Ivydene Gardens Glossary: S

Sap The juice of a plant contained in the cells and vascular tissue.

Sapling A young tree; a seedling or any young tree before the wood hardens.

Scandent Ascending or loosely climbing. (See also Climber.)

Scarification 1) Abrasion or chemical treatment of a seed coat in order to speed up water intake and induce germination. 2) Removing moss and thatch from a lawn using a scarifier or rake.

Scion A shoot or bud cut from one plant to graft onto a rootstock (stock) of another.

Scree A slope comprising rock fragments formed by the weathering of rock faces: simulated in gardens as scree beds, in which high-altitude alpines that need excellent drainage may be grown.

Seed The ripened, fertilised mule containing a dormant embryo capable of developing into an adult plant.

Seedhead Any fruit that contains ripe seeds.

Seedling A young plant that has developed from a seed.

Selection A plant selected for particular characteristics and usually propagated to retain the same characteristics.

Self seed To shed fertile seeds that produce seedlings around the parent plant.

Self-fertile Of a plant that produces viable seed when fertilised with its own pollen.

Self-pollination The transfer of pollen from the anthers to the stigma of the same flower, or alternatively to another flower on the same plant (see Cross pollination).

Self-sterile A plant unable to produce viable seed after self-fertilisation, and requiring a different pollinator in order for fertilisation to occur. Also known as “self-incompatible” — incapable of self-fertilisation.

Semi-deciduous See Deciduous.

Semi-determinate Used of tall or cordon tomatoes that will only grow to 1 to 1.2m (3 to 4ft) long.

Semi-evergreen See Evergreen.

Sepal The outer whorl of a flower, usually small and green but sometimes coloured and petal-like.

Set 1) A small onion, shallot bulb, or potato tuber, selected for planting; 2) A term describing flowers that have been successfully fertilised and have produced small fruits.

Sexual reproduction A form of reproduction involving fertilisation, giving rise to seed or spores.

Sheet mulch A mulch using artificially produced material (e.g. plastic).

Shoot A branch, stem or twig.

Shrub A woody-stemmed plant, usually branched from or near the base lacking a single trunk.

Sideshoot A stem that arises from the side of a main shoot.

Simple (mainly of leaves) Undivided.

Single digging A method of digging in which only the topsoil is turned over to a depth of one spit. (See also Double Digging.)

Snag A short stub or frayed end left after incorrect pruning.

Soil mark The usually noticeable point on a plant’s stem that shows the original soil level before the plant was lifted.

Species A category in plant classification, the lowest principal rank below genus containing closely related very similar individuals.

Specimen plant A striking plant, usually a tree or shrub in prime condition, grown where it can be clearly.

Spent (of flowers) Dying or dead.

Sphagnum mosses Mosses commonto bogs; their moisture-retentive nature is valued when used as a component of growing media, for example in orchid cultivation.

Spike A racemose and hence indeterminate inflorescence that bears unstalked flowers along a common axis (stem).

Spikelet A small spike, forming part of a compound inflorescence; often applied to grasses where the flowerhead consists of several flower, with basal bracts.

Spit The depth of a spade’s blade, usually 25-30cm (10-12in).

Spoon-type Applied to the florets of chrysanthemums (and some other flowers) in which the quill-like florets expand to form a spoon shape at the tips.

Sporangium A body that forms spores on a fern.

Spore The minute reproductive structure of flowerless plants, such as ferns, fungi and mosses.

Spray A group of flowers or flowerheads on a single, branching stem, such as occurs on many chrysanthemums and carnations.

Spur 1) A hollow projection from a petal, often producing nectar. 2) A short branch or branchlet bearing flower buds, as on fruit trees.

Stalk A general term describing the stem of a leaf or flower (e.g. petiole, peduncle).

Stamen The male reproductive organ in a plant, comprising the pollen-producing anther and usually its supporting filament or stalk.

Standard 1) A tree with at least 2m (6ft) of stem below the first branches (see also Half-standard). 2) A shrub trained so that it has a clear length of stem below the branches (1-1.2m/3-4ft for roses). 3) One of the three inner and often erect perianth segments of the iris flower. 4) The largest, usually uppermost petal of a flower in the subfamily Papilionoideae (peas and beans of the family Leguminosae).

Station sow To sow seed individually or in small groups at fixed intervals along a row or drill.

