistletoe
Moschatel
Naiad
Nettle
Nightshade
Oleaster
Olive
Orchid 1
Orchid 2
Orchid 3
Orchid 4
Parnassus-Grass
Peaflower
Peaflower
Clover 1

Peaflower
Clover 2

Peaflower
Clover 3

Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
Pink 1
Pink 2
Pipewort
Pitcher-Plant
Plantain
Pondweed
Poppy
Primrose
Purslane
Rannock Rush
Reedmace
Rockrose
Rose 1
Rose 2
Rose 3
Rose 4
Rush
Rush Woodrushes
Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
Sandalwood
Saxifrage
Seaheath
Sea Lavender
Sedge Rush-like
Sedges Carex 1
Sedges Carex 2
Sedges Carex 3
Sedges Carex 4
Spindle-Tree
Spurge
Stonecrop
Sundew
Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
Teasel
Thyme 1
Thyme 2
Umbellifer 1
Umbellifer 2
Valerian
Verbena
Violet
Water Fern
Waterlily
Water Milfoil
Water Plantain
Water Starwort
Waterwort
Willow
Willow-Herb
Wintergreen
Wood-Sorrel
Yam
Yew


Topic -
The following is a complete hierarchical Plant Selection Process

dependent on the Garden Style chosen
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index


Topic -
Flower/Foliage Colour Wheel Galleries with number of colours as a high-level Plant Selection Process

All Flowers 53 with
...Use of Plant and
Flower Shape
- page links in bottom row

All Foliage 53
instead of redundant
...(All Foliage 212)


All Flowers
per Month 12


Bee instead of wind pollinated plants for hay-fever sufferers
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers
per Month
12
...Index

Rock Garden and Alpine Flowers
Rock Plant Flowers 53
INDEX
A, B, C, D, E, F,
G, H, I, J, K, L,
M, NO, PQ, R, S,
T, UVWXYZ
...Rock Plant Photos

Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours
per Month Index

...All Plants Index


Topic -
Use of Plant in your Plant Selection Process

Plant Colour Wheel Uses
with
1. Perfect general use soil is composed of 8.3% lime, 16.6% humus, 25% clay and 50% sand, and
2. Why you are continually losing the SOIL STRUCTURE so your soil - will revert to clay, chalk, sand or silt.
Uses of Plant and Flower Shape:-
...Foliage Only
...Other than Green Foliage
...Trees in Lawn
...Trees in Small Gardens
...Wildflower Garden
...Attract Bird
...Attract Butterfly
1
, 2
...Climber on House Wall
...Climber not on House Wall
...Climber in Tree
...Rabbit-Resistant
...Woodland
...Pollution Barrier
...Part Shade
...Full Shade
...Single Flower provides Pollen for Bees
1
, 2, 3
...Ground-Cover
<60
cm
60-180cm
>180cm
...Hedge
...Wind-swept
...Covering Banks
...Patio Pot
...Edging Borders
...Back of Border
...Poisonous
...Adjacent to Water
...Bog Garden
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Winter-Flowering
...Fragrant
...Not Fragrant
...Exhibition
...Standard Plant is 'Ball on Stick'
...Upright Branches or Sword-shaped leaves
...Plant to Prevent Entry to Human or Animal
...Coastal Conditions
...Tolerant on North-facing Wall
...Cut Flower
...Potted Veg Outdoors
...Potted Veg Indoors
...Thornless
...Raised Bed Outdoors Veg
...Grow in Alkaline Soil A-F, G-L, M-R,
S-Z
...Grow in Acidic Soil
...Grow in Any Soil
...Grow in Rock Garden
...Grow Bulbs Indoors

Uses of Bedding
...Bedding Out
...Filling In
...Screen-ing
...Pots and Troughs
...Window Boxes
...Hanging Baskets
...Spring Bedding
...Summer Bedding
...Winter Bedding
...Foliage instead of Flower
...Coleus Bedding Photos for use in Public Domain 1

Uses of Bulb
...Other than Only Green Foliage
...Bedding or Mass Planting
...Ground-Cover
...Cut-Flower
...Tolerant of Shade
...In Woodland Areas
...Under-plant
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Covering Banks
...In Water
...Beside Stream or Water Garden
...Coastal Conditions
...Edging Borders
...Back of Border or Back-ground Plant
...Fragrant Flowers
...Not Fragrant Flowers
...Indoor
House-plant

...Grow in a Patio Pot
...Grow in an Alpine Trough
...Grow in an Alpine House
...Grow in Rock Garden
...Speciman Plant
...Into Native Plant Garden
...Naturalize in Grass
...Grow in Hanging Basket
...Grow in Window-box
...Grow in Green-house
...Grow in Scree
...Naturalized Plant Area
...Grow in Cottage Garden
...Attracts Butterflies
...Attracts Bees
...Resistant to Wildlife
...Bulb in Soil:-
......Chalk
......Clay
......Sand
......Lime-Free (Acid)
......Peat

Uses of Rose
Rose Index

...Bedding 1, 2
...Climber /Pillar
...Cut-Flower 1, 2
...Exhibition, Speciman
...Ground-Cover
...Grow In A Container 1, 2
...Hedge 1, 2
...Climber in Tree
...Woodland
...Edging Borders
...Tolerant of Poor Soil 1, 2
...Tolerant of Shade
...Back of Border
...Adjacent to Water
...Page for rose use as ARCH ROSE, PERGOLA ROSE, COASTAL CONDITIONS ROSE, WALL ROSE, STANDARD ROSE, COVERING BANKS or THORNLESS ROSES.
...FRAGRANT ROSES
...NOT FRAGRANT ROSES


Topic -
Camera Photo Galleries showing all 4000 x 3000 pixels of each photo on your screen that you can then click and drag it to your desktop as part of a Plant Selection Process:-

RHS Garden at Wisley

Plant Supports -
When supporting plants in a bed, it is found that not only do those plants grow upwards, but also they expand their roots and footpad sideways each year. Pages
1
, 2, 3, 8, 11,
12, 13,
Plants 4, 7, 10,
Bedding Plants 5,
Plant Supports for Unknown Plants 5
,
Clematis Climbers 6,
the RHS does not appear to either follow it's own pruning advice or advice from The Pruning of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers by George E. Brown.
ISBN 0-571-11084-3 with the plants in Pages 1-7 of this folder. You can see from looking at both these resources as to whether the pruning carried out on the remainder of the plants in Pages 7-15 was correct.

Narcissus (Daffodil) 9,
Phlox Plant Supports 14, 15

Coleus Bedding Foliage Trial - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, Index

National Trust Garden at Sissinghurst Castle
Plant Supports -
Pages for Gallery 1

with Plant Supports
1, 5, 10
Plants
2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9,
11, 12
Recommended Rose Pruning Methods 13
Pages for Gallery 2
with Plant Supports
2
,
Plants 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Dry Garden of
RHS Garden at
Hyde Hall

Plants - Pages
without Plant Supports
Plants 1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Nursery of
Peter Beales Roses
Display Garden

Roses Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Nursery of
RV Roger

Roses - Pages
A1,A2,A3,A4,A5,
A6,A7,A8,A9,A10,
A11,A12,A13,A14,
B15,
B16,B17,B18,B19,
B20,
B21,B22,B23,B24,
B25,
B26,B27,B28,B29,
B30,
C31,C32,C33,C34,
C35,
C36,C37,C38,C39,
C40,
C41,CD2,D43,D44,
D45,
D46,D47,D48,D49,
E50,
E51,E52,F53,F54,
F55,
F56,F57,G58,G59,
H60,
H61,I62,K63,L64,
M65,
M66,N67,P68,P69,
P70,
R71,R72,S73,S74,
T75,
V76,Z77, 78,

Damage by Plants in Chilham Village - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4

Pavements of Funchal, Madeira
Damage to Trees - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13
for trees 1-54,
14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
for trees 55-95,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, 33, 34, 35,
36, 37,
for trees 95-133,
38, 39, 40,
41, 42, 43, 44, 45,
for trees 133-166

Chris Garnons-Williams
Work Done - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Identity of Plants
Label Problems - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11

Ron and Christine Foord - 1036 photos only inserted so far - Garden Flowers - Start Page of each Gallery
AB1 ,AN14,BA27,
CH40,CR52,DR63,
FR74,GE85,HE96,

Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens - 1187
A 1, 2, Photos - 43
B 1, Photos - 13
C 1, Photos - 35
D 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
Photos - 411
with Plants causing damage to buildings in Chilham Village and Damage to Trees in Pavements of Funchal
E 1, Photos - 21
F 1, Photos - 1
G 1, Photos - 5
H 1, Photos - 21
I 1, Photos - 8
J 1, Photos - 1
K 1, Photos - 1
L 1, Photos - 85
with Label Problems
M 1, Photos - 9
N 1, Photos - 12
O 1, Photos - 5
P 1, Photos - 54
Q 1, Photos -
R 1, 2, 3,
Photos - 229
S 1, Photos - 111
T 1, Photos - 13
U 1, Photos - 5
V 1, Photos - 4
W 1, Photos - 100
with Work Done by Chris Garnons-Williams
X 1 Photos -
Y 1, Photos -
Z 1 Photos -
Articles/Items in Ivydene Gardens - 88
Flower Colour, Num of Petals, Shape and
Plant Use of:-
Rock Garden
within linked page


Topic -
Fragrant Plants as a Plant Selection Process for your sense of smell:-

Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an Acid Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
1
, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3
Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves
1
, 2
Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5
Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit
1
, 2, 3
Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2
Night-scented Flowering Plants
1
, 2


Topic -
Website User Guidelines


My Gas Service Engineer found Flow and Return pipes incorrectly positioned on gas boilers and customers had refused to have positioning corrected in 2020.

