Ivydene Gardens Infill Plants Index Gallery:
The Alpine Meadow with Winter- and Spring-Flowering Bulbs Page 3

Topic
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Useful Data

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
Bulb
Climber

 

Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12

All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index

All Foliage 212
All Spring Foliage 212

All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212
Rock Plant Flowers 53

 

Your chosen Garden Style then changes your Plant Selection Process

Garden Style
...
Infill Plants *
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...
12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

 

Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods

Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Vegetable

Wild Flower

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly

 

Cultivation Requirements of Plant

Outdoor / Garden Cultivation

1

Indoor / House Cultivation

 

Cool Greenhouse (and Alpine House) Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter

1

Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year

1

Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

1

 

Sun Aspect

Full Sun

1

Part Shade

1

Full Shade

1

 

Soil Type

Any Soil

1

Chalky Soil

1

Clay Soil

1

Lime-Free Soil

 

Peaty Soil

1

Sandy Soil

1

Acid Soil

1

Alkaline Soil

1

Badly-drained Soil

 

 

Soil Moisture

Dry

1

Moist

1

Wet

1

 

Position for Plant

Back of Shady Border

 

Back of Shrub Border

1

Bedding

1

Bog Garden

 

Coastal Conditions / Seaside

1

Container in Garden

1

Front of Border

1

Ground Cover 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

1

Ground Cover 24-72 inches (60-180 cms)

1

Ground Cover Over 72 inches (180 cms)

 

Hanging Basket

 

Hedge

1

Hedge - Thorny

 

Pollution Barrier

 

Pond

 

Pot in House, Greenhouse, Conservatory or Stovehouse

1

Raised Bed

 

Rest of Border

1

Rock Garden

1

Scree Bed

1

Speciman on Lawn

 

Sunny Border

1

Tree for Lawn

 

Tree for Small Garden

1

Wildflower

1

Windbreak

 

Woodland

1

 

Use of Plant

Pollen or nectar for Bees

1

Hosts to Butterflies

1

Encouraging birds / wildlife, providing food and shelter

1

Bee-Pollinated plants for Hay Fever Sufferers

1

Berries / Fruit

 

Dry Site in Full Sun

1

Dry Shade

 

Filtering noise

 

Flower Arrange-ments

 

Fragrant Flower

1

Language of Flowers

 

Low maintenance

1

Moist Shade

 

Moist and swampy Sites

 

Nitrogen fixing plants

 

Not Fragrant Flower

1

Rabbit-Resistant

 

Speciman Plant

1

Thornless

 

Tolerant of Poor Soil

1

 

Plant Foliage

Aromatic Foliage

 

Autumn Foliage

 

Finely Cut Leaves

1

Large Leaves

 

Yellow Variegated Foliage

1

White Variegated Foliage

1

Red / Purple Variegated Foliage

 

Silver, Grey and Glaucous Foliage

1

Sword-shaped Leaves

 

 

 

Flower Shape

Number of Flower Petals

Petal-less
 

1

1 Petal

 

2 Petals

 

3 Petals
 

1

4 Petals
 

1

5 Petals
 

1

Above 5
 

1

 

Flower Shape - Simple

Stars
 

1

Bowls
 

 

Cups and Saucers
 

1

Globes
 

 

Goblets and Chalices
 

 

Trumpets
 

1

Funnels
 

1

Bells
 

1

Thimbles
 

 

Urns
 

 

Salverform

 

 

Flower Shape - Elaborated

Tubes, Lips and Straps
 

 

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets
 

 

Hats, Hoods and Helmets
 

 

Standards, Wings and Keels
 

 

Discs and Florets
 

 

Pin-Cushions
 

 

Tufts
 

 

Cushion
 

 

Umbel
 

1

Buttons
 

 

Pompoms
 

 

 

Natural Arrangements

Bunches, Posies, Sprays
 

1

Columns, Spikes and Spires
 

 

Whorls, Tiers and Candelabra
 

1

Plumes and Tails
 

 

Chains and Tassels
 

1

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades
 

 

Spheres, Domes and Plates
 

 

 

Shrub, Tree Shape

Columnar
 

1

Oval
 

1

Rounded or Spherical
 

 

Flattened Spherical
 

1

Narrow Conical / Narrow Pyramidal
 

1

Broad Conical / Broad Pyramidal
 

1

Ovoid /
Egg-Shaped
 

 

Broad Ovoid
 

 

Narrow Vase-shaped / Inverted Ovoid
 

 

Fan-Shaped /Vase-Shaped
 

 

Broad Fan-Shaped / Broad Vase-Shaped
 

 

Narrow Weeping
 

 

Broad Weeping
 

 

Palm

 

 

Conifer Cone

1

 

Form

Arching

1

Climbing

 

Clump-Forming

1

Mat-Forming

 

Mound-Forming

1

Prostrate

1

Spreading

1

Stemless

 

Upright

1

 

Poisonous Plant

1

 

 

Click on text in cells below to jump to that page detailing those infill plants of that plant type for that Cultivation requirement.

