Ivydene Gardens Stage 2 - Infill Plants Index Gallery:
Annuals for attracting Beneficial Insects Page 1

Ivydene Gardens Stage 2 - Infill Plants Index Gallery:
Annuals for attracting Beneficial Insects

Botanical Plant Name

with link to
UK or
European Union
mail-order supplier for you to contact to buy this plant

Flower Colour

Sun Aspect of Full Sun,
Part Shade, Full Shade

with link to external website for photo/data

Flowering Months

with row in each month that it flowers in that colour in
STAGE 4A
12 BLOOM COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY
/

with link to
USA or
Canada
mail-order supplier

Height with Spacings or Width (W) in inches (cms)

1 inch =
2.5 cms
12 inches = 30 cms
40 inches = 100 cms

Foliage Colour


with row in relevant pages that it has foliage of that colour in
STAGE 4B
12 FOLIAGE COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY

or
Background Colour nearest to middle-aged leaf colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Soil Moisture:-
Dry,
Moist,
Wet

with link to Australia or New Zealand mail-order supplier

 

with data for rows in
STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY and
STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Pages

Plant Type is:-

A for Aquatic
Ann for Annual / Biennial
Ba for Bamboo
Bu for Bulb
Cl for Climber
Co for Conifer
F for Fern
G for Grass
H for Herb
P for Perennial
Rh for Rhodo-dendron, Azalea, Camellia
Ro for Rose
Sh for Shrub
So for Soft Fruit
To for Top Fruit
Tr for Tree
V for Vegetable
W for Wildflower

followed by:-
E for Evergreen,
D for Deciduous,
H for Herbaceous,
Alpine for being an Alpine as well as being 1 of above Plant Type /

 
Acid for Acidic,
Alk for Alkaline,
Any for AnySoil
 

with links to
STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES
1
, 2, 3
and
STAGE 3
ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERIES
1
, 2
pages
 

Comments

RHS Perfect for Pollinators

"We have compiled three downloadable plant lists to help gardeners identify plants that will provide nectar and pollen for bees and the many other types of pollinating insects:

RHS Perfect for Pollinators – Garden Plants (566kB pdf)

RHS Perfect for Pollinators – Wildflowers (759kB pdf)

RHS Perfect for Pollinators – Plants of the World (722kB pdf)

The plants were chosen using the extensive experience, archives and records of RHS entomologists, gardeners and beekeepers in addition to published lists and scientific evidence. The lists are maintained by a team of RHS staff, including horticultural advisors, entomologists and botanists and is reviewed annually. While these lists will continue to evolve and be improved on, they represent some of the best cultivated and wild plants for gardeners to attract a wide range of pollinating insects."

Adjacent Planting

Plant Associations

THE 10 MINUTE GARDENER: WINTER WILDLIFE GARDENING

"I’m Catherine, mum, wife, writer and fan of wellies. We love exploring, creating and growing things and my blog shares ideas, inspiration and tips for making the most of busy family life, indoors and out."

Achillea millefolium (Yarrow)

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A. millefolium is a spreading stoloniferous perennial with narrow, finely pinnately dissected leaves and small, cream or pink flowerheads in flat heads in summer. The plant is a frequent component of butterfly gardens. Yarrow is considered an especially useful companion plant, repelling some pest insects while attracting good, predatory ones. It attracts predatory wasps, which drink the nectar and then use insect pests as food for their larvae. Similarly, it attracts ladybirds and hoverflies.

 

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Achillea millefolium. In la Bòfia, Odèn (Solsonès - Catalunya), at 1,740 m. altitude. By Isidre blanc, via Wikimedia Commons

Anethum graveolens (Mammoth Dill)

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Supplier in USA

White to Yellow

Prefers Full Sun with high sunshine levels

Jul-Oct, 10 weeks from spring sowing

16-24 x 10
(40-60 x 10)

Rich, well-drained, sandy or chalky soil

Ann

Dill is a brilliant, acid-green filler – its leaves are invaluable for cooking, its flowers for decorating salads and arranging, and its seeds for salads, baking and tagines. As a cut flower, it's good with whites and blues or rich, brilliant colours to heighten their contrasts. This will self-sow freely. When used as a companion plant, dill attracts many beneficial insects as the umbrella flower heads go to seed. It makes a good companion plant for cucumbers. It is a poor companion for carrots and tomatoes.

Sow from mid spring to mid summer. Best direct sown in free draining soil. Sow regularly for a continual crop.

Also may be grown in containers. Dill seed can be used to make an excellent tea. Flower heads are excellent in dried arrangements.

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Inflorescence of Dill (Anethum graveolens). By Robert Reisman (WooteleF), via Wikimedia Commons

Anthriscus cerefolium (Garden Chervil)

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Clusters of tiny white flowers in second season.

Light dappled shade

 

12-24 x 6-12 (W)
(30-60 x 15-30)

Free-draining soil

Biennial if flowers required, annual if foliage only required

The genus grows in meadows and verges on slightly wet porous soils. One species, Anthriscus cerefolium is cultivated and used in the kitchen to flavor foods. According to some, slugs are attracted to chervil and the plant is sometimes used to bait them.

Sow: February - August
Harvest: March - November

Transplanting chervil can be difficult, due to the long taproot. It prefers a cool and moist location; otherwise, it rapidly goes to seed (also known as bolting). It is usually grown as a cool-season crop, like lettuce, and should be planted in early spring and late fall or in a winter greenhouse.

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Umbellet with fruits

Taxonym: Anthriscus cerefolium var. longirostris By Stefan.lefnaer, via Wikimedia Commons

Apium graveolens (Celery)

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The growing plant is an insect repellent, it repels the cabbage white butterfly so is a good companion for brassicas. When the mosquito repellencies of four fractions of Apium graveolens seeds were investigated in the laboratory, all four were found to offer human volunteers some protection against female, adult Aedes aegypti. Mosquito repellents based on extracts of Ap. graveolens seeds could be developed commercially, as an effective personal-protection measure against mosquito bites and the diseases caused by mosquito-borne pathogens.

 

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Apium graveolens var. rapaceum flowers (nl:Knolselderij bloemen}. By Rasbak 14:22, 10 June 2007 (UTC), via Wikimedia Commons

Borago officinalis (Borage)

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B. officinalis is a large, branched annual with coarsely hairy, ovate leaves and branched cymes of starry, bright blue flowers 2cm across over a long period in summer.

Borage is used in companion planting. It is said to protect or nurse legumes, spinach, brassicas, and even strawberries. It is also said to be a good companion plant to tomatoes because it confuses the mother moths of tomato hornworms or manduca looking for a place to lay their eggs.

 

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Ogórecznik lekarski Praca własna OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Data oryginału - 2005:07:09 12:42:05 with bee. By No machine-readable author provided. Mwpal assumed (based on copyright claims)., via Wikimedia Commons

Calendula officinalis (Marigold, Pot Marigold)

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Calendula officinalis 'Indian Prince' Line veg garden paths with this to attract aphid-eating hoverflies. It will lightly self-sow.

 

 

 

 

Pot marigold florets are edible. They are often used to add color to salads or added to dishes as a garnish and in lieu of saffron. The leaves are edible but are often not palatable. They have a history of use as a potherb and in salads.

Line veg garden paths with this to attract aphid-eating hoverflies. It will lightly self-sow.

 

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Calendula officinalis - I took this photo in the dunes near Katwijk. By ‪TeunSpaans, via Wikimedia Commons

Centaurea cyanus (Bachelor's Buttons)

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Piercing, bright blue flowers with ruffled petals and violet-blue centres appear from early to late summer among lance-shaped, mid-green leaves. Once a common sight in cornfields, this lovely annual is perfect for naturalising in a sunny wildflower meadow and is a magnet for butterflies and bees. The flower petals are edible and have a clove-like taste.

 

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Centaurea cyanus - Cornflower with Bee. By Daniel Schwen (WooteleF), via Wikimedia Commons

Clarkia pulchella (Ragged Robin)

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Pollinated by bees.

Clarkia makes a good addition to flower beds, borders, containers, rock gardens and native wildflower plantings. This plant attracts bees and butterflies and resists deer.

 

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Clarkia pulchella. By Citron / CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Collinsia heterophylla (Chinese Houses)

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Easy & exceptionally bloomy, enchanting in the garden & long lasting as a cut flower, who wouldn’t fall in love with this charming California wildflower? Sweetest purple-lavender & white bicolor, snapdragon-like blooms are held in tiers on multi-branching stems to 2’ tall & across, Spring thru early Summer. Adored by bees & a host plant for the Checkerspot Butterfly. Very pretty combined with Gilia capitata, Phacelia grandiflora & Layia platyglossa. Can be grown under oaks where it will self-sow for a lovely woodland effect.

 

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Collinsia heterophylla — Purple Chinese Houses; At Blue Sky Ecological Reserve in Poway, San Diego County, southern California.. By Stickpen, via Wikimedia Commons

Coriandrum sativum (Coriander)
 

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In the Salinas Valley of California, aphids have been one of the worst pest in the lettuce fields, and the USDA Cooperative Extension Service has been investigating organic methods for aphid control, and experimented with coriander plants and alyssum plants when intercropped with the lettuce and allowed to flower, attracts beneficial insects like Hoverflies. The Hoverflies lay their eggs and their larvae eat the aphids, up to 150 aphids per day before they mature into flying adults.

