Rock Plant Colour Wheel - Flowers Link Map

Click on Number in Colour Wheel or Black sections below:-

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Some abbreviations have been used in compiling the list of Rock Plants for small gardens in order to make it possible to provide all the required information at a glance in a condensed form within the Rock Garden Plant Index Pages.

 

Name

First is the name of the genus to which the plant belongs which is given in capitals. Under the generic name the names of the species and varieties are recorded.

Link to photos, cultivation details or mail-order business that sells it.

Link in *** to Rock Garden Colour Wheel Page with photo of the plant at bottom of page. Then, More Photos Page links to further photos / description in its Rock Plant Photos Gallery Page.

Suitability

Details of which container to grow the plant in:-

Type

Abbreviated to:-

  • B for Bulb
  • H for Herb - any non-woody plant that is not a tree or shrub
  • HP for Herbaceous Perennial
  • S for Shrub
  • SS for Sub-shrub

followed by

  • E for Evergreen
  • D for Deciduous

Height and Spread

The approximate height is given first in inches, followed by the approximate spread, when mature. 1 inch (") = 25.4 millimetres (mm)

Soil

The figures A, B, C and D denote that the plant in question requires one of the following soil mixtures:-

  • A. Equal parts of loam, leafmould and sand. This is a suitable mixture for plants which require a light, open, porous soil with good drainage. A good mixture for troughs in a sheltered position in part shade. All bulbs and conifers do well in this medium.
  • B. Equal parts of loam, leafmould, peat and sand. This is more retentive of water but is well-drained and will grow all the plants in this Rock Plant List which are suitable for full sun, and it is ideal for woodland plants in part shade.
  • C. Four parts leafmould and one part each of loam and sand. A soil for growing dwarf rhododendrons and other ericaceous plants in the raised bed type of trough and peat beds.
  • D. Three parts Cornish silver sand and one part flaked leafmould. For all difficult and rare high alpines, including most of the cushion type. The trough containing this mixture is best situated in part shade.

which may be followed by

  • N for when a neutral pH medium is required.
  • L for when a limey pH medum is required.

Where no additional letter is given, the plant will thrive under either condition.

Position and Protection

The following terms and abbreviations used singly or in combination will minimize the risk of planting in an unsuitable spot:-

  • C --- This means that the plant will do well planted on its side in a crevice built up on the rocks for preference.
  • P --- This plant requires a pane of glass suspended over it in winter, generally from October to the end of March.
  • PS -- A part-shady spot or facing west with protection from the south by a shadow cast by either a rock or shrub.
  • SA -- Shady position either facing north or protected by a rock.
  • Sun - This means that the plant will require a normal amount of direct sunlight.
  • W --- The plant will do well planted in a vertical position in the side of a trough or scree frame.

Flower Colour, Nearest Colour Wheel - Flowers Colour and Months of Flowering

These 3 columns are self-explanatory;
for example, Orange June, means that

  • the flowers are orange (if the plant has a Plant Description Page in this website then the link from here will be to that Plant Description Page otherwise to a Plant Description found on the Internet),
  • orange3 in the Colour Wheel - Flowers is the nearest colour for the majority of the flower petal (either from a flower image in this website or an image found on the Internet), with link to the Colour Wheel - Flowers Colour and
  • the flowering month is June with link to the flower photo on the Internet.

A double entry such as
Orange August
Red October
means that the plant has orange flowers in August and red fruits or berries in October.

Propagation

A general idea to the best method of increasing the stock:-

  • C ---- Half-ripened wood at the end of July.
  • D ----- Division.
  • GC ---- Green Cuttings in late spring.
  • L ------ Layering.
  • Leaf C - The plant is best propagated by leaf cuttings.
  • RC ----- Fully ripened wood at the end of September.
  • Root C - The plant is best propagated by cutting the thick root thongs at the end of September.
  • S ------- The best method is by seed.

may be followed by

  • H - Where this letter is placed after any of the above abbreviations, it means that bottom heat is essential to obtain a fair percentage of strikes.
    The omission of this letter does not mean that bottom heat cannot be employed; in fact, its use will certainly save an appreciable amount of time taken to increase the stock.

A combination of the above will denote that the plant can be increased by all the methods which those abbreviated letters stand for.

Propagation Seed Composts

"I am giving 3 types of composts which will be numbered 1, 2 and 3 so that they will not be confused with the potting mixtures. The number of the compost will be noted under the heading of propagation in the list of plants. These are not offered as the only types in which seedlings may be grown, but they have proved their worth over many years. As it will only be on rare occasions that a bushel of compost of any one of the seed mixtures will be required, I will give the size of the box which can be constructed easily to hold a quarter of a bushel, an amount more in keeping with the average amateur's need. The inside measurements of the box, which is best made of wood are 10 by 10 x 5.5 inches deep (25 by 25 x 13.25 cms). By doubling the depth a half bushel measure is available.

