Ivydene Gardens Companion Planting: How to use Companion Planting in your Garden
 

Companion planting in an organic garden should avoid the following:-

Planting in blocks - provides a feast for the pests which prey on them,
 
Mixing plants solely on the basis of their size and colour, without taking into consideration their companion planting effect for other plants,
 
Leaving beds of exposed soil.

 

There is no heavy digging to do, since the exposed soil should be covered with

shredded compost,
 
by the under-sowing of shrubs/trees with spinach, mustard or phacelia (phacelia is a small feathery plant, which with its blue flowers is attractive to bees) in the spring,
and by the following under-planting:-

 

 

Site design and content copyright ©December 2006 Chris Garnons-Williams. Page structure amended September 2012. May 2017 Template created May 2017 for all pages.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

Plant

Under-plant with plant

to help

This means the land is overgrown with green to hold the weeds down, the roots keep the soil broken up and the soil is shaded to prevent it drying out.

It is useful when planting a tree or shrub to put prime barley grain in the hole to lie just under the roots. A handful for a small shrub, a pail-full for a large tree. As the grain germinates beneath the roots, heat is generated and growth hormones released. Since the barley is unable to shoot after germinating, it eventually rots away to provide still more nourishment to the roots.

In the spring sow spinach, mustard or nasturtium round the base to shade the ground (3 feet radius from trunk). Keep grass away from all trees/shrubs by at least 3 feet radius to prevent it from taking all the nutrients and its rainwater. Chase Organics (www.chaseorganics.co.uk) are suppliers of liquid extracts of seaweed, which is useful in providing the small amounts of trace elements in exactly the right proportions for all plants including your lawn in the early spring.

Roses

nasturtium

inhibit the growth of weeds

Roses

periwinkle

in shady places (USE FEW plants and check periwinkles invasiveness of climbing over the roses)

Roses

garlic

to keep pests away with the help of sage, thyme, hyssop and lavender around the border edges

Shrubs

fritillaria

discourage mice and voles

Shrubs

lillies/ fritillaria

lillies require shade at their feet with garlic to discourage snails and mice

Shrubs

calendula

inhibits nematodes, as does French Marigold

Shrubs

euphorbia lathyris

discourages voles

Shrubs

lamium galeobdolon

yellow dead nettle is a good ground cover requiring no maintenance, as are the other lamiums.

In the garden the following relationships should be observed:-

Plants need other plants as partners in many different connections - see the Companion Plant A-Z Table,
 
Cultivated plants need various herbs to accompany them, i.e to promote their health and growth, to give shade and to protect them from pests and diseases,
 
Animals in the garden need plants; bees must be able to feed themselves,
 
Plants need 'animals' bees to pollinate some flowers, and most ants ventilate the soil, crumble it and de-acidify it,
 
Birds need plants to supply them with food,
 
'Animals' need other 'animals' as regulators. Ladybirds eat aphids.
 
'Animals' need wild flowers, on which to lay their eggs and rear their progeny. Butterflies and ladybirds need stinging nettles as breeding places.
 
Trees are required to provide shade and/or a windbreak.
 
The following combination of plants means that growth can be hindered:-
 
  • beans and onions,
  • cabbages and onions,
  • red cabbages and tomatoes,
  • parsley and cabbage lettuce,
  • beetroot and tomatoes,
  • potatoes and onions.

 

the following are useful plants for these relationships:-

.

Common Name

Plant Name

Balm. Attracts bees. Culinary use with all uncooked food.

Melissa
officinalis

Basil. Plant with cucumber. Use as flavouring in all raw and cooked foods

Ocimum
basilicum

Bellflower

Campanula

Birch. Butterfly

Betula

Blackberry. Emperor moth

Rubus

Bleeding heart

Dicentra

Borage. Plant with brassicas. Borage loosens heavy or hard ground. Culinary use in salads

Borago
officinalis

Box

Buxus
microphylla

Campion.

Lychnis
arkwrightii

Chervil. Plant with lettuce and endives. Culinary use in soups and gravies.

Anthriscus
cerefolium

Chives. Attracts bees. Wards off fungal diseases. Plant with roses. Culinary use in soup, sandwiches and salad dressings.