Copied from
Ivydene Gardens Bedding Plant Gallery:
Use for Summer Bedding


See Summer Bedding Page in Number 1 Plant Use and Flower Shape Gallery
in the next Table on the right; within its Table in its second row.

 

Bedding Uses,
where if possible use
Single Flowers (compared in Single Flower provides pollen for bees page)to provide honeybees with pollen to collect for the protein in a bee's diet, whereas double flowers do not provide this pollen as detailed in the table on the left:-

 

 

 

Copied from

Colour Wheel -
Plant Use and
Flower Shape Gallery

Site Map

 

Dark Tone
or Shades (Colours mixed with Black) is the outer circle of colours.

Mid-Tone
(Colours mixed with Grey) is the next circle of colours.

Pure Hue
(the Primary, Secondary or Tertiary Colour named) is the next circle of colours.

Pastel
(Colours mixed with White) is the innermost circle of colours.

 

These 12 colour spokes of Dark Tone, Mid-Tone, Pure Hue and Pastel are split into:-

Number

Primary Colour Name

Pure Hue Colour Name Used

1

Red

Red

2

Yellow

Yellow

3

Blue

Blue

Number

Secondary Colour Name

Pure Hue Colour Name Used

10

Orange

Vitamin C

11

Green

Lime

12

Violet

Magenta

Number

Tertiary Colour Name

Pure Hue Colour Name Used

100

Red Orange

Orange

101

Yellow Orange

Tangerine

102

Yellow Green

Lovely Lime

103

Blue Green

Light Teal

104

Blue Violet

Grape

105

Red Violet

Process Pagenta

Plant Bloom
Dec-Jan
Feb-Mar

Plant Bloom
Apr-May
Jun-Aug

Plant Bloom
Sep-Oct
Nov-Dec

There are other pages on Plants which bloom in each month of the year in this website:-

item76a1a1a1

 

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Click on Flower Colour above Colour Name to compare flowers of same colour and different plant types or 1,
then 2, 3, or 4 for following pages

 

 

 

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White 1, 2

 

White 3

 

White Wild-flower 1, 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gray

 

Silver
1
, 2

Black

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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105

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Blood Red 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dried Blood
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chocolate 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

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10

 

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Fuzzy Wuzzy 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Forbidden
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heatland 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Royal Purple
1

 

 

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Rusty Pelican
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red 1, 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item93a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Calihoe
1

 

item55a1a1a

 

Process Pagenta
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orange
1

 

item107a1a1a1

 

 

Tuscany
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item66a1a1a

 

 

item101a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flat Pink
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magenta
1

item57a1a1a

 

 

 

 

item109a1a1a1

 

Vitamin C 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pink
1
, 2

 

Orangelin
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

104

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

101

item43b1a1

 

item45b1a1

 

item47b1a1

 

item49b1a1

 

Magenta Shift
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Atomic Tangerine
1

item117a1a1a1

 

item115a1a1a1

 

item113a1a1a1

 

item111a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Violet
1

The Bands
1

 

Grape
1

 

Mauve
1

item41b1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item10b1a1

 

Sand
1

 

Tang-erine
1

Buddha Gold
1

Browser Caramel 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item39b1a1

 

Off-White Blue
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bone
1
, 2

 

item8b1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item33b1a1

 

 

 

 

 

item18b1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item37b1a1

 

 

Blue
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yellow
1
, 2

 

item5b1a2a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baby Blue
1

 

 

 

 

 

Lime-ade
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item31b1a1a

 

item26b1a1

 

item16b1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

item35b1a1

 

 

 

Periwinkle 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pine Glade
1

 

 

 

item3a1a2a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Light Teal
1

 

Offwhite Green 1

 

Lovely Lime
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Navy Blue
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item30b1a1

 

 

 

 

item24b1a1

 

 

 

 

item14b1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grass Stain
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

103

 

Aqua
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lime 1

 

 

 

Slimer 2
1

 

102

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item28b1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item22b1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item12b1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue Stone
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weak Green 1

 

 

 

Verdun Green
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

item20b1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pakistan Green 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you have reached the required Flower Colour Page, then
click on
Flowering Months of the required plant to compare this flower with others from the same
Plant Type - Bulbs, Climbers, Evergreen perennials - in that month
OR
with others from the plants at RHS Wisley in that month
 

Plant Selection by Flower Colour

Blue Flowers

Bedding.
Bulb.
Climber.
Evergr Per.
Evergr Shrub.
Wild Flower.
 

Orange Flowers

Bedding.

Wild Flower.

Other Colour Flowers

Bedding.

Bulb.
Climber.
Evergr Per.
Evergr Shrub.
Wild Flower.

Red Flowers

Bedding.

Bulb.
Climber.
Decid Shrub.
Evergr Per.
Evergr Shrub.
Herbac Per.
Rose.
Wild Flower.

White Flowers

Bedding.

Bulb.
Climber.
Decid Shrub.
Decid Tree.
Evergr Per.
Evergr Shrub.
Herbac Per.
Rose.
Wild Flower.
 

Yellow Flowers

Bedding.
Bulb.
Climber.
Decid Shrub.
Evergr Per.
Evergr Shrub.
Herbac Per.
Rose.
Wild Flower.
 

 

Copied from Summer Bedding Page in
Colour Wheel - Plant Use and Flower Shape Gallery. Since most of the page links in this table are to pages in that gallery, the links have not transferred. You can see that they compare the flower shape and the Plant Use in the
PLANT USE AND FLOWER SHAPE GALLERY PAGES:-

PLANT USE AND FLOWER SHAPE GALLERY PAGES
compares the use and flower shape of plants in this website
- WHICH ARE THOSE PLANTS FROM OTHER GALLERIES
BESIDES THE WILDFLOWER SHAPE GALLERY -
combined with those already compared in
Bedding,
Bulb,
Evergreen Perennial,
Herbaceous Perennial and
Roses
pages as linked to in row
Topic - Use of Plant in your Plant Selection Process
in the TOPIC table - on the extreme left - at the end of this page with this Tip Colour background.

PLANTS FLOWER SHAPE GALLERY PAGES

lessershapemeadowrue2a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

alliumcflohaireasytogrowbulbs1a1a1a1a1a

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14c2a1a1a1a1a1a1

irisflotpseudacorus1a1a1a1a1a1a1

aethionemacfloarmenumfoord1a2a1a1a1a1a

anemonecflo1hybridafoord1a2a1a1a1a1a

anemonecflo1blandafoord1a1a1a1a1a1a

Number of Flower Petals

Petal-less

1

2

3

4

5

Above 5

 

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a1a1a1a1a1a1

alliumcflo1roseumrvroger1a1a1a1a

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

paeoniamlokosewitschiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1a1

paeoniaveitchiiwoodwardiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1

acantholinumcflop99glumaceumfoord1a

stachysflotmacrantha1a1a1a1a1a1a

Flower Shape - Simple

Stars with Single Flowers

Bowls

Cups and Saucers

Globes

Goblets and Chalices

Trumpets

Funnels

 

digitalismertonensiscflorvroger1a2a1a1a1a1

fuchsiaflotcalicehoffman1a1a1a1a1a1a

ericacarneacflosspringwoodwhitedeeproot1a1a1a1a1a1a1

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming1a1a1a1a1a1a

Rose Petal Count from Rose Use Gallery

Single:
1-7 Petals

Semi-Double:
8-15 Petals

Flower Shape - Simple

Bells

Thimbles

Urns

Salver-form

Double:
Page 1
,
Page 2
16-25 Petals

Full:
26-40 Petals

Very Full:
40+ Petals

 

prunellaflotgrandiflora1a1a1a1a1a1

aquilegiacfloformosafoord1a2a1a1a1a

acanthusspinosuscflocoblands1a2a1a1a1a

lathyrusflotvernus1a2a1a1a1a

anemonecflo1coronariastbrigidgeetee1a1a1a1a

echinaceacflo1purpurealustrehybridsgarnonswilliams1a2a1a1a1a

centaureacfloatropurpureakavanagh1a1a1a1a1a

Flower Shape - Elabor-ated

Tubes, Lips and Straps

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Hats, Hoods and Helmets

Stan-dards, Wings and Keels

Discs and Florets

Pin-Cushions

Tufts and Petal-less Cluster

 