Plant Type
 

 

Alpines for Rock Garden (See Rock Garden Plant Flowers)

Alpine Shrubs and Conifers

The Alpine Meadow
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

The Alpine Border

Alpine Plants for a Purpose

The Alpines that Dislike Lime

Alpines and Walls
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

Alpines and Paving

Sink and Trough gardens

Aquatic
(Water Plants) for

Anti-erosion Riverbank

Marginal Plants (Bog Garden Plants)

Oxy-genating Weeds

Water Lilies

Floating Plants

Waterside Plants
and Plants for Dry Margins next to a Pond

Wildlife Pond Plants

Annual for

----------------

Plants for Cut Flowers in
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Exposed Sites

Sheltered Sites with Green-house Annuals from 1916

Extra Poor Soil with Half-Hardy Annuals from 1916

Very Rich Soil with Biennials from 1916

Gap-filling in Mixed Borders with Hardy Annuals from 1916

Patio Containers

Cut Flowers Page 1
Page 2 Everlasting Flowers with Red Flowers from 1916

Attracting beneficial insects

Scent / Fragrance with Annuals for Cool or Shady Places from 1916

Low-allergen Gardens for Hay Fever Sufferers

Annual Plant Pairing Ideas

Low-Growing Annuals

Medium-Growing Annuals

Tall-Growing Annuals with White Flowers from 1916

Black or Brown Flowers

Blue to Purple Flowers

Green Flowers with Annuals and Biennials from 1916

Red to Pink Flowers
Page 1
Page 2

White Flowers

Yellow or Orange Flowers

Decorative Foliage

Moist Soil

Shade

House-plants with Yellow Flowers from 1916

Edging Beds

Hanging Baskets

Vining Annuals

 

Bedding for

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Autumn/ Winter Bedding

Bedding for Light Sandy Soil

Bedding for Acid Soil

Bedding for Chalky Soil

Bedding for Clay Soil

Black Flowers

Blue Flowers

Orange Flowers

Pink Flowers

Long Flowering

Coloured Leaves

Attractive to Wildlife including Bees, Butterflies and Moths

Purple Flowers

Red Flowers

White Flowers

Yellow Flowers

Multi-Coloured Flowers

Aromatic Foliage or Scented Flowers

Bedding Plant Use

Flowers with 2 Petals

Flowers with 3 Petals

Flowers with
4 Petals

Flowers with 5 Petals

Flowers with 6 Petals

Flowers with more than 6 Petals

Use in Hanging Baskets

Flower Simple Shape

Shape of
Stars

Shape of
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Shape of
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

Shape of
Trumpets and Funnels

Shape of
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

Use in Pots and Troughs

Flower Elaborated Shape

Shape of
Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Shape of
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Shape of
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

 

Use in
Screening

Use in
Window Boxes

Shape of
Standards, Wings and Keels

Shape of
Discs and Florets

Shape of
Pin-Cushions and Tufts

Shape of
Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

Cut Flowers

Use in Bedding Out

Use in
Filling In

Biennial for

Cottage and Other Gardens

Cut Flower with Biennials for Rock Work from 1916

Patio Containers with Biennials for Pots in Greenhouse / Conservatory

Beneficial to Wildlife with Purple and Blue Flowers from 1916

Scent with Biennials for Sunny Banks or Borders from 1916

 

 

Bulb for
--------------
Explanation Intro to Bulbs
--------------
725 Blue, White, Yellow, Unusual Colour, or Red-Purple-Pink flowering Bulbs in each month they flower.

Indoor Bulbs for
December
January
February

Indoor Bulbs for
March
April
May

Indoor
Bulbs for
June
July
August

Indoor Bulbs for September
October
November

Bulbs in Window-boxes

Hardy Bulbs

Half-Hardy Bulbs

Plant Bloom Dec-Jan
Feb-Mar

Plant Bloom Apr-May
Jun-Aug

Plant Bloom
Sep-Oct
Nov-Dec

Smallest of Gardens Plant Bloom

Plant Bloom September
October

Green-house, Stove Bulbs

Bulbs for Bedding

Bulbs in the Border

Bulbs naturalised in Grass

Bulbs in the Woodland Garden

Bulbs in the Rock Garden

Bulbs in the Alpine House

Bulbs in Green-house

Bulbs in Bowls

Climber 3 sector Vertical Plant System with flowers in
Jan, Feb,
Mar, Apr,
May, Jun,
Jul, Aug,
Sep, Oct,
Nov, Dec

1a.
The Base -
Base of Wall Plants

1b.
Annuals

1c.
Herbs and Vegetables

1d.
Cut flowers, Cut Foliage

1e.
Scented flower or foliage

1f.
Foliage use only

 

2a.
The Prime - Wall Shrubs

2b.
Fruit trees

3a.
The Higher Reaches -
House-wall Ramblers

3b.
Non-House-Wall - Climbing Twiners

3c.
Non-House-Wall - Self-clinging Climbers

Raised Bed for Wheelchair Users

Plants for Wildlife-Use as well

Fern for

Dry Shade

Moist Shade

Containers

Other Good Ferns

Planting Scheme Using Ferns

 

 

Grass for

Full Sun, Year Round

Partial Sun, Year Round

Giant Grasses

Coastal Sites, Year Round

Hot and Dry Conditions
, Year Round

Moist Conditions

Containers

 

Wildlife Support

Other Good Grasses

Grasses Scheme

Bamboo

 

 

 

Groundcover

Full Sun, Year Round

Shade, Year Round

Hot and Dry Sites, Year Round

Poor Soil, Year Round

Rich Soil, Year Round

Other Good Ground-cover Plants

Ground-cover Schemes

Herb for

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Odds and Sods for

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perennial for

Full Sun, Winter and Spring

Full Sun, Summer and Autumn

Full Sun, year round

Tall perennials for Partial Sun, Year Round

Medium Perennials for partial Sun, year Round

Violas and Pansies

Tall Perennials for deep shade, year round

Tall Perennials for light shade, year round

Medium and Short Perennials for Light Shade

Tall Perennials for Sun, Year round

Medium Perennials for Sun, year round

Very Exposed situations, year round

Sheltered Situations, Year Round

Hostas

Coastal Sites, Year Round

Rock and Gravel, Year Round

Container,
Year Round

Limy Soil, Year Round

Lime-free Soil, Year Round

Low Water Require-ments

Attracting beneficial insects

Sustain-able Gardening

Low-Allergen Planting

Natural Repellent Properties

Scent

Spring Perennials with others for Summer/Autumn

Evergreen Foliage

Variegated Foliage

Golden Leaf Colour

Red-Purple Leaf Colour

Blue-Grey Leaf Colour

Other Good Perennials

The Autumn Climax

 