Allium

Coriander. Attracts bees. Culinary use with cabbages, potatoes, beetroot and in bread.

Coriandrum
sativum

Costmary or Mint Geranium.

Chrysanthemum balsamita

Comfrey. Attracts bees. It prefers damp ground. Can use the mown leaves as a fertilising mulch or having placed its leaves with nettle into a container and covered with water, this liquid after 4 weeks can be used as a fertiliser.

Symphytum
asperum

Cummin. Attracts bees

Carum carvi

Daffodil. Plant with roses

Narcissus

Single dahlias. Food for butterfly

Dahlia

Dame’s violet

Hesperis

Day lily

Hemerocallis

Dill. Plant with carrots, cucumber, cabbage, beetroot to keep those plants healthy. Lowers the blood sugar level. Culinary use as food seasoning.

Anthemum graveolens

Elder . Discourages mice, voles and moles.

Sambucus

Elecampane

Inula

Euphorbia. Food for butterflies

Euphorbia

Fennel. Culinary use of main plant as a vegetable

Foeniculum
vulgare

Foxglove

Digitalis

Garlic. Discourages aphids. Culinary use daily as a seasoning, often combined with parsley to counteract high blood pressure.

Allium
sativum

Gooseberry. A straw mulch up to the bottom branches to stop weeds. 1 wormwood to 3 gooseberries to stop rust and tansy to promote health.

Ribes
grossularia

Grape hyacinth

Muscari

Hazel. Attracts Butterflies.

Corylus

Heliotrope

Heliotropium arborescens

Honeysuckle. Food for butterflies

Lonicera

Iris

Iris
germanica

Larkspur

Annual
delphinium

Lavender. Attracts bees and butterflies. Plant with roses and other shrubs which suffer from aphids. Discourages ants. Discourages moths when placed in cupboards

Lavandula

Lemon balm. Outstanding plant for bees. Culinary use in salads

Melissa
officinalis

Lilac. Butterfly

Syringa

Lillies

Lilium
candidum

Lovage. Attracts bees. Culinary use in soups to cleanse the kidneys and aid digestion.

Levisticum
officinale

Lupins

Lupinus

Marigold. Plant with tomato. Can be added to soups and sauces

Calendula

Marguerite

Chrysanthemum

Michaelmas daisy. Food for butterflies. Pests find the leaves of perennial asters disagreeable to the smell and bitter to the taste, so they are good flowers to grow both for massing and cutting.

Aster

Monkshood

Aconitum

Mugwort. Attracts bees. Promotes digestion as a tea

Artemesia
vulgaris

Mullein. Emperor moth

Verbascum

Mustard and Marigold. Sow with strawberries after picking and cleaning the rows ( after the leaves have been cut off, the weeds removed and the soil loosened) to ward off nematodes. Culinary use of mustard seeds with water for breakfast to heal, cleanse, disinfect, regenerate and regulate the intestines.

Sinapis alba
and Calendula

Nasturtium. Tortoise-shell butterfly lays eggs on it. Culinary use of leaves in salad.

Trapaeolum

Onion. It contains cardio-active substances and some onion should be eaten daily.

Allium

Parsley. Plant with onion and tomato. Plant next to border. The leaves and roots regulate the digestion and should be used three times a week in dressings, uncooked food or with vegetables

Petroselinium
crispum

Peony. Ants help the peony to exhibit the most perfect blooms.

Paeonia

Privet. Butterfly

Liguster

Raspberry. Avoid animal manure, mulch with straw instead. Marigolds promote health

Rubus idaeus

Roses. Emperor moth

Damask and
moss roses

Rosemary. Attracts bees.

Rosmarinus
officinalis

Rue. Attracts bees

Ruta graveolens

Sage. Attracts bees. Plant with hyssop and thyme around the vegetable patch as a protective barrier against caterpillars, aphids and snails. Culinary use in sauces to purify the blood

Salvia officinalis

St John’s Wort

Hypericum

Salad burnet. Attracts bees.

Sanguisorba
minor

Sorrel. Attracts bees.