 

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Coriandrum sativum, Apiaceae, Coriander, Chinese parsley, flowers; Botanical Garden KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany. The seeds are used in homeopathy as remedy: Coriandrum sativum (Coriand.). By H. Zell, via Wikimedia Commons

Cosmos bipinnatus (Cosmos)

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Cosmos bipinnatus 'Purity' has large, open flowers of pure white, with delicate apple-green foliage. The classic cut flower and a supremely lovely garden plant, which no one should be without.Cosmos last 10 days in the vase, produce at least two buckets of cut flowers a week from a 1 x 1m patch and do so from late June until November – so that's nearly fifty buckets of flowers in one season from a small patch.
The flowers of Cosmos bipinnatus attract birds and butterflies, including the Monarch butterfly. It can be part of butterfly gardening and pollinators-honey bee habitat gardens.

 

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English: Cosmea with a Bee
Deutsch: Schmuckkörbchen (Cosmos bipinnatus) mit Biene. By Stefan-Xp, via Wikimedia Commons

Eschscholzia californica (California Poppy)

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The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve is located in northern Los Angeles County, California. At the peak of the blooming season, orange petals seem to cover all 1,745 acres (706 ha) of the reserve.

Grown en masse, with the fine dissected foliage making a tangle of stems, they are fascinating to the eye and are breathtaking in massed plantings or containers. The flowers are extremely attractive to bees and butterflies.

 

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Eschscholzia californica, Papaveraceae, California poppy, aberrant flower with six petals; Botanical Garden KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany with bee. The blooming plant is used in homeopathy as remedy: Eschscholzia californica (Esch.). By H. Zell, via Wikimedia Commons

Euphorbia lathyris
(Caper Spurge)

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All parts of the plant, including the seeds and roots are poisonous.

While poisonous to humans and most livestock, goats sometimes eat it and are immune to the toxin. However, the toxin can be passed through the goat's milk. It is reputed to deter moles and any other subterranean pests. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer or rabbits!

 

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Euphorbia lathyris. By Frank Vincentz, via Wikimedia Commons

Gilia tricolor (Bird's Eyes)

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Felicitas bird’s eyes have dainty half inch, chocolate-scented flowers in a mix of white, pink, clear blue, and violet. The dark contrasting central eyes and yellow throats are alluring to hummingbirds, native bees and an occasional butterfly. Since it is tube-shaped and fragrant, that is why the flower is a favorite of hummingbirds.

These endearing hardy annual wildflowers are native to the western US, growing 15 to 18 inches tall. Bird’s Eyes thrive in sunny, relatively dry conditions, establishing themselves equally well in garden borders and natural plantings.

 

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P1000371 Gilia tricolor (Bird's eyes) () Flower.JPG. By Magnus Manske, via Wikimedia Commons

Gypsophila elegans (Baby's Breath)

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The flowers can be cut and dried and used during the winter months. The plants themselves are useful in the hardy border, or as pot plants. Easily grown from seed it blooms 6 weeks from the day it was sown. 
If you are short of space, broadcast seed in the bulb bed and it will do a great job of hiding their faded foliage in summer.
Cut flowers when nearly all the flowers on the branch are open.
This plant attracts bees and butterflies, and resists deer.

 

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Gypsophila elegans from Lalbagh Garden, Bangalore, INDIA during the Annual flower show in August 2011. By Rameshng, via Wikimedia Commons

Helianthus annuus (Common Sunflower, Annual Sunflower, Sunflowers)
 

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Supplier in USA

The flower head is comprised of outer yellow ray florets, which serve to attract pollinators, and inner brownish disc florets which are fertile.

Full Sun

Jul-Aug

36-120 x 18-36
(90-300 x 45-90)

Moist, well-drained

Ann

Sunflower is pollinated by bees and some farmers place bee colonies in sunflower fields which produce honey as a by-product.

Sunflower meal is sometimes used as a substitute for wheat flour in the baking of bread and cakes for human consumption. The indigenous people of North America have a long tradition of using ground sunflower seeds to make bread-like products.

Grow wild Helianthus in a sunny location in somewhat fertile well-drained soil.

Easy to grow, branching habit so great for cut flowers. A charming flower for the youngsters to have a go at growing.

Removal of browned and tattered plants from the garden after bloom may improve the appearance of the landscape, but is a great disappointment to local bird populations that love to feed on the seeds.

Garden Uses
Specimen or mass. Borders, cottage gardens, bird gardens, wildflower or native plant gardens. Large varieties for border rears or backgrounds. Dwarf varieties for beds, border fronts or containers.

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Helianthus annuus, Asteraceae, Sonnenblume, Habitus; Stutensee, Germany. The ripe fruits are used in homeopathy as remedy: Helianthus annuus (Helia.). By H. Zell, via Wikimedia Commons

Hordeum vulgare (Barley)

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Hordeum species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species, including the flame, rustic shoulder-knot and setaceous Hebrew character.

 

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A lady beetle perches on barley. By T.Voekler, via Wikimedia Commons

Iberis umbellata (Candytuft)

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The genus name derives from "Iberia", the ancient name of Spain, while the species epithet comes from the Latin "umbel", meaning "umbrella" and refers to the shape of the inflorescence.

The flowers are hermaphroditic and pollinated by bees and butterflies.

 

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Iberis umbellata. By Leo Michels, via Wikimedia Commons

Lasthenia californica (California Goldfields)

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Large populations of this species bloom at once in the spring to produce the carpets of yellow on hillsides that give the plant its common name.

 

 

 

 

 

Goldfields occurs with many other plants, but in the garden it is best used in a dense patch with other annuals such as Blue Gilia (Gilia capitata), Baby Blue-eyes (Nemophila menziesii), Clarkia sp., Lupines (Lupinus sp.), Checkerbloom (Sidalcea sp.), as well as succulents such as Dudleya sp. and Sedum sp.

Numerous insects including bees and butterflies are attracted to the flowers

 

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Goldfields flower -- Lasthenia californica -- Point Reyes National Seashore. By a13ean, via Wikimedia Commons

Layia platyglossa (Coastal Tidytips)
 

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Pollination is done by insects. The ripe seeds are a food source for birds.

Adorable with Nemophila menziesii “Baby Blue Eyes,” both will self-sow for a harmonious show next Spring. Nice in pots too! In California, it’s an important nectar source for the Checkerspot butterfly.

 

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Layia platyglossa taken in the Cambridge University Botanic Garden. By Magnus Manske, via Wikimedia Commons

Limnanthes douglasii (Meadow Foam, Poached Egg plant)

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L. douglasii is a spreading bushy annual to 15cm in height, with finely divided leaves and open bowl-shaped yellow flowers with white-tipped petals, in summer and autumn.

Highly attractive to beneficial insects including bees and hoverflies, it will help reduce pest colonies in the vegetable garden. An easy to grow annual, it is ideal for the children’s garden and will self-see freely. It will also make a wonderful green manure crop.

 

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Limnanthes douglasii. By Kurt Stüber, via Wikimedia Commons

Linaria maroccana (Moroccan Toadflax, Annual Toadflax)

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Linaria maroccana 'Sweeties' is a jumble of brilliant, pretty colours, with mini snapdragon flowers – a recently found top favourite. An almost instant nectar bar for pollinators.

Linaria maroccana 'Northern Lights Mixed' is a plant that has received the RHS Perfect for Pollinators mark, which is given to plants that support pollinating insects in gardens. Bees, butterflies, moths, hoverflies and many others visit these flowers to feed on the pollen.

 

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Linaria maroccana cv. By I, KENPEI, via Wikimedia Commons

Lobelia erinus (Edging Lobelia)
 

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Lobelia erinus is a very popular edging plant in gardens, especially for hanging baskets and window boxes.

Flowers are attractive to butterflies. Trailing forms are best used in hanging baskets, containers or window boxes which enable the flowering stems to cascade downward over the sides. In mixed basket/container plantings, stems can also be easily removed as they succumb to hot summer weather. Upright varieties are best for edging and bedding. A good plant for rock gardens or butterfly gardens.

 

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Lobelia erinus, Campanulaceae, Edging Lobelia, Garden Lobelia, Trailing Lobelia, flower. The whole, fresh plant collected at bloom is used in homeopathy as remedy: Lobelia erinus (Lob-e.). By H. Zell, via Wikimedia Commons

Lobularia maritima (Sweet Alyssum)
 

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In the Salinas Valley of California, aphids have been one of the worst pest in the lettuce fields, and the USDA Cooperative Extension Service has been investigating organic methods for aphid control, and experimented with coriander plants and alyssum plants when intercropped with the lettuce and allowed to flower, attracts beneficial insects like Hoverflies. The Hoverflies lay their eggs and their larvae eat the aphids, up to 150 aphids per day before they mature into flying adults.