 

Shrub for

Large Shrub for Full Sun, Winter and Spring

Large Shrubs for Full Sun, Summer and Autumn

Large Shrubs for partial Sun, All Year

Large Shrubs for Shade, All year

Lilacs

Large Shrubs for Sheltered Sites, All Year

Large Shrubs for Extra Hot and Dry Sites, All Year

 

Rhodo-dendron

Large Shrubs for Evergreen Sculpture, All Year

Large Shrubs for Other Problem Sites, All Year

Hyd-rangea

Medium Shrubs for Full Sun, Winter and Spring

Medium Shrubs for Full Sun, Summer and Autumn

Medium Shrubs for Partial Sun, Winter and Spring

 

Medium Shrubs for Shade, Winter and Spring

Medium Shrubs for Shade, Summer and Autumn

Medium Shrubs for Hot and Dry Sites, Year Round

Medium Shrubs for Very Exposed Sites,Year Round

Medium Shrubs for Very Sheltered Sites, Year Round

Roses

Medium Shrubs for South or west wall, Climbing, Year Round

 

Medium Shrubs for East Wall, Climbing, Year Round

Medium Shrubs for North Wall, Climbing, Year Round

Medium Shrubs for Evergreen Sculpture, Year Round

Fuchsia

Small Shrubs for Full Sun, Year Round

Small Shrubs for Partial Sun, Year Round

Small and Dwarf Shrubs for Shade, Year Round

 

Small Shrubs for Hot and Dry Sites, Year Round

Heathers

Small Shrubs for Exposed Sites, Year Round

Small Shrubs for Sheltered Sites, Year Round

Shrubs for Coastal Sites

Shrubs for Containers
, Year Round

Shrubs for Low Allergen Planting

 

Shrubs tolerant of Air Pollution

Shrubs for Wildlife Value

Shrubs for Screening

Shrubs for Autumn Berries

Shrubs with Variegated Foliage

Shrubs with Golden Foliage

Shrubs with Purple-Red Leaves

 

Shrubs with Blue-Grey Leaves

Other Shrubs

Rubus cock-burnianus with Other Herbaceous Plants

Different Effects for Different Seasons from the Same Plants

Floral Friend-ships

Floral Hot-Spots

 

Soft Fruit for

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top Fruit for

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tree for

Large Trees for Exposed Sites

Large Trees for Sheltered Sites

Large Trees for Acid Soil

Large Trees for Lime Soil

Large Trees

Medium Trees for Exposed Sites

Medium Trees for Sheltered Sites

 

Medium Trees for Acid Soil, Year Round

Medium Trees for Lime Soil, Year Round

Medium Trees

Small Trees for Exposed Sites, Year Round

Small Trees for Sheltered Sites, Year Round

Small Trees for Acid Soil, Year Round

Small Trees for Lime Soil, Year Round

 

Small Trees

Trees for Coastal or Badly Exposed Sites

Trees for Containers

Trees with Columnar Shape

Trees with a Weeping Shape

Trees Tolerant of Air pollution

Trees for Low Allergen Planting

 

Trees for Best Wildlife Value

Conifers

Trees for Best Berries (Fruits)

Trees for Orna-mental Bark

Trees for Spring Blossom

Trees for Autumnal Colour

Trees with Golden Leaves

 

Trees with Red/Purple Leaves

Trees with Blue-Grey Leaves

Other Trees

Acers

 

 

 

Vegetable for

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wildflower for
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Gardening with Alpines by Stanley B. Whitehead. Garden Book Club. Published in 1962. It provides most of the data about the Alpines.

Essential Annuals The 100 Best for Design and Cultivation. Text by Elizabeth Murray. Photography by Derek Fell. ISBN 0-517-66177-2, provides data about annuals.

Ivydene Gardens Infill Plants Index Gallery:
The Alpine Meadow with Winter- and Spring-Flowering Bulbs Page 3

Botanical Plant Name

with link to
UK or
European Union
mail-order supplier for you to contact to buy this plant

Flower Colour
and Background Colour nearest to main petal colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Sun Aspect:- Full Sun,
Part Shade, Full Shade

with link to external website for photo/data

Flowering Months in UK

with link to
USA or
Canada
mail-order supplier

Height with Spacings or Width (W) in inches (cms)

1 inch =
2.5 cms
12 inches = 30 cms
40 inches = 100 cms

Foliage Colour

and Background Colour nearest to middle-aged leaf colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Soil Moisture:-
Dry,
Moist,
Wet

with link to Australia or New Zealand mail-order supplier

Plant Type is:-

A for Aquatic
Ann for Annual / Biennial
Ba for Bamboo
Bu for Bulb
Cl for Climber
Co for Conifer
F for Fern
G for Grass
H for Herb
P for Perennial
Rh for Rhodo-dendron, Azalea, Camellia
Ro for Rose
Sh for Shrub
So for Soft Fruit
To for Top Fruit
Tr for Tree
V for Vegetable
W for Wildflower

followed by:-
E for Evergreen,
D for Deciduous,
H for Herbaceous,
Alpine for being an Alpine as well as being 1 of above Plant Type /

 
Acid for Acidic,
Alk for Alkaline,
Any for AnySoil
 

with link to
ALL PLANTS Index Gallery page

Comments

Adjacent Planting

Plant Associations

It is sad to reflect that in England so few gardens open to the public label their plants or label them so that the label is visible when that plant is in flower, so that visitors can identify; and then later locate and purchase that plant.