Rumex acetosa

Sloe. Emperor moth

Prunus spinesa

Stock

Matthiola

Stinging Nettle. Food for caterpillars of red admiral, brimstone and painted lady butterflies. Lay down flat as sheet compost between vegetables and hostas. Snails discouraged by nettle’s stinging hairs. Culinary use of young leaves in salads as blood purefying

Urtica dioica

Strawberry. Sow mustard in spring to provide shade and interplant with leeks to ward off nematodes. Mulch with straw to keep strawberries clean by stopping rain spattering mud on the fruit. Mow off the leaves after all fruit picked, plant mustard seed to become compost in the winter.

Fragaria
ananassae

Sunflower

Helianthus

Summer savory. Plant with beans. Culinary use of leaves with steamed vegetables to strengthen the nerves.

Satureja
hortensis

Tansy

Tanacetum
vulgare

Tarragon. Attracts bees. Culinary use of fresh leaves in uncooked food to strengthen the stomach and against rheumatism.

Artemesia
dracunculus

Thyme. Attracts bees. Plant with hyssop and sage around the vegetable patch as a protective barrier against caterpillars, aphids and snails. Culinary use as flavouring or as a tea in the treatment of worms. Be careful - An overdose is possible.

Thymus
vulgaris

Valerian. Attracts bees. Infusion of the blossom stimulates fruiting vegetables including beans, peas, tomatoes, cucumbers, courgettes, roses and irises. Do not use on lettuces, carrots or onions. Medical use as a tea for sleep-promoting, for no more than 2 weeks at a time. Be careful - An overdose is possible.

Valeriana
officinalis

Violet. Food for butterflies

Viola

Wild chamomile

Matricaria
chamomilla

Wormwood. Attracts bees. Plant with currants to ward off rust. Do not put into compost bin as worms hate it.

Artemesia
absinthium

Useful addresses:-

Chase Organics
Gibraltar House
Shepperton
Middlesex. TW17 8AQ

www.chaseorganics.co.uk

Organic Growers Association
Aeron Park
Llangeitho
Dyfed
Wales

Henry Doubleday Research Association
Convent Lane
Bocking
Braintree
Essex. CM7 6RW

www.gardenorganic.org.uk

Soil Association
Walnut Tree Manor
Haughley
Stowmarket
Suffolk. IP14 3RS


www.soilassociation.org

Organic Farm Supplies
Toke Place
Linton
Maidstone
Kent. ME17 4AP

Wyartt Seeds
Stone Cottage
Beyton
Bury St Edmunds
Suffolk. IP30 9AF

Tel: 01359 270410

Companion planting can be considered as a complement to organic gardening.

Taking account of cosmic influences is one of the main differences between Bio-dynamic and Organic methods, as shall be shown on the Biodynamics page.

 

COMPANION PLANTING
PAGE MENU

Companion Introduction

Site Map
Franck's Veg Garden
My
Vegetable Garden
Katie Thear Veg Garden
Riotte Veg Garden
Create Companion Garden

Companion Plant A
Companion Plant B
Companion Plant C
Companion Plant D
Companion Plant E
Companion Plant F
Companion Plant G
Companion Plant H
Companion Plant I
Companion Plant J
Companion Plant K
Companion Plant L
Companion Plant M
Companion Plant N
Companion Plant O
Companion Plant P
Companion Plant Q
Companion Plant R
Companion Plant S
Companion Plant T
Companion Plant UV
Companion Plant W
Companion Plant XYZ

Pest Control

Companion References
Companion Library AG
Companion Library GW

Biodynamics Introduction
Preparations
     
Preparation Use
     
Advantages
     
Rotation
     
Cropping Sequence
Gardening

 

The 2 EUREKA EFFECT PAGES FOR UNDERSTANDING SOIL AND HOW PLANTS INTERACT WITH IT OUT OF 15,000:-


Explanation of Structure of this Website with User Guidelines Page for those photo galleries with Photos
(of either ones I have taken myself or others which have been loaned only for use on this website from external sources)

-----------------------------------------------------------

Choose 1 of these different Plant selection Methods:-

1. Choose a plant from 1 of 53 flower colours in the Colour Wheel Gallery.

2. Choose a plant from 1 of 12 flower colours in each month of the year from 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery.