androsacecforyargongensiskevock1a1a1a1a1

androsacecflorigidakevock1a1a1a1a1

argyranthemumflotcmadeiracrestedyellow1a1b1a1a1

armeriacflomaritimakevock1a1a1a1a1

anemonecflonemerosaalbaplenarvroger1a1a1a1a1

Rose Bloom Shape from Rose Use Gallery

High-Centred,

Cupped,
 

Flower Shape - Elabor-ated

Cushion

Umbel

Buttons with Double Flowers

Pompoms

Stars with Semi-Double Flowers

Flat,

Globular,

Pompon,

Rosette

 

bergeniamorningredcforcoblands1a1a1a1a1a1

ajugacfloreptansatropurpurea1a1a1a1a1a

lamiumflotorvala2a1a1a1a1a1

astilbepurplelancecflokevock1a1a1a1a1a1

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a1433a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a1434a1a1a1a1a1a1a1

androsacecfor1albanakevock1a1a1a1a1a

Natural Arrange-ments

Bunches, Posies and Sprays (Group)

Columns, Spikes and Spires

Whorls, Tiers and Cande-labra

Plumes and Tails

Chains and Tassels

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades

Sphere, Dome (Clusters), Drumstick and Plate

Plant Use

Bedding Out and Bedding Out of Roses

Bedding for Filling In

Bedding for Screening

Bedding for Pots and Troughs

Bedding in Window Boxes

Bedding in Hanging Baskets

Bedding Foliage

Bedding:- Spring

Summer

Winter

Foliage Only

Other than Green Foliage

Trees in Lawn

Trees in Small Gardens
 

Wildflower Garden

Attract Bird
Attract Butterfly
1, 2

Climber on House Wall

Climber not on House Wall

Climber in Tree

Rabbit-Resistant
 

Woodland

Pollution Barrier

Part Shade

Full Shade

Single Flower provides Pollen for Bees
1, 2, 3

Ground-Cover
<60cm
60-180cm
>180cm

Hedge

Wind-swept

Covering Banks

Patio Pot

Edging Borders

Back of Border

Poisonous

Adjacent to Water

Bog Garden
 

Tolerant of Poor Soil

Winter-Flowering
 

Fragrant

Not Fragrant

Exhibition

Standard Plant is 'Ball on Stick'

Upright Branches or Sword-shaped leaves

Plant to Prevent Entry to Human or Animal

Coastal Con-ditions

Tolerant on North-facing Wall

Cut Flower

Potted Veg Outdoors

Potted Veg Indoors

Thornless

Raised Bed Outdoors Veg

Grow in Alkaline Soil A-F, G-L, M-R, S-Z

Grow in Acidic Soil

Grow in Any Soil

Grow in Rock Garden

Grow Bulbs Indoors

Potted Fruit Outdoors

Potted Fruit Indoors

Fruit Outdoors

Plants for Outdoor
Containers Index
A-C,
D-M,
N-Z

 

 

 

 

Copied from
Ivydene Gardens Companion Planting: Introduction
 

Every year worldwide erosion, loss of organic matter, desertification, salination, and loss to marshlands takes an area of almost 20 million acres ( See reference 11 ). This is largely caused by man's interference, with some of it being due to the practice of monoculture cultivation techniques with subsequent failure to replenish the soil regularly with organic material.

In this case, an unnecessary use of land as a driveway is to be reclaimed as a vegetable garden. The author's aim is not to use man-made fertilisers, insecticides or herbicides, and so what system is likely to produce food and deter the non-human life from eating it before my family?

From academic research, Companion Planting with Organic Gardening may help.

Companion Planting
copied from the Topic Table on the extreme left
A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
H, I, J, K, L, M, N,
O, P, Q, R , S, T,
U ,V, W, X, Y, Z,
Pest Control using Plants

Companion planting cultivation is concerned with which plants will respond well to a certain environment, and in which environment, pests can be discouraged and diseases prevented. In order to make such mixed vegetable cultivation possible, monoculture in beds is replaced by row-crop cultivation, in which the right plants will be properly spaced.

 

The companion-planted garden has to be considered not only in relation to its plant material above ground, but also the affects on the soil and the biomass of that plant's roots. Ten ways that companion planting works is provided in the garden design section. Provision is then made for the continuous nourishment of plant life, via chopped organic plant matter covering the surface where there are no plants growing ( sheet surface composting ).

Companion Planting can also be used for pest control rather than chemicals.

Gertrude Franck's Companion Planting Method.

The selection of suitable beneficial plants, the seasonable preparation of suitable beds as well as soil composition and organic pest control to provide healthy food for yourself or a family in a way that will be helpful to the environment and the animals therein, is shown by this book:-

"Companion Planting - successful gardening the organic way" by Gertrude Franck (based on her 35 years of practical experience in Germany) Thorsons Publishing Group 1983, ISBN 0-7225-0695-3

.

Spinach is sown in spring in rows 50cm apart over the whole vegetable garden area for the following purposes:

  • these rows divide the vegetable garden up for the whole year,
  • the spinach roots prevent erosion, so the usual paths between beds are omitted,
  • young spinach plants provide protection and shade for the vegetable crops to be grown between them,
  • spinach provides ideal material for sheet surface composting, which becomes an intermediate space, a footpath, and
  • it is in between these lines of spinach that the other vegetable varieties are arranged.

The Garden Layout below shows that the rows are given letters.

 

 

 

Copied from
Ivydene Gardens Companion Planting: Gertrude Franck's Vegetable Garden
 


Gertrude Franck's Vegetable Garden Layout with Companion Planting

The explanation of the A. B. and C. labels in the Vegetable Garden plan alongside is given on the right. Each Plant in each section of a Bed in the Vegetable Garden Plan below is the only vegetable in that horizontal row from side to side in that section; the next row in that section may well be the other vegetable stated in that box, or if no other vegetable is stated, then it will be another row of the same vegetable

.

Fence with Flowers and Gate

All
kinds
of
herbs,
ann-
uals
and
perr-
enials

Path

Chi-
ves
and
Rhu-
barb

P
A
T
H

B.
Cauliflo-
wer
and
B.
Celeriac

P
A
T
H

C.
Late
Carrots

P
A
T
H

C.
Lettuce

A.
Cucumber

A.
Tomatoes
alternating
with
C.
radishes

A.
Cabbage
C.
Lettuce
(second
sowing)

C.
Late
Carrots

B.
Caulifl-
owers
and
B.
Celeriac

B.
Onions
followed
by
C.
corn salad

A.
Cabbage
C.
Lettuce
(third
sowing)

C.
Late
Carrots

A.
Late
Cabbage
and
B.
Celeriac

A.
Tomatoes
alternating
with
C.
Radishes

C.
Carrots
(second
sowing)

C.
Late
Carrots

B.
Black salsify

B.
Onions followed by
C.
Sugarloaf

C.
Carrots (second sowing)

C.
Late Carrots

A.
Late Cabbage and
A.
Celeriac

A.
Beans alternating
with
C.
Kohlrabi

C.
Carrots (second sowing)

C.
Endives or other salad crops

A.
New Potatoes

B.
Spring Greens alternating with
B.
Celeriac then
B.
Kidney Beans

B.
Beetroot

C.
Various Salad crops

A.
Brussels Sprouts
B.
and Kale

A.
Beans alternating with
C.
Kolhrabi and
C.
Radishes

B.
Beetroot

 

B.
Leeks

covering 3-year-old Straw-
berries

C.
Carrots

covering 3-year-old Straw-
berries

B.
Marrowfat Peas

 

C.
Carrots

 

B.
Onions

covering 2-year-old Straw-berries

C.
Lettuces and radishes

covering 2-year-old Straw-berries

B.
Peas followed in August by Straw-berries (new planting)

 

Path

 

The Garden Layout on this page shows that the rows are given letters. The main crop in the A rows is planted in May, but can follow an early crop almost immediately. They are 2 metres apart and are intended for:-

  • tomatoes,
    runner beans,
    cucumbers,
    late cabbage,
    broad beans,
    potatoes and
    courgettes.

 

Halfway between 2 A rows there is 1 B row, which is intended for plants which are going to require this space either in the first half or in the second half of the growing year. Each of these rows will yield at least 2 full crops. These are:-

  • leeks,
    onions,
    black salsify,
    cauliflower,
    celeriac,
    kidney beans,
    spring beans,
    beetroot,
    peas and
    parsnips.