Few mail-order nurseries provide the detail as shown in my rose or heather galleries.

If you want to sell a product, it is best to display it. When I sold my Transit van, I removed its signage, cleaned it and took photos of the inside and outside before putting them onto an advert in Autotrader amongst more than 2000 other Transit vans - it was sold in 20 minutes.

If mail-order nurseries could put photos to the same complexity from start of the year to its end with the different foliage colours and stages of flowering on Wikimedia Commons, then the world could view the plant before buying it, and idiots like me would have valid material to work with.

I have been in the trade (until ill health forced my Sole Trader retirement in 2013) working in designing, constructing and maintaining private gardens for decades and since 2005 when this site was started, I have asked any nursery in the world to supply photos. R.V. Roger in Yorkshire allowed me to use his photos from his website in 2007 and when I got a camera to spend 5 days in July 2014 at my expense taking photos of his roses growing in his nursery field, whilst his staff was propagating them. I gave him a copy of those photos.

Narcissus asturiensis (Pygmy daffodil syn. minimus)

Supplier in UK
 

The Mission of the American Daffodil Society is to be an internationally recognized nonprofit association of individuals, organizations, companies, and /or universities dedicated to the encouragement of widespread interest in daffodils, and to research and education with respect to their culture, breeding, preservation, diseases, pests, testing and exhibition.


Light yellow

Full Sun

Jan-Mar

4 x 4
10 x 10)

Well-drained Acicid Sand or Chalk

Moist. (Daffodils need lots of water while they are growing. Water immediately after planting and keep them moist until the rains come. Continue watering for three weeks or so after blooming time; then stop watering. The bulbs make their next year's bloom after flowering.)

Bu

Narcissus asturiensis (syn. minimus), 3 inches (7.5 cms) high, miature yellow trumpet flowered. Division 13 is Daffodils distinguished by Botanical Name

"Narcissus asturiensis is an almost perfect miniature form of the ever popular King Alfred daffodil and is one of the smallest daffodils. At a height of 2 ½ - 5 inches (10-12 cm) it needs careful placement in a regular garden to show to best effect. Wonderful in miniature bulb gardens and small containers. This tiny daffodil can easily be forced and is a good candidate for unusual small containers such as tea cups and miniature strawberry pots. It grows best in sandy, peaty soil which is not allowed to completely dry out in summer. Prefers full sun. Protect from slugs." from About.com.

There are other Narcissus used as alpines in Rock Garden Plants Suitable for Small Gardens in Colour Wheel Gallery

There are other Narcissus in Narcissus Gallery

narcissuscfloasturiensiswikimediacommons

Narcissus asturiensis. Sierra de la Peña de Francia, Salamanca, España. (Original: 461916175_ab48828065_b.jpg). By flickr-user Juan_Sanchez (Juan José Sánchez) via Wikimedia Commons.

Narcissus bulbocodium,
citrinus,
monophyllus,
obesus,
tenuifolius

Supplier in UK
Supplier in USA


Yellow flowers with excellent weather resistance

Full Sun, Part Shade

Mar-Apr

8 x 4
(20 x 10)

It requires relatively dry conditions during the summer dormant period, so is suitable for planting beneath deciduous trees.[

Bu

Narcissus bulbocodium, Hoop Petticoat Daffodil, 6 inches (15 cms) high, yellow
Varieties
citrinus, pale yellow,
monophyllus (has become Narcissus foliosus), white, 4 inches (10 cms) high,white
obesus, 4 inches (10 cms) high, yellow
tenuifolius, 4 inches (10 cms), yellow

It can be naturalized in grass and used in the greenhouse, conservatory, cottage gardens, alpine & rockery, low maintenance garden, cut flower garden.

narcissuscflobulbocodiumwikimediacommons

Narcissus bulbocodium in a garden in Gradignan, Gironde, France on 25 March 2005. By ‪Jean-Jacques MILAN via Wikimedia Commons.

Narcissus 'Canaliculatus'
(tazetta daffodil)

Supplier in UK
Supplier in USA

Scented white petals with a yellow cup

Full Sun, Part Shade

Mar-Apr

6 x 3
(15 x 7)

Well-drained soil

Bu

Narcissus 'Canaliculatus', 6 inches (15 cms) high, miniature Polyanthus Daffodil, white, with yellow cup

Plant this at the front of your border, in a pot or in your windowboxes where you can enjoy the small, scented flowers up close. This variety produces several flowers on each stem so they are really colourful. Excellent cut flowers.

Goes well with Narcissus bulbocodium and Muscari armeniacum

Forces easily indoors like a paperwhite. This variety is a sleeper that should be more widely grown. Deer and rodent proof.

 

Narcissus juncifolius

Supplier in UK
 


Scented Golden Yellow

May-Jul

12 x
(30 x )

 

Bu

Narcissus juncifolius, Rush-leaved Daffodil, 4 inches (10 cms) high, rich yellow

 

 

Narcissus nanus (Narcissus pseudo-narcissus subsp. minor)

Supplier in UK - who also sell lupins and they have the National Collection of Lupins.
 