Stem The main axis of a plant, usually above ground and supporting leaves, flowers and fruits.

Sterile 1) Not producing flowers or viable seed. 2) Of flowers without functional anthers and pistils.

Stigma The apical portion of a carpel, usually borne at the tip of a style, which receives pollen prior to fertilisation.

Stock plant A plant used to obtain propagating material, whether seed or vegetative material.

Stolon A horizontally spreading or arching stem, usually above ground, which roots at its tip to produce a new plant. Often confused with runner.

Stone fruits Fruits, also known as “drupes”, with one or more seeds (“stones”) surrounded by fleshy, usually edible tissue. They are common in the genus Prunus (e.g. apricots, plums, cherries) and some other plants, such as mangoes that produce indehiscent woody fruits.

Stool A number of shoots arising, more or less uniformly, from the base of an individual plant, for example some shrubs cut back regularly to produce propagating material and also chrysanthemums.

Stooling The routine pruning back of woody plants by coppicing.

Stopping See Pinching out.

Strain A loose undefined term sometimes applied to races of seed-raised plants, not a term accepted under the International Code for the Nomenclature of Cultivated Plants because of its imprecise definition.

Stratification Storage of seed in warm or cold conditions to overcome dormancy and aid germination.

Stylar column A column of joined styles.

Style The usually elongated part of a carpel between the ovary and stigma, not always present.

Subfamily A category in plant classification, a division within the family.

Sub-lateral A sideshoot originating from a lateral shoot or branch.

Subshrub 1) A low-growing plant that is entirely woody. 2) A plant that is woody at the base but has soft, usually herbaceous growth above.

Subsoil The layers of soil beneath the topsoil; these are usually less fertile and of poorer texture and structure than the topsoil.

Subspecies A subdivision of a species, higher in rank than varietas (see variety) or forma.

Succulent (of plants) A plant with thick, fleshy leaves and/or stems adapted to store water. All cacti are succulents.

Sucker 1) A shoot that arises below ground from a plant’s roots or underground stem. 2) On grafted plants, a sucker is any shoot that arises below the graft union.

Sympodial Definite growth of a shoot terminating in an inflorescence or dying; growth is continued by lateral buds.

Systemic Term describing a pesticide or fungicide that is absorbed and distributed through a plant when applied to the soil or foliage.

.

 

Site design and content copyright ©December 2006. Page structure amended October 2012. Glossary Index added to New Page Template March 2016. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

See
Explanation of Structure of this Website with User Guidelines to aid your use of this website.

grass-seeding_picture

 

Glossary Pages

Glossary
Site Map


Glossary A
Abortive
Abscission Layer
Acaricide
Acaulescent
Achene
Acicular
Acid (of soil)
Acorn
Acre
Acuminate
Acute
Adventitious
Aerate (of soil)
Aerial root
Alkaline (of soil)
Allelopathic
Alpine
Alpine house
Alternate (of leaves)
Anemone-centred (of flowers)
Annual
Anther
Arbour
Aquatic
Asclepiad
Asexual reproduction
Auxins
Awn
Axil
 

Glossary F
F1 hybrids
F2 hybrids
Falls
Family
Fastigiate
Feathered
Fertile (of plants)
Fertilisation
Fibrous
Filament
Fimbriate
Floating cloche
Floret
Flower
Flowerhead
Foliage
Force
Forma (f.)
Formative pruning
Foundation planting
Framework
Framework plants
Frame-working (of fruit trees)
Friable (of soil)
Frond
Frost pocket
Fruit
Fruit set
Fungicide

Glossary K
Knot garden

Glossary P
Packs
Pan
Panicle
Parterre
Parthenocarpic
Pathogens
Patio
Peat
Peat bed
Peat blocks
Peat substitute
Peduncle
Peltate (of leaves)
Perennial
Perianth
Perianth segment
Perlite
Perpetual
Pesticide
Petal
Petiole
pH
Photosynthesis
Picotee
Pinching out
Pistil
Pith
Pleaching
Plunge
Pod
Pollarding
Pollen
Polyembryonic
Pome fruit
Pompon
Potting compost
Potting on
Potting up
Pricking out
Propagation
Propagator
Proximal end (of cuttings)
Pruning
Pseudobulb

Glossary U
“U” cordon
Underplanting
Union
Upright
Urn-shaped (of flowers)