Halfway between the A row and the B row there is the C row, which is set with short-lived plants with a comparatively small, low growth. Each of these rows will produce 2 or often 3 crops one after another. These are:-

  • carrots,
    lettuce,
    endives,
    kohlrabi and
    fennel.

 

To avoid crop rotation problems the gardener :

  • changes his crops 2 or 3 times in the same row and
  • in the following year displaces the rows 25 cm away from where they were before, so that it is extremely unlikely that the same or a closely related plant will occupy the same place again.

Surface composting ensures a constant supply of nutrients and water to the soil, gives it protection and enriches it in humus. The strips where the compost is laid down this year will become the places where vegetables are grown next year, since the rows are displaced 25 cm sideways.

 

 

 

 

Copied from
Ivydene Gardens Companion Planting: My Vegetable Garden with Plan
 

The newly created 100 square yard vegetable area was a sloping pea-shingle covered concreted/tarmac driveway over part of the Upper Greensand. The pea-shingle and concrete with tarmac covering has been replaced with a mixture of local topsoil, horse manure and cow manure to make a level vegetable area.

According to the Soil Map of England and Wales ( see reference 35 ), the soil in our area is:-

.

 

Soil Type

HAMBLE 1.

Geology

Aeolian silty drift over tertiary loam.

Soil and Site Characteristics

Deep well drained often stoneless fine silty soils.

Cropping and land use

Fruit and horticultural crops; field vegetables, cereals and potatoes, some hops.

 

In September 1990 a mixture of Rape, Turnip and Mustard seed was sown on this area to produce a green manure over the winter period.

The following Garden Plan shows the Layout, and what vegetables were grown during the spring and summer of 1991:-

.

 

Veg Area 7.
Hedge. 3 feet wide and 34 feet long

2 feet =
24 inches =
60cms

Path. 2 feet wide and 21 feet long.
NORTH <----

Veg Area 8.
Fence. 3 feet wide.

Path. 2 feet (24 inches, 60 cms) wide

Veg Area 1.
Russian Comfrey and Lettuce

Path. 2 feet wide and 34 feet long.

Path. 2 feet wide and 17 feet long

Veg Area 2.
Potato,
French Marigolds, Broad Beans and Nasturtium,
followed by
Phacelia Green Manure.

Path

Veg Area 3.
Potato,
Nasturtium and African Marigolds, followed by
Phacelia Green Manure.

Path

Veg Area 4.
Swede,
Turnip,
Sage,
Garlic and
Carrot, followed by Phacelia Green Manure.

Path

Veg Area 5.
Marrow, Onion, Nasturtium and Borage, followed by Phacelia Green Manure.

Path

Veg Area 6.
Gooseberry and Clover.

Path

 

 

 

 

Copied from
Ivydene Gardens Companion Planting: Katie Thear's 4-year Rotation Vegetable Garden
 

In order to avoid planting crops on the same ground 2 years running and thus making pest problems more likely, I have decided on a 4-year crop rotation of:-
  potatoes,
  legumes,
  brassicas and
  roots
in Veg Areas 2, 3, 4 and 5. Within this basic system, I would intercrop appropriate companion plants as listed in the Companion Plant A-Z Table.
Unfortunately, there are discrepancies between this crop rotation and companion planting:-

Broad beans are companions of cabbages, but the rotation would have the former in a legume bed and the latter in a brassica bed.

The basic four-crop rotation will be followed and any companion plants introduced will be annuals in order to simplify bed clearance at the end of the season. Perennial crops and perennial herbs will be planted outside the rotation system in Veg Areas 6 and 8, and 'weed' plants such as yarrow will be grown in solitary confinement in Veg Area 8.

The following is a copy of Katie Thear's 4-year rotation in her vegetable garden plan, which solves some of these contradictions:-

.

 

Bed A ( Potatoes )

Bank of Sweetcorn

African or French Marigolds

Potatoes

African or
French Marigolds

African or French Marigolds

African or
French Marigolds

African or
French Marigolds

 

Bed B ( Legumes )

Summer Savory

Summer Savory

Runner Beans

Summer Savory

Summer Savory

Radishes

Peas

Radishes

Dwarf Beans

Summer Savory

Broad Beans

Buckwheat to attract hoverflies which are parasitic on aphids

 

Bed C ( Brassicas )

Dill

Brussels Sprouts

Chamomile

Chamomile

Broccoli

Chamomile

Chamomile

Chamomile

Spring Cabbage

Caraway

Chamomile

Chamomile

Early Cauliflower

Chamomile

Chamomile

Late Cauliflower

Chamomile

Chamomile

Summer Cabbage

Caraway

Caraway

Turnips

Caraway

Caraway

Kohlrabi

Caraway

 

Bed D ( Roots )

Keeping Onions

Carrots

Keeping Onions

Carrots

Shallots ( pickling onions )

Beetroot

Parsnips

Salad Onions

Swiss Chard

Parsley

Salsify

Spinach

Garlic

Late Carrots

Leeks

Celery

Bush Tomatoes

 

Any odd spaces have lettuce sown in them, as well bee flowers such as Mignonette, or attractive and useful additions such as nasturtiums.

 

Louise Riotte's Vegetable Garden is an alternative.

 

 

 

 

 

Copied from
Ivydene Gardens Companion Planting: Louise Riotte Model Vegetable Companion Garden
 

Louise Riotte Model Vegetable Companion Garden
from the following book (written by Louise Riotte 1909-1998 who was one of North America's most beloved gardeners) provides a wealth of extra information telling you what plants to put together for what purpose and how it does it:-

 

Carrots love Tomatoes: Secrets of Companion Planting for Successful Gardening by Louise Riotte Second Edition (Storey Publishing 1998) ISBN-13: 978-1-58017-027-7 ( See Reference 1 )

Fence with Flowers and Gate

Fence
with

 

 

Tansy

Cucumber

Tansy

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dill

Pea

Dill

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Petunia

Lima bean

Petunia

Pole beans alternated with Summer Savory

Fence
with

 

 

Tansy

Raspberry

Tansy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hyssop

Grape

Hyssop

Path

Path
 

Path

Asparagus
 

Tomatoes and
Garlic

Radish and
Spinach

Eggplant, Catnip and Pepper

Okra
 

Pumpkin and Sweetcorn

Pumpkin and Sweetcorn

Radish and
Squash

Carrot and
Onion

Shallot and
Beet

Kohlrabi, Tarragon and Turnip

Marigold and Cabbage

1 Horseradish, Potato and 1 Horseradish

1 Horseradish, Potato and 1 Horseradish

Thyme and Soybean

Lemon balm and Black-eyed Pea

Bush bean and Strawberry

Path

Fence with Climbing Nasturtium

ENTRANCE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copied from
Ivydene Gardens Companion Planting: How to use Companion Planting in your Garden
 

Companion planting in an organic garden should avoid the following:-

  • Planting in blocks - provides a feast for the pests which prey on them,
     
  • Mixing plants solely on the basis of their size and colour, without taking into consideration their companion planting effect for other plants,
     
  • Leaving beds of exposed soil.

 

There is no heavy digging to do, since the exposed soil should be covered with

  • shredded compost,
     
  • by the under-sowing of shrubs/trees with spinach, mustard or phacelia (phacelia is a small feathery plant, which with its blue flowers is attractive to bees) in the spring,
  • and by the following under-planting:-

 

Plant

Under-plant with plant

to help

This means the land is overgrown with green to hold the weeds down, the roots keep the soil broken up and the soil is shaded to prevent it drying out.

It is useful when planting a tree or shrub to put prime barley grain in the hole to lie just under the roots. A handful for a small shrub, a pail-full for a large tree. As the grain germinates beneath the roots, heat is generated and growth hormones released. Since the barley is unable to shoot after germinating, it eventually rots away to provide still more nourishment to the roots.

In the spring sow spinach, mustard or nasturtium round the base to shade the ground (3 feet radius from trunk). Keep grass away from all trees/shrubs by at least 3 feet radius to prevent it from taking all the nutrients and its rainwater. Chase Organics (www.chaseorganics.co.uk) are suppliers of liquid extracts of seaweed, which is useful in providing the small amounts of trace elements in exactly the right proportions for all plants including your lawn in the early spring.

Roses

nasturtium

inhibit the growth of weeds

Roses

periwinkle

in shady places (USE FEW plants and check periwinkles invasiveness of climbing over the roses)

Roses

garlic

to keep pests away with the help of sage, thyme, hyssop and lavender around the border edges

Shrubs

fritillaria

discourage mice and voles

Shrubs

lillies/ fritillaria

lillies require shade at their feet with garlic to discourage snails and mice

Shrubs

calendula

inhibits nematodes, as does French Marigold

Shrubs

euphorbia lathyris

discourages voles

Shrubs

lamium galeobdolon

yellow dead nettle is a good ground cover requiring no maintenance, as are the other lamiums.