Photo from Lithuanian Rare Bulb Garden


Sulphur yellow tepals, light yellow cup

 

 

 

Bu

Narcissus nanus, 5 inches (12.5 cms) high, creamy-yellow, golden trumpet. Division 1b(A)

 

 

Narcissus rupicola

Supplier in UK - All our plants are grown by ourselves and we strive to propagate principally from seed to encourage generic diversity.
Supplier in UK


Scented Yellow flowers

Mar-Apr

4 x
(10 x )

Well-drained acid soil

Bu

Narcissus rupicola, 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cms) high, 3-sided leaves, bright yellow flowers

Mountains of central Spain and Portugal on acid soil among rocks.

This is a tiny Narcissus but it is perfectly hardy outside. Due to its small stature it is best grown in a trough or raised bed. It can be successfully pot grown in a cool greenhouse. Although the bulbs are small they should flower in the next spring. Plant 6cm deep in gritty soil in a sunny position and protect from slugs.

It is ideal for a pot in an alpine house. Plant the bulbs in a gritty, humus rich compost in the autumn. Summer dormant.

 

Narcissus triandrus albus - Having clicked this link, you can either
make a cup of tea, spread the scones with butter, jam, and cream and start your cream tea,
or
you can mix the ingredients for your scones and bake them;
during its pdf download of 16 pages of Miniature Daffodils by Alec Gray, Treswithian, Daffodil Farm, Camborne, Cornwall,
concolor,
'Hawera'

Supplier in UK
 

Part Shade

April

 

Well-drained soil

Bu

Narcissus triandrus albus, Angel's Tears Daffodil, 6 inches (15 cms) high, creamy-white nodding flowers in clusters.
Varieties
concolor, 9 inches (22.5 cms) high, soft yellow,
'Hawera', 8 inches (20 cms) high, soft yellow, blooms late

While the more typical of the triandrus group, the miniature daffodils, should be given a choice position in the rock garden, with a good loamy but well drained soil and light shade, the larger hybrids may be grouped in mixed borders or along the edges of woodland.

In the rock garden it is desirable to cover the groups of flowering bulbs with ground cover plants such as creeping thyme.

As for most miniature daffodils, Narcissus Triandus bulbs should be planted at a depth of 3 to 5 inches.

This variety of narcissus need not be lifted for several years if planted in a sunny spot - this miniature daffodil will slowly naturalize in the garden

Eventually the narcissus bulbs can be dug up to be divided.

All varieties of Narcissus Triandus can be grown indoors.

Plant bulbs in a bowl with leaf mould, sand and a little turf soil.

 

Narcissus
'W.P. Milner'

Supplier in UK
Supplier in UK
Supplier in Germany

Photo

Scented Sulphur yellow trumpet, white tepals

Full Sun,
Part Shade

Mar-Apr

8 x 4
(20 x 10)

Plant pointy end up, 10-15cm (4-6in) inches deep with 3-4 inches between each bulb.

Well-drained Sand, Chalk

Bu

Narcissus 'W.P. Milner', 8 inches (20 cms) high, small sulphur-yellow trumpet.

Narcissi make great cut flowers lasting up to a week in the vase. I love them jumbled up in large jugs on the table. Be careful mixing with other flower types as their stems give off a compound that is toxic to other flowers and soak their stems in warm water before displaying to stop the 'goo' from running out.

Suitable for garden or pots, strong and reliable.

Narcissus 'W.P. Milner' is one of the best ever daffs for growing right at the front of a border or in a prominent pot. It looks good for months, has handsome foliage and is neat and compact.

Makes it perfect for wilder style gardens and open woodland where it can be left to form large clumps.

Goes well with Crocus tommasianus, Chionodoxa luciliae and Anemone blanda 'Mixed'

 

Puschkinia scilloides (Puschkinia hyacinthoides Baker, Puschkinia libanotica Zucc., Russian Snowdrop,
Striped Squill),
alba

Supplier in UK
Supplier in USA


Fragrant silver-blue, with darker blue lines

Full Sun,
Part Shade

Goes dormant by late spring.

Mar-Apr

6 x 2
(15 x 5)

Plant 5 - 10cm deep and a similar distance apart in autumn. Leave undisturbed and they will form good-sized clumps.

Moist well-drained sandy or gritty soil

Bu

Puschkinia scilloides (Puschkinia hyacinthoides Baker, Puschkinia libanotica Zucc.), 4 inches (10 cms) high, silver-blue, with darker blue lines;
variety
alba is a pure white form

Best naturalized in drifts in rock gardens, along walkways, in open woodland areas, meadows or in front of shrubs or under deciduous trees. Mixes well with other spring-flowering bulbs.

At roughly the same time in spring, the strappy upright(ish) foliage appears, almost seeming to stand guard at each side of the emerging flowerspike. This spike carries up to 10 near-white flowers, which often have a faint blue stripe down the length of each petal. It is very pretty when intermingled with Cyclamen or Fritillaria (the snake's head type), but avoid overcrowding as they like their space, and will naturalise areas under trees and shrubs if left undisturbed. They do well in pots too.

Goes well with
Aubretia 'Purple Cascade', Prunus 'Pandora',
Magnolia x soulangeana and Camellia japonica 'Margeret Davis'

Foliage should not be mowed or otherwise removed after bloom until it turns yellow.

puszkiniacforscilloideswikimediacommons

Puszkinia cebulicowata Puschkinia libanotica. By Barbara Wrzesińska via Wikimedia Commons.

