ROCK GARDEN PLANTS IN COLOUR WHEEL GALLERY PAGES

Site Map for Direct Link to Plant Description Page from their Petal Colour being nearest Colour to Colour in a Colour Wheel Page

Introduction

Small size plant in Flower Colours

Miniature size plant in Flower Colours

Small Size plant flower in Month

Miniature Size plant flower in Month

FLOWERING IN MONTH
including those from the Camera Photo Galleries as detailed in row 3 of the Topic Table on the left.
Click on the centre of each thumbnail in the following flower colour month pages to transfer to the description of that plant in a Camera Photo Gallery Page:-
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Dark Tone or Shades
(Colours mixed with Black)
Mid-Tone
(Colours mixed with Grey)
Pure Hue
(the Primary, Secondary or Tertiary Colour named)
Pastel
(Colours mixed with White)

ROCK GARDEN PLANT INDEX
(o)Rock Plant: A
(o)Rock Plant: B
(o)Rock Plant: C
(o)Rock Plant: D
(o)Rock Plant: E
(o)Rock Plant: F
(o)Rock Plant: G
(o)Rock Plant: H
(o)Rock Plant: I
(o)Rock Plant: J
(o)Rock Plant: K
(o)Rock Plant: L
(o)Rock Plant: M
(o)Rock Plant: NO
(o)Rock Plant: PQ
(o)Rock Plant: R
(o)Rock Plant: S
(o)Rock Plant: T
(o)Rock Plant: UVWXYZ

 

LISTS OF PLANTS SUITABLE FOR VARIOUS SITUATIONS AND PURPOSES:-

THE ROCK GARDEN -

Rock plants for Sunny Sites.

Rock plants for Shady Sites.

Early Bloom in the Rock Garden.

Summer Bloom in the Rock Garden.

Late Bloom in the Rock Garden.

Rock plants of Creeping and Trailing Habit.

Rock plants with Evergreen Foliage.

Rock Plants with Silvery or Variegated Foliage.

Rock plants needing the protection of Sheet of Glass in Winter.

Rock plants which hate Lime.

Lime Lovers.

Peat Lovers.

THE WALL GARDEN -

Plants for sunny sites in the Wall Garden.

Plants for Shady Sites in the Wall Garden.

Plants for a Dry Site on a Wall.

Plants for a Moderately Dry Site on a Wall.

Plants for a Moist Site on a Wall.

Plants for Positions on Top of Walls.

Plants to Hang Down from the Upper Parts of a Wall.
 


Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

 

DETAILS OF PLANTS IN LISTS FOR THE ROCK, WALL, PAVED, WATER AND BOG GARDENS

Some Good Rock Plants
with Some Plants that Thrive on the Moraine
and
Saxifraga

Plants for the Alpine House

Plants for the Miniature Rock Garden
with Some Bulbs and Tubers for the Rock Garden,
Some Bulbs for the Alpine House and
Bulbs and Tubers suitable for Naturalizing in Grass

Shrubs for the Rock Garden
with Rounded, Pyramidal, and Erect Growth. Then, Heath-like Lime Haters and last is Trailers and Prostrate Shrubs. Next Table has Gentiana for the Rock Garden followed by Pinks (Dianthus) for the Rock Garden

Moisture-loving Trees and Shrubs for Bog or Water Garden
with Conifers (Dwarf) and Ornamental Grasses for the Rock or Marsh Garden

Ferns

Plants for Wall Garden
with Plants for the Paved Garden

Plants for the Water Garden

Plants for the Bog Garden
with Alpine Primulas for the Rock Garden,
Alpine Primulas for the Bog Garden and
Campanulas for the Rock Garden

 

The Moraine or Scree Garden - Many of the alpines will not prosper in the ordinary rock garden. They require that the natural conditions under which they live in the wild state shall be copied as nearly as possible in the rock garden. The plants to which we refer grow on mountain slopes covered with loose stones, where the melting of the snow during summer provides them with plenty of ice-cold water and where a blanket of snow protects them during the winter. The conditions we must endeavour to reproduce are, therefore: adequate moisture for the roots in summer while the plants are growing, but at the same time good drainage:
and secondly, protection from damp in the winter. The moraine is intended to provide these requirements, and can be made quite cheaply anywhere in the rock garden. Plants requiring very diverse kinds of soil may thus, with great effect, be grown in close proximity.

Making the Moraine
An ideal and natural position for the moraine would be in the sun at the lower end of a miniature valley between 2 rocky spurs, the gorge gradually expanding into a flat bed of scree with occasional boulders strewn over it. The extent of the moraine will vary in proportion to the size of the whole rock garden. If the latter is large, the moraine may cover an area of many square yards (square metres); on the other hand, it may be nothing more than a small, well-drained pocket or crevice filled with moraine mixture in which a single specimen is grown.
To construct the moraine, dig out about 30 inches (75cms) of the soil and make the bottom of the basin or trench slope slightly towards the front: the slope must not be too steep or the moraine will become over-dry in summer. The lower 10 inches (25cms) must be made water-tight by means of puddling with clay or by means of cement. Make an outlet in front, which when closed keeps about 10 inches (25 cms) of water, but not more, in the lowest parts of the basin, while when the outlet is open no water can remain in the basin. Now cover the bottom of the trench with about 10 inches (25 cms) of rubble, stones, or any material that will afford good drainage. Above this place another 6 inches (15 cms) or so of smaller stones roughly 2 inches (5 cms) in diameter; these will fill the gaps between the larger stones and prevent the small grit above from sinking through and blocking the drainage. The hollow is then filled up with a mixture of stone chips and gravel. Over this again is thrown a covering, an inch or so (2.5 cm) in thickness, formed of a mixture of equal parts of ordinary garden soil, leaf mould, and small stone chips similar to those used in frosty weather for sprinkling on wood-paved roads. Limestone or sandstone chips are excellent and easily obtained; flint chips should not be used, as they do not conserve moisture. Place a few boulders in the moraine to break up the surface and to give the plants some protection. A natural trickle of water may be led into the top of the moraine, or each day sufficient moisture may be given from a watering-can to cause an overflow from the outlet at the bottom. From November to May, when no additional moisture is needed in the moraine, the outlet should be left open.
The overflow from the moraine may be led into a small pool, which will add great charm to the rock garden, and is easy to construct while the garden is being made. In it may be grown rushes and small water plants, while the overflow from it will provide an excellent situation for bog plants or for any alpines loving plenty of moisture. When planting, the gardener should remember the conditions under which each plant lives in its native state, and should set it in the rock garden accordingly. Many plants that have proved failures in the rock garden proper will, on transplantation to the moraine, flourish.
The inhabitants of the moraine are not so rampant as many alpines grown in the rock garden proper, but for all that, the more vigorous should be kept in check. A light top-dressing of equal parts of loam, leaf-mould, and stone chips will be required in spring and again in early autumn.

