Ivydene Gardens Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery:
Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey

Reasons for stopping infilling of previous Sense of Fragrance section on 28/07/2016 at end of this Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey Page. From September 2017 will be creating new pages starting with Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders using Scented Flora of the World by Roy Genders. ISBN 0 7090 5440 8

Ivydene Gardens Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery:
Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey

Botanical Plant Name

with link to
UK or
European Union
mail-order supplier for you to contact to buy this plant

Flower Colour
and Background Colour nearest to main petal colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Sun Aspect:- Full Sun,
Part Shade, Full Shade

with link to external website for photo/data

Flowering Months in UK

with link to
USA or
Canada
mail-order supplier

Height with Spacings or Width (W) in inches (cms)

1 inch =
2.5 cms
12 inches = 30 cms
40 inches = 100 cms

Foliage Colour

and Background Colour nearest to middle-aged leaf colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Soil Moisture:-
Dry,
Moist,
Wet

with link to Australia or New Zealand mail-order supplier

Plant Type is:-

A for Aquatic
Ann for Annual / Biennial
Ba for Bamboo
Bu for Bulb
Cl for Climber
Co for Conifer
F for Fern
G for Grass
H for Herb
P for Perennial
Rh for Rhodo-dendron, Azalea, Camellia
Ro for Rose
Sh for Shrub
So for Soft Fruit
To for Top Fruit
Tr for Tree
V for Vegetable
W for Wildflower

followed by:-
E for Evergreen,
D for Deciduous,
H for Herbaceous,
Alpine for being an Alpine as well as being 1 of above Plant Type /

 
Acid for Acidic,
Alk for Alkaline,
Any for AnySoil
 

with link to
ALL PLANTS Index Gallery page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From How Perfume Works in How Stuff Works - Science:-

"To apply the loosest definition, perfume is any substance that you wear and that smells. There are no requirements for it to smell good. Clearly, your experience of a perfume comes not only from the stuff in the bottle but also from the stuff in your head.
Our reaction to smell is primal in nature. Our sense of smell goes through less higher brain processing than our other senses do. The olfactory nerve is only 2 synapses away from the amygdala, a brain structure critical to expressing and experiencing emotion.
Because of this direct connection, smell can evoke an immediate emotional response.

A Composition in 3 Parts
Most perfumes are engineered to have a 3-part smell:

  • the top note,
  • the heart note and
  • the base note

Top Notes are composed of the lightest molecules. Therefore they evaporate first, followed by heart notes and base notes.

Top Notes appear within 15 minutes of applying. Designers often put weird unpleasant or spicy smells in this phase so that they interest you but don't hang around long enough to offend.

Heart Notes appear after 3-4 hours. They're probably what you remember about the perfume; if its a floral perfume, smells go here.

Base Notes appear 4-5 hours after application. Base notes are often used as a fixative to hold and boost the strength of the lighter top and middle notes. Musky, watery, mossy and woody chemicals go into the base.

The perfume world also classifies perfumes into scent families. The categories exist because critics and designers use the terms. There are no groupings that everyone agrees on, nor any rule about categorization beyond common sense and a perfume belonging if it smells like the last perfume in the category. Here are some classifications you may have encountered:

• Floral: smells like flowers
• Fruity: smells like fruit, including citrus
• Green: fresh grass or leaves
• Herbaceous: like any variety of herbs
• Woody: like different types of wood
• Amber: like tree resin
• Animalic: bodily smells
• Musk: like a substance made by the musk deer
• Oriental: amber and spice

Why is perfume so diluted?
It's not that manufacturers are stingy. The reason is actually aesthetic: Lots of alcohol spreads out the smells so that you can distinguish them. In a perfume oil, you'd encounter a jumble of smells. Smelling it would be like hearing an orchestra play all the notes in a symphony at once. You might register that you're smelling something sweet, but not that it's mango, followed by jasmine, finished with cherry. Its diluted nature makes the smell enjoyable.

 

You use perfume that you like and that is there to attract other people, so you probably use one of the above types. If you like it in perfume may be you will also like it as a fragrance in the garden.

Why perfume is diluted is as it states above, and you should excercise caution about the number of smells in your garden and what they are there for. Is there any reason why in the garden you cannot follow the note system of flowers?

You see alongside in the table on the right the chaotic shambles of the mixture of flower colours used in the Mixed Borders at Wisley. They might have started with a coordinated flower colour scheme, but over the years the planters of the replacement of the permanent and bedding plants had not either followed the original planting plan or a new one to replace the old. Please do not create the same mess in your garden.

You normally put one fragrance on your body or neck, not one for your ears (your lover or husband), a different one for your ankles (carrot for your tame rabbit to yearn after) and another for your wrists (honey for your led horse to lick) - I hope that my use of the English Language is clear! It can be difficult to be romantic with your husband or lover when your horse and rabbit are also with you!

 

So I use the classification of pleasant plant scents of flowers from The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover:-

 

Flower Exotic Scents - the heavy, tropically sweet perfumes possessed by such flowers as

  • Jasminum officinale,
  • Tobacco flowers,
  • Clerodendrum trichotum,
  • some Narcissi and
  • Lilium regale.

 

Flower Spicy Scents - a blend of sweetness and spiciness as in

  • Viburnum carlesii,
  • Viburnum x juddii,
  • stocks,
  • Phlox,
  • sweet rocket,
  • wallflowers,
  • Daphne,
  • Lonicera x americana,
  • Rhododendron trichostomum,
  • pinks and
  • carnations.
  • Aniseed in
    • Corylopsis,
    • Clematis rehderiana and
    • primula.
  • Other spicy scents from
    • Magnolia stellata,
    • witch hazel,
    • Cestrum parqui,
    • Hermodactylus tuberosus,
  • lemon-scented
    • wintersweet and
    • many roses.

 

Flower Vanilla and Almond Scents - these are 'foody' and not too sweet as in

  • Clematis armandii and
  • Clematis montana,
  • Abeliophyllum,
  • Oemleria,
  • heliotrope,
  • Fabiana,
  • some Pieris,
  • Persicaria wallichii,
  • Schizopetalon walkeri,
  • Azara microphylla,
  • Androsace,
  • Choisya ternata and
  • cherries such as Prunus x yedoensis with
  • the coconut of
    • gorse,
    • heptacodium,
    • tuberose (Polianthes) and
    • Cardiocrinum,
  • and the chocolate of
    • Cosmos atrosanguineus and
    • Lilium pumilum.

 

Flower Pea Scents - the pea scent is light, sweet and fruity, as in

  • Coronilla and
  • wisteria;
  • sometimes it is slightly heavy and musty, as in
    • laburnum with some
    • brooms and
    • lupins.
  • Acacias veer towards sweetness.

 

Flower French Perfumes Scents - piercingly sweet, but floral, refined and without much spice or tropical heaviness:

  • lily of the valley,
  • Mahonia japonica and
  • Skimmia;
  • cyclamen and
  • mignonette (reseda);
  • hyacinths and
  • Clematis heracleifolia;
  • and the better scented lilacs.
  • The violet scents are sharply sweet and very sophisticated:
    • sweet violets,
    • Iris reticulata,
    • Leucojum vernum and
    • some crab apples.

 

Flower Rose Scents - Most roses have a typical 'rose' perfume, which is also found in

  • some crab apples and
  • Japanese apricots.
    • The richest rose scents are found among the
    • old shrub roses, where the sweet French perfume is shaded with incense and spice, and among
    • the modern shrub roses,
    • climbers and
    • Hybrid Teas, where it is blended with fruit and tea.
  • Other roses have dominant flavours such as clove, incense and fruit, tea, fruity scents and 'myrrh'.

 

Flower Fruit Scents - encompass a range of delicious flavours. The fragrance is more often warm and full than sharp; sometimes the scent of a particular fruit dominates, but usually it is shaded by other flavours into a fruit cocktail.

  • Lemon seems to be the main flavour in
  • evening primroses,
  • Magnolia grandiflora and
  • Magnolia sinensis,
  • boronias,
  • Primula florindae and
  • Primula kewensis, and
  • Clematis forsteri,
  • melon in
    • Magnolia obovata;
  • banana in
    • Magnolia (Michelia) figo and
    • Muscari macrocarpum;
  • plum in
    • freesias and
    • Iris graminea;
  • pineapple in
    • Cytisus battandieri and
    • Philadelphus microphyllus;
  • raspberry in
    • Buddleja agathosma and
    • mignonette;
  • apricot in
    • Amaryllis belladonna,
    • Osmanthus fragrans and
    • Gardenia.
  • Other magnolias, honeysuckles and Calycanthus floridus deliver a well-balance fruit cocktail.

 

Flower Honey Scents - are rich and sticky-thick in

  • Crocus chysanthus,
  • Mahonia aquifolium,
  • Crambe,
  • Ozothamnus ledifolius,
  • Euphorbia mellifera,
  • Lobularia and
  • Sarcocca.
  • It is a little more flowery in Buddleja;
  • richly floral in
    • sweet peas,
    • Mirabilis jalapa and
    • Cestrum nocturnum;
  • and shades into 'musk' in
    • Centaurea moschata and
    • Olearia moschata.