Scilla bifolia (Alpine Squill),
rosea (Rosy Squill)

Supplier in UK
Supplier in USA


Starry Purple-blue

Full Sun in Winter,
Part Shade in Summer

Foliage will disappear by summer as plant goes dormant

Feb-Mar

6 x
(15 x )

Scilla bifolia bulbs should be planted 3" (8cm) deep and 2"-3" (5-8cm) apart where they can flower in the spring sun but then get summer shade

Well-drained sandy loam

Bu

Scilla bifolia, 4 inches (10 cms) high, sky-blue, star-like;
variety
rosea, pale pink - Photo

Resistant to deer and rodents.

It will naturalise under shrubs or in light grass to receive summer shade where the massed heads really create the purple haze.

Excellent edging plant. Provides colour and contrast to the woodland garden, rock garden and under deciduous trees or shrubs.

Companion plants - Helleborus Winter Jewels 'Golden Lotus',
Crocus tommasinianus 'Ruby Giant' and
Galanthus nivalis.
A lovely flower carpet with crocuses and scilla.

scillacforbifoliawikimediacommons

Polski: Cebulica dwulistna, Scilla bifolia. By Baczalak via Wikimedia Commons.

Scilla siberica (Siberian squill,
Othocallis siberica),
'Spring Beauty', alba

Supplier in UK
 

In the Midwestern United States it is becoming invasive in some situations.


Nodding, bell-shaped, Violet-blue

Full Sun,
Part Shade

Mar-Apr

After flowering, the flower stems become limp as capsules (pods) mature. At maturity, the capsules become purple and split open, releasing small, dark brown seeds. When the seeds are mature, the leaves wither and the plant goes dormant until the next spring.

8 x 2
(20 x 5)

Plant bulbs 8 - 10cm deep and 10cm apart in autumn, in naturalistic drifts where they can remain undisturbed for several years.

Humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil

Bu

Scilla siberica, 4 inches (10 cms) high, metallic blue,
softer in variety 'Spring Beauty'; while
alba is a pure white form

Dainty spikes of up to five nodding, bell-shaped, violet-blue flowers in March and April and slender, strap-shaped, glossy, mid-green leaves. Siberian squills are perfect for naturalising in areas of semi- shade underneath deciduous shrubs. To achieve a naturalistic display scatter bulbs in bold drifts on the ground, planting them where they fall. They originate from the area around the Black Sea so they are extremely robust.

Goes well with
Athyrium niponicum var. pictum and
Anemone coronaria 'Bordeaux'

scillacforsibericawikimediacommons

Polski: Cebulica dwulistna Othocallis siberica, Polska

English: Othocallis siberica, Poland. By ‪Nova via Wikimedia Commons.

Tulipa batalinii

Supplier in UK
Supplier in USA

Supplier of tulipa batalinii cultivars in UK


Yellow flowers

Full Sun

Apr-May

4-20 x 4
(10-50 x 10)

Tulipa batalinii Honky Tonk produces small bulbs which should be planted about 3" (7cm) deep and 2"-3" (5-7cm) apart in sunny well drained soil to flower in late April and early May. Beware of squirrel or mice damage.

Well-drained Sand, Chalk

Bu

Tulipa batalinii, 4 inches (10 cms) high, creamy-yellow, May-flowering.

Tulipa batalinii Honky Tonk has pale yellow petals above grey green foliage with wavy edges. The "batalinii" group are closely related to the "linifolia" types and may be botanically indistinguishable.

Excellent for rock gardens, front of borders, forcing and containers.

There are other Tulipa used as alpines in Rock Garden Plants Suitable for Small Gardens in Colour Wheel Gallery

There are other Tulipa in Tulipa Gallery

 

Tulipa persica (Tulipa celsiana, Cel's Tulip, Persian Tulip, Tulipa syvestris subsp. australis)

Supplier in UK
Supplier in UK
 


Fragrant Open yellow flowers, tinged carmine outside

Full Sun

Apr-May

6 x
(15 x )

Plant in a well drained position, in full sun. Protect from extreme winter winds.

Bu

Tulipa persica (Tulipa celsiana, Tulipa syvestris subsp. australis), 6 inches (15 cms) high, scented, yellow and bronze. Division 15: Miscellaneous and Species (Botanical) - see Introduction Page of Tulip Bulb Gallery.

Excellent for the rock garden and wild garden.

tulipacflospersicawikimediacommons

Tulipes sauvages (Tulipa sylvestris subsp. australis) : Fontaine de Gerland - Vercors - France (38). By ‪Stef1432 via Wikimedia Commons.

Tulipa tarda

Supplier in UK
Supplier in UK
Supplier in USA

Scented central yellow eye and the tips of the petals are white

Full Sun

Apr

5 x
(12.5 x )

Tulip tarda bulbs should be planted 4" (10cm) deep, about 3" (7cm) apart in a situation that catches the April sunshine.

Plant in a well drained position, in full sun. Protect from extreme winter winds.

Bu

Tulipa tarda, 3 inches (7.5 cms) high, golden-yellow, white-tipped inside, greenish-purple and white outside, in clusters.

Tulip tarda is one of the most popular of the dwarf tulips and easy to cultivate in a sunny position. It has a rosette of narrow green leaves with up to five flowers on each stem, close enough together as to appear in a bunch, opening out flat in the sun with a honey scent. The Tulip tarda flower has a large central yellow eye and the tips of the petals are white. Externally there is a greenish suffusion. Best grown en masse in a sunny situation in rockery, a raised bed or in pots.

 

Tulipa urumiensis

Supplier in UK
Supplier in UK
Supplier who ships globally


Bright Yellow flowers tinged in bronze

Apr

7 x
(17.5 x )

Tulip urumiensis bulbs should be planted 4" (10cm) deep, about 3" (7cm) apart in a situation that catches the April sunshine.