In the garden the following relationships should be observed:-

  • Plants need other plants as partners in many different connections - see the Companion Plant A-Z Table,
     
  • Cultivated plants need various herbs to accompany them, i.e to promote their health and growth, to give shade and to protect them from pests and diseases,
     
  • Animals in the garden need plants; bees must be able to feed themselves,
     
  • Plants need 'animals' bees to pollinate some flowers, and most ants ventilate the soil, crumble it and de-acidify it,
     
  • Birds need plants to supply them with food,
     
  • 'Animals' need other 'animals' as regulators. Ladybirds eat aphids.
     
  • 'Animals' need wild flowers, on which to lay their eggs and rear their progeny. Butterflies and ladybirds need stinging nettles as breeding places.
     
  • Trees are required to provide shade and/or a windbreak.
     
  • The following combination of plants means that growth can be hindered:-
  •  
    • beans and onions,
    • cabbages and onions,
    • red cabbages and tomatoes,
    • parsley and cabbage lettuce,
    • beetroot and tomatoes,
    • potatoes and onions.

 

the following are useful plants for these relationships:-

.

Common Name

Plant Name

Balm. Attracts bees. Culinary use with all uncooked food.

Melissa
officinalis

Basil. Plant with cucumber. Use as flavouring in all raw and cooked foods

Ocimum
basilicum

Bellflower

Campanula

Birch. Butterfly

Betula

Blackberry. Emperor moth

Rubus

Bleeding heart

Dicentra

Borage. Plant with brassicas. Borage loosens heavy or hard ground. Culinary use in salads

Borago
officinalis

Box

Buxus
microphylla

Campion.

Lychnis
arkwrightii

Chervil. Plant with lettuce and endives. Culinary use in soups and gravies.

Anthriscus
cerefolium

Chives. Attracts bees. Wards off fungal diseases. Plant with roses. Culinary use in soup, sandwiches and salad dressings.

Allium

Coriander. Attracts bees. Culinary use with cabbages, potatoes, beetroot and in bread.

Coriandrum
sativum

Costmary or Mint Geranium.

Chrysanthemum balsamita

Comfrey. Attracts bees. It prefers damp ground. Can use the mown leaves as a fertilising mulch or having placed its leaves with nettle into a container and covered with water, this liquid after 4 weeks can be used as a fertiliser.

Symphytum
asperum

Cummin. Attracts bees

Carum carvi

Daffodil. Plant with roses

Narcissus

Single dahlias. Food for butterfly

Dahlia

Dame’s violet

Hesperis

Day lily

Hemerocallis

Dill. Plant with carrots, cucumber, cabbage, beetroot to keep those plants healthy. Lowers the blood sugar level. Culinary use as food seasoning.

Anthemum graveolens

Elder . Discourages mice, voles and moles.

Sambucus

Elecampane

Inula

Euphorbia. Food for butterflies

Euphorbia

Fennel. Culinary use of main plant as a vegetable

Foeniculum
vulgare

Foxglove

Digitalis

Garlic. Discourages aphids. Culinary use daily as a seasoning, often combined with parsley to counteract high blood pressure.

Allium
sativum

Gooseberry. A straw mulch up to the bottom branches to stop weeds. 1 wormwood to 3 gooseberries to stop rust and tansy to promote health.

Ribes
grossularia

Grape hyacinth

Muscari

Hazel. Attracts Butterflies.

Corylus

Heliotrope

Heliotropium arborescens

Honeysuckle. Food for butterflies

Lonicera

Iris

Iris
germanica

Larkspur

Annual
delphinium

Lavender. Attracts bees and butterflies. Plant with roses and other shrubs which suffer from aphids. Discourages ants. Discourages moths when placed in cupboards

Lavandula

Lemon balm. Outstanding plant for bees. Culinary use in salads

Melissa
officinalis

Lilac. Butterfly

Syringa

Lillies

Lilium
candidum

Lovage. Attracts bees. Culinary use in soups to cleanse the kidneys and aid digestion.

Levisticum
officinale

Lupins

Lupinus

Marigold. Plant with tomato. Can be added to soups and sauces

Calendula

Marguerite

Chrysanthemum

Michaelmas daisy. Food for butterflies. Pests find the leaves of perennial asters disagreeable to the smell and bitter to the taste, so they are good flowers to grow both for massing and cutting.

Aster

Monkshood

Aconitum

Mugwort. Attracts bees. Promotes digestion as a tea

Artemesia
vulgaris

Mullein. Emperor moth

Verbascum

Mustard and Marigold. Sow with strawberries after picking and cleaning the rows ( after the leaves have been cut off, the weeds removed and the soil loosened) to ward off nematodes. Culinary use of mustard seeds with water for breakfast to heal, cleanse, disinfect, regenerate and regulate the intestines.

Sinapis alba
and Calendula

Nasturtium. Tortoise-shell butterfly lays eggs on it. Culinary use of leaves in salad.

Trapaeolum

Onion. It contains cardio-active substances and some onion should be eaten daily.

Allium

Parsley. Plant with onion and tomato. Plant next to border. The leaves and roots regulate the digestion and should be used three times a week in dressings, uncooked food or with vegetables

Petroselinium
crispum

Peony. Ants help the peony to exhibit the most perfect blooms.

Paeonia

Privet. Butterfly

Liguster

Raspberry. Avoid animal manure, mulch with straw instead. Marigolds promote health

Rubus idaeus

Roses. Emperor moth

Damask and
moss roses

Rosemary. Attracts bees.

Rosmarinus
officinalis

Rue. Attracts bees

Ruta graveolens

Sage. Attracts bees. Plant with hyssop and thyme around the vegetable patch as a protective barrier against caterpillars, aphids and snails. Culinary use in sauces to purify the blood

Salvia officinalis

St John’s Wort

Hypericum

Salad burnet. Attracts bees.

Sanguisorba
minor

Sorrel. Attracts bees.

Rumex acetosa

Sloe. Emperor moth

Prunus spinesa

Stock

Matthiola

Stinging Nettle. Food for caterpillars of red admiral, brimstone and painted lady butterflies. Lay down flat as sheet compost between vegetables and hostas. Snails discouraged by nettle’s stinging hairs. Culinary use of young leaves in salads as blood purefying

Urtica dioica

Strawberry. Sow mustard in spring to provide shade and interplant with leeks to ward off nematodes. Mulch with straw to keep strawberries clean by stopping rain spattering mud on the fruit. Mow off the leaves after all fruit picked, plant mustard seed to become compost in the winter.

Fragaria
ananassae

Sunflower

Helianthus

Summer savory. Plant with beans. Culinary use of leaves with steamed vegetables to strengthen the nerves.

Satureja
hortensis

Tansy

Tanacetum
vulgare

Tarragon. Attracts bees. Culinary use of fresh leaves in uncooked food to strengthen the stomach and against rheumatism.

Artemesia
dracunculus

Thyme. Attracts bees. Plant with hyssop and sage around the vegetable patch as a protective barrier against caterpillars, aphids and snails. Culinary use as flavouring or as a tea in the treatment of worms. Be careful - An overdose is possible.

Thymus
vulgaris

Valerian. Attracts bees. Infusion of the blossom stimulates fruiting vegetables including beans, peas, tomatoes, cucumbers, courgettes, roses and irises. Do not use on lettuces, carrots or onions. Medical use as a tea for sleep-promoting, for no more than 2 weeks at a time. Be careful - An overdose is possible.

Valeriana
officinalis

Violet. Food for butterflies

Viola

Wild chamomile

Matricaria
chamomilla

Wormwood. Attracts bees. Plant with currants to ward off rust. Do not put into compost bin as worms hate it.

Artemesia
absinthium

Useful addresses:-

Chase Organics
Gibraltar House
Shepperton
Middlesex. TW17 8AQ

www.chaseorganics.co.uk

Organic Growers Association
Aeron Park
Llangeitho
Dyfed
Wales

Henry Doubleday Research Association
Convent Lane
Bocking
Braintree
Essex. CM7 6RW

www.gardenorganic.org.uk

Soil Association
Walnut Tree Manor
Haughley
Stowmarket
Suffolk. IP14 3RS


www.soilassociation.org

Organic Farm Supplies
Toke Place
Linton
Maidstone
Kent. ME17 4AP

Wyartt Seeds
Stone Cottage
Beyton
Bury St Edmunds
Suffolk. IP30 9AF

Tel: 01359 270410

Companion planting can be considered as a complement to organic gardening.

Taking account of cosmic influences is one of the main differences between Bio-dynamic and Organic methods, as shall be shown on the Biodynamics page.

 

 

 

Copied from
Ivydene Gardens Companion Planting: Companion Plant : Pest Control
 

Control of Pests/Disease by Companion Planting

Centipedes, which have one pair of legs to every body segment, are useful because they live on decaying garden material, not growing plants.