 

Flower Rogue Scents - are for those that do not seem to fit into any of the main groups like

  • the milk of magnesis of Drimys winteri,
  • the mouse-and-sawdust of Callistemon pallidus, and
  • the horse-and-elephant of Rondeletia amoena.

 

Flowers with Less Pleasant Scents (Nasty)

  • Members of the Arum family:-
    • Bog arum, Lysichiton americanus has a fetid scent, which is unappealing.
    • The dragon arum, Dracunculus vulgaris is really foul-smelling, with its fly-pollinated flowers.
  • Ageratina ligustrina has tiny, rose-tinted white flowers with a scent of urine.
  • Eucomis bicolor has flowerheads that look like greenish pineapples on sticks with a meaty odour, which is nasty; and loved by flies.
  • Shrubs like
    • hawthorn,
    • cotoneaster,
    • mountain ash and
    • privet have unpleasant odours and are popular with flies.
  • The tree rowan, Sorbus vilmorinii also has an unpleasant odour.
  • Flowers of
    • common lilac and
    • Aesculus parviflora, whose sweetness is overlaid with a rather stale smell.
    • Candytuft (Iberis sempervirens) smells of stale socks.

 

So I use the classification of pleasant plant scents of foliage from The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover:-

Some of the flower scents are also found in leaves, but here they are generally less sugary. This is because in leaves scent has a different function: it purpose is to repel not to attract. Scent is used as a protection against disease and many of the compounds found in leaf scents are strongly antiseptic -

  • oil of eucalyptus,
  • thyme and
  • clove are examples -

and play an important part in the composition of medicines. Scents are also used to discourage insects and animals by presenting astringent tastes: some of the volatile oils act as natural herbicides. Accordingly, leaf scents tend more towards the pungent, bitter and medicinal. How they are released depends on how they are stored:-

  • Rub or Break Leaf - Where the essential oil is in capsules deep inside a leaf, it is released by rubbing or breaking.
  • Brush Leaf - Where it is in cells close to the surface of the leaf, you need only to brush against it lightly.
  • Sunshine or Rain - And where it it is actually secreted on to the surface of the leaf, you can usually smell it without disturbing the leaf at all. Hot sunshine causes some scents to oxidise, while others seem to be most evident after rain.

 

Foliage Spice Scents

  • Culinary herbs like
    • bay,
    • thyme,
    • basil,
    • marjoram,
    • cardamon and
    • rosemary
  • to shrubs like
    • sweet fern (Comptonia),
    • spice bush (Lindera) and
    • myrtle.
  • Curry-scented Helichrysum italicum and
  • Escallonia illinata.
  • Most of the above Foliage Spice Scents are released into the air by heat.
     
  • Aniseed in
    • fennel,
    • Primula wilsonii var. anisodora,
    • Agastache rugosa (Agastache foeniculum) and
    • a touch in Magnolia salicifolia.
  • Liquorice scent in
    • Myrrhis odorata and
    • Acorus gramineus 'Licorice'.
  • These aniseed and liquorice scents are released by rubbing the leaf.

 

Foliage Rose Scents

  • scent is made aromatic with fruit, mint and spice in some of the Geranium family:-
    • Pelargonium 'Attar of Roses',
    • Geranium macrorrhizum and
    • Geranium endressii.
  • The musky, honey scent is found in
  • olearias

 

Foliage Fruit Scents

  • Lemon in
    • Lemon verbena
    • Pelargonium 'Citronella',
    • lemon thyme,
    • bergamot,
    • lemon balm,
    • Eucalyptus citriodora.
  • Orange from
    • Houttuynia cordata,
    • Pelargonium graveolens and
    • rue.
  • Blackcurrant in
    • Salvia discolor,
    • Salvia microphylla and
    • on hot days, cedars waft the scent in the air.
  • Resinous pear-drop in
    • Western red cedar (Thuja plicata).
  • Grapefruit in
    • giant fir (Abies grandis)
  • Pineapple in
    • Salvia elegans 'Scarlet Pineapple'.
  • Apple in
    • Rosa rubigonosa,
    • camomile and
    • applemint.

 

Foliage Camphorous and Pungent Scents - where most have to be rubbed for the scent to be released.

  • Achilleas,
  • most Artemesia,
  • tansy and
  • Santolina.
  • The group includes some of the best grey-leaved plants.

 

Foliage Resinous Scents - Most of these infuse the air on warm days, especially in spring, and on a hot summer's evening the flower spikes of Dictamnus are so covered with inflammable oil that you can set fire to them; you get a whoosh of flame and the lemon scent is released.

  • Ranges from the
  • turpentine of
    • pines and
    • other conifers,
  • cedarwood of
    • Hebe cupressoides,
  • gummy resin of
    • Cistus,
  • fruity resin of
    • thujas,
    • abies and
    • Dictamnus albus
  • pumpkin pie of
    • Nothofagus antarctica to the
  • cloyingly sweet resin of
    • balsam poplar buds.

 

Foliage Mint and Eucalyptus Scents - they are very similar. They share a piercing top note and shade into each other in many leaves.

  • Eucalyptus coccifera has sharp peppermint fragrance.
  • Prostanthera,
  • catmints,
  • Calamintha,
  • Elsholtzia,
  • menthas and
  • Pelargonium tomentosum.

 

Foliage Miscellaneous Scents include the

  • fresh, green scents of
    • parsley and
    • celery.
  • musty scent of
    • ferns,
  • hay scent of
    • Dryopteris aemula and
  • the scent of wintergreen
    • Gaultheria procumbens.

 

Foliage with Less Pleasant Scents (Nasty)

  • sweaty aroma of
    • foliage of Salvia scalerea var. turkestanica and
    • Phuopsis stylosa.
  • Foxy scent of
    • Fritillaria imperialis.
  • Cat's urine smell of
    • box leaves and
    • flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum.
  • Meaty scent of
    • clerodendrum.
  • 'Roast Beef' in
    • Salvia gesneriifolia and
    • Iris foetidissima.
  • Roast lamb and mint sauce of
    • Salvia confertiflora.

 

Sites for Scented Plants from The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover:-

THere are 3 points to bear in mind when choosing places for scented plants in the garden:-

  • how the scent is released:-
    • Rub or Break Leaf - Where the essential oil is in capsules deep inside a leaf, it is released by rubbing or breaking.
    • Brush Leaf - Where it is in cells close to the surface of the leaf, you need only to brush against it lightly.
    • Sunshine or Rain - And where it it is actually secreted on to the surface of the leaf, you can usually smell it without disturbing the leaf at all. Hot sunshine causes some scents to oxidise, while others seem to be most evident after rain.
  • when the scent is released and
  • what sort of scent it is.

All pleasantly scented flowers need to be within reach of the nose and most pleasantly scented leaves within reach of the fingers or the feet, since they generally have to be rubbed for the scent to be released. This really means that scented plants ought never to be far from paths - certainly not at the back of wide borders or separated from you by water or prickly undergrowth.

Scented flowers, of course, have a flowering season and this may affect where you place them. Plants which open in the coldest months ought perhaps to be grown near the house and beside the paths in regular use; their scents can easily be wasted if they are growing at the bottom of the garden.

Instead of choosing plants that perform simulataneously, we can also arrange a succession of similar scents. If we planted one area, for example, with

  • Mahonia aquifolium,
  • Crambe,
  • Lobularia and
  • Sarcocca

we would give ourselves a honeyed zone lasting many months; this could contrast with another area given to year-round vanilla and almond scents -

  • Azara microphylla,
  • Oemleria,
  • Clematis montana,
  • heliotrope and
  • Persicaria wallichii.

Other scents seem to make happy contrasts quite naturally. Sweetness with Spice or Resin is the foundation for many a good scheme.

We can generally look to flowers to provide the top note and leaves the bass note; and since most leaves have to be rubbed, we can control the release of the bass note to suit our mood:-

  • Thus the lemon scent of evening primroses might be enhanced by a drift of thyme;
  • the apple scent of Rosa wichurana by a nearby pine.
  • Roses teamed up with lavender is a well-loved association.

 

I am using the contents of The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover to create these Fragrant Plant Pages in this Gallery. Here is where I am currently in doing the fragrant trees as the first type of plant. There are occasions in the book that

  • it does not tell you the type of foliage or flower fragrance for that plant that he defines at the beginning of the book,
  • other time it states it has a vanilla fragrance and when you attempt to verify that the nursery states that it has a honey fragrance

Although

  • Catalpa bignoniodes
  • Catalpa x erubescens
  • Cedrus
  • Chamaecyparis
  • Cercidiphyllum
  • Cladastris kentukea
  • Crataegus monogyna
  • Crataegus laevigata
  • Cupressus macrocarpa
  • Cupressus sempervirens
  • Cupressus arizonica var. glabra
  • Cydonia has scented fruit
  • Eucalyptus glaucescens has fruity foliage and flowers with sweet perfume
  • Eucalyptus gunnii
  • Eucalyptus pauciflora subsp. niphophila
  • Fraxinus ornus
  • Halesia carolina
  • Halesia monticola
  • Juglans regia
  • Laburnum alpinum 'Pendulum'
  • Laburnum x wateri 'Vossii'
  • Magnolia kobus
  • Magnolia x loebneri 'Merrill'
  • Magnolia obovata
  • Magnolia salicifolia
  • Magnolia virginiana

are listed The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover – 16 Oct 2014 by Stephen Lacey (Author), Andrew Lawson (Photographer) ISBN 978-0-7112-3574-8 with or without statements concerning the identity of their flower or foliage fragrance, I am unable to locate or validate those identities when searching through the internet with data from botanical gardens, government information or mail-order nurseries - who may simply state that they are fragrant.

