Ivydene Gardens Infill2 Plants Index Gallery:
Plants for Cut Flowers in May

INFILL2 PLANTS INDEX GALLERY PAGES

Links in Table below are available in Shrub Tree Shape Index Gallery


Site Map

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

Click on number in cells below to jump to that page detailing those cultivated plants with that plant type and their botanical name starts with that letter.

Click on or underlined text to jump to page comparing flower thumbnails of that blue colour.
is Red, Pink, Purple and is Unusual or Other Flower Colour.

Plant Type
with links to Other Plant Photo Galleries

A
B
C

D
E
F

G
H
I

J
K
L

M
N
O

P
Q
R

S
T
U

V
W
X

Y
Z

Alpine in Evergreen Perennial, Herbaceous Perennial and Rock Garden

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

Aquatic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annual/ Biennial

1

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

Bamboo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bedding and RHS Mixed Border Beds



















Bicolour

Other Flower Colours

White / Colour Bicolour

Bulb and
Allium / Anemone, Colchicum / Crocus, Dahlia, Gladiolus, Narcissus, Tulip





 

 



 



 



1



Climber



 





 









Conifer

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deciduous Shrub

1

 

 

 



 







Deciduous Tree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evergreen Perennial

1

 

 

 



 







Evergreen Shrub , Semi-Evergreen Shrub and Heather

1

 

 

 



 







Evergreen Tree

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grass

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

Herbaceous Perennial and RHS Mixed Border Beds



 

 

1



 







Herb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Odds and Sods

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rhododendron, Azalea, Camellia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rose

 

 





 









Soft Fruit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sub-Shrub

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top Fruit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wildflower
with
Plants used by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterflies in the UK



















Shrub and Small Tree

Botanical Names Page

Common Names Page

Companion Planting

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

UV

W

XYZ

Pest Control by Companion Planting

The following 2 books (written by Louise Riotte 1909-1998 who was one of North America's most beloved gardeners) provide a wealth of extra information telling you what plants to put together for what purpose and how it does it (The only wasted information on each page is the page number!!!):-

Carrots love Tomatoes: Secrets of Companion Planting for Successful Gardening by Louise Riotte Second Edition (Storey Publishing 1998) ISBN-13: 978-1-58017-027-7

Roses love Garlic: Companion Planting and other Secrets of Flowers by Loiuse Riotte Second Edition (Storey Publishing 1998)
ISBN 1-58017-028-5

Ivydene Gardens Infill2 Plants Index Gallery:
Plants for Cut Flowers in May

Botanical Plant Name

with link to
UK or
European Union
mail-order supplier for you to contact to buy this plant

Flower Colour
and Background Colour nearest to main petal colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Sun Aspect:- Full Sun,
Part Shade, Full Shade

with link to external website for photo/data

Flowering Months in UK

with link to
USA or
Canada
mail-order supplier

Height with Spacings or Width (W) in inches (cms)

1 inch =
2.5 cms
12 inches = 30 cms
40 inches = 100 cms

Foliage Colour

and Background Colour nearest to middle-aged leaf colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Soil Moisture:-
Dry,
Moist,
Wet

with link to Australia or New Zealand mail-order supplier

Plant Type is:-

A for Aquatic
Ann for Annual / Biennial
Ba for Bamboo
Bu for Bulb
Cl for Climber
Co for Conifer
F for Fern
G for Grass
H for Herb
P for Perennial
Rh for Rhodo-dendron, Azalea, Camellia
Ro for Rose
Sh for Shrub
So for Soft Fruit
To for Top Fruit
Tr for Tree
V for Vegetable
W for Wildflower

followed by:-
E for Evergreen,
D for Deciduous,
H for Herbaceous,
Alpine for being an Alpine as well as being 1 of above Plant Type /

 
Acid for Acidic,
Alk for Alkaline,
Any for AnySoil
 

with link to
ALL PLANTS Index Gallery page

Comments

Adjacent Planting

Plant Associations

It is sad to reflect that in England so few gardens open to the public label their plants or label them so that the label is visible when that plant is in flower, so that visitors can identify; and then later locate and purchase that plant.

Few mail-order nurseries provide the detail as shown in my rose or heather galleries.

If you want to sell a product, it is best to display it. When I sold my Transit van, I removed its signage, cleaned it and took photos of the inside and outside before putting them onto an advert in Autotrader amongst more than 2000 other Transit vans - it was sold in 20 minutes.

If mail-order nurseries could put photos to the same complexity from start of the year to its end with the different foliage colours and stages of flowering on Wikimedia Commons, then the world could view the plant before buying it, and idiots like me would have valid material to work with.

I have been in the trade (until ill health forced my Sole Trader retirement in 2013) working in designing, constructing and maintaining private gardens for decades and since 2005 when this site was started, I have asked any nursery in the world to supply photos. R.V. Roger in Yorkshire allowed me to use his photos from his website in 2007 and when I got a camera to spend 5 days in July 2014 at my expense taking photos of his roses growing in his nursery field, whilst his staff was propagating them. I gave him a copy of those photos.

Anemones (Windflower, wood anemone is a member of the Wildflower Buttercup Family)

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Many different colours

Spring blooming anemones do best in part shade. Fall bloomers thrive in full sun to part shade.

The sea anemone represents a clownfish's territory. Once established, It is rarely abandoned and clownfish will not venture far from it. The sea anemones stinging tentacles provide a safe haven for the clown when danger approaches. In return the clown fish helps the anemone by cleaning its tentacles of detritus, and possibly running off potential predators.

12-24 x
(30-40 x )

Anemones like soil that is deep and rich, with plenty of well-decayed manure, so that it holds moisture, but is also well-drained.