The Mole (Talpa europaea) eats their own body weight of earthworms and beetle-grubs under lawns and slugs, snails, birds, lizards, frogs and snakes above ground, but not plants. The mole can starve to death in several hours without food at any time of the year. The chief pairing season is at the end of March and beginning of April, and the young are born about 6 weeks later. Newborn female moles will mate the following spring and the cycle begins anew. They excavate 2 different types of tunnel:-

  • Those near the surface are for hunting and use during mild weather, which show as a ridge just under the lawn.
  • the other dug 7" deep are the main highways to connect nests to feeding grounds and are used exclusively during temperature extremes. it is these deeper tunnels that result in mole hills as the worker pushes up excavated soil.

Moles prefer loose, moist loam and avoid dry, sandy, or heavy clay soils in which they can dig up to 200 feet of tunnel every day, so they are too extensive to fumigate. Moles do not eat the roots and bulbs of flowers and vegetables. Its sense of smell and hearing are very acute. On the average, one acre of land will support about two or three moles at one time. But areas next to large tracts or forested areas may be subject to continual invasions by moles because such areas may support many moles.

Attack methods:-

  • Planting mole plant (Euphorbia lathyrus) or castor-oil plants may repell them.
  • Drenching the soil of fresh digs with a castor-oil mixture makes them uninhabitable. Mix two parts castor oil with one part liquid detergent and stir until foamy. Dilute 2 tablespoons of this in a gallon of water and use to saturate the soil inside and around the mound. This coats the animals' food source (grub and mole cricket) and causes stomach disruptions in the animal. However, it may take up to three weeks for this to meet its maximum effectiveness level. The targeted animals must make the association between feeding in a particular area and the stomach disruptions. One application will last for one month against moles, voles and other burrowing animals, when applied as directed.
  • Trapping is the most effective control. See www.hygienesuppliesdirect.com for some traps.

See useful data for non-plant control of cats and rodents.

Useful booklists on growing conditions and pest control after this table

.

Climate Zone -

Scottish Highlands and Northern Japan is Zone 7,

Most of British Isles, Central Ireland with parts of Japan, Australia and China are Zone 8

and the Mediterranean area is Zone 9

Plant

Climate Zone

Repels

Catnip (Nepeta cataria)

3-10

Ant

Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium)

7-10

Ant

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis)

3-10

Ant

Lavender (Lavandula)

5-10

Ant

Mint (Mentha). Fresh or dried mint in the pantry to deter house ants.

3-7

Ant

Oak leaf smoke (Quercus robur)

3-10

Ant

Pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium) Sprays either fresh or dried, placed on larder shelves deter ants.

7-9

Ant

Peppermint (Mentha piperita)

3-7

Ant

Sage (Salvia officinalis)

5-10

Ant

Southernwood or Lad's Love (Artemesia abrotanum). Sprays either fresh or dried, placed on larder shelves deter ants.

4-10

Ant

Spearmint (Mentha spicata)

3-7

Ant

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) Sprays either fresh or dried, placed on larder shelves deter ants.

4-9

Ant

Anise or Aniseed (Pimpenella anisum)

4-8

Aphid

Annual Delphinium (Consolida ambigua)

9-11

Aphid

Black Mustard (Brassica nigra)

7-11

Aphid

Catnip (Nepeta cataria)

3-10

Aphid

Chive (Allium schoenoprasum)

5-10

Aphid

Coriander (Coriandrum sativum)

6-9

Aphid

Dill (Anethum graveolens)

8-10

Aphid

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

5-10

Aphid

Garlic (Allium sativum). Pick young leaves of Garlic, Nettle (Urtica dioica), Basil (Ocimum
basilicum) or Wormwood (Artemesia
absinthium) into a pan, cover with water, bring it to the boil, boil for 2 minutes, then remove from heat and strain water into a measuring jug. Dilute 1 volume of 'tea' to 4 of cold water and spray affected plants at once.

8-10

Aphid.

Ladybirds prefer to eat up to 400 aphids per week.

Damsel-fly catch aphids and dispose of insect larvae.

Lavender (Lavandula)

5-10

Aphid

Milkweed (Asclepias)

7

Aphid

Nasturtium (Trapaeolum majus). Grow border of orange nasturtiums round plants to be protected.

9-11

Aphid

Oak leaf smoke (Quercus robur)

3-10

Aphid

Sage (Salvia officinalis)

5-10

Aphid

Southernwood or Lad's Love (Artemesia abrotanum)

4-10

Aphid

Spearmint (Mentha spicata)

3-7

Aphid

Spindle tree (Euonymus europeus) - this tree is the host to the Black Bean Fly

3-9

Aphid

Spurrey (Spergula arvensis)

7

Aphid

Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica)

3-9

Aphid

Summer Savory (Satureja hortensis)

5-9

Aphid

Chive (Allium schoenoprasum)

5-10

Apple tree scab

Marigold (Calendula officinalis)

6-10

Aspagus beetle

Rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis)

6-11

Bean beetle

Summer savory (Satureja hortensis)

5-9

Bean beetle

Petunia

9-11

Beetle

Mint (Mentha)

3-7

Black Flea beetle

Chive (Allium schoenoprasum)

5-10

Black spot

Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica)

3-9

Blackfly

Summer savory (Satureja hortensis)

5-9

Blackfly

Wormwood (Artemesia absinthum and Artemesia frigida)

4-10

Blackfly beetle

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

4-9

Borer

Tree Onion (Allium cepa)

5-10

Borer

Wormwood (Artemesia absinthum and Artemesia frigida)

4-10

Butterfly

Celery (Apium graveolens dulce)

5-8

Cabbage butterfly

Mint (Mentha)

3-7

Cabbage White Butterfly

Common Sage (Salvia officinalis)

5-10

Cabbage moth

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis)

3-10

Cabbage moth

Southernwood or Lad's Love (Artemesia abrotanum)

4-10

Cabbage moth

Rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis)

6-11

Cabbage moths

French Marigold (Tagetes patula)

11-12

Cabbage pests

Clover (Trifolium repens)

4-10

Cabbage root fly

Anise or Aniseed (Pimpenella anisum)

4-8

Cabbage worm

Common Sage (Salvia officinalis)

5-10

Cabbage worm

Garden Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)

7-10

Cabbage worm

Nasturtium (Trapaeolum majus)

9-11

Cabbage worm

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

4-9

Cabbage worm

Wormwood (Artemesia absinthum and Artemesia frigida)

4-10

Cabbage worm

Allium

8-10

Carrot fly

Common Sage (Salvia officinalis)

5-10

Carrot fly

Rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis)

6-11

Carrot fly

Tree Onion (Allium cepa)

5-10

Carrot fly

Viper's grass (Scorzonera hispanica)

6

Carrot fly

Wild Leek (Allium ampeloprasum)

6-9

Carrot fly

Common Rue (Ruta graveolens)

5-9

Cat

Hyssop (Hysoppus officinalis), Sage (Salvia officinalis) and Thyme (Thymus vulgaris). Plant mixture round edge of vegetable area.

3-10

Caterpillar

Spurrey (Spergula arvensis)

7

Caterpillar

Celeriac (Apium graveolens rapaceum)

5-8

Caterpillars in brassicas

Celery (Apium graveolens dulce)

5-8

Caterpillars in cabbages

Mint (Mentha). Sachets of dried mint in the wardrobe.

3-7

Clothes Moth

Chinaberry or Indian lilac (Melia azedarach)

8-12

Cockroach (Blatella)

Black nightshade (Solanum nigrum)

8-11

Colorado beetle

Catnip (Nepeta cataria)

3-10

Colorado beetle

Coriander (Coriandrum sativum)

6-9

Colorado beetle

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

3-10

Colorado beetle

Eggplant or Aubergine (Solanum melongena)

9-12

Colorado beetle

Horse-radish (Armoracia rusticana)

5-9

Colorado beetle

Nasturtium (Trapaeolum majus)

9-11

Colorado beetle

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

4-9

Colorado beetle

Thorn Apple (Datura stramontium)

7-11

Colorado beetle

Tree Onion (Allium cepa)

5-10

Colorado beetle

Bean (Phaseolus)

8-10

Corn armyworms

Soybean (Glycine max)

7-8

Corn borer

Soybean (Glycine max)

7-8

Corn earworm

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

4-8

Corn wireworms

Lavender cotton or Gray Santolina (Santolina chamaecyparissus)

7-10

Corn wireworms

African Marigold (Tagetes minuta)

10

Couch Grass

Radish (Raphanus sativus)

6-9

Cucumber beetle

Sweetcorn (Zea mays)

8-10

Cucumber beetle

Elder (Sambucus ebulus)

5-10

Cutworm

Oak leaf mulch (Quercus robur)

3-10

Cutworm

Oak Tanbark (Lithocarpus densiflorus)

7-9

Cutworm

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

4-9

Cutworm

Catnip (Nepeta cataria)

3-10

Darkling beetle

Castor beans (Ricinus communis) and Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea)