Protection of Plants in Winter
Plants whose leaves are covered with fluff or down are, when in their natural haunts, usually protected from damp during the winter by a coat of snow. When they are grown out of doors in England, they must, therefore, be given a covering of glass during the winter months: that is, from the middle of October to the beginning of March. When the plant is a small one nestling in a crevice between the rocks, it is often possible to cover it with a sheet of glass resting on the surrounding rocks; but when this cannot be done, 4 pieces of stiff galvanized wire should be inserted firmly in the ground and bent over at the top to hold the glass plate securely in position over the plant. If the weather is especially severe or the plant very delicate, 4 additional pieces of glass may be set in the soil and supported by the wires so as to form 4 walls protecting the plant. Sufficient space between the glass roof and the tops of the 4 walls should be left for adequate ventilation (but not enough to admit the rain or snow) or the plants will be liable to damp-off. Hand-lights and bell-glasses may also be used, but in all cases adequate ventilation should be provided. The frost will often raise the plants from the soil, especially those planted the previous autumn. In spring, therefore, each plant should be carefully scrutinized, and, if necessary, gently pressed down into the soil. Dead leaves must be removed from around the plants, and a top-dressing of fine, sandy loam and leaf-mould should be sifted round and close up to the crowns.

Ivydene Gardens Rock Garden Plants Suitable for Small Gardens in Colour Wheel Gallery:
Rock Garden Plant Lists of Plants Suitable for Rock, Wall and Water Gardens - How to plan and plant them including wall, paved and water gardens by A. Edwards in charge of the rock garden Kew. Published by Ward, Lock & Co. in 1929.

 

Plants for the Bog Garden
See also Ferns and Moisture-loving Shrubs and Trees for use in a Bog Garden.

Botanical plant Name

Common Name

Height in inches (cms)

Colour

Time of Flowering

 

Acorus calamus

Sweet Flag

30 (75)

Yellow

Jul and Aug

 

Acorus japonicus

Sweet Flag

30 (75)

Leaves striped with Red and White

Jul and Aug

 

Acorus japonicus var. variegatus

Sweet Flag

30 (75)

Leaves striped with Red and White

Jul and Aug

 

Anagallis tenella

Bog Pimpernel

3-4 (7.5-10)

Pink

Jul

 

Arundinaria (several varieties)

Bamboos

24-200 (60-500)

...

...

 

Arundo donax

Great Reed

100 (250)

Bluish-green Foliage

...

 

Astilbe (various)

Goat's Beard)

20-50 (50-125)

White, Yellow, Purple, Rose, or Crimson

May-Sep

 

Bambusa fortunei aurea

Bamboo

20-30 (50-75)

Golden Variegated Leaves

...

 

Caltha palustris fl. pl.

Marsh Marigold

12 (30)

Double Rich Yellow

May-Jul

 

Caltha polypetala

Giant Kingcup

20 (50)

Golden-Yellow

May-Jul

 

Cardamine pratensis fl. pl.

Lady's Smock or Cuckoo Flower

12 (30)

Lilac

May-Jul

 

Cortaderia argentea

Pampas-grass

72 (180)

Cream or Pink

Autumn

 

Cypripedium spectabile

Lady's Slipper Orchid

20 (50)

Pink and White

Jun-Jul

 

Dodecatheon meadia

American Cow-slip

12 (30)

Purple, Rose, and White

May-Jun

 

Epilobium (various)

Willow Herb

6-70 (15-175)

Crimson, Rose, or White

Jun-Sep

 

Fritillaria meleagris (various)

Snakeshead

10 (25)

Purple-rose and White

Apr

 

Funkia (various)

Plantain Lily

18-24 (45-60)

Lilac, with Ornamental Foliage

Jul-Sep

 

Gentiana pneu-monanthe

Windflower

5-10 (12.5-25)

Dark Blue

Jun-Aug

 

Geum rivale

Water Avens

10 (25)

Crimson Pink

May-Sep

 

Gunnera manicata

Prickly Rhbarb

80-100 (200-250)

Reddish Flowers. Foliage Plant

Aug

 

Gunnera scabra

Prickly Rhubarb

60 (150)

Small Reddish Flowers. Foliage Plant

Aug

 

Helonias bullata

Stud-flower

15 (37.5)

Crimson-purple

Apr-May

 

Hemerocallis aurantiaca

Day Lily

36 (90)

Apricot Orange

Jun-Sep

 

Hemerocallis dumortieii

Day Lily

15 (37.5)

Yellow and Red-brown

May-Aug

 

Hemerocallis fulva

Day Lily

36 (90)

Tawny Yellow

Jun-Jul

 

Heracleum villosum

Cow Parsnip

60-100 (150-250)