Compost 1
A mixture that has been found suitable for all the ordinary and easy types of alpine seed is the John Innes seed compost.
It can of course be mixed at home as required. Only the amount needed at the time should be made for its lasting qualities are strictly limited. All the following ingredients are mixed by bulk, not weight, and are best used dry after mixing, storing the compost for a day or 2 before use.

  • Take 2 parts of medium-heavy sterilised loam from a reliable source, full of rotted grass roots. The soil should be rubbed down between the hands into a light granular texture. All fibrous material must be retained and if large; cut into small pieces with scissors and mixed into the loam. On no account should the loam be sieved. This will spoil the texture of the finished compost and cause it to pack readily, a state of affairs to be avoided, for it is essential that the soil be open and granular in texture.
  • Add 1 part of sieved peat,
  • 1 part of Cornish sand

and well mix the whole together dry. Afterwards to this is added

  • 1.5 ounces of superphosphate of lime and
  • 0.75 ounces of chalk

to each bushel of compost. If this mixture is to be used for plants which are lime haters, the chalk should be omitted.

 

Compost 2
The more difficult and rare plants need a light, open soil in which to germinate and the following has been tried and found suitable. Equal parts by bulk of medium heavy fibrous loam and leaf-mould. Both the loam and leaf-mould should be sterilised and then rubbed down to a fine granular texture. The particles are better if small, but should not be sieved. To this is added 2 parts of Cornish sand, after sieving through a 1/16 inch sieve (2 mm) as the larger particles are not needed.

 

Compost 3
Shade-loving dwarf rhododendrons and other ericaceous and woodland plants like a more spongy yet still open medium. This consists of equal parts leaf-mould, peat and Cornish sand. The leaf-mould must be sterilised and rubbed down fine, the peat and sand should be sieved though a 1/16 inch (2 mm) sieve, and the wole well mixed together.

 

Both composts 2 and 3 need a very fine sprinkling of superphosphate of lime, just under 0.5 ounce for a quarter of a bushel of mixture or to be more precise 3/8 of an ounce. The superphosphate is needed by the seedlings in their early growth. In fact it is essential as a plant food as soon as the seed starts to germinate, so it must be mixed with the composts, not applied afterwards. " from Collector's Alpines by Royton E. Heath published in 1964 by Collingridge Limited.

 

 

Site design and content copyright ©October 2010. Page structure amended November 2012. Rock Plant Photos Gallery added August 2013. Topic Menu amended July 2015. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

 

 

ROCK GARDEN PLANTS IN COLOUR WHEEL GALLERY PAGES

Site Map for Direct Link to Plant Description Page from their Petal Colour being nearest Colour to Colour in a Colour Wheel Page

Introduction

Small size plant in Flower Colours
Miniature size plant in Flower Colours
Small Size plant flower in Month
Miniature Size plant flower in Month

FLOWERING IN MONTH
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Dark Tone or Shades
(Colours mixed with Black)
Mid-Tone
(Colours mixed with Grey)
Pure Hue
(the Primary, Secondary or Tertiary Colour named)
Pastel
(Colours mixed with White)

ROCK GARDEN PLANT INDEX
(o)Rock Plant: A
(o)Rock Plant: B
(o)Rock Plant: C
(o)Rock Plant: D
(o)Rock Plant: E
(o)Rock Plant: F
(o)Rock Plant: G
(o)Rock Plant: H
(o)Rock Plant: I
(o)Rock Plant: J
(o)Rock Plant: K
(o)Rock Plant: L
(o)Rock Plant: M
(o)Rock Plant: NO
(o)Rock Plant: PQ
(o)Rock Plant: R
(o)Rock Plant: S
(o)Rock Plant: T
(o)Rock Plant: UVWXYZ


Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

Ivydene Gardens Rock Garden Plants Suitable for Small Gardens in Colour Wheel Gallery:
Pure Hue Flower Colour:
Yellow 56 is Yellow

Yellow 56 is Yellow

Common Plant Name

Botanical Plant Name

Flowering Months

Bulbs

 

 

1
2
3
...
4
...

Sorrel
...
Hoop-petticoat
daffodil
Hoop-petticoat
daffodil

Oxalis lobata
Fritillaria pudica
Narcissus
bulbocodium

Narcissus bulbocodium x romieuxii

September
April, May, June
March, April
...
December, January,
February

oxaliscflolobatarvroger1

fritillariacflopudicagarnonswilliams

narcissuscflo4bulbocodiumgarnonswilliams

narcissuscflo3bulbocodiumromieuxiigarnonswilliams

 

freesiacflomagdalenarvroger

item3e1a1a3a10a6

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

item3a2a1c1j1e

item3a1a1d1j1e

item3a1a1a3a10a5

item3b1a1a10a5

item3c1a1a10a5

item3d1a1a10a5

item3e1a1a3a10a5

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

Bulbs - Colchicum and Crocus

 

 

1
...
2
...