Glossary B
Back-bulb
Backfill
Balled
Bare-root
Bark-ringing
Basal plate
Base dressing
Basin irrigation
Bed system
Bedding plants
Biennial
Biennial bearing
Blanch
Bleed
Blind
Bloom
Blown
Bog plant
Bole
Bolt
Bower
Bract
Branch
Brassica
Break
Broadcasting
Broad-leaved
Bromeliad
Bud
Bud union
Budding
Budwood
Bulb
Bulb fibre
Bulbil
Bulblet
Bush
 

Glossary G
Genus (pl. genera)
Germination
Girdling
Glaucous
Glume
Graft
Graft union
Grafting
Grafting tape
Green manure
Ground colour
Ground cover

Glossary L
Laced
Lamina
Lateral
Layer planting
Layering
Leaching
Leader
Leaf
Leaf mould
Leaflet
Legume
Light
Lime
Line out
Lithophyte
Loam
Lopper
Lute

Glossary Q
Quartered rosette

Glossary V
Variable
Variegated
Variety
Vegetative growth
Vegetative propagation
Vermiculite
Vertebrate

Glossary C
Cactus
Calcicole
Calcifuge
Callous
Calyx
Cambium
Capillary matting
Capping
Capsule
Carpet bedding
Catkin
Central leader
Certified stock
Chilling requirement
Chinese layering
Chlorophyll
Clamp
Climber
Cloche
Clone
Cold frame
Collar
Companion planting
Compositae
Compost
Compound
Cone
Conifer
Conservatory
Contact action
Coppicing
Cordon
Corm
Cormel
Cormlet
Corolla
Cotyledon
Crest
Cristate
Crocks
Crop rotation
Cross-fertilisation
Cross-pollination
Crown
Culm
Cultivar
Cupped
Cutting
Cyme
 

Glossary H
Half hardy
Half standard
Hardening off
Hardy
Haulm
Head
Head back
Heart up
Heavy (of soil)
Heel
Heeling in
Herb
Herbaceous
Herbicide
Hull (of nuts)
Humus
Hybrid
Hybrid vigour
Hybridisation
Hydroculture
Hydroponics
Hypocotyl
Hypogeal

Glossary M
Maiden
Maincrop (of vegetables)
Manure
Marcottage
Marginal water plant
Medium
Mericlone
Meristem
Micronutrients
Micro-propagation
Microlife
Midrib
Module
Monocarpic
Monocotyledon
Monoecious
Monopodial
Mulch
Mutation
Mycorrhizae

Glossary R
Raceme
Radicle
Rain shadow
Rambler
Ray flower (or floret)
Recurved
Reflexed
Remontant
Renewal pruning
Respiration
Revert
Rhizome
Rind
Root
Root ball
Root crops
Root run
Rooting
Rooting hormone
Rootstock
Rose (of a watering can)
Rosette
Rounded
Runner

Glossary W
Water shoots
Whip
Whorl
Widger
Wind-break
Wind-rock
Winter wet
Woody
Wound
Wound paint

Glossary D
Damping down
Dead-heading
Deciduous
Degradable pot
Dehiscence
Dehiscent
Determinate
Dibber
Dicotyledon
Dieback
Dioecious
Diploid
Disbudding
Distal end (of cuttings)
Division
Dormancy
Double digging
Drainage
Drill
 

Glossary I
Incurved
Indehiscent
Indeterminate
Inflorescence
Informal
Inorganic
Insecticide
Insert
lntercropping
Intermediate
Internode
Interplanting
Invertebrate
Irrigation

Glossary N
Naturalise
Neck
Nectar
Nectary
Nematicide
Nematode Worms
Neutral (of soil)
Node
Non-remontant
Nursery bed
Nut
Nutrients

Glossary S
Sap
Sapling
Scandent
Scarification
Scion
Scree
Seed
Seedhead
Seedling
Selection
Self seed
Self-fertile
Self-pollination
Self-sterile
Semi-deciduous
Semi-determinate
Semi-evergreen
Sepal
Set
Sexual reproduction
Sheet mulch
Shoot
Shrub
Sideshoot
Simple (mainly of leaves)
Single digging
Snag
Soil mark
Species
Specimen plant
Spent (of flowers)
Sphagnum mosses
Spike
Spikelet
Spit
Spoon-type
Sporangium
Spore
Spray
Spur
Stalk
Stamen
Standard
Station sow
Stem
Sterile
Stigma
Stock plant
Stolon
Stone fruits
Stool
Stooling
Stopping
Strain
Stratification
Stylar column
Style
Subfamily
Sub-lateral
Subshrub
Subsoil
Subspecies
Succulent (of plants)
Sucker
Sympodial
Systemic