3. Choose a plant from 1 of 6 flower colours per month for each type of plant:-
Aquatic
Bedding
Bulb
Climber
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Wild Flower

4. Choose a plant from its Flower Shape:-
Shape, Form
Index

Flower Shape

5. Choose a plant from its foliage:-
Bamboo
Conifer
Fern
Grass
Vegetable

6. There are 6 Plant Selection Levels including Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers in
Plants Topic.

or

7. When I do not have my own or ones from mail-order nursery photos , then from March 2016, if you want to start from the uppermost design levels through to your choice of cultivated and wildflower plants to change your Plant Selection Process then use the following galleries:-

  • Create and input all plants known by Amateur Gardening inserted into their Sanders' Encyclopaedia from their edition published in 1960 (originally published by them in 1895) into these
    • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery,
      then
    • Stage 2 - Infill Plants Index Gallery being the only gallery from these 7 with photos (from Wikimedia Commons) ,
      then
    • Stage 3 - All Plants Index Gallery with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2
    • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery,
    • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery with
    • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery and
    • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery
    • Unfortunately, if you want to have 100's of choices on selection of plants from 1000's of 1200 pixels wide by up to 16,300 pixels in length webpages, which you can jump to from almost any of the pages in these 7 galleries above, you have to put up with those links to those choices being on
      • the left topic menu table,
      • the header of the middle data table and on
      • the page/index menu table on the right of every page of those galleries.

 

I like reading and that is shown by the index in my Library, where I provide lists of books to take you between designing, maintaining or building a garden and the hierarchy of books on plants taking you from

There are other pages on Plants which bloom in each month of the year in this website:-

 

 

 

Before reaching for the pesticides, here are a few alternative natural, non-toxic methods of slug control:  

• Watering Schedule - Far and away the best course of action against slugs in your garden is a simple adjustment in the watering schedule. Slugs are most active at night and are most efficient in damp conditions. Avoid watering your garden in the evening if you have a slug problem. Water in the morning - the surface soil will be dry by evening. Studies show this can reduce slug damage by 80%.

 

• Seaweed - If you have access to seaweed, it's well worth the effort to gather. Seaweed is not only a good soil amendment for the garden, it's a natural repellent for slugs. Mulch with seaweed around the base of plants or perimeter of bed. Pile it on 3" to 4" thick - when it dries it will shrink to just an inch or so deep. Seaweed is salty and slugs avoid salt. Push the seaweed away from plant stems so it's not in direct contact. During hot weather, seaweed will dry and become very rough which also deters the slugs.

 

• Copper - Small strips of copper can be placed around flower pots or raised beds as obstructions for slugs to crawl over. Cut 2" strips of thin copper and wrap around the lower part of flower pots, like a ribbon. Or set the strips in the soil on edge, making a "fence" for the slugs to climb. Check to make sure no vegetation hangs over the copper which might provide a 'bridge' for the slugs. Copper barriers also work well around wood barrels used as planters.
A non-toxic copper-based metallic mesh Slug Shield is available which can be wrapped around the stem of plants and acts as a barrier to slugs. When slugs come in contact with the mesh they receive an electric-like shock. The mesh also serves as a physical barrier. These slug shields are reusable, long-lasting and weather-proof.

 

• Diatomaceous Earth - Diatomaceous earth (Also known as "Insect Dust") is the sharp, jagged skeletal remains of microscopic creatures. It lacerates soft-bodied pests, causing them to dehydrate. A powdery granular material, it can be sprinkled around garden beds or individual plants, and can be mixed with water to make a foliar spray.
Diatomaceous earth is less effective when wet, so use during dry weather. Wear protective gear when applying, as it can irritate eyes and lungs. Be sure to buy natural or agricultural grade diatomaceous earth, not pool grade which has smoother edges and is far less effective. Click for more information or to purchase Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth.

 

• Electronic "slug fence" - An electronic slug fence is a non-toxic, safe method for keeping slugs out of garden or flower beds. The Slugs Away fence is a 24-foot long, 5" ribbon-like barrier that runs off a 9 volt battery. When a slug or snail comes in contact with the fence, it receives a mild static sensation that is undetectable to animals and humans. This does not kill the slug, it cause it to look elsewhere for forage. The battery will power the fence for about 8 months before needing to be replaced. Extension kits are availabe for increased coverage. The electronic fence will repel slugs and snails, but is harmless to people and pets.