White

Jun-Aug

 

Iris aurea

Yellow Iris

48 (120)

Golden-Yellow

Jun

 

Iris cuprea

Iris

20 (50)

Red-bronze

Jun-Jul

 

Iris delavayi

Chinese Iris

50 (125)

Violet

Jul-Sep

 

Iris foetidissima

Stinking Gladwyn

30 (75)

Bluish-Lilac

Summer

 

Iris kempferi

Japanese Iris

18-30 (45-75)

Various

Jul-Sep

 

Iris laevigata

Japanese Iris

30 (75)

Purple and Yellow

Jul-Sep

 

Iris monnieri

Yellow Iris

36-48 (90-120)

Yellow and White

Jun-Jul

 

Iris monspur

Iris

50 (125)

Light Blue, Lavender, or Violet

Jul-Aug

 

Iris ochroleuca

Golden-banded Iris

48 (120)

Yellow and White

Jun-Jul

 

Iris orientalis

Eastern Iris

30-40 (75-100)

Blue

May-Jun

 

Iris pseudocorus and var. variegatus

Yellow Iris or Water Lily

30 (75)

Yellow

May-Jul

 

Iris sibirica

Siberian Iris

30 (75)

Magenta Blue, White, Yellow

Jun

 

Leucojum aestivum

Summer Snowdrop

15 (37.5)

White with Green Spots

May

 

Lilium clalced-onicum

Lily

40 (1000

Scarlet

Jul-Aug

 

Lilium giganteum

Giant Himalayan Lily

130 (325)

White, shaded with Purple

Aug

 

Lilium martagon

Martagon Lily

30 (75)

Purple and Black

Jul

 

Lilium monadelphium

Lily

50 (125)

Yellow

Jul

 

Lilium pardalinum

Panther Lily

70 (175)

Orange Crimson

Jul

 

Lilium superbum

American Swamp Lily

80 (200)

Orange Red, spotted Brown

Jul

 

Linnaea borealis

Twin-flower

3 (7.5)

White and Pink

Jun-Jul

 

Lysimachia ciliata

Yellow Loose-strife

30 (75)

Yellow

Jul-Aug

 

Lysimachia clethroides

Lossestrife

30 (75)

White

Jul-Sep

 

Lysimachia nummularia aurea

Creeping Jenny

4 (10)

Yellow Flowers, Golden Leaves

Jun-SEp

 

Lythrum salicaria roseum

Purple Loosestrife

40 (100)

Rose

Jul-Sep

 

Lythrum salicaria superbum

Purple Loosestrife

40 (100)

Purple

Jul-Sep

 

Mimulus cardinalis

Monkey Flower

24 (60)

Scarlet

Jun-Jul

 

Mimulus cupreus Brilliant

Monkey Flower

12 (30)

Orange

Jun-Aug

 

Mimulus luteus

Monkey Musk

10 (25)

Yellow, spotted Brown

Jul-Aug

 

Mimulus radicans

Monkey Flower

Creeper

White and Violet

May-Aug

 

Miscanthus japonicus var. zebrina

Zebra-striped Rush

40 (100)

Purple

Jun-Sep

 

Orchis foliosa

Madeira Orchis

10-20 (25-50)

Purple

May-Jun

 

Osmunda regalis

Royal Fern

10-100 (25-250)

Green Foliage

...

 

Parnassia palustris

Grass of Parnassus

5-10 (12.5-25)

White

May-Aug

 

Petasites fragrans

Winter Heliotrope

10 (25)

White

Dec-Feb

 

Petasites japonicus giganteus

Japanese Heliotrope

50-60 (125-150)

White

Dec-Feb

 

Phlox paniculata

Phlox

40 (100)

Various

Jul-Oct

 

Phormium tenax

New Zealand Flax

60 (150)

Greenish-White

Jul-Sep

 

Pinguicula vulgaris

Bog Violet

4-6 (10-15)

Purple-Violet

Apr-May

 

Podophyllum emodi

May Apple

12 (30)

White

May

 

Podophyllum peltatum

American May Apple

12 (30)

White

May

 

Polygonatum multiflorum

Solomon's Seal

30 (75)

White

May-Jun

 

Polygonum sachalinense

Knot-grass

100 (250)

White

Late Summer

 

Pratia angulata

...

2 (5)

White

May-Aug

 

Primula Beesiana

Primula

20 (50)

Magenta

May

 

Primula Bulleyana

Primula

12-15 (30-37.5)

Orange

Apr-May

 

Primula japonica

Japanese Primrose

12-14 (30-35)

Magenta, Pink, or White

May-Jun

 

Primula juliae

Primula

4 (10)

Magenta

Apr

 

Primula rosea grandiflora

Primula

10 (25)

Rose-carmine

Mar-May

 

Primula sikkimensis

Himalayan Primrose

20 (50)

Sulphur Yellow

May-Jun

 

Primula vulgaris

Primrose

9 (22.5)

Yellow

Apr

 

Ranunculus aconitifolius

Maids of France

24-30 (60-75)

White

May-Jun

 

Rheum officinale

Rhubarb

100 (250)

Whitish-yellow

Jul-Aug

 

Rodgersia aesculifolia

Rodger's Bronze Lead

40 (100)

Pink

Jun-Jul

 

Sarracenia purpurea

Huntsman's Horn

10 (25)

Purple

Jun

 

Saxifraga hirculus

Rockfoil

5 (12.5)

Yellow

Jul-Sep

 

Saxifraga peltata

Giant Californian Saxifrage

30 (75)

Pake Pink

May-Jun

 

Saxifraga umbrosa

London Pride

10 (25)

Pale Pink, White

May-Jun

 

Scirpus lacustris

Great Bulrush

65 (162.5)

Brown

Summer

 

Scirpus lacustris Taber-naemontani zebrinus

Porcupine Rush

36 (90)

Brown

Summer

 

Senecio clivorum

...