9-12
4-9

Deer

Fennel (Foeniculum officinalis) planted alongside dog kennels and sprays inside the kennel

5-10

Dog Fleas

French Marigold (Tagetes patula)

11-12

Eelworm

Everlasting Pea (Lathyrus grandiflorus )

6-10

Field Mouse

Catnip (Nepeta cataria)

3-10

Flea beetle

Common Lettuce (Lactuca sativa)

6-11

Flea beetle

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis)

3-10

Flea beetle

Radish (Raphanus sativus)

6-9

Flea beetle

Celery (Apium graveolens dulce)

5-8

Flea beetle in cabbages

Anise or Aniseed (Pimpenella anisum)

4-8

Fleas

Amur Corktree (Phellodendron amurense)

3-9

Fly

Basil (Ocimum basilicum)

10-12

Fly

Common Rue (Ruta graveolens)

5-9

Fly

Hazelnut (Corylus avallana)

4-8

Fly

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

4-9

Flying insect

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare),
Basil (Ocimum basilicum) and
Southernwood (Artemesia abrotanum)

4-9
10-12
4-10

Fruit Fly of Peach and Apricot trees

Garlic (Allium sativum)

8-10

Fruit Tree Borers

Southernwood or Lad's Love (Artemesia abrotanum)

4-10

Fruit Tree Moth

Chive (Allium schoenoprasum)

5-10

Fungus

Squill (Scilla bifolia)

4-8

Gopher (Geomyidae)

Chinaberry or Indian lilac (Melia azedarach)

8-12

Grasshopper

Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium)

7-10

Greenfly from lettuces

African Marigold (Tagetas minuta)

9

Ground Elder

Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris lactiflora)

3-10

Growth retardant for nearby plants

Oak leaf mulch (Quercus robur)

3-10

Grub

Oak Tanbark (Lithocarpus densiflorus)

7-9

Grub

Black Mustard (Brassica nigra)

7-11

Harlequin bug

Wormwood (Artemesia absinthum and Artemesia frigida)

4-10

Houseflies

Basil (Ocimum basilicum), Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) or Eau-de-cologne Mint (Mentha) in pots by the house-entrance doors and the barbeque area

4-9
10-12
3-7

Houseflies

Tickseed (Coreopsis lanceolate)

3-9

Insect

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis)

3-10

Insect larvae

Annual Delphinium (Consolida ambigua)

9-11

Japanese beetle

Catnip (Nepeta cataria)

3-10

Japanese beetle

Chive (Allium schoenoprasum)

5-10

Japanese beetle

Common Rue (Ruta graveolens)

5-9

Japanese beetle

Garlic (Allium sativum)

8-10

Japanese beetle

French Marigold (Tagetes patula)

11-12

Japanese beetle

Red Buckeye (Aesculus pavia)

7

Japanese beetle

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

4-9

Japanese beetle

Thorn Apple (Datura stramontium)

7-11

Japanese beetle

White Geranium (Geranium versicolor)

6-9

Japanese beetle

White rose (Rosa alba semi-plena)

4-10

Japanese beetle

Zinnia

9-11

Japanese beetle

Borage (Borage officinalis)

5-10

Japanese beetle and pests of Brassicas

Cranesbill (Geranium)

6-9

Leafhopper

Petunia

9-11

Leafhopper

Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris lactiflora)

3-10

Lice

Chinaberry or Indian lilac (Melia azedarach)

8-12

Locust

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

4-8

Lygus bugs

Rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis)

6-11

Malaria mosquito

Southernwood or Lad's Love (Artemesia abrotanum)

4-10

Malaria mosquito

Wormwood (Artemesia absinthum and Artemesia frigida)

4-10

Malaria mosquito

French Marigold (Tagetes patula)

11-12

Mexican bean beetle

Petunia

9-11

Mexican bean beetle

Potato (Solanum tuberosum)

7-11

Mexican bean beetle

Winter Savory (Satureja montana)

4-8

Mexican bean beetle

Caper spurge (Euphorbia lathyris)

6-10

Mice

Daffodil or Daffy Down Dilly (Narcissus)

5-10

Mice

Daffodil or Daffy Down Dilly (Narcissus)

5-10

Mice

Elder (Sambucus ebulus)

5-10

Mice

Garlic (Allium sativum)

8-10

Mice

Grape hyacinth (Muscari aucheri)

6-9

Mice

Mint (Mentha)

3-7

Mice

Spurge (Euphorbia lactea)
Sow in late autumn for best effect

8-11

Mice

Squill (Scilla bifolia)

4-8

Mice

Wormwood (Artemesia absinthum and Artemesia frigida)

4-10

Mice

Chive (Allium schoenoprasum)

5-10

Mite

Tree Onion (Allium cepa)

5-10

Mite

Allium

8-10

Mole

Caper spurge (Euphorbia lathyris)

6-10

Mole

Elder (Sambucus ebulus). Put twigs into molehill or make into a liquid and pour it onto the molehill.

5-10

Mole

Spurge (Euphorbia lactea) Sow in late autumn for best effect

8-11

Mole

Striped Squill (Puschkinia scilloides)

4-6

Mole

Basil (Ocimum basilicum)

10-12

Mosquito

Garlic (Allium sativum)

8-10

Mosquito

Pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium)

7-9

Mosquito

Sassafras albidum

5-9

Mosquito

Artemesia family

4-10

Moth

Clover (Trifolium repens)

4-10

Moth

Common Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

5-10

Moth

Feverfew (Chrysanthemum parthenium)

4-9

Moth

Lavender cotton or Gray Santolina (Santolina chamaecyparissus)

7-10

Moth

Oil of cade (Juniperus oxycedrus)

5-9

Moth

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

4-9

Moth

Wormwood (Artemesia absinthum and Artemesia frigida)

4-10

Moth

Asparagus (Asparagus acutifolius)

4-8

Nematode

Chrysanthemum or Persian Insect Flower (Chrysanthemum coccineum)

5-9

Nematode

Dahlia

9-11

Nematode

Marigold (Calendula officinalis)

6-10

Nematode

French Marigold (Tagetes patula)

11-12

Nematode

White Mustard (Sinapis alba)

7-11

Nematode

Rattle-box (Crotalaria spectabilis) – poisonous to livestock

9-11

Nematode

Rye (Secale cereale)

3

Nematode

Scarlet Sage (Salvia coccinea)

9-12

Nematode

Carrot (Daucus carota)

3-9

Onion Fly

Garlic (Allium sativum)

8-10

Onion Fly

Peanut, Groundnut or Monkey Nut (Arachis hypogaea)

8-12

Ostrinia furnacalis

Pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium)

7-9

Plant lice

Sassafras albidum

5-9

Plant lice

Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica)

3-9

Plant lice

Garlic (Allium sativum)

8-10

Plum curculio

Eggplant or Aubergine (Solanum melongena)

9-12

Potato beetle

Eggplant or Aubergine (Solanum melongena)

9-12

Potato bug

Flax (Linum)

9

Potato bug

Petunia

9-11

Potato bug

White Dead Nettle (Lamium maculatum album)

4-10

Potato bug

Horse-radish (Armoracia rusticana)

5-9

Potato bug

Allium. Plant at corners of plot.

8-10

Rabbit

Dusty Miller or Sea Ragwort (Senecio cineraria).
Prevent them getting into your garden by enclosing it with a fence of 18-gauge, 31mm hexagonal wire mesh netting at least 3 feet wide. Fold the bottom 1 foot outwards i foot underground to deter rabbits from digging under it. Fill 1 foot wide and deep trench with earth and make wire fence 5 feet high.

7-10

Rabbit

Tree Onion (Allium cepa)

5-10

Rabbit

Caper spurge (Euphorbia lathyris)

6-10

Rat

Peppermint (Mentha piperita)

3-7

Rat

Spurge (Euphorbia lactea)
Sow in late autumn for best effect

8-11

Rat

Radish (Raphanus sativus)

6-9

Root fly

Common Sage (Salvia officinalis)

5-10

Root maggots

Spurrey (Spergula arvensis)

7

Root worm

Cranesbill (Geranium)

6-9

Rose chafer

Petunia

9-11

Rose chafer

Tree Onion (Allium cepa)

5-10

Rose chafer

Tree Onion (Allium cepa)

5-10

Rust

Oak leaf mulch (Quercus robur)

3-10

Slug. Persuade a hedgehog or toad to live in your garden so that they eat the slugs. See further info at end of this table.