 

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Sweet alyssum. By Luis nunes alberto, via Wikimedia Commons

Lotus corniculatus (Birdsfoot Trefoil)
 

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It is a perennial herbaceous plant, similar in appearance to some clovers. The flowers are mostly visited by bumblebees and develop into small pea-like pods or legumes. It is often used as forage and is widely used as food for livestock due to its nonbloating properties. It can survive fairly close grazing, trampling, and mowing. It is most often found in sandy soils.

Their bright yellow flowers take on an orange hue as they age, and will provide a good source of nectar for bees and butterflies.

 

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Lotus corniculatus
English: Birdfoot Deervetch, Garden Bird's-foot Trefoil. By Walter Siegmund, via Wikimedia Commons

Lupinus succulentus (Arroyo Lupine)
 

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Being the most water tolerant of all Lupines, Lupinus succulentus is used cultivated as an ornamental plant, for flower borders, native plant and wildlife gardens, and in natural landscaping projects.

Plant this California native in good soil & she’ll easily reach 3-4’ tall in a jiffy, bearing tonsof fragrant 8” blooms for several months.

The leaves are designed to trap water and channel it down to the soil. The leaves are eaten by the caterpillars of several butterflies such as the Painted Lady, West Coast Lady  and Common Sulfur, so Arroyo Lupines attract butterflies to the garden.

 

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Lupinus succulentus — arroyo lupine. At Blue Sky Ecological Reserve in Poway, San Diego County, California. By Stickpen, via Wikimedia Commons

Melilotus indicus (Sweet Clover)
 

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It is used as a source of nectar for bees, as forage, and as a soil improver. It is poisonous to some mammals.

What is Calflora? Calflora is 1. a website you can use to learn about plants that grow wild in California (both native plants and weeds); and 2. a nonprofit organization responsible for providing this service.
What Grows Here? You define "here" by picking a place on the map, or by choosing park boundary, place name, etc. Refine "here" by zooming in and out of the map, or drawing a polygon Then click SEARCH to get an illustrated list of plants known to grow "here."


 

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Melilotus indica (flowering habit with Laysan albatross chick). Location: Midway Atoll, Halsey Dr residences Sand Island. By Forest & Kim Starr, via Wikimedia Commons

Ocimum basilicum (Great Basil, List of basil cultivars)

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The leaves are used to make an insecticide that can protect stored crops from beetle damage. In double-blind taste tests, basil has been found not to significantly affect the taste of tomatoes when planted adjacent to them. Studies of the essential oil showed antifungal and insect-repelling properties, including potential toxicity to mosquitos.

 

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Image of Ocimum basilicum. By Leo Michels, via Wikimedia Commons

Origanum majorana (Sweet Marjoram)

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The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees. It is noted for attracting wildlife. The plant is often used to disinfect bee hives. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer. 2 tablespoons of marjoram is packed with antioxidants, vitamins, and other nutrients. Every two tablespoons of marjoram contains:

• Vitamin A: 6% (RDA)
• Calcium: 8% RDA
• Vitamin C: 3.5% RDA
• Iron: 18% RDA

 

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Origanum majorana (flowering habit). Location: Maui, Enchanting Gardens of Kula. By Forest & Kim Starr, via Wikimedia Commons

Papaver rhoeas (Corn Poppy)

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The leaves and latex have an acrid taste and are mildly poisonous to grazing animals. In classic and modern Persian poems, the poppy is a symbol of people who died for love (Persian: راه عشق).
It is pollinated by insects, particularly bumble bees. "can I have poppies in my meadow?" The answer unfortunately is no. Poppies can be used on their own or in conjunction with other cornfield annuals to provide a nurse crop when creating a meadow but once the sward has closed the poppies will disappear.

 

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Field poppy (Papaver rhoeas) in meadow. By MichaelMaggs, via Wikimedia Commons

Phacelia tanacetifolia (Bee Phacelia)

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I first spied it in the veg gardens at my chum @the10minutegardener’s patch down here in Cornwall. He had a bed of perhaps two metres square of the flowers. What was clearly apparent was that both bees and hoveflies were deeply and madly and uncontrollably in love with it. You could hardly put a pin in between the furry fellows and the sound of their activity was almost enough to make a young chap break into a verse of ‘Land of Hope and Glory’.

 

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Phacelia tanacetifolia with Bombus terrestris. By ‪Rasbak, via Wikimedia Commons

Scabiosa atropurpurea (Pincushion Flower, aka Sweet Scabious)

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Butterflies love these lovely, sweetly fragrant, easy-to-grow, ever-popular and very rewarding hardy annuals; so this is on the list of RHS Perfect for Pollinators. Moderately fast growing, they give a profusion of double pincushion flowers, two inches or so across, on tall, strong stems. Blooming from summer into early autumn, they will supply you with some excellent cut flowers.

 

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Scabiosa sp. By Por los caminos de Málaga, via Wikimedia Commons

Secale cereale (Rye)

Supplier of Green Manure Winter Rye

 

 

 

 

 

Winter rye is any breed of rye planted in the fall to provide ground cover for the winter. It actually grows during any warmer days of the winter, when sunlight temporarily warms the plant above freezing, even while there is general snow cover. It can be used to prevent the growth of winter-hardy weeds, and can either be harvested as a bonus crop, or tilled directly into the ground in spring to provide more organic matter for the next summer's crop.

The flame moth, rustic shoulder-knot and turnip moth are among the species of Lepidoptera whose larvae feed on rye.

 

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Secale_cereale_flowering. By Rasbak, via Wikimedia Commons

Tagetes tenuifolia (Signet Marigold, Golden Marigold)

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Some species of Tagetes possess a characteristic scent, which repels insects such as mosquitoes, small animals and smaller, burrowing insects. Tagetes tenuifolia is one of these and is often planted near small creeks or puddle prone areas to repel bugs, especially mosquitoes. This is a very showy annual, that can be used as a companion plant in the rose garden and vegetable patch to help repel aphids. They have a compact habit so make ideal edging and look fantastic in containers. The petals are edible and can be scattered over salads.

 

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Tegetes tenuifolia. By Kurt Stüber, via Wikimedia Commons

Tithonia rotundifolia (Mexican Sunflower)

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This is on the list of RHS Perfect for Pollinators.
Tithonia form large, but compact plants for the back of the border. The plant is multi-branched, giving multitudes of flowers per plant. The Mexican sunflower is one of the best flowers you can grow for attracting butterflies. 
In late summer, a stand of Tithonia may attract a half dozen or more butterfly species with one or more individuals on every single blossom!

 

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Tithonia rotundifolia. By Kurt Stüber, via Wikimedia Commons

Trachymene coerulea, aka Didiscus coeruleas (Blue Lace Flower)

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Beautiful pale blue, flat lacy umbels, which is lovely on its own, or used as a scented filler in any arrangement.

In addition, it attracts beneficial insects to the garden.

Cut the flowers in the morning when approximately 80% of the flowers are open. They will last around 7 to 10 days in a vase. 
For dried flowers, air dry flowers for two to three weeks in a dark, dry place. Darkness is necessary so the flowers do not turn brown.



 

bluelaceflowercfloswikimediacommons

Blue lace flower. ブルーレースフラワー。. By Yoko Nekonomania, via Wikimedia Commons

Trifolium incarnatum (Crimson Clover)

Supplier

 

 

 

 

 

If a few plants are retained and not cut-down, the flowers produced attract bees and other beneficial insects.
Whenever the ground is left bare for more than about six weeks, Green Manure seeds can be sown to add nutrients and organic matter to the soil. Seeds are quick growing (2-3 months) and can be sown from March through to August/September for over-wintering in all but the coldest areas. The resultant crop should be dug in before flowering when it is fresh and green. Before re-planting the area, the plant material should then be left for about a month to enable it to break down into rich organic matter, allowing nutrients to be released slowly over a period of time.

 

trifoliumcforincarnatumwikimediacommons

Trifolium incarnatum, Tauberland, Germany. By Bernd Haynold, via Wikimedia Commons

Trifolium repens (White Clover)

Supplier of White Clover - Green Manure

 

 

 

 

 

The flowers are mostly visited by bumblebees. The leaves form the symbol known as shamrock. White clover can tolerate close mowing, and can grow on many different types and pHs of soil, but prefers clay. It is considered to be a beneficial component of natural or organic lawn care due to its ability to fix nitrogen and out-compete lawn weeds. Natural nitrogen fixing reduces leaching from the soil and can reduce the incidence of some lawn diseases that are enhanced by the availability of synthetic fertilizer.

 

whitecforcloverwikimediacommons

White clover, photographed in England by Heron 16:46, 20 Jun 2004 (UTC). By The original uploader was Heron at English Wikipedia, via Wikimedia Commons

Trifolium subterraneum (Subterranean Clover)

Supplier

Product Development Pathway of each Heritage Seed:-

Breeding
Years 1-6
 
Evaluation
Years 7-12
 
Release Preparation
Years 13-14 for Seed Production and Market preparation, then
 
Year 15
Product release.

 

 

 

 

 

The flowers of subclover are often located beneath its leaves and are low in nectar, making access both difficult and unappealing for bees. This species is self-fertilizing

Subterranean clover is sometimes mixed with alfalfa for a longer-lasting grazing pasture.