I had thought that if that had been the case, then I would have relegated that plant to

but I decided that perhaps the nursery that produces that plant might be able to tell me rather than simply stating that is fragrant; by clicking Ivydene Horticultural Services. Unfortunately, currently I can receive so please include a telephone number (new-fangled machines, in my younger days it was by carrier pigeon or snail-mail), but not send emails.

 

I am using the contents of The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover to create these Fragrant Plant Pages in this Gallery. Here is where I am currently in doing the fragrant shrubs as the first type of plant. There are occasions in the book that

  • it does not tell you the type of foliage or flower fragrance for that plant that he defines at the beginning of the book,
  • other time it states it has a vanilla fragrance and when you attempt to verify that the nursery states that it has a honey fragrance

Although

  • Aesculus parviflora
  • Berberis candidula
  • Berberis julianae
  • Berberis verruculosa
  • Buddleja alternifolia
  • Buddleja fallowiana var. alba
  • Buddleja globosa
  • Buddleja x weyeriana 'Golden Glow'
  • Buxus sempervirens leaves are poisonous to humans and cattle
  • Calycanthus floridus has a strong camphor smell that is released when stems are scraped and the flowers are are strongly scented
  • Caryopteris x clandonensis
  • Cassinia leptophylla 'Fulvida'

are listed The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover – 16 Oct 2014 by Stephen Lacey (Author), Andrew Lawson (Photographer) ISBN 978-0-7112-3574-8 with or without statements concerning the identity of their flower or foliage fragrance, I am unable to locate or validate those identities when searching through the internet with data from botanical gardens, government information or mail-order nurseries - who may simply state that they are fragrant.
Also in the above list:-

  • are those that conflict between smells described from the book and from the internet such as for Caryopteris x clandonensis -
    • "A turpentine scent comes from the grey leaves when they are rubbed" from the book and
    • "ONE of the most compelling but unsung features of the little caryopteris bush is the lavender scent of its foliage. Although the plant is now grown in its thousands and is widely available in garden centres, this quality is rarely noticed or talked about. I discovered its wonderful scent when I came across it in a public seaside garden once resplendent with rock plants but by then almost abandoned to nature. You could still take your ease on one of the memorial seats and sniff: on that sunny day the caryopteris scent outdid the salty tang on the air." from The Telegraph.
  • As well as ones that are described like this Aesculus parviflora in the book:-
    • "A.parviflora, bottlebrush buckeye, is a shrubby relative of the horse chestnut. It has typical fingered leaves and ercet panicles of creamy white flowers. The scent is heavy and sweet, sometimes a little sickly, and can fill the air. It is particularly useful in woodland borders where, with hydrangeas, it ensures interest through late summer." So which type of flower scent (defined in his book) is it?

I had thought that if that had been the case, then I would have relegated that plant to

but I decided that perhaps the nursery that produces that plant might be able to tell me by clicking Ivydene Horticultural Services. Unfortunately, currently I can receive, but not send emails.

 

The following is what is printed on the back cover of The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover :-

"Companion to Scented Plants
Fully revised, Inspirational Classic featuring over 1,000 Fragrant Plants

Scent in the garden is transformative - a fragrant moment becomes an evocative memory. With this fully revised and expanded edition of the classic work by Stephen Lacey you can learn how to animate your garden with all kinds of fragrance. Change the mood by the hour or day with your choice of plants: use plans and lists to spice up planting in specific soils and sites; and discover ways to enliven seating areas by creating a tapestry of fragrance, all year round.

  • The most comprehensive, illustrated A-Z guide combining the author's knowledge and authority of the Royal Horticultural Society.
  • Provides bespoke planting plans, an analysis of the attraction of scent, plant lists for every soil and situation, and a calendar of scent.
  • Chapters on herbs, perennials, roses, trees, shrubs, annuals, climbers, bulbs, tender plants as well as alpines and water plants.

Royalties from the sale of this book are paid to RHS Enterprises which covenants all its profits to support the work of the RHS, promoting horticulture and helping gardeners."

 

Following on from the comments in the above rows through inserting the trees and some of the shrubs detailed in this book into this fragrant plants section, I am wasting my time. Since nurseries will not send me their information on the scent of their plants, then I am stopping the creation and infilling of this Fragrant Plant Section.

 

Since the horticultural industry appears to be lacking a coordinated approach to fragrance in plants, why not get the perfume manufactureres to do it for every fragrant plant using their scent families - starting with plants which smell without rubbing or crushing them, and then detailing which family is suitable for which gender - human male or female. They already do that for perfumes for people.
 

Then having put the fragrant plants that suit you in your garden, you take a person out there for a meal and see if they like it as well.

If they do the same for unpleasant smells, then you can create a garden by the entry door and front drive to persuade people not to visit.

Ivydene Gardens Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery:
Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey

Botanical Plant Name

with link to
UK or
European Union
mail-order supplier

Flower Colour
and Background Colour nearest to main petal colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Sun Aspect:- Full Sun,
Part Shade, Full Shade

with link to external website for photo/data

Flowering Months

with link to
USA or
Canada
mail-order supplier

Height with Spacings or Width (W) in inches (cms)

1 inch =
2.5 cms
12 inches = 30 cms
40 inches = 100 cms

Foliage Colour

and Background Colour nearest to main petal colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Soil Moisture:-
Dry,
Moist,
Wet

with link to Australia or New Zealand mail-order supplier

Plant Type is:-

A for Aquatic
Ann for Annual / Biennial
Ba for Bamboo
Bu for Bulb
Cl for Climber
Co for Conifer
F for Fern
G for Grass
H for Herb
P for Perennial
Rh for Rhodo-dendron, Azalea, Camellia
Ro for Rose
Sh for Shrub
So for Soft Fruit
To for Top Fruit
Tr for Tree
V for Vegetable
W for Wildflower

followed by:-
E for Evergreen,
D for Deciduous,
H for Herbaceous,
Alpine for being an Alpine as well as being 1 of above Plant Type /

 
Acid for Acidic,
Alk for Alkaline,
Any for AnySoil
 

with link to
ALL PLANTS Index Gallery page

 

The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover – 16 Oct 2014 by Stephen Lacey (Author), Andrew Lawson (Photographer) ISBN 978-0-7112-3574-8:-

RHS COMPANION TO SCENTED PLANTS is an authoritative guide to creating beautiful, well designed gardens that are highly scented, and shows how scent can turn a good-looking garden into an unforgettable one.

Stephen Lacey analyses the different scent ‘flavours’ available to the gardener, and discusses how to use scent as an ingredient in a planting scheme. An experienced gardener and plantsman, he shows how a simultaneous display of riches for the eye and the nose is within the grasp of every gardener. A comprehensive catalogue describes over 1,000 of the best plants to grow for their fragrance as well as their beauty.

This is the only major reference work on scent and scented plants and is endorsed by the Royal Horticultural Society.

 

Scented plants: how to make your garden a fragrant paradise by Mark Diacono in The Telegraph of 4 October 2014:-

"The longer I garden, the more I appreciate how much the rhythm of the Otter Farm year is punctuated by scent.

The broad beans I’ll be sowing soon will fill the spring veg patch with my favourite perfume, teleporting me back 15 years to a walk around the Studland coast, where several hectares either side of the path were unexpectedly full of flowering beans.

More than any other sense, smell seems capable of transporting us to other places and times – some entirely imagined. Elderflower’s evocative aroma of spring-into-summer reminds me of romances in the long grass that never happened; the wicket-taking, Ashes-opening over that I never bowled.

I was lucky enough to spend a morning with fellow scentophile Stephen Lacey a longstanding contributor to Telegraph Gardening, whose revised, updated and enlarged RHS Companion to Scented Plants is published this month.

“For me the best reason to grow a plant is its smell. Scent makes connections with people in so many different ways – it switches on lights from your past, drawing forward little memories. I’ve always been interested in smells,” he says.

“As a child, I would get into trouble for smelling my food before I ate it. But it was part of the pleasure. It’s still OK to smell your wine, but not your food: madness!”

Lacey’s interest in garden scents was stirred by the likes of Christopher Lloyd, who, in a moment of genius, separated odours into the moral and the immoral – the perfect division. Every scent I know falls beautifully into that simple dichotomy: daylily flowers even switch from the former at noon to the latter when the end of the day crumples their blooms. While following the spirit of Lloyd’s division, Stephen’s book uses a more scientific, yet understandable, classification – rose scents, honey scents, spicy scents and pea scents among them – to help readers navigate.

In the book as well as in conversation, Stephen has a gift for a turn of phrase that hits the nail on the head.

Paperwhite narcissi, which half the world has in their house for Christmas, “smell like the elephant house at Chester Zoo where I briefly worked”; the scent of witch hazel “is exactly that of parrots, a hint of fermented fruit”.