Oak Tanbark (Lithocarpus densiflorus)

7-9

Slug

Rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis)

6-11

Slug

White hellebore (Helleborus niger)

3-9

Slug

Wormwood (Artemesia absinthum and Artemesia frigida)

4-10

Slug

Borage (Borago officinalis)

5-10

Snail

Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium)

7-10

Snail

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis)

3-10

Snail

Rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis)

6-11

Snail

Sage (Salvia officinalis)

5-10

Snail

Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica). Lay flat round affected plants as sheet mulch. Snails discouraged by its stinging hairs

3-9

Snail

Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)

7-10

Snail

White hellebore (Helleborus niger)

3-9

Snail

Wormwood (Artemesia absinthum and Artemesia frigida)

4-10

Snail

Lavender cotton or Gray Santolina (Santolina chamaecyparissus)

7-10

Southern rootworm

Dill (Anethum graveolens)

8-10

Spider mite

Garlic (Allium sativum)

8-10

Spider mite

Catnip (Nepeta cataria)

3-10

Squash bug

Nasturtium (Trapaeolum majus)

9-11

Squash bug

Petunia

9-11

Squash bug

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

4-9

Squash bug

Radish (Raphanus sativus)

6-9

Squash insects

Egyptian potato (Allium cepa) with conifers. When planting bulbs in pots, put a 1" deep layer of horticultural grit to the surface of the compost. You can do the same when planting bulbs in the ground, or cover them with chicken wire hidden under a layer of soil.
Use squirrel-proof bird feeders to stop squirrels eating bird food.
Use a homemade cage of chicken wire to prevent squirrels eating your fruit or crops.

5-10

Squirrel

Broccoli (Brassica oleracea)

8-11

Striped cucumber beetle

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

4-9

Striped cucumber beetle

Nasturtium (Trapaeolum majus)

9-11

Striped pumpkin beetle

Chinaberry or Indian lilac (Melia azedarach)

8-12

Termite

Oak leaf smoke (Quercus robur)

3-10

Termite

Annual Delphinium (Consolida ambigua)

9-11

Thrips

Common Sage (Salvia officinalis)

5-10

Ticks

Basil (Ocimum basilicum)

10-12

Tomato hornworm

Borage (Borage officinalis)

5-10

Tomato hornworm

Marigold (Calendula officinalis)

6-10

Tomato hornworm

Dill (Anethum graveolens)

8-10

Tomato worm

Radish (Raphanus sativus)

6-9

Vine borer

Elder (Sambucus ebulus)

5-10

Vole

Bay (Laurus nobilis). Bay leaves stored with wheat, rye, beans, or oats repel weevils.

8-11

Weevil

Catnip (Nepeta cataria)

3-10

Weevil

Garlic (Allium sativum)

8-10

Weevil

Peppermint (Mentha piperita)

3-7

White Cabbage butterfly

Mint (Mentha)

3-7

White Cabbage Moth

Apple-Of-Peru or Shoofly (Nicandra physalodes)

8-11

White fly

Basil (Ocimum basilicum)

10-12

White Fly

Garden Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)

7-10

White fly

French Marigold (Tagetes patula)

11-12

White fly

Nasturtium (Trapaeolum majus)

9-11

White fly

Oak leaf smoke (Quercus robur)

3-10

White fly in greenhouses

Johnson grass (Sorghum halapense)

9-12

Willamette mites on vines

Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum)

10

Wireworm

White mustard (Brassica campestris)

9-11

Wireworm

Woad (Isatis tinctoria)

6-8

Wireworm

Nasturtium (Trapaeolum majus)

9-11

Woolly aphid

Carrot (Daucus carota)

3-9

Worms in goats

Mulberry leaves (Morus indica)

4-6

Worms in horses

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

4-9

Worms -Tansy leaves for worms in horses

The following book and its cd from the Garden Planting Design section of the Library will help with the growing conditions etc of the above plants:-

Title

Author

Pictures of

Content

IBSN Number

Flora the gardener's bible

tony lord

12000 plant photos

20,000 good descriptions of garden plants, some 12,000 with colour photographs. There is also an interactive CD with it which has all 20,000 plants on it. The plant chooser part of it can break up the list into plant groups, uses, hardiness zones, height, position (sun, half-sun, shade), flower colour and flowering season (spring, summer, autumn or winter). Extremely useful for getting plant lists.

0-304-36435-5

The following books from the Library will provide more data on pest control:-

Title

Author

Pictures of

Content

IBSN Number

Bugs, slugs & other thugs Controlling garden pests organically

Rhinda massingham hart

Line drawings

Very useful essay on organic pest control of bad birds, rodent warriors, big game, friends and neighbours, lowlifes, what bugs you and acquiring and managing beneficials

0-88266- 664-9

Gardening with the Enemy. A guide to Rabbit-proof Gardening

Janet Thomson

 

Rabbit-proof plants list with description. Thin book

0-9530013 0 X

Organic Pest & Disease Management Practical guides to growing organically

Magi brown

23 black and white illustrations

Describes cultural methods of control -biological pest control - barriers, traps and deterrents- along with commercial products suitable for organic gardens Thin Booklet

HDRA Publishing, Ryton Organic Gardens, Coventry. CV8 3LG


The information above is mostly gleaned from American publications by American authors and so some of the life forms to be repelled, like the following, may not be available in Britain:-

  • Black Swallowtail,
  • Japanese Beetle,
  • Iris borer,
  • Colorado beetle,
  • Blister beetle,
  • Rose beetle,
  • Squash insect,
  • Corn earworm,
  • Fall armyworms,
  • Hornworms and
  • Gophers.

Legumes planted in a rotation will protect grain crops and grasses from white grubs and corn rootworm. Chinch bug on corn and flea beetles are controlled by growing soybeans to shade the bases of the plants.
 


The
Rabbit Welfare Association & Fund (RWAF) has existed since 1996 and is the combined effort of the Rabbit Welfare Association and its charity partner, the Rabbit Welfare Fund, working to improve the lives of domestic rabbits across the UK through education and communication by making people realise that rabbits are intelligent creatures that need space, exercise, companionship and stimulation and are not to be bought on a whim.

Sadly, despite being the third most popular pets in Britain, rabbits are still one of the most neglected domestic animals.

A huge proportion of rabbits live out their days in a small hutch with little or no exercise, or are unwanted and discarded onto rescue centres that are already bursting at the seams. Most cases of cruelty and neglect towards rabbits are out of ignorance; people often don't realise they are doing anything wrong because they haven’t done enough research into rabbit care and wellbeing before choosing to buy a pet rabbit.

As well as being an animal welfare agency, the RWAF also offers members the support needed to give their rabbits the best lives possible and have a huge wealth of experience to share with you.


It has been established that people who own pets live longer, have less stress, and have fewer heart attacks.

Most pet owners (94 percent) say their pet makes them smile more than once a day.
 

Dogs can distinguish between blue, yellow, and gray, but probably do not see red and green. This is much like our vision at twilight.
 

A cat can jump as much as seven times its height.

A cat's tail held high means happiness. A twitching tail is a warning sign, and a tail tucked in close to the body is a sure sign of insecurity. Many cats are unable to properly digest cow's milk. Milk and milk products give them diarrhea.
 

What we do about slugs from

Guy's News
Exodus; not a good time for slugs
from their leaflet from Riverford Organic Farmers on Monday 19th June 2017:-

For the last month, our irrigation reservoirs have been rimmed by a black mass of writhing tadpoles. I reckon there are over a million in the one I swim in, even after the carp have feasted. Last week they got their legs and this week they are off; the ground around the ponds is heaving as they go in search of their first terrestial meal. Facing this hungry biblical plague, slugs have no chance. It will be 2 years before the toads return to breed, by which time they'll have made a home on the waterless hill half a mile away.

"What do we do about slugs" is always the visiting gardener's top question on our organic farms. The answer, with the occasional exception of out polytunnels, is nothing; they aren't a problem for our field crops. I know you will find the occasional slimy surprise in our lettuces and our sprouts are often scarred (which we hope and assume you can live with), but I cannot remember ever seeing any organic crops suffering significantly. Most conventional potato growers will routinely apply vast quantities of slug pellets and still have substantial damage. Likewise, slugs can be a huge problem in winter wheat and barley even after applying pellets, but almost never when the ground has been organic for 3 years or more. The reason is undoubtedly that our soils, free from pesticides and synthetic fertilisers, are teeming with life looking for a meal; toads, frogs and carabid beetles like to munch on slugs, nematodes will paratize them, and there are almost certainly many other predators and pathogens. No one makes money from their activity, so this unglamorous part of ecology hasn't been studied much.

The principle of organic farming is to find balance; the population of every indigenous pest (except Homo sapiens) is regulated by predators and pathogens. It doesn't always work; sometimes you have to encourage them a little (e.g. flowering plants to foster the lacewings and hoverflies that control aphids), but with slugs all you have to do is spare the soil those toxic chemicals, and soil ecology will do the rest. Annoyingly I know this approach does not work in a garden; I suspect there is just too much cover for the slugs to retreat to. If you can handle the poo and keep the foxes away, get a duck.

 

In my own front, back and vegetable area, I have not used any chemicals on or in the ground for 30 years and my mixture of wildlife seems to keep the slugs down.

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