40-60 (100-150)

Yellow

Jul-Aug

 

Sibthorpia europaea

Money-wort

2 (5)

Yellow

Jul

 

Solidago (various)

Golden Rod

50-100 (125-250)

Yellow

Aug-Oct

 

Spiraea aruncus

Goat's Beard

50-50 (100-125)

White

Jun-Jul

 

Spiraea palmata

Meadow Sweet

24-48 (60-120)

Rose-crimson and White

Jul-Aug

 

Thalictrum (various)

Meadow Rue

6-60 (15-150)

Purple, Yellow, and White

Jun-Sep

 

Trillium (various)

American Wood Lily

6-18 (15-45)

Purple, Red, and White

May-Jul

 

Trollius (various)

Globe Flower

10-40 (25-100)

Yellw

May-Jul

 

Typha latifolia

Reed Mace

70 (175)

Brown

Late Summer

 

Typha stenophylla

Reed Mace

30-40 (75-100)

Purple-brown

Late Summer

 

Vinca major

Periwinkle

20 (50)

Blue-purple

Jun-Sep

 

Vinca minor

Periwinkle

9 (22.5)

Blue-purple

Jun-Sep

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Site design and content copyright ©October 2010. Page structure amended November 2012. Rock Plant Photos Gallery added August 2013. Topic Menu amended July 2015. This page added March 2020. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

 

Rock Plant Colour Wheel - Flowers Link Map

Click on Number in Colour Wheel or Black sections below:-

 

 

colourwheelexported1a1a1

 

 

 

Rock Garden Plant Lists of Plants Suitable for Rock, Wall and Water Gardens - How to plan and plant them including wall, paved and water gardens by A. Edwards in charge of the rock garden Kew. Published by Ward, Lock & Co. in 1929.

 

Alpine Primulas for the Rock Garden

Botanical Plant Name (Common Name)

Colour of Flowers

Time of Flowering

Height in Inches (Cms)

Site

Soil

Sun or Shade

Primula allionii tyrolensis

Pale Pink, White Eye

Mar-May

5 (12.5)

Limestone Crevice or Wall

Well-drained, Calcareous Loam and Sand

Shade

Primula auricula

Golden-Yellow

Spring

6 (15)

Vertical Limestone Crevice or Wall

Deep Calcareous, well-drained loam

Partial Shade

Primula clusiana

Violet-red, White-eye

Apr-May

8 (20)

Crevice or wall

Calcareous, Gritty Loam or Peat

Ample Sun

Primula edgeworthii (Syn. Primula Winteri)

Lilac-Blue

Feb-Mar

4-5 (10-12.5)

Sheltered Crevice with North Aspect

Deep Calcareous, well-drained Loam

Partial Shade

Primula hirsuta

Rose-Purple, White Eye

Apr-Jun

6 (15)

Crevice

Gritty, Calcareous Loam, Peat and Sand

Partial Shade

Primula farinosa (Bird's Eye Primrose)

Rose-purple, Gold Eye

May

6 (15)

Moraine, or Alpine House

Light, Rich, Turfy Loam

Sun

Primula fortunei

Pale Blue

Apr-May

4-8 (10-20)

Alpine House

Calcareous, Gritty Loam or Peat

Semi-shade

Primula glutinosa

Deep Violet-blue

May

4 (10)

Moraine

Moist, Non-calcareous, and well-drained soil with Granite. or Peat

Semi-shade

Primula intermedia

Lilac-rose

Mar-May

5 (12.5)

Moraine

Moist Loam

Shade

Primula marginata

Lavender-blue, Purple or Violet

Feb-Jun

4 (10)

Perpendicular Crevice or Alpine House

Gritty, Calcareous Loam

Sun

Primula minima

Rose-pink

May-Jun

1-2 (2.5-5)

Moraine with Granite and Limestone

Moist, well-drained, Peaty Loam

Semi-shade

Primula nivalis

White

Feb-May

6 (15)

Vertical Crevice

Loam

Partial Shade

Primula spectabilis

Lilac-rose

Mar-May

5 (12.5)

Moraine

Moist, Calcareous, Sandy Loam and Leaf-mould with ample drainage

Shade

Primula viscosa

Rosy-purple, with White Eye

Mar-Jun

6 (15)

Crevice, Alpine House, or Wall

Gritty, Non-calcareous Loam and Sand, with a little peat, if possible

Partial Shade

Primula Winteri (See Primula edgeworthii above)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Primula
"The majority of primulas thrive in rich, deep loam, and appreciate the admixture of old mortar-rubble, leaf-mould, grit, and well-decayed cow-manure with the soil; they are all moisture-lovers, but must have a well-drained soil. The majority like partial shade, unless unlimited moisture is available in hot weather.
The alpine, or rock-loving section, love a deep vertical crevice into which their roots can penetrate. Let them have ample soil in the crevice, but scarcely any up round their necks. The rains of the winter are apt to wash the soil, from the roots of those not firmly embedded in crevices, and the frosts may also raise them from the ground. In the early spring, therefore, firm the soil around the crowns of these plants, and top-dress them with sifted loam and leaf-mould.
Culture: Nearly all primulas sow themselves profusely, and some of them are biennal in character, it is advisable always to have some seed in hand. Sow the seed in pots or pans under glass as soon as ripe in May, in a compost of equal parts of loam, leaf-moulf, and sands, all sieved though a 0.5 inch (1.25 cm) mesh, and well mixed; covr thinly with fine sandy soil and keep in a temperature of 60 F (15C). The seeds, like those of many other alpines, germinate better if sown as soon as ripe. If kept until the following spring, they lose much of their vitality, and in some cases do not come up for a year or more. Prick off the seedlings 1 inch (2.5cms) apart into pans as soon as possible, and pot up singly into 3-inch (7.5 cm) pots or pans; harden off, and keep on a bed of ashes in a shaded frame; plant out in September or early October. Propagate also by means of division of roots in September or in spring.
Alpine primulas are of great value in the rock garden and the bog garden.In the preceeding list and the following, we have divided them into 2 classes:-

  • The first group thrives among the rocks in rich loam and, therefore, is admirable for the rock garden proper;
  • the second class loves a cool, moist, but well-drained soil, and is suitable for the bog or marsh garden.