Bu

Tuberous-rooted or herbaceous perennials

Propagate tuberous-rooted anemones by seeds sown in prepared beds in January or in July. The best varieties should be taken up annually and offsets removed for propagation, but others are usually left undisturbed.
Best Tuberous Varieties:-

  • Anemone coronaria (poppy anemone), spring flowering, various colours
  • Anemone hortensis fulgens (Anemone hortensis, scarlet windflower), spring. (Best for naturalizing)
  • Anemone nemorosa (wood anemone is a member of the Wildflower Buttercup Family), spring, white (Use under deciduous shrubs or trees)
  • Anemone nemorosa robinsoniana, a good subject for the rock garden; sky blue
  • Anemone blanda, blue, winter flowering
  • Anemone palmata, yellow, likes peaty soil, 6 inches (15 cms), May

Herbaceous Varieties:-

  • Anemone alpina, 6 inches (15 cms), white
  • Anemone pulsatilla (Pasque Flower), purple, spring
  • Anemone sylvestris, the snowdrop-flowered anemone. This dislikes cold soils
  • Anemone hepatica, spring, flowering various colours
  • Anemone japonica, September-flowering perennial 24 inches (60 cms) in height, very useful for mixed borders. In addition to the white form, rose shades are now offered.

To make up an ideal bed for cultivation of these flowers, dig out 18 inches (45 cms) of soil. Put in a 6 inch (15 cms) layer of cow dung. Then refill the bed with good fresh loam. On this can be sown the seed, which must first be separated carefully so that it is evenly distributed. Generally the plants will flower the same season, but only the best kinds for exhibition should be retained for the following year. Never let the plants lack moisture, but do not let water become stagnant in the soil or the leaves will become distorted and swollen.
When planting, put the tubers 2-3 inches (5-7.5 cms) deep in soil similar to that of the seed bed described above, i.e.soil containing good loam, and rotted cow dung, with a quantity of sand.
Anemones will not usually respond to much forcing, but they may be potted in September, and grown in a cold frame or pit until spring, when they may be removed to the greenhouse. In this way excellent pot blooms may be obtained.

Aquilegia alpina (Columbine)

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aquilegiacfloalpinawikimediacommons

Aquilegia alpina, Ranunculaceae, Alpine Columbine, flower; Botanical Garden KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany. By H. Zell, via Wikimedia Commons

Berberis Darwinii and Berberis stenophylla (Barberries - Darwin's and Stenophylla)

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Culture: Plant evergreens (E) from March to April or October and November; deciduous (D), November to March, in ordinary soil. Thin out shoots after flowering when overcrowded and trim to shape. Those grown for autumn foliage should not be trimmed until the spring.
Propagation: by seeds sown in open in October, by half-matured cuttings in a frame in July or August, or by layering in August.

 

berberiscflodarwiniiwikimediacommons

Berberis darwinii shoot with flowers. By MPF at the English language Wikipedia, via Wikimedia Commons

Genista hispanica (Broom, Spanish Gorse, Spanish Furze)

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genistacflohispanicawikimediacommons

Genista hispanica. In Montsec de Rúbies (Noguera-Catalunya). To 1.180 m. altitude. This is a a photo of a natural area in Catalonia, Spain, with id: ES510192 By Isidre blanc, via Wikimedia Commons

Carnations are flowers for all those born in the month of January.

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Do not confuse the above Carnation with Carnation.

 

 

 

 

 

There are many different Carnations described in The New Illustrated Gardening Encyclopedia by Richard Sudell, printed before May 1935 for the plant names, culture and propagation.

Further details from British National Carnation Society.

There are many different carnations detailed in Mr. Middleton's Garden Book by Daily Express Publication, reprinted 1941 for the individual cultivar names with flower colour, flower month and height.

dianthuscforcaryophylluswikimediacommons1

Dianthus caryophyllus, a photography originating of the internet site http://sophy.u-3mrs.fr/. The accord of the autor, H. Brisse, is here. By Henry Brisse, via Wikimedia Commons

Erysimum cheiri (Cheiranthus cheiri, Wallflower)

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erysimumcforcheiriwikimediacommons1

Erysimum cheiri. By ‪Aroche , via Wikimedia Commons

Clematis alpina

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Clematis tangutica 'Gravetye'

 

Clematis in flower for every month of the year (see also Clematis Climber Plant Gallery)

Growing Clematis in Containers

A Quick Guide to Clematis Pruning from The British Clematis Society

Bell-like Lavender

In nature the flowering portions of this plant are exposed to Full Sun, whilst the main stem and lower parts of the plant are often shaded by other vegetation. It is therefore advisable to place the plants on the northern side of their supports.

Mar-May

120 x 60
(150 x 300)

The moist soil should be an open loamy one, containing lime or chalk, the Clematis being essentially a plant of calcareous soils. The clematis also thrives in peaty loam.

Cl H

Clematis alpina comes from the mountains of central and southern Europe, and it is a delightful May-flowering slender climber that can be planted on the shady side of a large rock to scramble over and drape its face. Its flowers are bell-shaped and blue, but there are also white flower-forming of equal charm.

Clematis alpina does not need pruning. It can scramble through a strong shrub or tree.

Another gem of slender growth is Clematis tangutica 'Gravetye variety, with its rich golden yellow nodding lantern-shaped flowers and silky whorled seed heads that give joy from August to October.

Taylors Clematis : Bees & Butterflies
"With the rapid decline of bees in the last few years here are a selection of clematis that we feel are especially attractive to bees and butterfly's. Bees love a varied Menu so aim to provide a mixture of colours and textures as well as flower shapes and plant heights. The 1st solitary bees emerge very early in the spring, so any of the alpina & macropetala varieties would be ideal for this period. Large mid season single flowered varieties will provide pollen for May & June. For later flowering varieties, look at the integrifolas and any 'bell shaped' flowers as these are also very effective."