 

Winter fragrance

I ask Stephen for a few ideas to bring more scent to winter; I imagine I am not alone in wanting a little more interest during the cold and dark time of year.

“Early winter can be a tricky time for scents, but there are some:-

  • Buddleja auriculata grows on the side of my house, flowering in November and through Christmas. It may not be the most fascinating plant to look at, but the flowers smell of lemon peel and make perfect scented bunches for the Christmas table.
  • Winter sweet (Chimonanthus praecox) has the most amazing scent for midwinter – lemon lipstick. A couple of stems cut for the house fill every room with perfume.
  • And for a little later, there’s oemleria, hugely popular in Edwardian gardens. It flowers before its leaves appear, bringing the fragrance of almonds in February and March.”

I had presumed that most ornamental gardens were planted with smell to the fore, but Stephen debunks that idea:

“So many gardens are planted without a thought to scent – perhaps because there has been such a shift to perennials, which are the least-scented group of plants. They’re missing the third dimension – fragrance puts the whole garden into another orbit,” he says.

“Shrubs and climbers are often highly scented, possibly because many woodland plants have less opportunity to lure in pollinators visually in shady positions. That’s where scent plays such an important role. Shrubs are out of fashion at the moment – there is no blueprint from a leading designer on how to use them, whereas perennials and naturalistic planting are everywhere but involve few scents. To make matters worse, many beautifully scented plants are sold only for their looks.

“Occasionally plants ambush you – you get a wave of unexpected scent. The little pale blue muscari I grow has an incredible scent – I’m straight back to the sweet shops of my childhood – yet this is rarely mentioned in catalogues. I have Phlomis russeliana by the washing line at home, and it took me some time to realise that the soapy scent wasn’t the clothes.”

These associations and the pleasure in creating evocative spaces are at the heart of Stephen’s writing and the way he gardens.

“The warm coconut of gorse flowers is another scent of my childhood,” he says. “I grow the double-flowered version ('Flore Pleno’) at home as doubles are usually more scented. It flowers for a long time, while being shorter and more compact than regular gorse. American yellow root (Xanthorhiza simplicissima) is a low-suckering shrub with dangly flowers – chocolate-coloured stars in spring that turn yellow. Not long after I planted it, I was transported back to my childhood as I walked past it – it wasn’t the gorse, it was the xanthorhiza, which has a salty, tangy seaweed scent that reminds me of Anglesey.”

 

Secrets of scent

As well as being a guide to understanding scent and offering suggestions for the inquisitive, Stephen’s book gets into the nitty gritty of planning a garden around scent and getting the best from it.

“Building scent into your garden is one thing, but to get the best from it you have to make it easy to enjoy. At Alderley Grange in Gloucestershire – one of the few gardens built around scent – lemon verbenas used to be grown as standards in containers and placed at path junctions, at the right height for the passer-by.” I make a mental note of this for my own plot.

“Similarly, planning scent around windows and doors, at heights to suit, fills both the garden and your life with magic. House plants, too – why would you have a house plant that wasn’t scented? I can’t think of a better house plant than Meyer lemon, with its superb thin-skinned fruit and wonderful perfume.

“Gardening with scent makes life more evocative and keeps your nose alert, but perhaps most importantly, it’s more fun.”

And that is about the finest reason I can think of for planting with scent in mind, and why I’m wondering whether there might be room for a few scented (whisper it) ornamentals at Otter Farm.

 

Stephen Lacey's desert island scented plants

Rhododendrons I feel like the only person still ploughing a lonely furrow for them. They have some of the finest scents a garden can have: I’d go for something such as Rhododendron 'Fragrantissimum’, with its white flowers in late winter through spring. The fragrance is wonderful – complex and lily-like. A good one for growing in containers as it’s slightly tender.

Philadelphus are very good perfumers. 'Mexican Jewel’, which has not been around for long, is a small-leaved philadelphus with a sophisticated floral pineapple scent.

Lily regale, a white, wonderfully scented lily, is hard to beat, but if I was to branch out I’d go for the giant lily, Cardiocrinum giganteum, which can reach 7-8ft, producing huge white trumpets flared with maroon. It carries a coconut-laced lily scent, especially strong in the evening. The downside is it takes a while to establish from seed and can be five years between flowering. It’s the plant the postman asks after: “Is it going to flower this year?”

Every garden needs a rose and if I had to choose one it would be one of the Moss roses, 'William Lobb’, with its complex French perfume and the bonus of a resinous scent to the sticky buds.

Magnolia grandiflora is a big wall shrub/small tree, but for a small garden I would suggest Magnolia yunnanensis – a newish shrub, like a small-flowered grandiflora. Compact, with small leaves and small creamy flowers, it has the same fruit cocktail/lemon perfume of grandiflora.

Viburnums are a must – an early summer variety such as Viburnum × juddii with its clove-scented flowers.

Daphnes can carry so many different scents, none finer than Daphne bholua, which is one of the best flowers introduced in my lifetime – its scent carries so far around the garden. For a smaller space, I would go for Daphne odora 'Aureomarginata’, with its fine fruity scent.

 

The following table shows the linkages for the information about the plants
described in Sanders' Encyclopedia of Gardening in The Gardeners' Golden Treasury, revised by A. G. L Hellyer F.L.S, Editor of 'Amateur Gardening', (thirty-first impression of original published in 1895) was published in 1960 by W. H. & L. Collingridge Limited,
between:-

  • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery (in this Table) and Stage 1 Fragrant Plants (in Table on left), then
  • Stage 2 - 3 Infill Plants Index Galleries (in Table on right), then
  • Stage 3 - All Plants Index Gallery with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2 (in this Table)
  • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery (in Table on right)
  • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery (in Table on right) with
    column for Deciduous / Herbaceous plants with the same foliage colour during their growing season and
    column for Evergreen plants with the same foliage colour during the entire year
  • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery (in Table on left)
  • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery (in Table on left)

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY
It would be useful if when you decide to change your garden that you use a uniform garden style throughout your garden and the GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY aims to provide pointers.
The new pages (April 2016) in the gallery will have a suitable list of plants on each page (as that plant gets further detailed in the ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY), then each row containing that plant name in the GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY will also be updated. I aim to input details of plants starting with A in alphabetical order to Z.

Private Garden Design:-
What is your Budget and What are the purposes for your garden?
Designing for a purpose: Areas which require answers before answering your Designing for a Purpose Questionaire.
Then, do the Site Survey with Photographs, before putting the Current Garden Design on paper or in your computer.
Using the Broad Design elements of Scale, which Garden Style to use:-
Low Maintenance Garden Style, Cottage Garden Style, Wildlife Garden Style or Japanese Garden Style and the
Hard and Soft Landscaping elements, create the Broad Proposed Design. Then, the Detailed Design of each Hard Landscaping item followed by the Soft Landscaping elements: The Soil, changing the Microclimate; and the
Plant Selection is influenced by the Colour Wheel, with Plant Quantities determined by time to establish versus width between plants and Companion Planting will provide helpful neighbouring plants
or
Click on text in cells below to jump to that page describing that data
.

 

 

Container
Gardening at my work-place

 

<----

 

Yes
|
v

 

Do you want to garden and grow plants?

 

No

Cannot be bothered.
I am too busy.
My kids, rabbits or dog would destroy the garden.
Too many weeds to control.
Not allowed plants at work.

 

Potted
House-plant


<----
|
|
v


No Gar-den

At Home with Gard-ening Area


Yes


---->

Balcony Garden or Roof Garden


Yes


---->

Grow flowers for flower arranging and vegetables on Balcony Garden or Roof Garden

 

Conservatory Gardening

|
<--
|

 

 

 

 


No

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stovehouse for Tropical Plants

|
<--

 

 

 

 

Outside Garden
|
v

 

 

 

 

 

You need to know the following:-
1. How much time per week are you prepared to look after your garden or prepared to pay someone else to do it for you?
2. How much are you are prepared to spend on creating your garden and then on its maintenance for its feeding and replacement of its plants and hard landscaping?
3. In order for you to go into your garden, there must be mystery in it, so that from any position in the house you cannot see all the garden, otherwise you will not be tempted to go out into it.
4. You must decide what garden style you are going to use THROUGHOUT the garden and make sure of using 3. the mystery in it as well.
5. What plants do you want to keep in your existing garden and incorporate into your new garden?
6. What Human Problems do you have and what Site Problems are there?

A) Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers List leads onto the
B) Bee Pollinated Bloom in Month galleries and
C) extra Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers.


<----

Human Prob-lems
v


---->

Blind,
Deaf,
in a Wheelchair, or
you cannot bend easily

 

 

 

Garden Style, which takes into account the Human Problems above

 

 

Classic Mixed Style


<----

Cottage Garden Style


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v


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Naturalistic Style

Formal English Garden

 

Mediterranean Style


<----

Meadow and Corn-field


<----

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v


---->

Paving and Gravel inland,
Coastal Conditions near the sea, Seashore with shingle/sand

 

 

 

 

Problem Sites within your chosen Garden Style from the above

 

 

Exposure to Wind


<----

Excess Shade


<----

Exce-ssively Dry Shade


<----


<----

.
.
.
.
.
v


---->

Exce-ssively Hot, Sunny and Dry Site is suitable for Drought Resistant Plants

Excessively Wet Soil - especially when caused by poor drainage

Control of Pests (Aphids, Rabbits, Deer, Mice, Mole, Snails) / Disease by Companion Planting in Garden

Whether your Heavy Clay or Light Sandy / Chalk Soil is excessively Alkaline (limy) / Acidic or not, then there is an Action Plan for you to do with your soil, which will improve its texture to make its structure into a productive soil instead of it returning to being just sand, chalk, silt or clay.