 

• Lava Rock - Like diatomaceous earth, the abrasive surface of lava rock will be avoided by slugs. Lava rock can be used as a barrier around plantings, but should be left mostly above soil level, otherwise dirt or vegetation soon forms a bridge for slugs to cross.

• Salt - If all else fails, go out at night with the salt shaker and a flashlight. Look at the plants which have been getting the most damage and inspect the leaves, including the undersides. Sprinkle a bit of salt on the slug and it will kill it quickly. Not particularly pleasant, but use as a last resort. (Note: some sources caution the use of salt, as it adds a toxic element to the soil. This has not been our experience, especially as very little salt is used.)

• Beer - Slugs are attracted to beer. Set a small amount of beer in a shallow wide jar buried in the soil up to its neck. Slugs will crawl in and drown. Take the jar lid and prop it up with a small stick so rain won't dilute the beer. Leave space for slugs to enter the trap.

• Overturned Flowerpots, Grapefruit Halves, Board on Ground - Overturned flowerpots, with a stone placed under the rim to tilt it up a bit, will attract slugs. Leave overnight, and you'll find the slugs inside in the morning. Grapefruit halves work the same way, with the added advantage of the scent of the fruit as bait.
Another trap method, perhaps the simplest of all, is to set a wide board on the ground by the affected area. Slugs will hide under the board by day. Simply flip the board over during the day to reveal the culprits. Black plastic sheeting also works the same way.

 

• Garlic-based slug repellents
Laboratory tests at the University of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (UK) revealed that a highly refined garlic product (ECOguard produced by ECOspray Ltd, a British company that makes organic pesticides) was an effective slug killer. Look for garlic-based slug deterrents which will be emerging under various brand names, as well as ECOguard.

• Coffee grounds; new caffeine-based slug/snail poisons - Coffee grounds scattered on top of the soil will deter slugs. The horticultural side effects of using strong grounds such as espresso on the garden, however, are less certain. When using coffee grounds, moderation is advised.
A study in June 2002 reported in the journal Nature found that slugs and snails are killed when sprayed with a caffeine solution, and that spraying plants with this solution prevents slugs from eating them. The percentage of caffeine required in a spray (1 - 2%) is greater than what is found in a cup of coffee (.05 - 07%), so homemade sprays are not as effective. Look for new commercial sprays which are caffeine-based.


Topic
Case Studies
...Drive
...Foundations

Companion
Planting
*
...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants

Garden Construction
Garden Design
...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants Garden Maintenance
Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants
...Poisonous Plants
Soil
...Soil Nutrients
Tool Shed
Useful Data

................

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape

Bulb
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
Climber
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evgr
...Heather Shrub
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evgr
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous
Perennial

...P -Herbaceous
...Peony
...Flower Shape
...RHS Wisley
......Mixed Border
......Other Borders
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable

Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour
NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown Note
...Cream Note
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note
Poisonous
Wildflower Plants

............

Topic - Flower/Foliage Colour
Colour Wheel Galleries

Following your choice using Garden Style then that changes your Plant Selection Process
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

or
you could use these Flower Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12
with its
Explanation of
Structure of this Website with

...User Guidelines
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index
Rock Garden and Alpine Flower Colour Wheel with number of colours
Rock Plant Flowers 53

...Rock Plant Photos

or
these Foliage Colour Wheels structures, which I have done but until I can take the photos and I am certain of the plant label's validity, these may not progress much further
All Foliage 212

All Spring Foliage 212
All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212

or
Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index

............

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly
Usage of Plants
by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly

Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly usage of
Plant A-C
Plant C-M
Plant N-W
Butterfly usage of Plant

followed by all the Wild Flower Family Pages:-

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 1


(o)Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
(o)Arrow-Grass
(o)Arum
(o)Balsam
Bamboo
(o)Barberry
(o)Bedstraw
(o)Beech
(o)Bellflower
(o)Bindweed
(o)Birch
(o)Birds-Nest
(o)Birthwort
(o)Bogbean
(o)Bog Myrtle
(o)Borage
(o)Box
(o)Broomrape
(o)Buckthorn
(o)Buddleia
(o)Bur-reed
(o)Buttercup
(o)Butterwort
(o)Cornel (Dogwood)
(o)Crowberry
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
(o)Daffodil
(o)Daisy
(o)Daisy Cudweeds
(o)Daisy Chamomiles
(o)Daisy Thistle
(o)Daisy Catsears (o)Daisy Hawkweeds
(o)Daisy Hawksbeards
(o)Daphne
(o)Diapensia
(o)Dock Bistorts
(o)Dock Sorrels