First Choices

clematiscflosalpinawikimediacommons

Clematis alpina, 1 avril 2003, Jardin des Plantes, Paris. By The original uploader was Bouba at French Wikipedia via Wikimedia Commons.

Deutzia longifolia (Deutzia)

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deutziacflolongifoliawikimediacommons

Deutzia longifolia in the UC Botanical Garden, Berkeley, California, USA. Identified by sign. By Stickpen, via Wikimedia Commons

Lamprocapnos spectabilis (Dicentra spectabilis - Bleeding Heart, Dielytra)

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lamprocapnoscflosspectabiliswikimediacommons

Lamprocapnos spectabilis, Papaveraceae, Venus's Car, Bleeding Heart, Dutchman's Trousers, Lyre Flower, inflorescence; Botanical Garden KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany. The plant is used in homeopathy as remedy: Dicentra spectabilis (Dice-s.). By H. Zell, via Wikimedia Commons

Doronicum pardalianches (Leopardsbane is a member of the Wildflower Daisy Family)

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doronicumcflopardalianchewikimediacommons

Doronicum pardalianche. By Kurt Stüber, via Wikimedia Commons

Myosotis palustris (Forget-me-nots, Myosotos scorpioides)

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myosotiscforscorpioideswikimediacommons

Myosotis scorpioides (forget-me-not) photo taken on 8 April 2004, 19:52. By Nicu Buculei from Bucharest, Romania, via Wikimedia Commons

Gladiolus (Corn Flag, Sword Lily)

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Corm

Pot Culture: Compost, 2 parts loam, 1 part well decayed manure and river sand. Position, pots in cold frame, cool greenhouse or window. Pot Colvillei varieties October or November, placing 5 corms 1 inch (2.5 cms) deep in a 6-inch (15 cms) pot; late kinds March or April, one 1 inch deep in a 6-inch pot or three 1 inch deep in an 8 inch (20 cm) pot. Place pots in cold frame till flower spikes show, then remove to greenhouse or window. Water moderately at first, freely afterwards. --->

Apply liquid manure when flower spikes show. After flowering gradually withold water till foliage dies, then clean off corms and sore in trays as with those grown outdoors.

Propagation: By seeds down 0.125 inch (3mm) deep in pans of light rich soil in February, in temperature 55 to 65 degess Fahrenheit (13-18 degrees Celsius); by bulbils growing at base of corms, planted 2 inches (5 cms) deep and 6 inches (15 cms) apart in sunny border outdoors, March. Seedlings flower when 3 years old; bulbils when 2 years old.

gladioluscfloalatuswikimediacommons

Deutsch: Siegwurz Gladiolus alatus L., Nahaufnahme, in den Cederbergs, Distrikt Westküste, Südafrika. By Amada44, via Wikimedia Commons

Gypsophila elegans

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gypsophilacfloseleganswikimediacommons

Gypsophila elegans カスミソウ。
(2007/05/23 Takarazuka, Hyogo, JAPAN). By Hyougushi / Hideyuki KAMON from Takarazuka, Hyogo, JAPAN, via Wikimedia Commons

Halesia

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halesiacfloscarolinawikimediacommons

Halesia carolina. Flowers of a Little silverbell in the Manie van der Schijff Botanical Garden, Pretoria. By ‪JMK, via Wikimedia Commons

Lunaria annua (Honesty)

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lunariacflosannuawikimediacommons

Lunaria annua - Annual Honesty. By Philipendula 11:18, 10 May 2005 (UTC), via Wikimedia Commons

Aesculus hippo-castanum (Horse -chestnut, conker tree)

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aesculuscflohippocastanumwikimediacommons

Aesculus hippocastanum - Rosskastanienblüte bei Fronhausen, Landkreis Marburg-Biedenkopf, Hessen, Deutschland. Photo taken on 5 May 2005. By Nikanos. Attribution ShareAlike 2.5, via Wikimedia Commons

Hydrangea macrophylla (Hydrangea)

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hydrangeacflosmacrophyllawikimediacommons

Hydrangea macrophylla. By Frank Vincentz, via Wikimedia Commons

Papaver nudicaule (Iceland Poppy)

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papavercfornudicaulewikimediacommons

Papaver nudicaule. Photograph taken at the Jardin des Plantes in Paris, France. By David Monniaux, via Wikimedia Commons

Iris unguicalis (Algerian Winter Iris)

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Full Sun

Blue

Feb-Apr

12 (30)

Thrives in a dry, stony Alkaline soil. Well-drained, dry, poor to moderately fertile.

Rhizome E

Iris Sections: Tall Bearded, Dwarf Bearded, Beardless, Cushion, Japanese and Bulbous-rooted.
Culture of Beardless Section: Moist soil and margins of ponds or streams for I. versicolor, siberica, ochroleuca and Pseudacorus. Plant, October or March.
Cool, deep soil well supplied with humus and partially shady position for I. gracilipes. Plant, March or April.
Ordinary rich soil and sunny borders or rockeries for other species. Plant in October or March.