<----

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v


---->

Problems caused by builders:- 1. Lack of soil on top of builders rubble in garden of just built house.
2. Clay soil of Garden slopes towards house with no drainage of this rainwater by the house wall.

In planning your beds for your garden, before the vertical hard-landscaping framework and the vertical speciman planting is inserted into your soft landscaping plan, the following is useful to consider:-
1. The ground plan usually depends upon 1 or more unalterable existing features. The position of the doors of the house will dictate the positions of paths, the shortest route to the kitchen may indicate the best place for a paved area for eating and drinking out of doors, or the kept trees/shrubs may indicate what garden style is used.
2. Rules of Proportion -
A. A border should be roughly 1/2 as wide as the hedge or wall behind it.
B. The proportion of planted areas to paved or turfed areas should be 1/3 to 2/3, or a 1/4 to 3/4, not 1/2 and 1/2.
C. Within a bed or border, unless a 2-dimensional pattern on the ground is the objective, the height and bulk of the plants should be varied to avoid monotony; it is particularly important to provide strong planting, in terms of either height or bulk or both, at either end of a long bed.
D. The ground surface provides a background to the plants that is as important as the hedges, walls or fences that surround it. Grass is perhaps the most satisfying carpet to use, the cool green forming a restful antidote to the dancing colours of the flowers. Use different coloured pea-shingle inside Cedar Gravel for people in wheelchairs, or infirm in their legs or who suffer from Hay Fever.

 

 

 

 

|
v

 

 

 

 

 

After you have selected your vertical hard-landscaping framework and the vertical speciman plants for each bed or border, you will need to infill with plants taking the following into account:-

 

 

 

Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey

Fragrant Plants in:-
Spring,
Early-Mid Summer,
Mid-Late Summer,
Autumn,
Winter.

Fragrant Plants by Habitat:-
Sun/Well-Drained Soil,
Sun/Moist Soil,
Shade.

Fragrant Plants by Type:-
Trees,
Shrubs,
Perennials,
Bulbs,
Annuals and Biennials, Wall Shrubs,
Climbers,
Alpine and Trough,
Pond and Waterside,
Roses,
Herbs,
Conservatory and Houseplants

Fragrance data from Stephen Lacey

Flower Scent:-
Exotic.
Spicy.
Vanilla.
Pea.
French.
Rose.
Fruit.
Honey.
Rogue.
Nasty.

Foliage Scent:-
Spice.
Rose.
Fruit.
Pungent.
Resinous.
Mint.
Miscell-aneous.
Nasty.

The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover – 16 Oct 2014 by Stephen Lacey (Author), Andrew Lawson (Photographer) ISBN 978-0-7112-3574-8:-

RHS COMPANION TO SCENTED PLANTS is an authoritative guide to creating beautiful, well designed gardens that are highly scented, and shows how scent can turn a good-looking garden into an unforgettable one.

Stephen Lacey analyses the different scent ‘flavours’ available to the gardener, and discusses how to use scent as an ingredient in a planting scheme. An experienced gardener and plantsman, he shows how a simultaneous display of riches for the eye and the nose is within the grasp of every gardener. A comprehensive catalogue describes over 1,000 of the best plants to grow for their fragrance as well as their beauty.

This is the only major reference work on scent and scented plants and is endorsed by the Royal Horticultural Society.

Due to the problems that I found in validating information provided by the above book especially on the Fragrant Trees and Fragrant Shrubs Pages, together with the summary at the bottom of the Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey Page, I have ceased this section of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey and switched to a new section in the next row on Plant Fragrance as determined by Roy Genders in the Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders Page (using the information within his book Sense of Fragrance using Scented Flora of the World by Roy Genders. ISBN 0 7090 5440 8), starting in September 2017.

Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark 1, 2, 3
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil 1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil 1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Sandy Soil 1
, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves 1, 2, 3
Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves 1, 2
Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit 1, 2, 3
Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers 1, 2
Night-scented Flowering Plants 1, 2
Scented Aquatic Plants.
Plants with Scented Fruits.
Plants with Scented Roots 1, 2
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood.
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums.
Scented Cacti and Succulents.
Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell 1, 2

Flower Perfume Group:-
Miscellaneous Group with scents - Balm, Brandy, Cedar, Cloying, Cowslip, Cucumber, Damask Rose, Daphne, Exotic, Freesia, Fur-like, Gardenia, Hay-like, Heliotrope, Honeysuckle, Hops, Hyacinth, Incense-like, Jasmine, Laburnham, Lilac, Lily of the Valley, Meadowsweet, Mignonette, Mint, Mossy, Muscat, Muscatel, Myrtle-like, Newly Mown Hay, Nutmeg, Piercing, Primrose, Pungent, Resinous, Sandalwood, Sassafras, Seductive, Slight, Soft, Stephanotis, Sulphur, Starch, Sweet, Sweet-briar, Tea-rose, Treacle and Very Sweet.

Flower Perfume Group:-
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group with scent - Hawthorn.
Heavy Group with scents -
Jonquil and
Lily.
Aromatic Group with scents - Almond,
Aniseed, Balsamic,
Carnation, Cinnamon, Clove,
Spicy and
Vanilla.
Violet Group.
Rose Group.
Lemon Group with scent -
Verbena.
Fruit-scented Group with scents -
Apricot,
Fruity,
Green Apple,
Orange, Pineapple,
Ripe Apple , Ripe Banana and
Ripe Plum.
 

Flower Perfume Group:-
Animal-scented Group with scents -
Cat,
Dog,
Ferret,
Fox,
Goat,
Human Perspiration,
Musk,
Ripe Apple and
Tom Cat.
Honey Group.
Unpleasant Smell Group with scents -
Animal,
Fetid,
Fishy,
Foxy,
Fur-like,
Garlic,
Hemlock,
Manure,
Nauseating,
Perspiration,
Petrol,
Putrid,
Rancid,
Sickly,
Skunk,
Stale Lint
Sulphur and
Urinous,

Leaf Perfume Group:-
Turpentine Group.
Camphor and Eucalyptus Group.
Mint Group.
Sulphur Group.
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group.
Heavy Group.
Aromatic Group.
Violet Group.
Rose Group.
Lemon Group.
Fruit-scented Group.
Animal-scented Group.
Honey Group.

Scent of Wood, Bark and Roots Group:-
Aromatic Group.
Turpentine Group.
Rose Group.
Violet Group.
Stale Perspiration Group.

 

Scent of Fungi Group:-
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group.
Sulphur Group.
Aromatic Group.
Rose Group.
Violet Group.
Fruit Group.
Animal Group.
Honey Group

Sense of Sight

Emotion of
Hot /Cool; Calm / Agitated

Emotion of
Low-key / High Key


<----

.
.
.
v

Emotion of
Inviting
/ Forbidding

Emotion of Intellectual versus Emotional

Sense of Touch

Sense of Taste

Sense of Sound

 

 

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 for
lists of plants of 1 plant type for 1 cultivation requirement is in Table on right

 

 

 

STAGE 3 ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY
Click on Blue or underlined text to jump to page comparing flower thumbnails of that blue colour in the
Other Plant Photo Galleries. RedPP is Red, Pink, Purple and Other is Unusual or Other Flower Colour.

Plant Type
with links to Other Plant Photo Galleries

ABC

DEF

GHI

JKL

MNO

PQR

STU

VWX

YZ

Alpine in Evergreen Perennial,
Herbaceous Perennial and Rock Garden

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Aquatic

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Annual/ Biennial

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Bamboo

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Bedding,
RHS Mixed Border Beds and
Flower Shape

1

Blue

1

Green

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

Purple

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Bicolour

Other Flower Colours

White / Colour Bicolour

Bulb,
Allium / Anemone, Colchicum / Crocus, Dahlia, Gladiolus, Narcissus and Tulip

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Climber

1

Blue

1

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Conifer

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Deciduous Shrub

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Deciduous Tree

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Evergreen Perennial

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Evergreen Shrub , Semi-Evergreen Shrub and Heather

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Evergreen Tree

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Fern

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Grass

1

1

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

Herbaceous Perennial and
RHS Mixed Border Beds

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Herb

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Odds and Sods

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Rhododendron, Azalea, Camellia

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Rose

1

1

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

 

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Soft Fruit

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Sub-Shrub

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Top Fruit

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Vegetable

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Wildflower with
Plants used by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterflies in the UK

1

Blue

1

Green

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

Red

1

Purple

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Multi-colour

Cream

Mauve

Brown

Shrub and Small Tree

Botanical Names Page

Common Names Page

Finally, you might be advised to check that the adjacent plants to the one you have chosen for that position in a flower bed are suitable; by checking the entry in Companion Planting - like clicking A page for checking Abies - and Pest Control page if you have a pest to control in this part of the flower bed.
Companion Planting
- A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z
Pest Control using Plants

 

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY
The planning a Rose Garden chapter from Rose Gardens by Jane Fearnley-Whitingstall ISBN 0 7011 3344 9 and
Plant Solutions by Nigel Colborn provides information for this gallery.