Subterranean clover is one of the most commonly grown forage crops in Australia. It is also grown in places such as California and Texas, where the extreme ranges of soil type and quality, rainfall, and temperature make the variable tolerances of sub clover especially useful.

Subterranean clover revolutionised farming practice, converting many struggling farms into successful livestock holdings.

 

trifoliumcforsubterraneumwikimediacommons

Trifolium subterraneum at Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge Complex, California, USA. By Gordon Leppig & Andrea J. Pickart, via Wikimedia Commons

From Attracting Beneficial Insects by Fine Gardening:-
To create a welcoming habitat for your insect helpers, first you need to know something about them:-

Lady beetles—Lady beetles prey on aphids and other soft-bodied insects. The adults will eat as many as 50 aphids per day. If you have enough aphids, and the beetles stick around long enough to lay eggs, each hatched larva will eat some 400 aphids before entering its pupal stage.

Ground beetles—Ground beetles don't fly much, preferring to run away when disturbed. They're nocturnal hunters, rooting among leaf litter for insect eggs and larvae.

Lacewings —When the fairylike green lacewing flutters silently by in search of pollen or nectar, I find it hard to imagine it in its fiercely predacious larval stage, during which it devours aphids, caterpillars, mealybugs, leafhoppers, insect eggs, and whiteflies.

Hover flies —With their striped abdomens, hover flies look like small bees, but they move through the air more like flies, zipping from plant to plant, hovering briefly before landing. They visit a variety of flowers in search of pollen and nectar, and they lay their eggs near aphids or other soft-bodied insects. The eggs hatch into hungry larvae that eat up to 60 aphids per day.

True bugs—There are bugs and then there are true bugs. Many are plant feeders but many are predacious, with tubular mouthparts they insert like a straw to suck the juices out of their prey. The minute pirate bug is a tiny (1/12 inch) predator with a wide-ranging appetite; it eats aphids, thrips, mites, whiteflies, and insect eggs. It lays its eggs on the leaf surface near its prey; nymphs hatch and begin feeding. The cycle from egg to adult takes only three weeks.

Parasitic wasps—These very helpful creatures, ranging in size from small to minuscule, will defend your garden against caterpillars like corn earworm, tomato fruitworm, cabbageworm, and tent caterpillars. The smallest and perhaps most popular parasitic wasp is the trichogramma, a dust-size creature that lays up to 300 eggs in moth or butterfly eggs.

I water my garden with overhead sprinklers, so insects always have puddles and wet leaves to drink from. If I were using drip irrigation, I'd offer them water in a saucer filled with pebbles, so they don't drown.

Just like the rest of us, beneficials need protection from heat and rain. They need to hide from birds and insects who would make a meal of them. Again, a variety of leafy plants offers protection. Ground beetles hide in low-growing ground covers and in mulch or leaf litter. Flying insects hide in shrubs, on the undersides of leaves, even among the petals of marigolds.

Since many of the beneficials are tiny or have short mouthparts, I offer them tiny flowers with short nectaries. Many plants in the carrot and aster families offer just that.

Beneficials also need a reason to stay on when they've finished cleaning up the crops or at the end of the season when you've cleaned up the garden. Consider trying to recreate in a corner of the yard or on the edge of your garden the thick, wild diversity of a hedgerow by using a variety of early-flowering shrubs, perennials, and grasses to provide year-round shelter and a place for alternative prey to dwell. Keep this beneficial insect reservoir as close to your garden as you dare. If the insects get too comfortable in the hedgerow, they might not be inclined to travel very far for a meal. As long as there is a place for pests, the beneficials may stay to eat in your weedy refuge rather than head for the neighbor's yard.

Insect allies hate dust. Keeping the soil covered at all times, either with mulch or with growing plants, conserves moisture, moderates temperatures, and eliminates dust. It also provides habitat for ground and rove beetles. Try not to eliminate every weed. Leave some for the insects.

Creating your habitat can be a colorful affair. Start luring beneficials quickly with annuals like alyssum, cosmos, zinnias, sunflowers, and marigolds. At the same time, set out perennial flowers and herbs, including golden marguerite ( Anthemis tinctoria ), yarrow, lavender, mint, fennel, angelica, and tansy. Beneficials are also fond of dill, parsley, and cilantro flowers. When you've finished harvesting these herbs, leave the plants in the garden to flower. I like to let a small patch of carrots run to flower. Their blossoms are sweetly fragrant; beneficials love them.

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERY 1
PAGES

Site Map

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY PAGES Links to pages in Table alongside on the left with Garden Design Topic Pages

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

Plant Type
 

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 with its Cultivation Requirements

Alpines for Rock Garden (See Rock Garden Plant Flowers)

Alpine Shrubs and Conifers

The Alpine Meadow
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

The Alpine Border
1
, 2

Alpine Plants for a Purpose

The Alpines that Dislike Lime 1, 2

Alpines and Walls
Dry Sunny Walls 1a, b
Tops of Walls 2a, b
Dry Shady and Conifers 3a, b

Alpines and
Paving
1
, 2

Sink and Trough gardens
1
, 2

Aquatic
(Water Plants) for

Anti-erosion River-bank

Marginal Plants (Bog Garden Plants)
1
, 2

Oxy-genating Weeds

Water Lilies

Floating Plants

Water-side Plants
and Plants for Dry Margins next to a Pond
1
, 2

Wildlife Pond Plants

Annual for

----------------



 

 

ANY PLANT TYPE for
Cut Flowers in
January 1, 2
February
March 1, 2
April
May 1, 2
June 1, 2
July 1, 2
August
September
October
November
December

Exposed Sites

Sheltered Sites with Green-house Annuals from 1916

Extra Poor Soil with Half-Hardy Annuals from 1916

Very Rich Soil with Biennials from 1916

Gap-filling in Mixed Borders with Hardy Annuals from 1916

Patio Con-tainers

Cut Flowers
1
, 2, 3 Ever-lasting Flowers with Red Flowers from 1916

Attract-ing bene-ficial insects
1
, 2

Scent / Fra-grance with Annuals for Cool or Shady Places from 1916

Low-allergen Gardens for Hay Fever Sufferers

Annual Plant Pairing Ideas and Colour Schemes with Annuals
1
, 2

Low-Growing Annuals
1
, 2

Medium-Growing Annuals

Tall-Growing Annuals with White Flowers from 1916

Black or Brown Flowers

Blue to Purple Flowers

Green Flowers with Annuals and Biennials from 1916

Red to Pink Flowers and Cut Flowers
Page
1
, 2, 3

White Flowers
1
, 2

Yellow or Orange Flowers
1
, 2

Dec-orative Foliage

Moist Soil

Shade
1
, 2

House-plants with Yellow Flowers from 1916

Edging Beds

Hanging Baskets

Vining Annuals

 

Bedding for

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Autumn/ Winter Bedding

Bedding for Light Sandy Soil

Bedding for Acid Soil

Bedding for Chalky Soil

Bedding for Clay Soil

Black Flowers

Blue Flowers

Orange Flowers

Pink Flowers

Long Flowering

Coloured Leaves

Attract-ive to Wildlife including Bees, Butterflies and Moths

Purple Flowers

Red Flowers

White Flowers

Yellow Flowers

Multi-Coloured Flowers

Aromatic Foliage or Scented Flowers

Bedding Plant Use

Flowers with 2 Petals

Flowers with 3 Petals

Flowers with
4 Petals

Flowers with 5 Petals

Flowers with 6 Petals

Flowers with more than 6 Petals

Use in Hanging Baskets

Flower Simple Shape

Shape of
Stars

Shape of
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Shape of
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

Shape of
Trumpets and Funnels

Shape of
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

Use in Pots and Troughs

Flower Elabo-rated Shape

Shape of
Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Shape of
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Shape of
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

 

Use in
Screen-ing

Use in
Window Boxes

Shape of
Stand-ards, Wings and Keels

Shape of
Discs and Florets

Shape of
Pin-Cushions and Tufts

Shape of
Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

 

Use in Bedding Out

Use in
Filling In

Biennial for

Cottage and Other Gardens
1
, 2

Cut Flower with Biennials for Rock Work from 1916

Patio Con-tainers with Biennials for Pots in Green-house / Con-servatory

Bene-ficial to Wildlife with Purple and Blue Flowers from 1916

Scent with Biennials for Sunny Banks or Borders from 1916

 

 

Bulb for
--------------
Explan-ation Intro to Bulbs
--------------
725 Blue, White, Yellow, Unusual Colour, or Red-Purple-Pink flowering Bulbs in each month they flower.