Saffron
...
Saffron
...

Crocus chrysanthus
'Fusco-tinctus'

Crocus chrysanthus
'Romance'

January, February,
March
January, February,
March

crocuscflochrysanthusfuscotinctusgeetee

crocuscflochrysanthusromancegeetee1

item3a2a1c1j1g

item3a1a1d1j1g

item3a1a1a3a10a7

item3b1a1a10a7

item3c1a1a10a7

item3d1a1a10a7

item3e1a1a3a10a7

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Deciduous Shrubs

 

 

1

 

 

 

item3a1a1d1j1h

item3a1a1a3a10a8

item3b1a1a10a8

item3c1a1a10a8

item3d1a1a10a8

item3e1a1a3a10a8

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Evergreen Perennials

 

 

1
2
...
3
...

...
Stonecrop
...
...
...

Alyssum montanum
Sedum spathulifolium
'Cape Blanco'

Dionysia aretioides
...

June
July, August,
September
March, April, May,
June, July

alyssumflotmontanumflowermay84

sedumflotspathulifoliumcapeblanco1

dionysiacflo4aretioidesgarnonswilliams

item3a1a1d1j1i

item3a1a1a3a10a9

item3b1a1a10a9

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item3d1a1a10a9

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1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Evergreen Shrubs

 

 

1
 

 

 

 

item3a1a1a3a10a10

item3b1a1a10a10

item3c1a1a10a10

item3d1a1a10a10

item3e1a1a3a10a10

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Herbaceous Perennials

 

 

1
 

 

 

 

item3a1a1d1j1d

item3a1a1a3a10a4

item3b1a1a10a4

item3c1a1a10a4

item3d1a1a10a4

item3e1a1a3a10a4

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Multi-Coloured Cultivated Plant

 

 

1
 

 

 

 

rosakimcflorogerltd

item3e1a1a3a10a

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Photos of Rock Garden Plants who have this Flower Colour:-

dionysiapforaretioidesgarnonswilliams

Photo of Dionysia aretiodes by Chris Garnons-Williams from Alpine House in Garden of RHS Wisley on 13 February 2014.

"Dionysia aretiodes is from the Elburz mountains of Iran. First discovered in 1770 but not introduced to cultivation until 1959. It is one of the less difficult and most beautiful of the species. Dense cushions of packed rosettes of softly hairy leaves, lightly toothed at the upper margins. From each rosette springs an almost stemless yellow flower. It is a variable species. Like all the Dionysias I have so far grown it is very happy in Tufa rock." from Manual of Alpine Plants by Will Ingwersen (ISBN 0-304-34063-4).

More Photos Page

fritillariapforpudicagarnonswilliams

Photo of Fritillaria pudica by Chris Garnons-Williams from Alpine House in Garden of RHS Wisley on 13 February 2014.

"Fritillaria pudica's common name is Johnny-Jump-Up. Native to the western United States and Canada, from California north to British Coloumbia. Tolerates wide range of climates, with or without summer moisture, but never in drought situations. Height above 6-8 inches (15-20 cms). Leaves found near base of stem, almost erect, commonly whorled. Flowers in April-June, yellow with purple tint, 1-2 per stem." from Bulbs Volume I, A-H by John E. Bryan (ISBN 0-7470-0231-2).

More Photos Page

narcissuspforbulbocodiumgarnonswilliams

Photo of Narcissus bulbocodium by Chris Garnons-Williams from Sissinghurst Castle on 19 April 2013.

"The type plant has a wide distribution over Southern France and Spain and varies from 4 to 6 Inches (10-15 cms) high. Leaves up to 4 rounded, channelled, stem slender, topped by long narrow funnel-shaped corona, wide at mouth, margins crenulate, bright golden-yellow, petals erect, yellow-keeled green. March-April. " from Collector's Alpines by Royton E. Heath published in 1964 by Collingridge Limited.

More Photos Page

narcissuspforbulbocodiumromieuxiigarnonswilliams

Photo of Narcissus bulbocodium x romieuxii by Chris Garnons-Williams from Alpine House in Garden of RHS Wisley on 17 February 2015.

"A native of Morocco, this has the usual rush-like sprawling green leaves. Flowers solitary on 4-inch (10 cms) stems, large open trumpets of bright pale yellow with protruding stamens and style. December-January." from Collector's Alpines by Royton E. Heath published in 1964 by Collingridge Limited.

More Photos Page

fritillariapudicaIMG3151a1a

 

More Photos Page

Topic
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Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
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Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
All Foliage 212
All Spring Foliage 212

All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212

Rock Plant Flowers 53 *
...Rock Plant Photos

 

Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos

Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...
12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

 

Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods

Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Vegetable

Wild Flower

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly

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