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3
Gardening with Alpines by Stanley B. Whitehead. Garden Book Club. Published in 1962. It provides most of the data about the Alpines.
Plant Solutions 1000+ suggestions for every garden situation by Nigel Colborn ISBN 13:978 0 00 719312 7, provides many of the plants for the pages in these Galleries.
Essential Annuals The 100 Best for Design and Cultivation. Text by Elizabeth Murray. Photography by Derek Fell. ISBN 0-517-66177-2, provides data about annuals.
Indoor Bulb Growing by Edward Pearson. Published by Purnell & Sons, Ltd in 1953. It provides the data about Indoor Bulbs and Bulbs in Window-boxes.
Colour All The Year In My Garden: A selection of choice varieties - annuals, biennials, perennials, bulbs, climbers and trees and shrubs - that will give a continuity of colour in the garden throughout the year. Edited by C.H. Middleton. Gardening Book from Ward, Lock & Co published in 1938, provides plant data for a calendar of plants in bloom throughout the year and for those in the smallest garden.
The Book of Bulbs by S. Arnott, F.R.H.S. Printed by Turnbull & Spears, Edinburgh in 1901. This provides data about Hardy Bulbs, Half-Hardy Bulbs, Greenhouse and Stove Bulbs.
Collins Guide to Bulbs by Patrick M. Synge. ISBN 0 00 214016-0 First Edition 1961, Second Edition 1971, Reprinted 1973. This provides data on bulbs for bedding, bulbs in the border, bulbs naturalised in grass, bulbs in the woodland garden, bulbs in the rock garden, bulbs in pans in the alpine house, bulbs in the greenhouse, bulbs in bowls and the bulb frame.
Annuals & Biennials, the best annual and biennial plants and their uses in the garden by Gertrude Jekyll published in 1916 and republished by Forgotten Books in 2012 (Forgotten Books is a London-based book publisher specializing in the restoration of old books, both fiction and non-fiction. Today we have 372,702 books available to read online, download as ebooks, or purchase in print.).
Cut Flowers All The Year from The New Illustrated Gardening Encyclopedia by Richard Sudell, printed before May 1935 for the plant names in each month, followed by details for culture and propagation.
Mr. Middleton's Garden Book by Daily Express Publication, reprinted 1941 for the individual cultivar names with evergreen/deciduous, flower colour, flower month and height.

STAGE 3 ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY
In addition to these 9 galleries, there are links to the Other Plant Photo Galleries in the table above like Bulb , which have plant descriptions accessed by clicking a flower thumbnail in its flower comparison page. Click the respective flower colour - like Green - to change page to that flower colour comparison page. Then, you can also choose these other plants.
It will also state the Plant Combinations for each plant from The Ulimate Visual Guide to Successful Plant Harmony - The Encyclopedia of Planting Combinations by Tony Lord ISBN 1-55209-623-8

STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY
Some extra details about the Cultivation Requirements of Plant:- Outdoor /Garden Cultivation, Indoor / House Cultivation, Cool Green-house Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter, Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year, and Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

Since 2006, I have requested photos etc from the Mail-Order Nurseries in the UK and later from the rest of the World. Few nurseries have responded.
I worked for a lady, who with her husband took 35 mm slides of plants in the 1960's and 1970's. She allowed me to digitise some of her Kodachrome slides, which I have used in my website. I discovered that at least the green colour of the foliage became very much darker over that period of years to 2008, by comparing wildflower photos from her slides with digital photos supplied by a current Wildflower mail-order nursery, so I stopped creating my Foliage Galleries.
I bought myself a camera some years ago and started taking photos, some of which have been put into the website. I started taking photos of the Heathers at the Royal Horticultural Society at Wisley garden. I have displayed the Heathers foliage in closeup since their leaves are 2mm long and in macro-scale in the Heather Galleries - sometimes the foliage colour at the terminal end of the foliage stem is only a few leaves, whereas others have the same foliage colour throughout the stem. I discovered that some of the heathers did not have the correct plant label, since the flower colour did not correspond with the flower colour in the literature. I was informed that since kids have free rein, that perhaps they move the plant labels. Since, I cannot rely that the heather plant label next to the heather plant is valid, I have stopped taking photos of those heathers.
This leaves a small problem, especially since very few gardens open to the public have their plants labelled so that the public can use the data on their label to buy that named plant from a nursery or garden centre. Currently (June 2018) I insert photos from Wikimedia Commons as well as my own.
I have found the above book - which does not contain any colour plant photos. Since it had the following experts help in creating it, I have decided to use its information in these 10 galleries to help the public:-

  • T.W. Sanders Editor of Amateur Gardening in 1895.
  • A.J Macself Editor of Amateur Gardening in 1926 - both Sanders and Macself had worked entirely to the handlists published by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
  • A.G.L. Hellyer in this work of revision and also in checking the all-important cultural notes sought the help of experts in the various classes of plant:-
    • Mr S.A. Pearce, Assistant Curator at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew undertook the revision of those genera of plants which in this country are mainly grown under glass.
    • Mr Will Ingwersen dealt with the Rock plants,
    • Mr N. Catchpole made himself responsible for trees and shrubs;
    • Mr G.A Phillips for herbaceous plants,
    • Mrs Francis Perry for water plants,
    • Mr A.J. Macself for ferns,
    • Mr E. Cooper for orchids,
    • Mr J.S Dakers for annuals,
    • Miss Doreen Crowther for fruit and vegetables

with the aid of further information from other books, magazines and cross-checking on the internet.
In this edition of the book Sander's Encyclopaedia, the individual soil mixtures to grow plants have been retained, for it was considered that many gardeners might still wish to use them in certain circumstances. The John Innes mixtures may be substituted wherever desired. Details of these individual mixtures will be put into these galleries.

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY PAGES Links to pages in Table alongside on the left with Garden Design Topic Pages

Site Map

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

Plant Type
 

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 with its Cultivation Requirements

Alpines for Rock Garden (See Rock Garden Plant Flowers)

Alpine Shrubs and Conifers

The Alpine Meadow
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

The Alpine Border
1
, 2

Alpine Plants for a Purpose

The Alpines that Dislike Lime 1, 2

Alpines and Walls
Dry Sunny Walls 1a, b
Tops of Walls 2a, b
Dry Shady and Conifers 3a, b

Alpines and
Paving
1
, 2

Sink and Trough gardens
1
, 2

Aquatic
(Water Plants) for

Anti-erosion River-bank

Marginal Plants (Bog Garden Plants)
1
, 2

Oxy-genating Weeds

Water Lilies

Floating Plants

Water-side Plants
and Plants for Dry Margins next to a Pond
1
, 2

Wildlife Pond Plants

Annual for

----------------



 

 

ANY PLANT TYPE for
Cut Flowers in
January 1, 2
February
March 1, 2
April
May 1, 2
June 1, 2
July 1, 2
August
September
October
November
December

Exposed Sites

Sheltered Sites with Green-house Annuals from 1916

Extra Poor Soil with Half-Hardy Annuals from 1916

Very Rich Soil with Biennials from 1916

Gap-filling in Mixed Borders with Hardy Annuals from 1916

Patio Con-tainers

Cut Flowers
1
, 2, 3 Ever-lasting Flowers with Red Flowers from 1916

Attract-ing bene-ficial insects
1
, 2

Scent / Fra-grance with Annuals for Cool or Shady Places from 1916

Low-allergen Gardens for Hay Fever Sufferers

Annual Plant Pairing Ideas and Colour Schemes with Annuals
1
, 2

Low-Growing Annuals
1
, 2

Medium-Growing Annuals

Tall-Growing Annuals with White Flowers from 1916

Black or Brown Flowers

Blue to Purple Flowers

Green Flowers with Annuals and Biennials from 1916

Red to Pink Flowers and Cut Flowers
Page
1
, 2, 3

White Flowers
1
, 2

Yellow or Orange Flowers
1
, 2

Dec-orative Foliage

Moist Soil

Shade
1
, 2

House-plants with Yellow Flowers from 1916

Edging Beds

Hanging Baskets

Vining Annuals

 

Bedding for

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Autumn/ Winter Bedding

Bedding for Light Sandy Soil

Bedding for Acid Soil

Bedding for Chalky Soil

Bedding for Clay Soil

Black Flowers

Blue Flowers

Orange Flowers

Pink Flowers

Long Flowering

Coloured Leaves

Attract-ive to Wildlife including Bees, Butterflies and Moths

Purple Flowers

Red Flowers

White Flowers

Yellow Flowers

Multi-Coloured Flowers

Aromatic Foliage or Scented Flowers

Bedding Plant Use

Flowers with 2 Petals

Flowers with 3 Petals

Flowers with
4 Petals

Flowers with 5 Petals

Flowers with 6 Petals

Flowers with more than 6 Petals

Use in Hanging Baskets

Flower Simple Shape

Shape of
Stars

Shape of
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Shape of
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

Shape of
Trumpets and Funnels

Shape of
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

Use in Pots and Troughs

Flower Elabo-rated Shape

Shape of
Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Shape of
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Shape of
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

 

Use in
Screen-ing

Use in
Window Boxes

Shape of
Stand-ards, Wings and Keels

Shape of
Discs and Florets

Shape of
Pin-Cushions and Tufts

Shape of
Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

 

Use in Bedding Out

Use in
Filling In

Biennial for

Cottage and Other Gardens
1
, 2

Cut Flower with Biennials for Rock Work from 1916

Patio Con-tainers with Biennials for Pots in Green-house / Con-servatory

Bene-ficial to Wildlife with Purple and Blue Flowers from 1916

Scent with Biennials for Sunny Banks or Borders from 1916

 

 

Bulb for
--------------
Explan-ation Intro to Bulbs
--------------
725 Blue, White, Yellow, Unusual Colour, or Red-Purple-Pink flowering Bulbs in each month they flower.