Each species, however, has different minor requirements, and these are shown, as far as space will permit, in the lists referred to. Alpine primulas should be raised from seed, as described above, or increased by division of roots after flowering. Although, strictly speaking, mostly of perennial nature, alpine primulas are very prone to die off in the rock or bog gardens. A few young plants should, therefore, be raised annually from seed, as above described, to replace casualties. Many of these alpine primulas should be selected for cultivation in the Alpine House as shown in the list for Plants for the Alpine House page. These are best grown in shallow pans 4 to 5 inches (10-12.5 cms) in diameter and in a compost of 2 parts of fibrous loam to 1 part of leaf-mould, silver sand, and well-rotted manure. They should be re-potted annually after flowering. Stand in a cold frame or under a north wall in summer so as to rest them, keep fairly dry in autumn and winter, pinching off any flower buds that form; then transfer to the cool Alpine House for flowering. A little soot water may be given from time to time while the buds are forming. Discard the plants after flowering, except in the case of choice species."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alpine Primulas for the Bog Garden

Botanical Plant Name (Common Name)

Colour of Flowers

Time of Flowering

Height in Inches (Cms)

Site

Soil

Sun or Shade

Primula aurantiaca

Rich Yellow

Sep

15-20 (37.5-50)

Rock Garden or Bog Garden

Deep Loam and Leaf-Mould

Semi-Shade

Primula Beesiana

Magenta, with Yellow Eye

May

20-30 (50-75)

Bog Garden

Deep Loam and Leaf-Mould

Semi-shade

Primula bulleyana

Orange-buff

Apr-May

12-18 (30-45)

Bog Garden

Deep, Rich, Moist Loam and Leaf-Mould

Semi-shade

Primula capitata

Violet-blue

Sep-Oct

6-9 (15-22.5)

Moraine or Alpine House

Cool, Moist, but well-drained Light Loam

Semi-shade

Primula cockburniana

Orange-red

May

10 (25)

Bog Garden

Fairly rich Loam and Leaf-Soil

Semi-shade

Primula denticulata

Deep Lilac and White

Feb-Apr

12-18 (30-45)

Bog Garden or Alpine House

Deep, Rich Loam

Semi-shade

Primula frondosa

Rose-purple

Apr-May

4 (10)

Moraine

Loam and Leaf-mould

Semi-shade

Primula involucrata

Creamy-white, tinged Blue

May-Jul

8 (20)

Bog Garden

Moist, Rich Loam

Semi-shade

Primula japonica (varieties)

Various

May-Aug

12-24 (30-60)

Marsh or Bog Gaden

Deep, Moist, Rich Loam and Leaf-mould

Semi-shade

Primula Juliae

Magenta

Apr-May

4 (10)

Bog or Paved Gardens

Moist Loam, Leaf-mould and Sand

Semi-shade

Primula litttoniana

Violet

Jun-Aug

24 960)

Moraine or Bog Garden

Rich, Moist Loam and Leaf-mould

Semi-shade

Primula luteola

Sulphur-Yellow

Jul-Aug

20 (50)

Bog Garden

Cool, Deep Loam and Leaf-mould

Semi-shade

Primula pulverulenta

Crimson-maroon

Apr-May

20 (50)

Bog Garden

Deep, Moist Loam and Leaf-mould

Semi-shade

Primula rosea

Rose-carmine (Yellow Eye)

March-May

6 (15)

Water-edge or Alpine House

Deep, Moist Loam, Leaf-mould and sand

Semi-shade

Primula sikkimensis

Pale Yellow

May-Jun

20 (50)

Bog Garden

Deep, Moist Loam and Leaf-mould

Semi-shade

Primula Wardii

Lavender-pink (White Eye)

May

8 (20)

Bog Garden

Moist, Rich Loam

Semi-shade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Campanulas for the Rock Garden
* indicates species which like a mixture of gritty, peaty loam, and leaf-mould.
! indicates those requiring a sunny position.

Botanical Plant Name

Colour of Flowers

Flowering Period

Height in Inches (Cms)

Remarks

 

 

*Campanula alpina

Steel-Blue

Jul-Aug

4 (10)

Large pendant bells on short stems rising from tufts of greyish, hairy foliage. Very beautiful, but very apt to die off.

 

 

Campanula caespitosa

Blue

Jun-Jul

5 (12.5)

Easily grown. Excellent for the Wall or Paved Garden

 

 

Campanula carpaticav (varieties)

Purple, Blue, or White

May-Sep

6-12 (15-30)

Spreads rapidly. Should be grown.

 

 

Campanula cenisia

Blue

Jun

2-3 (5-7.5)

Excellent for the Miniature Rock Garden

 

 

Campanula fragilis

Blue

Summer

5 (12.5)

Easily grown. Excellent for the wall or Paved Garden

 

 

Campanula garganica

Blue, Mauve, or White

Jun-Sep

Trailing

Large, star-shaped flowers. Splendid plant for Rock Ledges, Wall, or Paved Garden, or for the Moraine

 

 

!Campanula garganica hirsuta

Pale Blue

Jul-Sep

4 (10)

A good plant for a Wall. Needs glass covering in winter.