Indoor Bulbs for
Dec-ember
January
February

Indoor Bulbs for
March
April
May

Indoor
Bulbs for
June
July
August

Indoor Bulbs for Sep-tember
October
November

Bulbs in Window-boxes
1
, 2

Bulbs in the Border

Bulbs natural-ised in Grass

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Dec-Jan
Feb-Mar

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Apr-May
Jun-Aug 1, 2, 3, 4

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Sep-Oct
Nov-Dec

Any Plant Type Blooming in Smallest of Gardens

Bulbs for the Bulb Frame

Bulbs in the Wood-land Garden

Bulbs in the Rock Garden

Bulbs in Green-house or Stove

Achi-menes, Alocasias, Amorpho-phalluses, Aris-aemas, Arums, Begonias, Bomar-eas, Calad-iums

Clivias,
Colo-casias, Crinums, Cyclam-ens, Cyrt-anthuses, Euchar-ises, Urceo-charis, Eurycles

Freesias, Gloxinias, Hae-manthus, Hipp-eastrums

Lachen-alias, Nerines, Lycorises, Pen-cratiums, Hymen-ocallises, Richardias, Sprekelias, Tuberoses, Vallotas, Watsonias, Zephy-ranthes

Bulbs in Bowls

Bulbs in the Alpine House

Hardy Bulbs

Aconitum, Allium, Alstroe-meria, Anemone 1, 1a

Amaryllis, Antheri-cum, Antholy-zas, Apios, Arisaema, Arum, Aspho-deline,

Aspho-delus, Belam-canda, Bloom-eria, Brodiae, Bulbo-codium

Calo-chorti, Cyclo-bothras, Camassia, Col-chicum, Con-vallaria,
Forcing Lily of the Valley, Corydalis, Crinum, Crosmia, Mon-tbretia , Crocus

Cyclamen, Dicentra, Dierama, Eranthis, Eremurus, Ery-thrnium, Eucomis

Fritillaria, Funkia, Gal-anthus, Galtonia, Gladiolus, Hemero-callis

Hya-cinth, Hya-cinths in Pots,
Scilla, Pusch-kinia, Chion-odoxa, Chiono-scilla, Muscari

Iris,
Kniphofia, Lapey-rousia, Leucojum

Lilium,

Lilium in Pots, Malvastrum, Merendera, Milla, Narcissus, Narcissi in Pots

Orni-thogalum, Oxalis, Paeonia, Ran-unculus, Romulea, Sanguin-aria,
Stern-bergia,
Schi-zostylis, Teco-philaea, Trillium

Tulip,
Zephy-ranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs

Acidan-thera, Albuca, Alstroe-meri, Andro-stephium, Bassers, Boussing-aultias, Bravoas, Cypellas, Dahlias, Galaxis,
Geis-sorhizas, Hesper-anthas

Gladioli, Ixias,
Sparaxises, Babianas, Morphixias, Tritonias

Ixio-lirions, Moraeas, Orni-thogal-ums, Oxalises, Phaedra-nassas,
Pan-cratiums, Tigridias, Zephyr-anthes, Cooper-ias

Bulbs for Bedding

Plant each Bedding Plant with a Ground, Edging or Dot Plant for
Spring
1
, 2
or
Summer
1
, 2

Climber 3 sector Vertical Plant System with

Any Plant Type flowers in
Jan,
Feb,
Mar,
Apr,
May 1, 2
Jun,
Jul,
Aug,
Sep,
Oct,
Nov,
Dec
 

----------
Choosing the right Plant

1a.
The Base -
Base of Wall Plants

1b.
Annuals

1c.
Herbs and Vege-tables

1d.
Cut
flowers, Cut Foliage

1e.
Scented flower or foliage

1f.
Foliage use only

 

2a. 1,2,3,4
The Prime - Wall Shrubs

2b.
Fruit trees

3a.
The Higher Reaches -
House-wall Ramblers

3b. 1,2
Non-House-Wall - Climbing Twiners

3c.
Non-House-Wall - Self-clinging Climbers

Raised
Bed
for Wheel-chair Users

Plants for Wildlife-Use as well

Fastest Covering

Least prot-ruding growth when fan-trained

1, 2
Evergreen

Use as
Hedge

Exposed Positions

Use as Ground-cover

1,2
Ornam-ental Fruit

Scented Flowers

1, 2
Autumn Foliage Colour

Winter Bark

Winter and Early Spring Flowers

Summer Colour or Shape of Foliage

Edible Fruit

Needs Conserv-atory or Green-house

Large
Pots and Con-tainers
1
, 2

Cut Flowers

Attractive to Bees

Climber - Simple Flower Shape

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a
Stars

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14k1a1a1a1a1a1a
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord2
Trumpets and Funnels

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming
Salver-form

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14q1a1a1a1a1a
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

 

Climber - Elabo-rated Flower Shape

prunellaflotgrandiflora
Tubes, Lips and Straps

aquilegiacfloformosafoord
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14u1a1a1a1a1a1
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14v1a1a1a1a1a1
Stand-ards, Wings and Keels

brachyscomecflorigidulakevock
Disks and Florets

andosacecforyargongensiskevock
Pin-cushions, Tufts, Petal-less and Cushions

armeriaflomaritimakevock
Umbels, Buttons and Pompoms

 

STAGE 4A 12 BLOOM COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Blue

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Mauve

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Purple

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Brown

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Cream

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Orange

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Pink

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Red

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
White

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 Yellow

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Un-
usual

1
Multi-Colou-red

1
Each Flower Diff-

1
erent Colour

 

STAGE 4B 12 FOLIAGE COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY
Deciduous Shrubs or Trees, Herbaceous Perennials or Bulbs- if that changes from the main colour for instance to a different autumn colour, then it will be in this column and the relevant colour for those months of Win (Winter), Spr (Spring), Sum (Summer) or Aut (Autumn) group as well.
Evergreen Shrubs or Trees, Evergreen Perennials - if that changes from the main colour for instance to a different autumn colour, then it will be in this column and the relevant colour for those months of Win (Winter), Spr (Spring), Sum (Summer) or Aut (Autumn) group as well.

Jan Win

Feb Win

Mar Spr

Apr Spr

May Spr

Jun Sum

Jul Sum

Aug Sum

Sep Aut

Oct Aut

Nov Aut

Dec Win

Decid
Herba

Ever-green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Blue

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Mauve

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Purple

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Black

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Bronze

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Orange

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Pink

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Red

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Grey

1
White

1
Silver

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Yellow

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Un-
usual

1
Varie-gated

1

1

1

1

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677


Site design and content copyright ©April 2016.
Top menus revised June 2018. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

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Scented Flora of the World by Roy Genders - was first published in 1977 and this paperback edition was published on 1 August 1994 ISBN 0 7090 5440 8:-
This comprehensive book looks at scented flowers and leaves of plants from all over the world. The work has been prepared to the standards of the Index Kewensis, and is filled with the most interesting facts about the scented flora of the world.

I am using the above book from someone who took 30 years to compile it from notes made of his detailed observations of growing plants in preference to
The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover – 16 Oct 2014 by Stephen Lacey (Author), Andrew Lawson (Photographer) ISBN 978-0-7112-3574-8 even though this is the only major reference work on scent and scented plants which is endorsed by the Royal Horticultural Society. See reasons for stopping infilling of previous Sense of Fragrance section on 28/07/2016 at end of Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey Page.

The Propagation of Alpines by Lawrence D. Hills. Published in 1950 by Faber and Faber Limited describes every method of propagation for 2,500 species. Unlike modern books published since 1980, this one states exactly what to do and is precisely what you require if you want to increase your alpines.

Topic
Case Studies
Companion Planting

...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants

Garden Construction
Garden Design

...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
Garden Maintenance
Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants

...Poisonous Plants
Soil
...Soil Nutrients
Tool Shed
Useful Data

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
Bulb
Climber

 

Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12

All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index

All Foliage 212
All Spring Foliage 212

All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212
Rock Plant Flowers 53

 

Your chosen Garden Style then changes your Plant Selection Process

Garden Style
...Infill Plants *
...Infill2 Plants
...Infill3 Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...
12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...All2 Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

 

Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods

Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Vegetable

Wild Flower

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly

 

STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY

 

Cultivation Requirements of Plant

Outdoor / Garden Cultivation

1

Indoor / House Cultivation

1

Cool Greenhouse (and Alpine House) Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter

1

Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year

1

Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

1

 

Sun Aspect

Full Sun

1

Part Shade

1

Full Shade

1

 

Soil Type

Any Soil

1

Chalky Soil

1

Clay Soil

1

Lime-Free Soil

1

Peaty Soil

1

Sandy Soil

1

Acid Soil

1

Alkaline Soil

1

Badly-drained Soil

1

 

Soil Moisture

Dry

1

Moist

1

Wet

1

 

Position for Plant

Back of Shady Border

1

Back of Shrub Border

1

Bedding

1

Bog Garden

1

Coastal Conditions / Seaside

1

Container in Garden

1

Front of Border

1

Ground Cover 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

1

Ground Cover 24-72 inches (60-180 cms)

1

Ground Cover Over 72 inches (180 cms)

1

Hanging Basket

1

Hedge

1

Hedge - Thorny

1

Pollution Barrier

1

Pond

1

Pot in House, Greenhouse, Conservatory or Stovehouse

1

Raised Bed

1

Rest of Border

1

Rock Garden

1

Scree Bed

1

Speciman on Lawn

1

Sunny Border

1

Tree for Lawn

1

Tree/Shrub for Small Garden

1, 2,
3, 4,
5, 6,
7, 8,
9, 10,
11,12,
13,14,
15,16,
uses of tree/ shrub

Wildflower

1

Windbreak

1

Woodland

1

 