 

iriscflounguiculariswikimediacommons

Iris unguicularis in the botanic garden of BerneDate13 March 2009. By Feloidea, via Wikimedia Commons

Ixia

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ixiacflosmonadelphawikimediacommons

Afrikaans: Ixia monadelpha bontkalossie. By Andrew massyn, via Wikimedia Commons

Kerria japonica

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kerriacflosjaponicawikimediacommons

Kerria japonica Pleniflora. By Simon Eugster, via Wikimedia Commons

Laburnum anagyroides (Laburnum vulgare, Laburnum, Common Laburnum, Golden Rain)

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laburnumcflosanagyroideswikimediacommons

Laburnum anagyroides. By J.F. Gaffard, via Wikimedia Commons

Syringa vulgaris (Lilac)

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Full Sun

Lilac to mauve, occasionally white

May-Jun

240-276
(600-690)

Well-drained soil. Tolerant of alkaline soils

Sh D

Culture: Soil, ordinary good. Position, sunny borders or shrubberies. Plant, October to February. Prune moderately after flowering (June), removing all shoots with spent flowers, and thinning out the weaker shoots. Allow no suckers to grow from roots. The speciall coloured named varieties of the Common Lilac require feeding. Give annual dressing of bonemeal, 2 ounces per square yard (1 yard=36 inches=90 cms) in spring, or on lighter soils a generous mulch of manure or compost.

Pot Culture for Forcing: Compost, 2 parts good sandy loam, 1 part leaf-mould and little sand. Pot, October or November. Place plants after potting in --->

sheltered corner outdoors, protecting pots from frost with litter until required for forcing. Transfer to temperature of 55 degrees Fahrenheit (13 degrees Celsius), November to February. Syringe daily. Water moderately. Directly buds burst place in temperature of 60 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit (15-18 degrees Celsius); when expanded replace in temperature of 55 degrees (13 degrees Celsius). Prune shoots that have flowered to within 2 inchs (5 cms) of base directly after blooming. Keep plants in heat until May, then gradually harden and plant outdoors. Plants must not be forced 2 years in succession. Lilacs may be grown in cold greenhouse for flowering in A pril and May. Place in greenhouse in November.

syringacforvulgariswikimediacommons

Syringa vulgaris in Bothanic Garden, Poznań. By Radomil talk, via Wikimedia Commons

Convallaria majalis (Lily of the Valley is a member of the Wildflower Lily Family)

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Highly poisonous

Part Shade,
Full Shade

White

May

6-8
(15-20)

Moist but well-drained, sand or silt.

After planting, then water them in and give them a good mulch of leaf mould or good compost

P Rhizome H

Outdoor Culture: Compost, equal parts loam, leaf-mould, decayed manure and sharp sand. Position, beds or borders under shade of trees, high walls or fences for general culture; south border for early flowering. Plant single crowns 2 or 3 inches (5 or 7.5 cms) apart, with points just below surface, in September and October. Lift and replant every 4 years, always planting largest crowns by themselves. Mulch bed annualy in February with decayed manure. Apply liquid manure once a week, May to September, to beds more than a year old.

Pot Culture: Compost, equal parts good soil and leaf-mould. Plant 1 clump or a dozen single crowns in a 6 inch (15 cms) pot, well-drained, in October or November. Place inverted pot over crowns --->

and stand in cold frame or under greenhouse stage until January, then remove into heat, or allow to bloom naturally in greenhouse or window. Water only when soil needs moisture in winter, freely when growth begins.

Propagation: By seeds sown 0.25 inches (6mm) deep in light soil outdoors in March; division of crowns September or October.

Species Cultivated:
C. majalis, white, spring, 6 inches (15 cms),
var. Fortunei, larger flowers,
rosea, pink flowered.

Cut the flower and leaf together for a fresh looking and smelling arrangement. They will last 4-5 days but may fade faster in a warm room.

convallariacflosmajaliswikimediacommons

Convallaria majalis, Ruscaceae, Lily of the Valley, inflorescence; Karlsruhe, Germany. The fresh aerial parts of the blooming plant are used in homeopathy as remedy: Convallaria majalis (Conv.). By H. Zell, via Wikimedia Commons

Lupinus (Lupins, Scottish Lupin - Lupinus nootkatensis - is a member of the Wildflower Peaflower Family)

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lupinuscfornootkatensiswikimediacommons

Lupinus nootkatensis (de:Alaska-Lupine) in Iceland. By de:User:Jutta234, via Wikimedia Commons

Argyranthemum frutescens (Chry-santhemum frutescens, Marguerites, Paris Daisy, Marguerite Daisy

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argyranthemumcflosfrutescenswikimediacommons

Argyranthemum frutescens. 日本語: マーガレット (植物) By 日:Jnn via Wikimedia Commons

Calendula officinalis (Marigold) Tagetes patula (French Marigold) Tagetes erecta (African Marigold)

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calendulacforofficinaliswikimediacommons

Ringelblume (Calendula officinalis), Asteraceae. By Ernst Schütte at French Wikipedia, via Wikimedia Commons

Crataegus monogyna (May, Hawthorn is a member of Wildflower Rose Family)

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crataeguscflosmonogynawikimediacommons

Deutsch: Weißdorn (Crataegus monogyna) im Hockenheimer Rheinbogen. By AnRo0002, via Wikimedia Commons

Pelargonium (Geranium)

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pelargoniumcforangeleyeswikimediacommons

Pelargonium (Angel Group) 'Angeleyes', Place: Osaka-fu Japan. By KENPEI, via Wikimedia Commons

Paeonia (Paeonies, Wild Peony is a member of Wildflower Peony Family)

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paeoniacflosuffruticosawikimediacommons

Krūminio bijūno (Paeonia suffruticosa) žiedas. By Origami, via Wikimedia Commons

Dianthus (Pinks, Maiden Pink - Dianthus deltoides - is a member of Wildflower Pink Family)

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dianthuscfloschinensiswikimediacommons

Dianthus chinensis. Common name: China Pink. Chinese Pink. India Pink. Rainbow Pink. 石竹 (Chinese). By Mokkie, via Wikimedia Commons

Tanacetum (Pyrethrum, Tansy - Tanacetum vulgare - is a member of Wildflower Daisy: Chamomiles and Mayweeds Family)

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tanacetumcforvulgarewikimediacommons