Indoor Bulbs for
Dec-ember
January
February

Indoor Bulbs for
March
April
May

Indoor
Bulbs for
June
July
August

Indoor Bulbs for Sep-tember
October
November

Bulbs in Window-boxes
1
, 2

Bulbs in the Border

Bulbs naturalised in Grass

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Dec-Jan
Feb-Mar

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Apr-May
Jun-Aug

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Sep-Oct
Nov-Dec

Any Plant Type Blooming in Smallest of Gardens

Bulbs for the Bulb Frame

Bulbs in the Wood-land Garden

Bulbs in the Rock Garden

Bulbs in Green-house or Stove

Achi-menes, Alocasias, Amorpho-phalluses, Aris-aemas, Arums, Begonias, Bomar-eas, Calad-iums

Clivias,
Colo-casias, Crinums, Cyclam-ens, Cyrt-anthuses, Euchar-ises, Urceo-charis, Eurycles

Freesias, Gloxinias, Hae-manthus, Hipp-eastrums

Lachen-alias, Nerines, Lycorises, Pen-cratiums, Hymen-ocallises, Richardias, Sprekelias, Tuberoses, Vallotas, Watsonias, Zephy-ranthes

Bulbs in Bowls

Bulbs in the Alpine House

Hardy Bulbs

Aconitum, Allium, Alstroe-meria, Anemone 1, 1a

Amaryllis, Antheri-cum, Antholy-zas, Apios, Arisaema, Arum, Aspho-deline,

Aspho-delus, Belam-canda, Bloom-eria, Brodiae, Bulbo-codium

Calo-chorti, Cyclo-bothras, Camassia, Col-chicum, Con-vallaria,
Forcing Lily of the Valley, Corydalis, Crinum, Crosmia, Mon-tbretia , Crocus

Cyclamen, Dicentra, Dierama, Eranthis, Eremurus, Ery-thrnium, Eucomis

Fritillaria, Funkia, Gal-anthus, Galtonia, Gladiolus, Hemero-callis

Hya-cinth, Hya-cinths in Pots,
Scilla, Pusch-kinia, Chion-odoxa, Chiono-scilla, Muscari

Iris,
Kniphofia, Lapey-rousia, Leucojum

Lilium,

Lilium in Pots, Malvastrum, Merendera, Milla, Narcissus, Narcissi in Pots

Orni-thogalum, Oxalis, Paeonia, Ran-unculus, Romulea, Sanguin-aria,
Stern-bergia,
Schi-zostylis, Teco-philaea, Trillium

Tulip,
Zephy-ranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs

Acidan-thera, Albuca, Alstroe-meri, Andro-stephium, Bassers, Boussing-aultias, Bravoas, Cypellas, Dahlias, Galaxis,
Geis-sorhizas, Hesper-anthas

Gladioli, Ixias,
Sparaxises, Babianas, Morphixias, Tritonias

Ixio-lirions, Moraeas, Orni-thogal-ums, Oxalises, Phaedra-nassas,
Pan-cratiums, Tigridias, Zephyr-anthes, Cooper-ias

Bulbs for Bedding

Plant Bedding Spring
Summer

Climber 3 sector Vertical Plant System with

Any Plant Type flowers in
Jan,
Feb,
Mar,
Apr,
May 1, 2
Jun,
Jul,
Aug,
Sep,
Oct,
Nov,
Dec
 

----------
Choosing the right Plant

1a.
The Base -
Base of Wall Plants

1b.
Annuals

1c.
Herbs and Vege-tables

1d.
Cut
flowers, Cut Foliage

1e.
Scented flower or foliage

1f.
Foliage use only

 

2a. 1,2,3,4
The Prime - Wall Shrubs

2b.
Fruit trees

3a.
The Higher Reaches -
House-wall Ramblers

3b. 1,2
Non-House-Wall - Climbing Twiners

3c.
Non-House-Wall - Self-clinging Climbers

Raised
Bed
for Wheel-chair Users

Plants for Wildlife-Use as well

Fastest Covering

Least prot-ruding growth when fan-trained

1, 2
Evergreen

Use as
Hedge

Exposed Positions

Use as Ground-cover

1,2
Ornam-ental Fruit

Scented Flowers

1, 2
Autumn Foliage Colour

Winter Bark

Winter and Early Spring Flowers

Summer Colour or Shape of Foliage

Edible Fruit

Needs Conserv-atory or Green-house

Large
Pots and Con-tainers
1
, 2

Cut Flowers

Attractive to Bees

Climber - Simple Flower Shape

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a1a2a
Stars

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1a1a1
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14k1a1a1a1
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord2a1a
Trumpets and Funnels

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming1a1a
Salver-form

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14q1a1a1
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

 

Climber - Elabo-rated Flower Shape

prunellaflotgrandiflora1a1a
Tubes, Lips and Straps

aquilegiacfloformosafoord1a1a
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14u1a1a1a
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14v1a1a1
Stand-ards, Wings and Keels

brachyscomecflorigidulakevock1a1a
Disks and Florets

androsacecforyargongensiskevock1a1a
Pin-cushions, Tufts, Petal-less and Cushions

armeriaflomaritimakevock1a1
Umbels, Buttons and Pompoms

 

STAGE 4A 12 BLOOM COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Blue

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Mauve

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Purple

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Brown

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Cream

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Orange

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Pink

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Red

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
White

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 Yellow

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Un-
usual

1
Multi-Colou-red

1
Each Flower Diff-

1
erent Colour

 

STAGE 4B 12 FOLIAGE COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY
Deciduous Shrubs or Trees, Herbaceous Perennials or Bulbs- if that changes from the main colour for instance to a different autumn colour, then it will be in this column and the relevant colour for those months of Win (Winter), Spr (Spring), Sum (Summer) or Aut (Autumn) group as well.
Evergreen Shrubs or Trees, Evergreen Perennials - if that changes from the main colour for instance to a different autumn colour, then it will be in this column and the relevant colour for those months of Win (Winter), Spr (Spring), Sum (Summer) or Aut (Autumn) group as well.

Jan Win

Feb Win

Mar Spr

Apr Spr

May Spr

Jun Sum

Jul Sum

Aug Sum

Sep Aut

Oct Aut

Nov Aut

Dec Win

Decid
Herba

Ever-green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Blue

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Mauve

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Purple

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Black

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Bronze

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Orange

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Pink

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Red

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Grey

1
White

1
Silver

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Yellow

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Un-
usual

1
Varie-gated

1

1

1

1

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677


Site design and content copyright ©July 2016.
Top menus revised June 2018. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

Ivydene
Horticultural
Services

Scented Flora of the World by Roy Genders - was first published in 1977 and this paperback edition was published on 1 August 1994 ISBN 0 7090 5440 8:-
This comprehensive book looks at scented flowers and leaves of plants from all over the world. The work has been prepared to the standards of the Index Kewensis, and is filled with the most interesting facts about the scented flora of the world.

I am using the above book from someone who took 30 years to compile it from notes made of his detailed observations of growing plants in preference to
The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover – 16 Oct 2014 by Stephen Lacey (Author), Andrew Lawson (Photographer) ISBN 978-0-7112-3574-8 even though this is the only major reference work on scent and scented plants which is endorsed by the Royal Horticultural Society.
See reasons for stopping infilling of previous Sense of Fragrance section on 28/07/2016 at end of Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey Page.