Use of Plant

Pollen or nectar for Bees

1

Hosts to Butterflies

1

Encouraging birds / wildlife, providing food and shelter

1

Bee-Pollinated plants for Hay Fever Sufferers

1

Berries / Fruit

1

Dry Site in Full Sun

1

Dry Shade

1

Filtering noise

1

Flower Arrange-ments

Growing Plants for the Church

1



1, 2,
3, 4,
5, 6,
7, 8,
9,10,
11,12,
13,14

Fragrant Flower

1

Language of Flowers

1

Low maintenance

1

Moist Shade

1

Moist and swampy Sites

1

Nitrogen fixing plants

1

Not Fragrant Flower

1

Rabbit-Resistant

1

Speciman Plant

1

Thornless

1

Tolerant of Poor Soil

1

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Plant Foliage

Aromatic Foliage

1

Autumn Foliage

1

Finely Cut Leaves

1

Large Leaves

1

Yellow Variegated Foliage

1

White Variegated Foliage

1

Red / Purple Variegated Foliage

1

Silver, Grey and Glaucous Foliage

1

Sword-shaped Leaves

1

 

 

Flower Shape

Number of Flower Petals

Petal-less
lessershapemeadowrue2a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

1 Petal

1

2 Petals

1

3 Petals
irisflotpseudacorus1a1a1a1a1a1

1

4 Petals
aethionemacfloarmenumfoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

5 Petals
anemonecflo1hybridafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Above 5
anemonecflo1blandafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

 

Flower Shape - Simple

Stars
anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Bowls
 

1

Cups and Saucers
euphorbiacflo1wallichiigarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Globes
paeoniamlokosewitschiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Goblets and Chalices
paeoniaveitchiiwoodwardiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Trumpets
acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Funnels
stachysflotmacrantha1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Bells
digitalismertonensiscflorvroger1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Thimbles
fuchsiaflotcalicehoffman1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Urns
ericacarneacflosspringwoodwhitedeeproot1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Salverform

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

 

Flower Shape - Elaborated

Tubes, Lips and Straps
prunellaflotgrandiflora1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets
aquilegiacfloformosafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Hats, Hoods and Helmets
acanthusspinosuscflocoblands1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Standards, Wings and Keels
lathyrusflotvernus1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Discs and Florets
brachyscomecflorigidulakevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Pin-Cushions
echinaceacflo1purpurealustrehybridsgarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Tufts
centaureacfloatropurpureakavanagh1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Cushion
androsacecforyargongensiskevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Umbel
agapanthuscflos1campanulatusalbidusgarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Buttons
argyranthemumflotcmadeiracrestedyellow1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Pompoms
armeriacflomaritimakevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

 

Natural Arrangements

Bunches, Posies, Sprays
bergeniamorningredcforcoblands1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Columns, Spikes and Spires
ajugacfloreptansatropurpurea1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Whorls, Tiers and Candelabra
lamiumflotorvala2a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Plumes and Tails
astilbepurplelancecflokevock1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Chains and Tassels
 

1

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades
 

1

Spheres, Domes (Clusters), Plates and Drumsticks
androsacecfor1albanakevock1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Shrub, Tree Shape

Columnar
ccolumnarshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Oval
covalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Rounded or Spherical
croundedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Flattened Spherical
cflattenedsphericalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Conical / Narrow Pyramidal
cnarrowconicalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Conical / Broad Pyramidal
cbroadpyramidalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Ovoid /
Egg-Shaped

ceggshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Ovoid
cbroadovoidshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Vase-shaped / Inverted Ovoid
cnarrowvaseshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Fan-Shaped /Vase-Shaped
cfanshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Fan-Shaped / Broad Vase-Shaped
cbroadfanshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Weeping
cnarrowweepingshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Weeping
cbroadweepingshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Palm

1

 

Conifer Cone

1

 

Form

Arching

1

Climbing

1

Clump-Forming

1

Mat-Forming

1

Mound-Forming

1

Prostrate

1

Spreading

1

Stemless

1

Upright

1

 

Poisonous Plant

1

 

STAGE 1
GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY

 

Fragrant Plants adds the use of another of your 5 senses in your garden:-
Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark
1
, 2, 3

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4

Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
1
, 2, 3

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves
1
, 2, 3

Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves
1
, 2

Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5

Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit
1
, 2, 3

Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2

Night-scented Flowering Plants
1
, 2

Scented Aquatic Plants
1


Plants with Scented Fruits
1


Plants with Scented Roots
1
, 2

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood
1


Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums
1


Scented Cacti and Succulents
1


Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell
1
, 2
 

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERY 3

Fan-trained Shape
fantrainedshape2a1a1a

From Rhododendrons, boxwood, azaleas, clematis, novelties, bay trees, hardy plants, evergreens : novelties bulbs, cannas novelties, palms, araucarias, ferns, vines, orchids, flowering shrubs, ornamental grasses and trees book, via Wikimedia Commons

 

Ramblers Scramblers & Twiners by Michael Jefferson-Brown (ISBN 0 - 7153 - 0942 - 0) describes how to choose, plant and nurture over 500 high-performance climbing plants and wall shrubs, so that more can be made of your garden if you think not just laterally on the ground but use the vertical support structures including the house as well.

The Gardener's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Climbers & Wall Shrubs - A Guide to more than 2000 varieties including Roses, Clematis and Fruit Trees by Brian Davis. (ISBN 0-670-82929-3) provides the lists for 'Choosing the right Shrub or Climber' together with Average Height and Spread after 5 years, 10 years and 20 years.

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3


Gardening with Alpines by Stanley B. Whitehead. Garden Book Club.
Published in 1962. It provides most of the data about the Alpines.

Plant Solutions 1000+ suggestions for every garden situation by Nigel Colborn ISBN
13:978
0 00 719312 7, provides many of the plants for the pages in these Galleries.

Essential Annuals The 100 Best for Design and Cultivation. Text by Elizabeth Murray. Photography by Derek Fell. ISBN 0-517-66177-2, provides data about annuals.

Indoor Bulb
Growing by
Edward Pearson
. Published by Purnell & Sons, Ltd in 1953. It provides the data about Indoor Bulbs and Bulbs in
Window-boxes.

Colour All The
Year In My Garden
: A selection of choice varieties - annuals, biennials, perennials, bulbs, climbers and trees and shrubs - that will give a continuity of colour
in the garden throughout the year. Edited by C.H. Middleton. Gardening Book
from Ward, Lock & Co published in 1938, provides plant data for a calendar of plants in bloom throughout the year and for those in the smallest garden.
The Book of Bulbs by S. Arnott, F.R.H.S. Printed by
Turnbull & Spears, Edinburgh in 1901. This provides data about Hardy Bulbs, Half-Hardy Bulbs, Greenhouse and Stove Bulbs.

Collins Guide to
Bulbs by Patrick
M. Synge
. ISBN
0 00 214016-0
First Edition 1961, Second Edition 1971, Reprinted 1973. This provides data on bulbs for bedding, bulbs in the border, bulbs naturalised in grass, bulbs in the woodland garden, bulbs in the rock garden, bulbs in pans in the alpine house, bulbs in the greenhouse, bulbs in bowls and the bulb frame.

Annuals & Biennials, the best annual and biennial plants and their uses in the garden by Gertrude Jekyll published in 1916 and
republished by Forgotten Books in 2012
(Forgotten Books
is a London-based book publisher specializing in the restoration of old books, both fiction and non-fiction. Today we have
372,702 books available to read online, download as ebooks, or
purchase in print.).

Cut Flowers All The Year from The New Illustrated
Gardening Encyclopedia
by Richard Sudell, printed before May 1935 for the plant names in each month, followed by details for culture and propagation.

Mr. Middleton's Garden Book by
Daily Express Publication,
reprinted 1941
for the individual
cultivar names with evergreen/
deciduous, flower colour, flower month and height.

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Tree and Shrubs in Garden Design -

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Clay Soils (neutral to slightly acid)

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Dry Acid Soils

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Shallow Soil over Chalk

Trees and Shrubs tolerant of both extreme Acidity and Alkalinity

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Damp Sites

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Industrial Areas

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Cold Exposed Areas

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Seaside Areas

Shrubs suitable for Heavy Shade

Shrubs and Climbers suitable for NORTH- and EAST-facing Walls

Shrubs suitable for Ground Cover

Trees of Pendulous Habit

Trees and Shrubs of Upright or Fastigiate Habit

Trees and Shrubs with Ornamental Bark or Twigs

Trees and Shrubs with Bold Foliage

Trees and Shrubs for Autumn Colour

Trees and Shrubs with Red or Purple Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Golden or Yellow Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Grey or Silver Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Variegated Foliage

Trees and Shrubs bearing Ornamental Fruit

Trees and Shrubs with Fragrant or Scented Flowers

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Foliage

Flowering Trees and Shrubs for Every Month:-
Jan
, Feb, Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov, Dec

The following table shows the linkages for the information about the plants
described in Sanders' Encyclopedia of Gardening in The Gardeners' Golden Treasury, revised by A. G. L Hellyer F.L.S, Editor of 'Amateur Gardening', (thirty-first impression of original published in 1895) was published in 1960 by W. H. & L. Collingridge Limited,
between:-

  • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery (in this Table) and Stage 1 Fragrant Plants (in Table on left), then
  • Stage 2 - 3 Infill Plants Index Galleries (in Table on right), then
  • Stage 3a - All Plants Index Gallery with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2 (in this Table)
  • Stage 3b - All2 Plants Index Gallery for Alpines without a Garden for your health and productivity (in this Table)
  • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery (in Table on right)
  • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery (in Table on right) with
    column for Deciduous / Herbaceous plants with the same foliage colour during their growing season and
    column for Evergreen plants with the same foliage colour during the entire year
  • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery (in Table on left)
  • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery (in Table on left)

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY
It would be useful if when you decide to change your garden that you use a uniform garden style throughout your garden and the GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY aims to provide pointers.
The new pages (April 2016) in the gallery will have a suitable list of plants on each page (as that plant gets further detailed in the ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY), then each row containing that plant name in the GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY will also be updated. I aim to input details of plants starting with A in alphabetical order to Z.