 

 

!Campanula hostii

Blue

Jul

10 (25)

Excellent grower and very sturdy. Flowers on wiry, erect stems.

 

 

Campanula loyeii

Pale Blue

Aug-Sep

2-3 (5-7.5)

Excellent for the Miniature Rock Garden

 

 

Campanula muralis (Syn. Porten-schlagiana)

Purple-Blue

Jun-Aug

4 (10)

Large Mats of glossy foliage covered with bell-shaped flowers. Esily grown almost anywhere. Good for Wall or Paved Garden, or for rock ledge.

 

 

*Campanula pulla

Deep Violet

Jun-Sep

3 (7.5)

Large, pendant bell-shaped flowers on single stems. A lovely kind.

 

 

Campanula pulloides

Deep Vilet, Blue, or Mauve

Jun-Aug

5 (12.5)

Showy, large-flowered and easily grown. Excellent for Paved Garden or Moraine.

 

 

Campanula pucilla pumila

Pale or Deep Blue, or White

Jun-Aug

3 (7.5)

Small, pendant bells in masses. Tufted habit. Grows almost anywhere and rampages over the rocks. Excellent for Carpeting, for the Paved Garden, or for rocky crevices. Also for the Moraine.

 

 

Campanula rotundifolia (Harebell)

Blue or White

Summer

10 (25)

Suitable to almost any situation.

 

 

Campanula stansfieldii

Violet

Jun-Jul

4-5 (10-12.5)

A very beautiful plant.

 

 

*Campanula wald-steiniana

Bright Blue-mauve, White Eye

Jun-Jul

3-6 (7.5-15)

Star-like flowers on erect, wiry stems. One of the best and easiest. Grow on a wall, or in the Paved Garden, or on the Moraine.

 

 

Campanula G.F. Wilson

Deep Violet-blue, Whitish Eye

Jul-Aug

4 (10)

Flowers semi-pendant and bell-shaped. Vigorous and sreads rapidly. Suitable for almost any situation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Campanula (Bellflower)
"A comprehensive genus, including annuals, biennials, and perennials, and providing a great variety of plants for the greenhouse, border and rock garden. The species intermarry freely.
The alpine species are most delightful little plants, and quite indispensable in the rock garden. The flowers are mostly blue, purple or white in colour. These alpine campanulas rarely exceed 6 inches (15 cms) in height, and nearly all of them love an open position in sun or partial shade, doing best in rocky crevices, on walls, on the chip-strewn scree of a moraine, or in the chinks between the stones in the paved garden. They should be given a compost of well-drained, light, sandy loam with ample grit and leaf-mould. Most of these plants are lime-haters. Generally speaking, they are very easy of cultivation, but a few need special considerations. In the list above we give a selection of species that are representative, well worth having, and at the same time easy to grow:-

  • Campanula pulla does not like lime in its soil and is essentially a plant for the moraine, but it will grow in gritty leaf-mould in a chink or crevice.
  • Campanula garganica hirsuta must be protected by means of glass in winter.
  • Campanula pulla, as well as such species as Campanula alpina and Campanula pusilla, are also excellent subjects for cultivation in the Alpine House (see Plants for the Alpine House Page).
  • There are, in addition, the taller campanulas, as Campanula grandiflora, Campanula latifolia, and Campanula persicifolia, which are rather large for the small rock garden, but which may be grown in out-of-the-way corners and on the outskirts.

Culture: Most species are easily raised from seed, but many, unfortunately, do not as a rule come true to type, and are, therefore, better propagated by means of division of roots. Sow seed in gentle heat as soon as ripe, or in March, or propagate by means of division in spring or autumn."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topic -
Case Studies
...Drive Foundations
Ryegrass and turf kills plants within Roadstone and in Topsoil due to it starving and dehydrating them.
CEDAdrive creates stable drive surface and drains rain into your ground, rather than onto the public road.
8 problems caused by building house on clay or with house-wall attached to clay.
Pre-building work on polluted soil.

Companion Planting
...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants
to provide a Companion Plant to aid your selected plant or deter its pests

Garden
Construction

with ground drains
Garden Design
...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed
Borders

......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
......Camera photos of Plant supports
Garden
Maintenance

Glossary with a tomato teaching cauliflowers
Home
Library of over 1000 books
Offbeat Glossary with DuLally Bird in its flower clock.

Plants
...in Chalk
(Alkaline) Soil
......A-F1, A-F2,
......A-F3, G-L, M-R,
......M-R Roses, S-Z
...in Heavy
Clay Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...in Lime-Free
(Acid) Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...in Light
Sand Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z.
...Poisonous Plants.
...Extra Plant Pages
with its 6 Plant Selection Levels

Soil
...
Interaction between 2 Quartz Sand Grains to make soil
...
How roots of plants are in control in the soil
...
Without replacing Soil Nutrients, the soil will break up to only clay, sand or silt
...
Subsidence caused by water in Clay
...
Use water ring for trees/shrubs for first 2 years.