Tanacetum vulgare (Asteraceae), Botanical Garden Bern, Switzerland. By MurielBendel, via Wikimedia Commons

Ranunculus (Buttercups, Meadow Buttercup - Ranunculus acris - is a member of Wildflower Buttercup Family)

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ranunculuscforacriswikimediacommons

Ranunculus acris. In Torà (Segarra- Catalunya). By Isidre blanc, via Wikimedia Commons

Rhododendron ponticum (Do not plant Rhodo-dendron ponticum as it is Public Enemy No 1 in the UK, but do use other Rhododendrons for their flowers)

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rhododendroncfloponticawikimediacommons

Rhododendron pontica. By Karduelis, via Wikimedia Commons

Spiraea (Bridewort - Spiraea salicifolia - is a member of Wildlife Rose Family)

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spiraeacflossalicifoliawikimediacommons

Spiraea salicifolia

• 日本語: ホザキシモツケ

Place:Osaka,Japan. By KENPEI, via Wikimedia Commons

Statice sinuata

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Lathyrus odoratus with 900 results from RHS
(Sweet Pea)

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The National Sweet Pea Society promotes knwledge and cultivation of Lathyrus odoratus (Sweet Peas) and other members of the Lathyrus family.

Many flower colours

Full Sun

May-Aug

71 x 12
(180 x 30)

Grow sweet peas in fertile, well-drained, humus-rich soil and in full sun or very light dappled shade. For best results, incorporate organic matter such as garden compost or well-rotted manure at least four weeks before planting and apply a mulch of Spent Mushroom Compost with matured Cow Manure to provide fertiliser throughout the growing season. After planting, water the plants well during dry spells.

Ann Cl

Sweet Pea 'Blue Shift'
Lathyrus odoratus

The astonishing colour-changing blooms of Sweet Pea 'Blue Shift' transform from light mauve to true blue as they mature. These extraordinary annuals make a spectacular display bearing different coloured blooms at the same time - flowers even change colour in the vase after cutting! Bred by renowned New Zealand Lathyrus breeder, Dr. Keith Hammett, this is a 'must have' for the sweet pea enthusiast. Height: 180cm (71"). Spread: 30cm (12").

Useful links:
How to grow sweet peas

Ideal For: patio, walls and fences, cottage gardens, scented gardens, cut flower garden

Flowering Period: May, June, July, August

Sowing Months: March, April, October

Position: full sun

See Growing Sweet Peas page from The National Sweet Pea Society for further sowing details,

or

Join The National Sweet Pea Society and receive the Booklet "Enjoy Sweet Peas" Produced by the Society - Softback – 9th edition 2008 (sent free to new members). First written in 1946, this completely revised and illustrated 88 page booklet contains invaluable information on cultivation of the Sweet Pea.

lathyruscfloodoratuswikimediacommons1

Lathyrus odoratus, Sweet Pea - Flower - Kerava, Finland. By Anneli Salo via Wikimedia Commons

Trollius (Globe Flower - Trollius europaeus - is a member of Wildlife Buttercup Family)

Supplier in UK
Supplier in USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

trolliuscfloeuropaeuswikimediacommons

Trollius europaeus. Bothanic Garden, Poznań. By Radomil talk, via Wikimedia Commons

Tulipa, dwarf species

Supplier in UK
Supplier in USA - Tulips are popular in USA (Top 10 Tulip Festivals in the USA)

With plants from all over the world displayed in a 40-acre oasis of gardens and glasshouses, Cambridge University Botanic Garden has a collection of 60 of the 100 species of tulipa

 

 

 

 

 

There are other tulipa used as alpines in Rock Garden Plants Suitable for Small Gardens in Colour Wheel Rock Gallery and Tulip Gallery.

Elegant Tulip Bulbs - The Best Information on Tulip Bulbs. The aim of this web site is to provide you with all the best information and answers about these beautiful flowers.

A genus of bulbous plants, with many lovely dwarf species and varieties, which add beauty in colour and form to alpine gardens. Their chief needs are well-drained, porous soil, spring and early summer sun, and deep planting. Many will, when happy, increase by offset bulblets, and need lifting, sorting and replanting every third or fourth year, others can be increased by seed, though it make take 4 to 7 years for seedlings to reach flowering stage.

tulipacflosylvestriswikimediacommons1

Tulipa_sylvestris - close-up flower. By Meneerke bloem, via Wikimedia Commons.

Viola cornuta

Supplier in UK
Supplier in USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

violacflocornutawikimediacommons

Viola cornuta, Vallée de Lesponne (65). By Cptcv at French Wikipedia, via Wikimedia Commons

Erysimum cheiri (Cheiranthus cheiri, Wallflower)

Supplier in UK
Supplier in USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

erysimumcforcheiriwikimediacommons

Erysimum cheiri. By ‪Aroche , via Wikimedia Commons

Wisteria sinensis

Supplier in UK
Supplier in USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

wisteriacflossinensiswikimediacommons

Wisteria sinensis (glicínia) em Lindoso, Parque Nacional da Peneda-Gerês. By PatríciaR, via Wikimedia Commons

Ivydene Gardens Infill2 Plants Index Gallery:
Plants for Cut Flowers in May

Cut Flowers All The Year from The New Illustrated Gardening Encyclopedia by Richard Sudell, printed before May 1935 for the plant names in each month, followed by details for culture and propagation. Mr. Middleton's Garden Book by Daily Express Publication, reprinted 1941 for the individual cultivar names with evergreen/deciduous, flower colour, flower month and height.

The following - in the 3 pages of Cut Flowers all the Year - ordinary garden flowers, foliage and berries (including products of the greenhouse) should be available for the decoration of the home. For convenience; they are grouped under each month. By a careful study of the different kinds, and planning ahead, amateur gardeners should be able to dispense with the need for purchasing floral decorations, a form of economy by which the appearance of the garden itself will benefit.