Plant in a well drained position, in full sun. Protect from extreme winter winds.

Bu

Tulipa urumiensis, 6 inches (15 cms) high, golden-yellow, bronze outside

Excellent for the rock garden and wild garden.

tulipacforurumiensiswikimediacommons

Tulipa urumiensis. By BerndH via Wikimedia Commons.

 

Do you want to be able to identify wild plants correctly, to use a flora and to follow a botanical key?

This Identiplant (Plant identification course for beginners in serious botany by The Botanical Society of the British Isles) course could be the answer:-

Applications for the 2016 course are now closed as it is full, applications for the 2017 course will open on 1st December 2016.

It is a distance learning course with a difference – course units are delivered online but you practise real plant identification throughout the summer with the support of a tutor

• The course consists of 15 units delivered at fortnightly intervals

• It starts in February and finishes in August, tracking the flowering season

• Each unit concludes with a short question sheet, requiring you to find and examine wild plants

• You have your own tutor, who will correct your answers and give advice

• There are no grades or numerical marks

• The course can be completed in one year but you may continue into a second year if you wish

• YOU WILL NEED TO GO OUT TO FIND WILD PLANTS, BUT ONLY COMMON ONES

 

About Gardenia Creating Gardens website:-

"This site is for beginners, amateurs, as well as professionals who may be looking for inpiration or wish to share their gardening or horticultural projects and experiences with others. We do not sell products. We are simply a straightforward interface between you and the gardening world, trying to connect the dots between inspiration, products, nurseries and you!

The pages on the above website contain a great deal of information, which you will need to rewrite on your computer yourself, since a simple copy of a selection of text does not seem to work - I use a Mac with Safari (that is not a raincoat being used on a trip through the african bush to prevent sunburn!).

 

"Edgewood" The Lonsdale Garden is a private garden which has been evolving since the family's move from the UK to the US in 1995. It is home to several thousand hardy plants, trees and shrubs, grown in a variety of raised beds, woodland, greenhouses and other settings. Following The Garden link above takes you to a general description of the garden and climate.

Sharing over 10,000 digital images of the plants and garden at 'Edgewood' was the primary driver behind the development of this web site. The Plant Images Album displays images of individual plants, categorized by botanical hierarchy. The Garden Images Album takes you to a collection of images showing more general views, captured during the various seasons since fall 2000. There is also a Homeland Security album which contains pictures of all the family pets which are vital to keeping away all those critters which would otherwise consume the plants. Please see the Lectures and Sales page should you wish to obtain any of the original images. The Articles link will lead you to more specific articles about the cultivation and propagation techniques used at "Edgewood". Plants and seeds for sale or exchange can be viewed by following the Lectures & Sales link, which will also take you to a list of lectures offered by John, on a variety of themes, together with a short biography.

 

State of the World's Plants report released by Kew in 2016

 

The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew has released the first annual report on the State of the World’s Plants accompanied by the first international science and policy symposium on the topic.

The report provides a baseline assessment of current knowledge on the diversity of plants on earth, the global threats plants face, the policies in place and their effectiveness in dealing with threats. The report has taken a year to produce and involved more than 80 scientists.

This is the first ever global assessment on the state of the world’s plants. We already have a ‘State of the World’s …birds, sea-turtles, forests, cities, mothers, fathers, children even antibiotics’ but not plants. I find this remarkable given the importance of plants to all of our lives– from food, medicines, clothing, building materials and biofuels, to climate regulation. This report therefore provides the first step in filling this critical knowledge gap.

Professor Kathy Willis, Director of Science at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

The status of plants outlined in the report is based on the most up to date knowledge from around the world and covers the following topics:

• Naming and counting the world’s plants
• New plant species discovered in 2015
• Plant evolutionary relationships and plant genomes
• Useful plants
• Important plant areas
• Country focus: status of knowledge of Brazilian plants
• Climate change
• Global land-cover change
• Invasive species
• Plant diseases - state of research
• Extinction risk and threats to plants
• CITES and the prevention of illegal trade
• The Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and Benefit Sharing

 

To find out more and download the report visit:

 

Border ideas and collections from Pernewood Plants in Norfolk:-

Choosing and placing plants in the appropriate setting in order to get the most from a particular variety of plant can sometimes be daunting and confusing. To make things easier and hopefully to inspire your own ideas we’ve provided various border plans for a range of different scenarios. You may wish to follow one of our plans and order an entire collection, use this as inspiration in your own design or choose just a few perhaps to compliment an existing border.

 

 

The following is from Ashley Vale Allotments Association (with its hedge laying course) on the reason for using Garden Lime and Blood, Fish and Bone on allotments:-

"I have also acquired supplies of garden lime and of blood, fish and bone manure (organic) purchased from another allotment society with a surplus. These are in 20 kg bags which are £10 and £16 for the lime and BFB respectively. I can make up smaller bags of BFB if necessary. Regular liming is important to keep the PH (acidity level) of your soil in the range that most vegetables require. While some species react adversely to fresh lime (e.g. potatoes) all vegetables like a PH between 5 and 7 and also benefit for a supply of available calcium in the soil. Over time, most garden and urban soils slowly become more acid due to the effects of acid rain and other atmospheric pollutants. Blood fish and bone manure provides basic supplies of the three major plant nutrients – nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus – from organic sources, and is helpful wherever plants flag or soil is short of nutrients."