Tool Shed with 3 kneeling pads
Useful Data with benefits of Seaweed

 

Topic -
Plant Photo Galleries

If the plant type below has flowers, then the first gallery will include the flower thumbnail in each month of 1 of 6 or 7 flower colour comparison pages of each plant in its subsidiary galleries, as a low-level Plant Selection Process
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape



Bulb with its 7 Flower Colours per Month Comparison Pages
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus with its 40 Flower Colours
......European A-E
......European F-M
......European N-Z
......Eur Non-classified
......American A
......American B
......American C
......American D
......American E
......American F
......American G
......American H
......American I
......American J
......American K
......American L
......American M
......American N
......American O
......American P
......American Q
......American R
......American S
......American T
......American U
......American V
......American W
......American XYZ
......Ame Non-classified
......Australia - empty
......India
......Lithuania
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
...Each of the above ...Bulb Galleries has its own set of Flower Colour Pages
...Flower Shape
...Bulb Form

...Bulb Use

...Bulb in Soil


Further details on bulbs from the Infill Galleries:-
Hardy Bulbs
...Aconitum
...Allium
...Alstroemeria
...Anemone

...Amaryllis
...Anthericum
...Antholyzas
...Apios
...Arisaema
...Arum
...Asphodeline

...Asphodelus
...Belamcanda
...Bloomeria
...Brodiaea
...Bulbocodium

...Calochorti
...Cyclobothrias
...Camassia
...Colchicum
...Convallaria 
...Forcing Lily of the Valley
...Corydalis
...Crinum
...Crosmia
...Montbretia
...Crocus

...Cyclamen
...Dicentra
...Dierama
...Eranthis
...Eremurus
...Erythrnium
...Eucomis

...Fritillaria
...Funkia
...Galanthus
...Galtonia
...Gladiolus
...Hemerocallis

...Hyacinth
...Hyacinths in Pots
...Scilla
...Puschkinia
...Chionodoxa
...Chionoscilla
...Muscari

...Iris
...Kniphofia
...Lapeyrousia
...Leucojum

...Lilium
...Lilium in Pots
...Malvastrum
...Merendera
...Milla
...Narcissus
...Narcissi in Pots

...Ornithogalum
...Oxalis
...Paeonia
...Ranunculus
...Romulea
...Sanguinaria
...Sternbergia
...Schizostylis
...Tecophilaea
...Trillium

...Tulip
...Zephyranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs
...Acidanthera
...Albuca
...Alstroemeri
...Andro-stephium
...Bassers
...Boussing-aultias
...Bravoas
...Cypellas
...Dahlias
...Galaxis,
...Geissorhizas
...Hesperanthas

...Gladioli
...Ixias
...Sparaxises
...Babianas
...Morphixias
...Tritonias

...Ixiolirions
...Moraeas
...Ornithogalums
...Oxalises
...Phaedra-nassas
...Pancratiums
...Tigridias
...Zephyranthes
...Cooperias

Uses of Bulbs:-
...for Bedding
...in Windowboxes
...in Border
...naturalized in Grass
...in Bulb Frame
...in Woodland Garden
...in Rock Garden
...in Bowls
...in Alpine House
...Bulbs in Greenhouse or Stove:-
...Achimenes
...Alocasias
...Amorpho-phalluses
...Arisaemas
...Arums
...Begonias
...Bomareas
...Caladiums

...Clivias
...Colocasias
...Crinums
...Cyclamens
...Cyrtanthuses
...Eucharises
...Urceocharis
...Eurycles

...Freesias
...Gloxinias
...Haemanthus
...Hippeastrums

...Lachenalias
...Nerines
...Lycorises
...Pencratiums
...Hymenocallises
...Richardias
...Sprekelias
...Tuberoses
...Vallotas
...Watsonias
...Zephyranthes

...Plant Bedding in
......Spring

......Summer
...Bulb houseplants flowering inside House during:-
......January
......February
......March
......April
......May
......June
......July
......August
......September
......October
......November
......December
...Bulbs and other types of plant flowering during:-
......Dec-Jan
......Feb-Mar
......Apr-May
......Jun-Aug
......Sep-Oct
......Nov-Dec
...Selection of the smaller and choicer plants for the Smallest of Gardens with plant flowering during the same 6 periods as in the previous selection


Climber in
3 Sector Vertical Plant System
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evgr
...Heather Shrub
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evgr
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous
Perennial

...P -Herbaceous
...Peony
...Flower Shape
...RHS Wisley
......Mixed Border
......Other Borders
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron

Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use - page links in row 6. Rose, RHS Wisley and Other Roses rose indices on each Rose Use page
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Pruning Methods
Photo Index
R 1, 2, 3
Peter Beales Roses
RV Roger
Roses

Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable
Wild Flower and
Butterfly page links are in next row


Topic -
Butterflies in the UK mostly use native UK wildflowers.

Butterfly Species.

Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly Usage
of Plants.

Plant Usage by
Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly.

Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown Botanical Names
...Cream Common Names
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note

Poisonous
Wildflower Plants.


You know its name, use
Wild Flower Plant Index a-h, i-p, q-z.
You know which habitat it lives in, use
on
Acid Soil,
on
Calcareous
(Chalk) Soil
,
on
Marine Soil,
on
Neutral Soil,
is a
Fern,
is a
Grass,
is a
Rush, or
is a
Sedge.
You have seen its flower, use Comparison Pages containing Wild Flower Plants and Cultivated Plants in the
Colour Wheel Gallery.

Each plant named in each of the 180 Wildflower Family Pages within their 23 Galleries may have a link to:-
1) its Plant Description Page in its Common Name column in one of those Wildflower Plant Galleries and will have links,
2) to external sites to purchase the plant or seed in its Botanical Name column,
3) to see photos in its Flowering Months column and
4) to read habitat details in its Habitat Column.