There are other pages on Plants which bloom in each month of the year in this website:-

 

 

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

 

The Propagation of Alpines by Lawrence D. Hills. Published in 1950 by Faber and Faber Limited describes every method of propagation for 2,500 species.

Unlike modern books published since 1980, this one states exactly what to do and is precisely what you require if you want to increase your alpines.


Site design and content copyright ©July 2016. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

Ivydene
Horticultural
Services

 

 

Click on text in cells below to jump to that page detailing those Infill2 Plants of that plant type for that Cultivation requirement.

Plant Type
 

 

Alpines for Rock Garden (See Rock Garden Plant Flowers)

Alpine Shrubs and Conifers

The Alpine Meadow
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

The Alpine Border

Alpine Plants for a Purpose

The Alpines that Dislike Lime

Alpines and Walls
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

Alpines and Paving

Sink and Trough gardens

Aquatic
(Water Plants) for

Anti-erosion Riverbank

Marginal Plants (Bog Garden Plants)

Oxy-genating Weeds

Water Lilies

Floating Plants

Waterside Plants
and Plants for Dry Margins next to a Pond

Wildlife Pond Plants

Annual for

----------------

Plants for Cut Flowers in
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Exposed Sites

Sheltered Sites with Green-house Annuals from 1916

Extra Poor Soil with Half-Hardy Annuals from 1916

Very Rich Soil with Biennials from 1916

Gap-filling in Mixed Borders with Hardy Annuals from 1916

Patio Containers

Cut Flowers Page 1
Page 2 Everlasting Flowers with Red Flowers from 1916

Attracting beneficial insects

Scent / Fragrance with Annuals for Cool or Shady Places from 1916

Low-allergen Gardens for Hay Fever Sufferers

Annual Plant Pairing Ideas

Low-Growing Annuals

Medium-Growing Annuals

Tall-Growing Annuals with White Flowers from 1916

Black or Brown Flowers

Blue to Purple Flowers

Green Flowers with Annuals and Biennials from 1916

Red to Pink Flowers
Page 1
Page 2

White Flowers

Yellow or Orange Flowers

Decorative Foliage

Moist Soil

Shade

House-plants with Yellow Flowers from 1916

Edging Beds

Hanging Baskets

Vining Annuals

 

Bedding for

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Autumn/ Winter Bedding

Bedding for Light Sandy Soil

Bedding for Acid Soil

Bedding for Chalky Soil

Bedding for Clay Soil

Black Flowers

Blue Flowers

Orange Flowers

Pink Flowers

Long Flowering

Coloured Leaves

Attractive to Wildlife including Bees, Butterflies and Moths

Purple Flowers

Red Flowers

White Flowers

Yellow Flowers

Multi-Coloured Flowers

Aromatic Foliage or Scented Flowers

Bedding Plant Use

Flowers with 2 Petals

Flowers with 3 Petals

Flowers with
4 Petals

Flowers with 5 Petals

Flowers with 6 Petals

Flowers with more than 6 Petals

Use in Hanging Baskets

Flower Simple Shape

Shape of
Stars

Shape of
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Shape of
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

Shape of
Trumpets and Funnels

Shape of
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

Use in Pots and Troughs

Flower Elaborated Shape

Shape of
Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Shape of
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Shape of
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

 

Use in
Screening

Use in
Window Boxes

Shape of
Standards, Wings and Keels

Shape of
Discs and Florets

Shape of
Pin-Cushions and Tufts

Shape of
Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

Cut Flowers

Use in Bedding Out

Use in
Filling In

Biennial for

Cottage and Other Gardens

Cut Flower with Biennials for Rock Work from 1916

Patio Containers with Biennials for Pots in Greenhouse / Conservatory

Beneficial to Wildlife with Purple and Blue Flowers from 1916

Scent with Biennials for Sunny Banks or Borders from 1916

 

 

Bulb for
--------------
Explanation Intro to Bulbs
--------------
725 Blue, White, Yellow, Unusual Colour, or Red-Purple-Pink flowering Bulbs in each month they flower.

Indoor Bulbs for
December
January
February

Indoor Bulbs for
March
April
May

Indoor
Bulbs for
June
July
August

Indoor Bulbs for September
October
November

Bulbs in Window-boxes

Bulbs in the Border

Bulbs naturalised in Grass

Plant Bloom Dec-Jan
Feb-Mar

Plant Bloom
Apr-May
Jun-Aug

Plant Bloom
Sep-Oct
Nov-Dec

Plant Bloom Smallest of Gardens

Bulbs for the Bulb Frame

Bulbs in the Woodland Garden

Bulbs in the Rock Garden

Bulbs in Green-house or Stove

Achimenes, Alocasias, Amorpho-phalluses, Arisaemas, Arums, Begonias, Bomareas, Caladiums

Clivias,
Colocasias, Crinums, Cyclamens, Cyrt-anthuses, Eucharises, Urceocharis, Eurycles

Freesias, Gloxinias, Hae-manthus, Hipp-eastrums

Lachenalias, Nerines, Lycorises, Pen-cratiums, Hymen-ocallises, Richardias, Sprekelias, Tuberoses, Vallotas, Watsonias, Zephy-ranthes

Bulbs in Bowls

Bulbs in the Alpine House

Hardy Bulbs

Aconitum, Allium, Alstroe-meria, Anemone

Amaryllis, Antheri-cum, Antholy-zas, Apios, Arisaema, Arum, Aspho-deline,

Aspho-delus, Belam-canda, Bloomeria, Brodiae, Bulbo-codium

Calochorti, Cyclo-bothras, Camassia, Colchicum, Con-vallaria, Forcing Lily of the Valley, Corydalis, Crinum, Crosmia, Montbretia , Crocus