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 2


(o)Clubmoss
(o)Duckweed
(o)Eel-Grass
(o)Elm
(o)Filmy Fern
(o)Horsetail
(o)Polypody
Quillwort
(o)Royal Fern
(o)Figwort - Mulleins
(o)Figwort - Speedwells
(o)Flax
(o)Flowering-Rush
(o)Frog-bit
(o)Fumitory
(o)Gentian
(o)Geranium
(o)Glassworts
(o)Gooseberry
(o)Goosefoot
(o)Grass 1
(o)Grass 2
(o)Grass 3
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 1
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 2
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 3 (o)Hazel
(o)Heath
(o)Hemp
(o)Herb-Paris
(o)Holly
(o)Honeysuckle
(o)Horned-Pondweed
(o)Hornwort
(o)Iris
(o)Ivy
(o)Jacobs Ladder
(o)Lily
(o)Lily Garlic
(o)Lime
(o)Lobelia
(o)Loosestrife
(o)Mallow
(o)Maple
(o)Mares-tail
(o)Marsh Pennywort
(o)Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 3


(o)Mesem-bryanthemum
(o)Mignonette
(o)Milkwort
(o)Mistletoe
(o)Moschatel
Naiad
(o)Nettle
(o)Nightshade
(o)Oleaster
(o)Olive
(o)Orchid 1
(o)Orchid 2
(o)Orchid 3
(o)Orchid 4
(o)Parnassus-Grass
(o)Peaflower
(o)Peaflower Clover 1
(o)Peaflower Clover 2
(o)Peaflower Clover 3
(o)Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
(o)Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
Pipewort
(o)Pitcher-Plant
(o)Plantain
(o)Pondweed
(o)Poppy
(o)Primrose
(o)Purslane
Rannock Rush
(o)Reedmace
(o)Rockrose
(o)Rose 1
(o)Rose 2
(o)Rose 3
(o)Rose 4
(o)Rush
(o)Rush Woodrushes
(o)Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
(o)Sandalwood
(o)Saxifrage
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 4


Seaheath
(o)Sea Lavender
(o)Sedge Rush-like
(o)Sedges Carex 1
(o)Sedges Carex 2
(o)Sedges Carex 3
(o)Sedges Carex 4
(o)Spindle-Tree
(o)Spurge
(o)Stonecrop
(o)Sundew
(o)Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
(o)Teasel
(o)Thyme 1
(o)Thyme 2
(o)Umbellifer 1
(o)Umbellifer 2
(o)Valerian
(o)Verbena
(o)Violet
(o)Water Fern
(o)Waterlily
(o)Water Milfoil
(o)Water Plantain
(o)Water Starwort
Waterwort
(o)Willow
(o)Willow-Herb
(o)Wintergreen
(o)Wood-Sorrel
(o)Yam
(o)Yew

 

It is worth remembering that especially with roses that the colour of the petals of the flower may change - The following photos are of Rosa 'Lincolnshire Poacher' which I took on the same day in R.V. Roger's Nursery Field:-

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Closed Bud

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Opening Bud

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Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot94a1a1a1

Older Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot95a1a1a1

Middle-aged Flower - Flower Colour in Season in its
Rose Description Page is
"Buff Yellow, with a very slight pink tint at the edges in May-October."

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot96a1a1a1

Mature Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot97a1a1a1

Juvenile Flower and Dying Flower

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Form of Rose Bush

There are 720 roses in the Rose Galleries; many of which have the above series of pictures in their respective Rose Description Page.

So one might avoid the disappointment that the 2 elephants had when their trunks were entwined instead of them each carrying their trunk using their own trunk, and your disappointment of buying a rose to discover that the colour you bought it for is only the case when it has its juvenile flowers; if you look at all the photos of the roses in the respective Rose Description Page!!!!