Glossary XYZ
 

Glossary E
Earthing up
Emasculation
Epicormic shoots
Epigeal
Epiphyte
Ericaceous
Espalier
Evergreen
Explant
Eye

Glossary J
John Innes compost

Glossary O
Offset
Open-pollination
Opposite
Organic
Ovary
Ovule
Oxygenator

Glossary T
Tap root
Taxon (pl. taxa)
Tender
Tendril
Tepal
Terminal
Terrarium
Terrestrial
Thatch
Thin (of soil)
Thinning
Tilth
Tip prune
Tissue culture (of plants)
Top-dressing
Topiary
Topsoil
Trace element
Translocated (of dissolved nutrients or weedkillers)
Transpiration
Transplanting
Tree
Trellis
Trench digging
Triploid
True (True-breeding)
Trunk
Truss
Tuber
Tufa
Tunic
Tunicate
Turion

 

THE 2 EUREKA EFFECT PAGES FOR UNDERSTANDING SOIL AND HOW PLANTS INTERACT WITH IT OUT OF 15,000:-


Explanation of Structure of this Website with User Guidelines Page for those photo galleries with Photos
(of either ones I have taken myself or others which have been loaned only for use on this website from external sources)

 

or

 

when I do not have my own or ones from mail-order nursery photos , then from March 2016, if you want to start from the uppermost design levels through to your choice of cultivated and wildflower plants to change your Plant Selection Process then use the following galleries:-

  • Create and input all plants known by Amateur Gardening inserted into their Sanders' Encyclopaedia from their edition published in 1960 (originally published by them in 1895) into these
    • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery,
      then
    • Stage 2 - Infill Plants Index Gallery being the only gallery from these 7 with photos (from Wikimedia Commons) ,
      then
    • Stage 3 - All Plants Index Gallery with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2
    • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery,
    • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery with
    • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery and
    • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery
    • Unfortunately, if you want to have 100's of choices on selection of plants from 1000's of 1200 pixels wide by up to 16,300 pixels in length webpages, which you can jump to from almost any of the pages in these 7 galleries above, you have to put up with those links to those choices being on
      • the left topic menu table,
      • the header of the middle data table and on
      • the page/index menu table on the right of every page of those galleries.

There are other pages on Plants which bloom in each month of the year in this website:-

 

 

 

The following details come from Cactus Art:-

"A flower is the the complex sexual reproductive structure of Angiosperms, typically consisting of an axis bearing perianth parts, androecium (male) and gynoecium (female).    

Bisexual flower show four distinctive parts arranged in rings inside each other which are technically modified leaves: Sepal, petal, stamen & pistil. This flower is referred to as complete (with all four parts) and perfect (with "male" stamens and "female" pistil). The ovary ripens into a fruit and the ovules inside develop into seeds.

Incomplete flowers are lacking one or more of the four main parts. Imperfect (unisexual) flowers contain a pistil or stamens, but not both. The colourful parts of a flower and its scent attract pollinators and guide them to the nectary, usually at the base of the flower tube.

partsofaflower

Androecium (male Parts or stamens)
It is made up of the filament and anther, it is the pollen producing part of the plant.
Anther This is the part of the stamen that produces and contains pollen. 
Filament This is the fine hair-like stalk that the anther sits on top of.
Pollen This is the dust-like male reproductive cell of flowering plants.

Gynoecium (female Parts or carpels or pistil)
 It is made up of the stigma, style, and ovary. Each pistil is constructed of one to many rolled leaflike structures. Stigma This is the part of the pistil  which receives the pollen grains and on which they germinate. 
Style This is the long stalk that the stigma sits on top of. 
Ovary The part of the plant that contains the ovules. 
Ovule The part of the ovary that becomes the seeds. 

Petal 
The colorful, often bright part of the flower (corolla). 
Sepal 
The parts that look like little green leaves that cover the outside of a flower bud (calix). 
(Undifferentiated "Perianth segment" that are not clearly differentiated into sepals and petals, take the names of tepals.)"