Cyclamen, Dicentra, Dierama, Eranthis, Eremurus, Erythrnium, Eucomis

Fritillaria, Funkia, Galanthus, Galtonia, Gladiolus, Hemero-callis

Hyacinth, Hyacinths in Pots, Scilla, Puschkinia, Chionodoxa, Chionoscilla, Muscari

Iris, Kniphofia, Lapeyrousia, Leucojum

Lilium,

Lilium in Pots, Malvastrum, Merendera, Milla, Narcissus, Narcissi in Pots

Orni-thogalum, Oxalis, Paeonia, Ran-unculus, Romulea, Sanguin-aria,
Stern-bergia, Schi-zostylis, Teco-philaea, Trillium

Tulip, Zephy-ranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs

Acidanthera, Albuca, Alstroemeri, Andro-stephium, Bassers, Boussing-aultias, Bravoas, Cypellas, Dahlias, Galaxis,
Geis-sorhizas, Hesper-anthas

Gladioli, Ixias,
Sparaxises, Babianas, Morphixias, Tritonias

Ixiolirions, Moraeas, Orni-thogalums, Oxalises, Phaedra-nassas,
Pan-cratiums, Tigridias, Zephyr-anthes, Cooperias

Bulbs for Bedding

 

Plant Bedding Spring
Summer

Climber 3 sector Vertical Plant System with flowers in
Jan,
Feb,
Mar,
Apr,
May 1, 2
Jun,
Jul,
Aug,
Sep,
Oct,
Nov,
Dec

----------

Choosing the right Shrub or Climber

1a.
The Base -
Base of Wall Plants

1b.
Annuals

1c.
Herbs and Vegetables

1d.
Cut flowers, Cut Foliage

1e.
Scented flower or foliage

1f.
Foliage use only

 

2a. 1,2,3,4
The Prime - Wall Shrubs

2b.
Fruit trees

3a.
The Higher Reaches -
House-wall Ramblers

3b. 1,2
Non-House-Wall - Climbing Twiners

3c.
Non-House-Wall - Self-clinging Climbers

Raised Bed for Wheelchair Users

Plants for Wildlife-Use as well

Fastest Covering

Least protruding growth when fan-trained

1, 2
Evergreen

Use as
Hedge

Exposed Positions

Use as Groundcover

1,2
Ornam-ental Fruit

Scented Flowers

1, 2
Autumn Foliage Colour

Winter Bark

Winter and Early Spring Flowers

Summer Colour or Shape of Foliage

Edible Fruit

Needs Conservatory or Greenhouse

Large Pots and Containers

Cut Flowers

Attractive to Bees

Climber - Simple Flower Shape

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a
Stars

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14k1a1
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord2
Trumpets and Funnels

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming
Salverform

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14q1
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

 

Climber - Elaborated Flower Shape

prunellaflotgrandiflora
Tubes, Lips and Straps

aquilegiacfloformosafoord
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14u1a
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14v1a
Standards, Wings and Keels

brachyscomecflorigidulakevock
Disks and Florets

androsacecforyargongensiskevock
Pin-cushions, Tufts, Petal-less and Cushions

armeriaflomaritimakevock
Umbels, Buttons and Pompoms


Gardening with Alpines by Stanley B. Whitehead. Garden Book Club. Published in 1962. It provides most of the data about the Alpines.

Essential Annuals The 100 Best for Design and Cultivation. Text by Elizabeth Murray. Photography by Derek Fell. ISBN 0-517-66177-2, provides data about annuals.


Indoor Bulb Growing by Edward Pearson. Published by Purnell & Sons, Ltd in 1953. It provides the data about Indoor Bulbs and Bulbs in Window-boxes.

Colour All The Year In My Garden: A selection of choice varieties - annuals, biennials, perennials, bulbs, climbers and trees and shrubs - that will give a continuity of colour in the garden throughout the year. Edited by C.H. Middleton. Gardening Book from Ward, Lock & Co published in 1938, provides plant data for a calendar of plants in bloom throughout the year and for those in the smallest garden.

The Book of Bulbs by S. Arnott, F.R.H.S. Printed by Turnbull & Spears, Edinburgh in 1901. This provides data about Hardy Bulbs, Half-Hardy Bulbs, Greenhouse and Stove Bulbs.

Collins Guide to Bulbs by Patrick M. Synge. ISBN 0 00 214016-0 First Edition 1961, Second Edition 1971, Reprinted 1973. This provides data on bulbs for bedding, bulbs in the border, bulbs naturalised in grass, bulbs in the woodland garden, bulbs in the rock garden, bulbs in pans in the alpine house, bulbs in the greenhouse, bulbs in bowls and the bulb frame.

Topic
Case Studies
Companion Planting
Garden Construction
Garden Design
Garden Maintenance
Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants
Soil
Tool Shed
Useful Data

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
Bulb
Climber

 

Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12

All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index

All Foliage 212
All Spring Foliage 212

All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212
Rock Plant Flowers 53

 

Your chosen Garden Style then changes your Plant Selection Process

Garden Style
...
Infill2 Plants *
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...
12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

 

Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods

Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Vegetable

Wild Flower

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly

 

Cultivation Requirements of Plant

Outdoor / Garden Cultivation

1

Indoor / House Cultivation

 

Cool Greenhouse (and Alpine House) Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter

1

Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year

1

Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

1

 

Sun Aspect

Full Sun

1

Part Shade

1

Full Shade

1

 

Soil Type

Any Soil

1

Chalky Soil

1

Clay Soil

1

Lime-Free Soil

 

Peaty Soil

1

Sandy Soil

1

Acid Soil

1

Alkaline Soil

1

Badly-drained Soil

 