Topic
Case Studies
Companion Planting

...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants

Garden Construction
Garden Design

...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
Garden Maintenance
Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants

...Poisonous Plants
Soil
...Soil Nutrients
Tool Shed
Useful Data

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
Bulb
Climber

 

Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12

All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index

All Foliage 212
All Spring Foliage 212

All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212
Rock Plant Flowers 53

 

Your chosen Garden Style then changes your Plant Selection Process

Garden Style *
...Infill Plants
...Infill2 Plants
...Infill3 Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...
12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...All2 Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

 

Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods

Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Vegetable

Wild Flower

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly

 

STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY

 

Cultivation Requirements of Plant

Outdoor / Garden Cultivation

1

Indoor / House Cultivation

1

Cool Greenhouse (and Alpine House) Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter

1

Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year

1

Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

1

 

Sun Aspect

Full Sun

1

Part Shade

1

Full Shade

1

 

Soil Type

Any Soil

1

Chalky Soil

1

Clay Soil

1

Lime-Free Soil

1

Peaty Soil

1

Sandy Soil

1

Acid Soil

1

Alkaline Soil

1

Badly-drained Soil

1

 

Soil Moisture

Dry

1

Moist

1

Wet

1

 

Position for Plant

Back of Shady Border

1

Back of Shrub Border

1

Bedding

1

Bog Garden

1

Coastal Conditions / Seaside

1

Container in Garden

1

Front of Border

1

Ground Cover 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

1

Ground Cover 24-72 inches (60-180 cms)

1

Ground Cover Over 72 inches (180 cms)

1

Hanging Basket

1

Hedge

1

Hedge - Thorny

1

Pollution Barrier

1

Pond

1

Pot in House, Greenhouse, Conservatory or Stovehouse

1

Raised Bed

1

Rest of Border

1

Rock Garden

1

Scree Bed

1

Speciman on Lawn

1

Sunny Border

1

Tree for Lawn

1

Tree for Small Garden

1

Wildflower

1

Windbreak

1

Woodland

1

 

Use of Plant

Pollen or nectar for Bees

1

Hosts to Butterflies

1

Encouraging birds / wildlife, providing food and shelter

1

Bee-Pollinated plants for Hay Fever Sufferers

1

Berries / Fruit

1

Dry Site in Full Sun

1

Dry Shade

1

Filtering noise

1

Flower Arrange-ments

1

Fragrant Flower

1

Language of Flowers

1

Low maintenance

1

Moist Shade

1

Moist and swampy Sites

1

Nitrogen fixing plants

1

Not Fragrant Flower

1

Rabbit-Resistant

1

Speciman Plant

1

Thornless

1

Tolerant of Poor Soil

1

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Plant Foliage

Aromatic Foliage

1

Autumn Foliage

1

Finely Cut Leaves

1

Large Leaves

1

Yellow Variegated Foliage

1

White Variegated Foliage

1

Red / Purple Variegated Foliage

1

Silver, Grey and Glaucous Foliage

1

Sword-shaped Leaves

1

 

 

Flower Shape

Number of Flower Petals

Petal-less
lessershapemeadowrue2a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

1 Petal

1

2 Petals

1

3 Petals
irisflotpseudacorus1a1a1a1a1a1

1

4 Petals
aethionemacfloarmenumfoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

5 Petals
anemonecflo1hybridafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Above 5
anemonecflo1blandafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

 

Flower Shape - Simple

Stars
anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Bowls
 

1

Cups and Saucers
euphorbiacflo1wallichiigarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Globes
paeoniamlokosewitschiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Goblets and Chalices
paeoniaveitchiiwoodwardiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Trumpets
acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Funnels
stachysflotmacrantha1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Bells
digitalismertonensiscflorvroger1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Thimbles
fuchsiaflotcalicehoffman1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Urns
ericacarneacflosspringwoodwhitedeeproot1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Salverform

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

 

Flower Shape - Elaborated

Tubes, Lips and Straps
prunellaflotgrandiflora1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets
aquilegiacfloformosafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Hats, Hoods and Helmets
acanthusspinosuscflocoblands1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Standards, Wings and Keels
lathyrusflotvernus1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Discs and Florets
brachyscomecflorigidulakevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Pin-Cushions
echinaceacflo1purpurealustrehybridsgarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Tufts
centaureacfloatropurpureakavanagh1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Cushion
androsacecforyargongensiskevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Umbel
agapanthuscflos1campanulatusalbidusgarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Buttons
argyranthemumflotcmadeiracrestedyellow1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Pompoms
armeriacflomaritimakevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

 

Natural Arrangements

Bunches, Posies, Sprays
bergeniamorningredcforcoblands1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Columns, Spikes and Spires
ajugacfloreptansatropurpurea1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Whorls, Tiers and Candelabra
lamiumflotorvala2a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Plumes and Tails
astilbepurplelancecflokevock1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Chains and Tassels
 

1

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades
 

1

Spheres, Domes (Clusters), Plates and Drumsticks
androsacecfor1albanakevock1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Shrub, Tree Shape

Columnar
ccolumnarshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Oval
covalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Rounded or Spherical
croundedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Flattened Spherical
cflattenedsphericalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Conical / Narrow Pyramidal
cnarrowconicalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Conical / Broad Pyramidal
cbroadpyramidalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Ovoid /
Egg-Shaped

ceggshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Ovoid
cbroadovoidshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Vase-shaped / Inverted Ovoid
cnarrowvaseshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Fan-Shaped /Vase-Shaped
cfanshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Fan-Shaped / Broad Vase-Shaped
cbroadfanshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Weeping
cnarrowweepingshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Weeping
cbroadweepingshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Palm

1

 

Conifer Cone

1

 

Form

Arching

1

Climbing

1

Clump-Forming

1

Mat-Forming

1

Mound-Forming

1

Prostrate

1

Spreading

1

Stemless

1

Upright

1

 

Poisonous Plant

1

 

STAGE 1
GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY

 

Fragrant Plants adds the use of another of your 5 senses in your garden:-
Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark
1
, 2, 3

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4

Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
1
, 2, 3

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves
1
, 2, 3

Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves
1
, 2

Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5

Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit
1
, 2, 3

Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2

Night-scented Flowering Plants
1
, 2

Scented Aquatic Plants
1


Plants with Scented Fruits
1


Plants with Scented Roots
1
, 2

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood
1


Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums
1


Scented Cacti and Succulents
1


Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell
1
, 2
 

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERY 3

Fan-trained Shape
fantrainedshape2a1a1a

From Rhododendrons, boxwood, azaleas, clematis, novelties, bay trees, hardy plants, evergreens : novelties bulbs, cannas novelties, palms, araucarias, ferns, vines, orchids, flowering shrubs, ornamental grasses and trees book, via Wikimedia Commons

 

Ramblers Scramblers & Twiners by Michael Jefferson-Brown (ISBN 0 - 7153 - 0942 - 0) describes how to choose, plant and nurture over 500 high-performance climbing plants and wall shrubs, so that more can be made of your garden if you think not just laterally on the ground but use the vertical support structures including the house as well.

The Gardener's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Climbers & Wall Shrubs - A Guide to more than 2000 varieties including Roses, Clematis and Fruit Trees by Brian Davis. (ISBN 0-670-82929-3) provides the lists for 'Choosing the right Shrub or Climber' together with Average Height and Spread after 5 years, 10 years and 20 years.

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3


Gardening with Alpines by Stanley B. Whitehead. Garden Book Club.
Published in 1962. It provides most of the data about the Alpines.

Plant Solutions 1000+ suggestions for every garden situation by Nigel Colborn ISBN
13:978
0 00 719312 7, provides many of the plants for the pages in these Galleries.

Essential Annuals The 100 Best for Design and Cultivation. Text by Elizabeth Murray. Photography by Derek Fell. ISBN 0-517-66177-2, provides data about annuals.

Indoor Bulb
Growing by
Edward Pearson
. Published by Purnell & Sons, Ltd in 1953. It provides the data about Indoor Bulbs and Bulbs in
Window-boxes.

Colour All The
Year In My Garden
: A selection of choice varieties - annuals, biennials, perennials, bulbs, climbers and trees and shrubs - that will give a continuity of colour
in the garden throughout the year. Edited by C.H. Middleton. Gardening Book
from Ward, Lock & Co published in 1938, provides plant data for a calendar of plants in bloom throughout the year and for those in the smallest garden.
The Book of Bulbs by S. Arnott, F.R.H.S. Printed by
Turnbull & Spears, Edinburgh in 1901. This provides data about Hardy Bulbs, Half-Hardy Bulbs, Greenhouse and Stove Bulbs.

Collins Guide to
Bulbs by Patrick
M. Synge
. ISBN
0 00 214016-0
First Edition 1961, Second Edition 1971, Reprinted 1973. This provides data on bulbs for bedding, bulbs in the border, bulbs naturalised in grass, bulbs in the woodland garden, bulbs in the rock garden, bulbs in pans in the alpine house, bulbs in the greenhouse, bulbs in bowls and the bulb frame.

Annuals & Biennials, the best annual and biennial plants and their uses in the garden by Gertrude Jekyll published in 1916 and
republished by Forgotten Books in 2012
(Forgotten Books
is a London-based book publisher specializing in the restoration of old books, both fiction and non-fiction. Today we have
372,702 books available to read online, download as ebooks, or
purchase in print.).

Cut Flowers All The Year from The New Illustrated
Gardening Encyclopedia
by Richard Sudell, printed before May 1935 for the plant names in each month, followed by details for culture and propagation.

Mr. Middleton's Garden Book by
Daily Express Publication,
reprinted 1941
for the individual
cultivar names with evergreen/
deciduous, flower colour, flower month and height.

Appendix 6 from The Rochford Book of Houseplants by Thomas Rochford and Richard Gorer. Published by Faber and Faber in 1961 with this Second Edition reprinted in 1967.

Temperature Conversion Table
 

F
100
99
98
97
96
95
94
93
92
91
90
89
88

C
37.8
37.2
36.7
36.1
35.6
35.0
34.4
33.9
33.3
32.8
32.2
31.7
31.1

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