 

 

 

The following details come from Nectary Genomics:-

"NECTAR. Many flowering plants attract potential pollinators by offering a reward of floral nectar. The primary solutes found in most nectars are varying ratios of sucrose, glucose and fructose, which can range from as little a 8% (w/w) in some species to as high as 80% in others. This abundance of simple sugars has resulted in the general perception that nectar consists of little more than sugar-water; however, numerous studies indicate that it is actually a complex mixture of components. Additional compounds found in a variety of nectars include other sugars, all 20 standard amino acids, phenolics, alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenes, vitamins, organic acids, oils, free fatty acids, metal ions and proteins.

NECTARIES. An organ known as the floral nectary is responsible for producing the complex mixture of compounds found in nectar. Nectaries can occur in different areas of flowers, and often take on diverse forms in different species, even to the point of being used for taxonomic purposes. Nectaries undergo remarkable morphological and metabolic changes during the course of floral development. For example, it is known that pre-secretory nectaries in a number of species accumulate large amounts of starch, which is followed by a rapid degradation of amyloplast granules just prior to anthesis and nectar secretion. These sugars presumably serve as a source of nectar carbohydrate.

WHY STUDY NECTAR? Nearly one-third of all worldwide crops are dependent on animals to achieve efficient pollination. In addition, U.S. pollinator-dependent crops have been estimated to have an annual value of up to $15 billion. Many crop species are largely self-incompatible (not self-fertile) and almost entirely on animal pollinators to achieve full fecundity; poor pollinator visitation has been reported to reduce yields of certain species by up to 50%."

 

The following details about DOUBLE FLOWERS comes from Wikipedia:-

"Double-flowered" describes varieties of flowers with extra petals, often containing flowers within flowers. The double-flowered trait is often noted alongside the scientific name with the abbreviation fl. pl. (flore pleno, a Latin ablative form meaning "with full flower"). The first abnormality to be documented in flowers, double flowers are popular varieties of many commercial flower types, including roses, camellias and carnations. In some double-flowered varieties all of the reproductive organs are converted to petals — as a result, they are sexually sterile and must be propagated through cuttings. Many double-flowered plants have little wildlife value as access to the nectaries is typically blocked by the mutation.

 

There is further photographic, diagramatic and text about Double Flowers from an education department - dept.ca.uky.edu - in the University of Kentucky in America.

 

"Meet the plant hunter obsessed with double-flowering blooms" - an article from The Telegraph.


Topic
Case Studies
...Drive
...Foundations

Companion Planting
...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants

Garden Construction
Garden Design
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants Garden Maintenance
Glossary *
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants
...Poisonous Plants
Soil
...Soil Nutrients
Tool Shed
Useful Data

................

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape

Bulb
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
Climber
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evgr
...Heather Shrub
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evgr
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
...P -Herbaceous
...RHS Wisley
...Flower Shape
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable

Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour
NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown Note
...Cream Note
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note
Poisonous
Wildflower Plants

............

Topic - Flower/Foliage Colour
Colour Wheel Galleries

Following your choice using Garden Style then that changes your Plant Selection Process
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

or
you could use these Flower Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12
with its
Explanation of
Structure of this Website with

...User Guidelines
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index
Rock Garden and Alpine Flower Colour Wheel with number of colours
Rock Plant Flowers 53

...Rock Plant Photos

or
these Foliage Colour Wheels structures, which I have done but until I can take the photos and I am certain of the plant label's validity, these may not progress much further
All Foliage 212

All Spring Foliage 212
All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212

or
Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index

............

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly
Usage of Plants
by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly

Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly usage of
Plant A-C
Plant C-M
Plant N-W
Butterfly usage of Plant

followed by all the Wild Flower Family Pages:-

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 1


(o)Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
(o)Arrow-Grass
(o)Arum
(o)Balsam
Bamboo
(o)Barberry
(o)Bedstraw
(o)Beech
(o)Bellflower
(o)Bindweed
(o)Birch
(o)Birds-Nest
(o)Birthwort
(o)Bogbean
(o)Bog Myrtle
(o)Borage
(o)Box
(o)Broomrape
(o)Buckthorn
(o)Buddleia
(o)Bur-reed
(o)Buttercup
(o)Butterwort
(o)Cornel (Dogwood)
(o)Crowberry
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
(o)Daffodil
(o)Daisy
(o)Daisy Cudweeds
(o)Daisy Chamomiles
(o)Daisy Thistle
(o)Daisy Catsears (o)Daisy Hawkweeds
(o)Daisy Hawksbeards
(o)Daphne
(o)Diapensia
(o)Dock Bistorts
(o)Dock Sorrels