 

Soil Moisture

Dry

1

Moist

1

Wet

1

 

Position for Plant

Back of Shady Border

 

Back of Shrub Border

1

Bedding

1

Bog Garden

 

Coastal Conditions / Seaside

1

Container in Garden

1

Front of Border

1

Ground Cover 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

1

Ground Cover 24-72 inches (60-180 cms)

1

Ground Cover Over 72 inches (180 cms)

 

Hanging Basket

 

Hedge

1

Hedge - Thorny

 

Pollution Barrier

 

Pond

 

Pot in House, Greenhouse, Conservatory or Stovehouse

1

Raised Bed

 

Rest of Border

1

Rock Garden

1

Scree Bed

1

Speciman on Lawn

 

Sunny Border

1

Tree for Lawn

 

Tree for Small Garden

1

Wildflower

1

Windbreak

 

Woodland

1

 

Use of Plant

Pollen or nectar for Bees

1

Hosts to Butterflies

1

Encouraging birds / wildlife, providing food and shelter

1

Bee-Pollinated plants for Hay Fever Sufferers

1

Berries / Fruit

 

Dry Site in Full Sun

1

Dry Shade

 

Filtering noise

 

Flower Arrange-ments

 

Fragrant Flower

1

Language of Flowers

 

Low maintenance

1

Moist Shade

 

Moist and swampy Sites

 

Nitrogen fixing plants

 

Not Fragrant Flower

1

Rabbit-Resistant

 

Speciman Plant

1

Thornless

 

Tolerant of Poor Soil

1

 

Plant Foliage

Aromatic Foliage

 

Autumn Foliage

 

Finely Cut Leaves

1

Large Leaves

 

Yellow Variegated Foliage

1

White Variegated Foliage

1

Red / Purple Variegated Foliage

 

Silver, Grey and Glaucous Foliage

1

Sword-shaped Leaves

 

 

 

Flower Shape

Number of Flower Petals

Petal-less
 

1

1 Petal

 

2 Petals

 

3 Petals
 

1

4 Petals
 

1

5 Petals
 

1

Above 5
 

1

 

Flower Shape - Simple

Stars
 

1

Bowls
 

 

Cups and Saucers
 

1

Globes
 

 

Goblets and Chalices
 

 

Trumpets
 

1

Funnels
 

1

Bells
 

1

Thimbles
 

 

Urns
 

 

Salverform

 

 

Flower Shape - Elaborated

Tubes, Lips and Straps
 

 

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets
 

 

Hats, Hoods and Helmets
 

 

Standards, Wings and Keels
 

 

Discs and Florets
 

 

Pin-Cushions
 

 

Tufts
 

 

Cushion
 

 

Umbel
 

1

Buttons
 

 

Pompoms
 

 

 

Natural Arrangements

Bunches, Posies, Sprays
 

1

Columns, Spikes and Spires
 

 

Whorls, Tiers and Candelabra
 

1

Plumes and Tails
 

 

Chains and Tassels
 

1

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades
 

 

Spheres, Domes and Plates
 

 

 

Shrub, Tree Shape

Columnar
 

1

Oval
 

1

Rounded or Spherical
 

 

Flattened Spherical
 

1

Narrow Conical / Narrow Pyramidal
 

1

Broad Conical / Broad Pyramidal
 

1

Ovoid /
Egg-Shaped
 

 

Broad Ovoid
 

 

Narrow Vase-shaped / Inverted Ovoid
 

 

Fan-Shaped /Vase-Shaped
 

 

Broad Fan-Shaped / Broad Vase-Shaped
 

 

Narrow Weeping
 

 

Broad Weeping
 

 

Palm

 

 

Conifer Cone

1

 

Form

Arching

1

Climbing

 

Clump-Forming

1

Mat-Forming

 

Mound-Forming

1

Prostrate

1

Spreading

1

Stemless

 

Upright

1

 

Poisonous Plant

1

 

 

It is worth remembering that especially with roses that the colour of the petals of the flower may change - The following photos are of Rosa 'Lincolnshire Poacher' which I took on the same day in R.V. Roger's Nursery Field:-

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot91a

Closed Bud

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot92a

Opening Bud

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot93a

Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot94a

Older Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot95a

Middle-aged Flower - Flower Colour in Season in its
Rose Description Page is
"Buff Yellow, with a very slight pink tint at the edges in May-October."

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot96a

Mature Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot97a

Juvenile Flower and Dying Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot98a

Form of Rose Bush

There are 720 roses in the Rose Galleries; many of which have the above series of pictures in their respective Rose Description Page.

So one might avoid the disappointment that the 2 elephants had when their trunks were entwined instead of them each carrying their trunk using their own trunk, and your disappointment of buying a rose to discover that the colour you bought it for is only the case when it has its juvenile flowers; if you look at all the photos of the roses in the respective Rose Description Page!!!!

 

This also applies to the Foliage Colour of Heathers, where sometimes it is only the top few leaves which are not green whereas others with coloured foliage have it coloured along the full length of the foliage stem.
A minor point to remember is that the distant view of a heather will show

  • months of a foliage colour followed by
  • months of flower bud,
  • flowers and then
  • seedheads.

So do not be disappointed that the foliage colour may be hidden for many months of the year by buds, flowers or seedheads.

It still makes a fine foliage plant in floral displays.
 

 

Fragrant Plants adds the use of another of your 5 senses in your garden:-
Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves.

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark.

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil
.

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
.

Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
.

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers.

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves.

Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves.

Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers.

Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit.

Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers.

Night-scented Flowering Plants.

Scented Aquatic Plants.

Plants with Scented Fruits.

Plants with Scented Roots.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums.

Scented Cacti and Succulents.

Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell.
 

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