Private Garden Design:-
What is your Budget and What are the purposes for your garden?
Designing for a purpose: Areas which require answers before answering your Designing for a Purpose Questionaire.
Then, do the Site Survey with Photographs, before putting the Current Garden Design on paper or in your computer.
Using the Broad Design elements of Scale, which Garden Style to use:-
Low Maintenance Garden Style, Cottage Garden Style, Wildlife Garden Style or Japanese Garden Style and the
Hard and Soft Landscaping elements, create the Broad Proposed Design. Then, the Detailed Design of each Hard Landscaping item followed by the Soft Landscaping elements: The Soil, changing the Microclimate; and the
Plant Selection is influenced by the Colour Wheel, with Plant Quantities determined by time to establish versus width between plants and Companion Planting will provide helpful neighbouring plants
or
Click on text in cells below to jump to that page describing that data
.

 


Container

Gardening at my work-place

 

<----

 

Yes
|
v


Do you want to garden and grow plants?

 

No

Cannot be bothered.
If you wish to improve your productivity and health, then, plant an Alpine Pan in your work area or at home using the information within Alpines without a Garden by Lawrence D. Hills, using these pages:-


Potted
House-plant


<----
|
|
v


No
Garden

At Home with Gard-ening Area


Yes


---->

Balcony Garden or Roof Garden


Yes
---->

Grow flowers for flower arranging and vegetables on Balcony Garden or Roof Garden

Pan Plant Back-grou-nd Colour

STAGE 3b
ALL2 PLANTS INDEX GALLERY

|
v


Conservatory Gardening

|
<--
|

 

|
No
-->

Outside Garden
|
v

Pan, Trough and Window-Box Odds and Sods
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14,
15

The beginner's dozen for the small pan

Plants for the pan gar-den


Stovehouse for Tropical Plants

|
<--

An extra dozen for the larger pan

Kinds of Pan Plants that may be split up and tucked in Corners and Crevices

|
|
v

Miniature trees and shrubs for pan

The leafy soil pan

The gritty soil pan

The Limy Soil Plan

Blue Flower Colour Pan Plants

Lilac, Violet and Purple Flower Colour Pan Plants

Reds, Carm-ines Flower Colour Pan Plants

Pinks Flower Colour Pan Plants

White Flower Colour Pan Plants and Bicol-ored

Yellow Flower Colour Pan Plants

Blue Flower Colour Trough Plants

Violet, Lilac and Purple Flower Colour Trough Plants

|
|
v

Reds and Carm-ines Flower Colour Trough Plants

Pinks - all shades Flower Colour Trough Plants

Yellow Flower Colour Trough Plants

White and Cream Flower Colour Trough Plants

Bi-colour-ed Flower Colour Trough Plants

Feb Flower Season Pan

Mar Flower Season Pan

Apr Flower Season Pan

May Flower Season Pan

Jun Flower Season Pan

Jul Flower Season Pan

Aug Flower Season Pan

Sep Flower Season Pan

|
|
v

Oct Flower Season Pan

Nov Flower Season Pan

Pans for Semi-shade

Pans for In-doors

Mini-ature Pot

Feb Flower Season Trough

Mar Flower Season Trough

Apr Flower Season Trough

May Flower Season Trough

Jun Flower Season Trough

Jul Flower Season Trough

Aug Flower Season Trough

Sep Flower Season Trough

|
|
v

Oct Flower Season Trough

Nov Flower Season Trough

Dec Flower Season Trough

Bulb Pan

Bulb Cover-ing Carp-eters

Trough and Window-box plants 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Trough and Window-Box Background Colour

Pan Plant
Alpines without a Garden

ABC 1
Pan Plants

DEF 1
Pan Plants

GHI
Pan Plants

JKL 1
Pan Plants

|
|
v

MNO 1
Pan Plants

PQR 1
Pan Plants

STU 1
Pan Plants

V 1
Pan Plants

WXYZ 1
Pan Plants

You need to know the following:-
1. How much time per week are you prepared to look after your garden or prepared to pay someone else to do it for you?
2. How much are you are prepared to spend on creating your garden and then on its maintenance for its feeding and replacement of its plants and hard landscaping?
3. In order for you to go into your garden, there must be mystery in it, so that from any position in the house you cannot see all the garden, otherwise you will not be tempted to go out into it.
4. You must decide what garden style you are going to use THROUGHOUT the garden and make sure of using 3. the mystery in it as well.
5. What plants do you want to keep in your existing garden and incorporate into your new garden?
6. What Human Problems do you have and what Site Problems are there?

A) Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers List leads onto the
B) Bee Pollinated Bloom in Month galleries and
C) extra Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers.


<----

Human Prob-lems
v


---->

Blind,
Deaf,
in a Wheelchair, or
you cannot bend easily

 

 

 

Garden Style, which takes into account the Human Problems above

 

 

Classic Mixed Style


<----

Cottage Garden Style


<----

.
v


---->

Naturalistic Style

Formal English Garden

 

Mediterranean Style


<----

Meadow and Corn-field


<----

.
.
v


---->

Paving and Gravel inland,
Coastal Conditions near the sea, Seashore with shingle/sand

 

 

 

 

Problem Sites within your chosen Garden Style from the above

 

 

Exposure to Wind


<----

Excess Shade


<----

Exce-ssively Dry Shade


<----


<----

.
.
.
.
.
v


---->

Exce-ssively Hot, Sunny and Dry Site is suitable for Drought Resistant Plants

Excessively Wet Soil - especially when caused by poor drainage

Control of Pests (Aphids, Rabbits, Deer, Mice, Mole, Snails) / Disease by Companion Planting in Garden

Whether your Heavy Clay or Light Sandy / Chalk Soil is excessively Alkaline (limy) / Acidic or not, then there is an Action Plan for you to do with your soil, which will improve its texture to make its structure into a productive soil instead of it returning to being just sand, chalk, silt or clay.


<----

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
v


---->

Problems caused by builders:- 1. Lack of soil on top of builders rubble in garden of just built house.
2. Clay soil of Garden slopes towards house with no drainage of this rainwater by the house wall.

In planning your beds for your garden, before the vertical hard-landscaping framework and the vertical speciman planting is inserted into your soft landscaping plan, the following is useful to consider:-
1. The ground plan usually depends upon 1 or more unalterable existing features. The position of the doors of the house will dictate the positions of paths, the shortest route to the kitchen may indicate the best place for a paved area for eating and drinking out of doors, or the kept trees/shrubs may indicate what garden style is used.
2. Rules of Proportion -
A. A border should be roughly 1/2 as wide as the hedge or wall behind it.
B. The proportion of planted areas to paved or turfed areas should be 1/3 to 2/3, or a 1/4 to 3/4, not 1/2 and 1/2.
C. Within a bed or border, unless a 2-dimensional pattern on the ground is the objective, the height and bulk of the plants should be varied to avoid monotony; it is particularly important to provide strong planting, in terms of either height or bulk or both, at either end of a long bed.
D. The ground surface provides a background to the plants that is as important as the hedges, walls or fences that surround it. Grass is perhaps the most satisfying carpet to use, the cool green forming a restful antidote to the dancing colours of the flowers. Use different coloured pea-shingle inside Cedar Gravel for people in wheelchairs, or infirm in their legs or who suffer from Hay Fever.