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 2


(o)Clubmoss
(o)Duckweed
(o)Eel-Grass
(o)Elm
(o)Filmy Fern
(o)Horsetail
(o)Polypody
Quillwort
(o)Royal Fern
(o)Figwort - Mulleins
(o)Figwort - Speedwells
(o)Flax
(o)Flowering-Rush
(o)Frog-bit
(o)Fumitory
(o)Gentian
(o)Geranium
(o)Glassworts
(o)Gooseberry
(o)Goosefoot
(o)Grass 1
(o)Grass 2
(o)Grass 3
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 1
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 2
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 3 (o)Hazel
(o)Heath
(o)Hemp
(o)Herb-Paris
(o)Holly
(o)Honeysuckle
(o)Horned-Pondweed
(o)Hornwort
(o)Iris
(o)Ivy
(o)Jacobs Ladder
(o)Lily
(o)Lily Garlic
(o)Lime
(o)Lobelia
(o)Loosestrife
(o)Mallow
(o)Maple
(o)Mares-tail
(o)Marsh Pennywort
(o)Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 3


(o)Mesem-bryanthemum
(o)Mignonette
(o)Milkwort
(o)Mistletoe
(o)Moschatel
Naiad
(o)Nettle
(o)Nightshade
(o)Oleaster
(o)Olive
(o)Orchid 1
(o)Orchid 2
(o)Orchid 3
(o)Orchid 4
(o)Parnassus-Grass
(o)Peaflower
(o)Peaflower Clover 1
(o)Peaflower Clover 2
(o)Peaflower Clover 3
(o)Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
(o)Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
Pipewort
(o)Pitcher-Plant
(o)Plantain
(o)Pondweed
(o)Poppy
(o)Primrose
(o)Purslane
Rannock Rush
(o)Reedmace
(o)Rockrose
(o)Rose 1
(o)Rose 2
(o)Rose 3
(o)Rose 4
(o)Rush
(o)Rush Woodrushes
(o)Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
(o)Sandalwood
(o)Saxifrage
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 4


Seaheath
(o)Sea Lavender
(o)Sedge Rush-like
(o)Sedges Carex 1
(o)Sedges Carex 2
(o)Sedges Carex 3
(o)Sedges Carex 4
(o)Spindle-Tree
(o)Spurge
(o)Stonecrop
(o)Sundew
(o)Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
(o)Teasel
(o)Thyme 1
(o)Thyme 2
(o)Umbellifer 1
(o)Umbellifer 2
(o)Valerian
(o)Verbena
(o)Violet
(o)Water Fern
(o)Waterlily
(o)Water Milfoil
(o)Water Plantain
(o)Water Starwort
Waterwort
(o)Willow
(o)Willow-Herb
(o)Wintergreen
(o)Wood-Sorrel
(o)Yam
(o)Yew

 

It is worth remembering that especially with roses that the colour of the petals of the flower may change - The following photos are of Rosa 'Lincolnshire Poacher' which I took on the same day in R.V. Roger's Nursery Field:-

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot91a1a1a1

Closed Bud

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot92a1a1a1

Opening Bud

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot93a1a1a1

Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot94a1a1a1

Older Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot95a1a1a1

Middle-aged Flower - Flower Colour in Season in its
Rose Description Page is
"Buff Yellow, with a very slight pink tint at the edges in May-October."

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot96a1a1a1

Mature Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot97a1a1a1

Juvenile Flower and Dying Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot98a1a1a1

Form of Rose Bush

There are 720 roses in the Rose Galleries; many of which have the above series of pictures in their respective Rose Description Page.

So one might avoid the disappointment that the 2 elephants had when their trunks were entwined instead of them each carrying their trunk using their own trunk, and your disappointment of buying a rose to discover that the colour you bought it for is only the case when it has its juvenile flowers; if you look at all the photos of the roses in the respective Rose Description Page!!!!