 

99 Roots:-

99roots is all about gardening. We’ll help you to be pro without turning into your parents. We have inspirational ideas, amazing gardening products, how-to guides on pruning, advice for taking care of your little loved ones (plants, that is). We also have a Q&A section for members and of course our massive database with all the info you could ever need to help you pick your perfect plants. If that’s not enough, we’ve grouped flowers and plants into inspirational sets with tagged photos, so you can see what you’re aiming for. Some are even ready to buy and grow.

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  • Creative Categories - Kid Approved Simple Food Fast Growing For Beginners Fine Fragrants We love the Dark Show-Offs Colours Pond Plants For Birds & Bees Neighbour Repellant Roses & Classics Tough Survivors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ivydene Gardens Infill Plants Index Gallery:
The Alpine Meadow with Winter- and Spring-Flowering Bulbs Page 3

 

Visitors to the mountains of Switzerland and other alpine regions will know the delight of coming upon the glowing kaleidoscopic colour of an alpine meadow be-jewelled with flowering alpine in full bloom.
Reduced to garden context the alpine meadow becomes a lawn formed of dwarf, creeping or squat carpeting plants, which flower in due season and yet have the inestimable virtue of requiring no regular mowing.
It can be made as a separate and distinctive feature on its own:-

  • it makes a happy solution to the problem of clothing a small area that does not warrant grass and the expenditure on a lawn mower.
  • when a lawn is up to a house wall, your boundary fence, log roll fencing or surrounding a tree. Then, it is very difficult to cut all the grass adjacent to that fixed object. Replace a 6 inch (15 cms) width from that object to the lawn with an alpine meadow, and then mowing that adjacent lawn becomes much easier.
  • area under and adjacent to a picket fence, a post and rail fence or footpath demarcation where the lawn or the flower bed can be replaced by the alpine meadow.

But with equal facility, it can be adapted to quite large areas, becoming pleasant to walk upon and durable enough for most garden lawn purposes as an ornamental feature.
But the alpine meadow, like its natural counterpart, associates most beautifully with rock. It can be used to carpet a plateau within the rock garden or to clothe ground between related outcrops of rock. It is also the ideal way of merging a rock garden into the greater garden design and scene. In some instances, it may be necessary for want of space to confine the rock garden to its allotted space by placing a flagged or gravel path around its front edges. A better way is, where space allows, to let the foothills of the rock garden run out into an alpine meadow.
The site needs as careful preparation as the rock garden itself. Drainage must be excellent, and the ground dug and amended with grit, coarse sand and peat to give a free-draining rooting medium. Particulat attention should be given to the removal of every scrap of perennial weeds and their roots, especially the pernicious and invasive couch grass, bindweed, ground elder, oxalis, speedwells and thistles.
The soil should then be firmed well by walking on it with the heels, raking and tamping it down. On the heavier soils, it is well worth spreading an inch or 2 (2.5-5 cms) of coarse sand over the area. The next step is to put down stone flags as stepping-stones to give access to the rock garden and where there will be much wear. They should be spaced at easy stride distances, large enough to take both feet, and set almost flush with the soil surface. Their shape is not very material for their edges will soon be blurred by creeping plants, but they should harmonize with the stone used in the rock garden.

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

 

The Propagation of Alpines by Lawrence D. Hills. Published in 1950 by Faber and Faber Limited describes every method of propagation for 2,500 species.

Unlike modern books published since 1980, this one states exactly what to do and is precisely what you require if you want to increase your alpines.


Site design and content copyright ©July 2016. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

Ivydene
Horticultural
Services

 

INFILL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY PAGES

Links in Table below are available in Shrub Tree Shape Index Gallery


Site Map

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

Click on number in cells below to jump to that page detailing those cultivated plants with that plant type and their botanical name starts with that letter.

Click on or underlined text to jump to page comparing flower thumbnails of that blue colour.
is Red, Pink, Purple and is Unusual or Other Flower Colour.

Plant Type
with links to Other Plant Photo Galleries

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D
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Alpine in Evergreen Perennial, Herbaceous Perennial and Rock Garden

 

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Aquatic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annual/ Biennial

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Bamboo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bedding and RHS Mixed Border Beds



















Bicolour

Other Flower Colours

White / Colour Bicolour

Bulb and
Allium / Anemone, Colchicum / Crocus, Dahlia, Gladiolus, Narcissus, Tulip





 

 



 



 



1



Climber



 





 









Conifer

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Deciduous Shrub

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Deciduous Tree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evergreen Perennial

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Evergreen Shrub , Semi-Evergreen Shrub and Heather

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Evergreen Tree

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Fern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grass

 

 

 

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Herbaceous Perennial and RHS Mixed Border Beds



 

 

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Herb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Odds and Sods

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rhododendron, Azalea, Camellia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rose

 

 





 









Soft Fruit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sub-Shrub

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top Fruit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wildflower
with
Plants used by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterflies in the UK



















Shrub and Small Tree

Botanical Names Page

Common Names Page

Companion Planting

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UV

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XYZ

Pest Control by Companion Planting

The following 2 books (written by Louise Riotte 1909-1998 who was one of North America's most beloved gardeners) provide a wealth of extra information telling you what plants to put together for what purpose and how it does it (The only wasted information on each page is the page number!!!):-

Carrots love Tomatoes: Secrets of Companion Planting for Successful Gardening by Louise Riotte Second Edition (Storey Publishing 1998) ISBN-13: 978-1-58017-027-7

Roses love Garlic: Companion Planting and other Secrets of Flowers by Loiuse Riotte Second Edition (Storey Publishing 1998)
ISBN 1-58017-028-5