Reasons for stopping infilling of Sense of Fragrance section on 28/07/2016 at end of Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey Page. From September 2017 will be creating the following new pages on Sense of Fragrance using Scented Flora of the World by Roy Genders.
ISBN 0 7090 5440 8:-

 

 

 

|
v

 

 

 

 

 

After you have selected your vertical hard-landscaping framework and the vertical speciman plants for each bed or border, you will need to infill with plants taking the following into account:-

 

 

 

Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark 1, 2, 3
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil 1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil 1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Sandy Soil 1
, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves 1, 2, 3
Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves 1, 2
Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit 1, 2, 3
Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers 1, 2
Night-scented Flowering Plants 1, 2
Scented Aquatic Plants.
Plants with Scented Fruits.
Plants with Scented Roots 1, 2
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood.
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums.
Scented Cacti and Succulents.
Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell 1, 2

Flower Perfume Group:-
Miscellaneous Group with scents - Balm, Brandy, Cedar, Cloying, Cowslip, Cucumber, Damask Rose, Daphne, Exotic, Freesia, Fur-like, Gardenia, Hay-like, Heliotrope, Honeysuckle, Hops, Hyacinth, Incense-like, Jasmine, Laburnham, Lilac, Lily of the Valley, Meadowsweet, Mignonette, Mint, Mossy, Muscat, Muscatel, Myrtle-like, Newly Mown Hay, Nutmeg, Piercing, Primrose, Pungent, Resinous, Sandalwood, Sassafras, Seductive, Slight, Soft, Stephanotis, Sulphur, Starch, Sweet, Sweet-briar, Tea-rose, Treacle and Very Sweet.

Flower Perfume Group:-
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group with scent - Hawthorn.
Heavy Group with scents -
Jonquil and
Lily.
Aromatic Group with scents - Almond,
Aniseed, Balsamic,
Carnation, Cinnamon, Clove,
Spicy and
Vanilla.
Violet Group.
Rose Group.
Lemon Group with scent -
Verbena.
Fruit-scented Group with scents -
Apricot,
Fruity,
Green Apple,
Orange, Pineapple,
Ripe Apple , Ripe Banana and
Ripe Plum.
 

Flower Perfume Group:-
Animal-scented Group with scents -
Cat,
Dog,
Ferret,
Fox,
Goat,
Human Perspiration,
Musk,
Ripe Apple and
Tom Cat.
Honey Group.
Unpleasant Smell Group with scents -
Animal,
Fetid,
Fishy,
Foxy,
Fur-like,
Garlic,
Hemlock,
Manure,
Nauseating,
Perspiration,
Petrol,
Putrid,
Rancid,
Sickly,
Skunk,
Stale Lint
Sulphur and
Urinous,

Leaf Perfume Group:-
Turpentine Group.
Camphor and Eucalyptus Group.
Mint Group.
Sulphur Group.
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group.
Heavy Group.
Aromatic Group.
Violet Group.
Rose Group.
Lemon Group.
Fruit-scented Group.
Animal-scented Group.
Honey Group.

Scent of Wood, Bark and Roots Group:-
Aromatic Group.
Turpentine Group.
Rose Group.
Violet Group.
Stale Perspiration Group.

 

Scent of Fungi Group:-
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group.
Sulphur Group.
Aromatic Group.
Rose Group.
Violet Group.
Fruit Group.
Animal Group.
Honey Group

Sense of Sight

Emotion of
Hot /Cool; Calm / Agitated

Emotion of
Low-key / High Key


<----

.
.
.
v

Emotion of
Inviting
/ Forbidding

Emotion of Intellectual versus Emotional

Sense of Touch

Sense of Taste

Sense of Sound

 

 

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 for
lists of plants of 1 plant type for 1 cultivation requirement is in Table on right

 

 

 

STAGE 3a ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY
Click on Blue or underlined text to jump to page comparing flower thumbnails of that blue colour in the
Other Plant Photo Galleries. RedPP is Red, Pink, Purple and Other is Unusual or Other Flower Colour.

Plant Type
with links to Other Plant Photo Galleries

ABC

DEF

GHI

JKL

MNO

PQR

STU

VWX

YZ

Alpine in Evergreen Perennial,
Herbaceous Perennial and Rock Garden

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Aquatic

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Annual/ Biennial

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Bamboo

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Bedding, 25
RHS Mixed Border Beds 75 and
Flower Shape, Flower Colour and Bedding Plant Use

1

Blue

1

Green

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

Purple

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Bicolour

Other Flower Colours

White / Colour Bicolour

Bulb, 746 with Use, Flower Colour/Shape of
Allium / Anemone, Colchicum / Crocus, Dahlia, Gladiolus, Narcissus and Tulip

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Climber 71 Clematis, 58 other Climbers with Use, Flower Colour and Shape

1

Blue

1

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Conifer

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Deciduous Shrub 43 with Use and Flower Colour

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Deciduous Tree

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Evergreen Perennial 104 with Use, Flower Colour, Flower Shape and Number of Petals

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Evergreen Shrub 46, Semi-Evergreen Shrub and Heather 74 with Use and Flower Colour

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Evergreen Tree

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Fern with 706 ferns
within 21 types and 41 uses

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Grass

1

1

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

Herbaceous Perennial 91,
RHS Mixed Border Beds 176 and
Peonies 46 with Flower Colour/Shape

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Herb

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Odds and Sods

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Rhododendron, Azalea, Camellia

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Rose with 720 roses within Flower Colour, Flower Shape, Rose Petal Count and Rose Use

1

1

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

 

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Soft Fruit

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Sub-Shrub

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Top Fruit

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Vegetable

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Wildflower 1918 with
Plants used by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterflies in the UK
I am inserting the plants described in Sanders' Encyclopedia of Gardening into STAGE 3a ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY

1

Blue

1

Green

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

Red

1

Purple

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Multi-colour

Cream

Mauve

Brown

Shrub and Small Tree

Botanical Names Page

Common Names Page

Finally, you might be advised to check that the adjacent plants to the one you have chosen for that position in a flower bed are suitable; by checking the entry in Companion Planting - like clicking A page for checking Abies - and Pest Control page if you have a pest to control in this part of the flower bed.
Companion Planting
- A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z
Pest Control using Plants

 

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY
The planning a Rose Garden chapter from Rose Gardens by Jane Fearnley-Whitingstall ISBN 0 7011 3344 9 and
Plant Solutions by Nigel Colborn provides information for this gallery.

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 Reference books for these galleries in Table on left

STAGE 3a ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY
In addition to these 10 galleries, there are links to the Other Plant Photo Galleries in the table above like Bulb , which have plant descriptions accessed by clicking a flower thumbnail in its flower comparison page. Click the respective flower colour - like Green - to change page to that flower colour comparison page. Then, you can also choose these other plants.
It will also state the Plant Combinations for each plant from The Ulimate Visual Guide to Successful Plant Harmony - The Encyclopedia of Planting Combinations by Tony Lord ISBN 1-55209-623-8

STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY
Some extra details about the Cultivation Requirements of Plant:- Outdoor /Garden Cultivation, Indoor / House Cultivation, Cool Green-house Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter, Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year, and Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

Since 2006, I have requested photos etc from the Mail-Order Nurseries in the UK and later from the rest of the World. Few nurseries have responded.
I worked for a lady, who with her husband took 35 mm slides of plants in the 1960's and 1970's. She allowed me to digitise some of her Kodachrome slides, which I have used in my website. I discovered that at least the green colour of the foliage became very much darker over that period of years to 2008, by comparing wildflower photos from her slides with digital photos supplied by a current Wildflower mail-order nursery, so I stopped creating my Foliage Galleries.
I bought myself a camera some years ago and started taking photos, some of which have been put into the website. I started taking photos of the Heathers at the Royal Horticultural Society at Wisley garden. I have displayed the Heathers foliage in closeup since their leaves are 2mm long and in macro-scale in the Heather Galleries - sometimes the foliage colour at the terminal end of the foliage stem is only a few leaves, whereas others have the same foliage colour throughout the stem. I discovered that some of the heathers did not have the correct plant label, since the flower colour did not correspond with the flower colour in the literature. I was informed that since kids have free rein, that perhaps they move the plant labels. Since, I cannot rely that the heather plant label next to the heather plant is valid, I have stopped taking photos of those heathers.
This leaves a small problem, especially since very few gardens open to the public have their plants labelled so that the public can use the data on their label to buy that named plant from a nursery or garden centre. Currently (June 2018) I insert photos from Wikimedia Commons as well as my own.
I have found the above book - which does not contain any colour plant photos. Since it had the following experts help in creating it, I have decided to use its information in these 10 galleries to help the public:-

  • T.W. Sanders Editor of Amateur Gardening in 1895.
  • A.J Macself Editor of Amateur Gardening in 1926 - both Sanders and Macself had worked entirely to the handlists published by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
  • A.G.L. Hellyer in this work of revision and also in checking the all-important cultural notes sought the help of experts in the various classes of plant:-
    • Mr S.A. Pearce, Assistant Curator at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew undertook the revision of those genera of plants which in this country are mainly grown under glass.
    • Mr Will Ingwersen dealt with the Rock plants,
    • Mr N. Catchpole made himself responsible for trees and shrubs;
    • Mr G.A Phillips for herbaceous plants,
    • Mrs Francis Perry for water plants,
    • Mr A.J. Macself for ferns,
    • Mr E. Cooper for orchids,
    • Mr J.S Dakers for annuals,
    • Miss Doreen Crowther for fruit and vegetables

with the aid of further information from other books, magazines and cross-checking on the internet.
In this edition of the book Sander's Encyclopaedia, the individual soil mixtures to grow plants have been retained, for it was considered that many gardeners might still wish to use them in certain circumstances. The John Innes mixtures may be substituted wherever desired. Details of these individual mixtures will be put into these galleries.