WILD FLOWER FAMILY PAGE MENU
(o)Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
(o)Arrow-Grass
(o)Arum
(o)Balsam
Bamboo
(o)Barberry
(o)Bedstraw
(o)Beech
(o)Bellflower
(o)Bindweed
(o)Birch
(o)Birds-Nest
(o)Birthwort
(o)Bogbean
(o)Bog Myrtle
(o)Borage
(o)Box
(o)Broomrape
(o)Buckthorn
(o)Buddleia
(o)Bur-reed
(o)Buttercup
(o)Butterwort
(o)Cornel (Dogwood)
(o)Crowberry
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
(o)Daffodil
(o)Daisy
(o)Daisy Cudweeds
(o)Daisy Chamomiles
(o)Daisy Thistle
(o)Daisy Catsears (o)Daisy Hawkweeds
(o)Daisy Hawksbeards
(o)Daphne
(o)Diapensia
(o)Dock Bistorts
(o)Dock Sorrels
(o)Clubmoss
(o)Duckweed
(o)Eel-Grass
(o)Elm
(o)Filmy Fern
(o)Horsetail
(o)Polypody
Quillwort
(o)Royal Fern
(o)Figwort - Mulleins
(o)Figwort - Speedwells
(o)Flax
(o)Flowering-Rush
(o)Frog-bit
(o)Fumitory
(o)Gentian
(o)Geranium
(o)Glassworts
(o)Gooseberry
(o)Goosefoot
(o)Grass 1
(o)Grass 2
(o)Grass 3
(o)Grass Soft
Bromes 1

(o)Grass Soft
Bromes 2

(o)Grass Soft
Bromes 3

(o)Hazel
(o)Heath
(o)Hemp
(o)Herb-Paris
(o)Holly
(o)Honeysuckle
(o)Horned-Pondweed
(o)Hornwort
(o)Iris
(o)Ivy
(o)Jacobs Ladder
(o)Lily
(o)Lily Garlic
(o)Lime
(o)Lobelia
(o)Loosestrife
(o)Mallow
(o)Maple
(o)Mares-tail
(o)Marsh Pennywort
(o)Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
(o)Mesem-bryanthemum
(o)Mignonette
(o)Milkwort
(o)Mistletoe
(o)Moschatel
Naiad
(o)Nettle
(o)Nightshade
(o)Oleaster
(o)Olive
(o)Orchid 1
(o)Orchid 2
(o)Orchid 3
(o)Orchid 4
(o)Parnassus-Grass
(o)Peaflower
(o)Peaflower
Clover 1

(o)Peaflower
Clover 2

(o)Peaflower
Clover 3

(o)Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
(o)Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
Pipewort
(o)Pitcher-Plant
(o)Plantain
(o)Pondweed
(o)Poppy
(o)Primrose
(o)Purslane
Rannock Rush
(o)Reedmace
(o)Rockrose
(o)Rose 1
(o)Rose 2
(o)Rose 3
(o)Rose 4
(o)Rush
(o)Rush Woodrushes
(o)Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
(o)Sandalwood
(o)Saxifrage
Seaheath
(o)Sea Lavender
(o)Sedge Rush-like
(o)Sedges Carex 1
(o)Sedges Carex 2
(o)Sedges Carex 3
(o)Sedges Carex 4
(o)Spindle-Tree
(o)Spurge
(o)Stonecrop
(o)Sundew
(o)Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
(o)Teasel
(o)Thyme 1
(o)Thyme 2
(o)Umbellifer 1
(o)Umbellifer 2
(o)Valerian
(o)Verbena
(o)Violet
(o)Water Fern
(o)Waterlily
(o)Water Milfoil
(o)Water Plantain
(o)Water Starwort
Waterwort
(o)Willow
(o)Willow-Herb
(o)Wintergreen
(o)Wood-Sorrel
(o)Yam
(o)Yew


Topic -
The following is a complete hierarchical Plant Selection Process

dependent on the Garden Style chosen
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index


Topic -
Plant Selection Process comparing relevant plants of all types within each of the number of colours for each Flower or Foliage Colour Gallery.

All Flowers 53 with
...Use of Plant and
Flower Shape
- page links in next row

All Foliage 53
instead of redundant
...(All Foliage 212)


All Flowers
per Month 12


Bee instead of wind pollinated plants for hay-fever sufferers
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers
per Month
12
...Index

Rock Garden and Alpine Flowers
Rock Plant Flowers 53

...Rock Plant Photos

Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours
per Month Index

...All Plants Index


Topic -
Use of Plant in your Plant Selection Process

Plant Colour Wheel Uses
with
1. Perfect general use soil is composed of 8.3% lime, 16.6% humus, 25% clay and 50% sand, and
2. Why you are continually losing the SOIL STRUCTURE so your soil - will revert to clay, chalk, sand or silt.
Uses of Plant and Flower Shape:-
...Foliage Only
...Other than Green Foliage
...Trees in Lawn
...Trees in Small Gardens
...Wildflower Garden
...Attract Bird
...Attract Butterfly
1
, 2
...Climber on House Wall
...Climber not on House Wall
...Climber in Tree
...Rabbit-Resistant
...Woodland
...Pollution Barrier
...Part Shade
...Full Shade
...Single Flower provides Pollen for Bees
1
, 2, 3
...Ground-Cover
<60
cm
60-180cm
>180cm
...Hedge
...Wind-swept
...Covering Banks
...Patio Pot
...Edging Borders
...Back of Border
...Poisonous
...Adjacent to Water
...Bog Garden
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Winter-Flowering
...Fragrant
...Not Fragrant
...Exhibition
...Standard Plant is 'Ball on Stick'
...Upright Branches or Sword-shaped leaves
...Plant to Prevent Entry to Human or Animal
...Coastal Conditions
...Tolerant on North-facing Wall
...Cut Flower
...Potted Veg Outdoors
...Potted Veg Indoors
...Thornless
...Raised Bed Outdoors Veg
...Grow in Alkaline Soil A-F, G-L, M-R,
S-Z
...Grow in Acidic Soil
...Grow in Any Soil
...Grow in Rock Garden
...Grow Bulbs Indoors

Uses of Bedding
...Bedding Out
...Filling In
...Screen-ing
...Pots and Troughs
...Window Boxes
...Hanging Baskets
...Spring Bedding
...Summer Bedding
...Winter Bedding
...Foliage instead of Flower
...Coleus Bedding Photos for use in Public Domain 1

Uses of Bulb
...Other than Only Green Foliage
...Bedding or Mass Planting
...Ground-Cover
...Cut-Flower
...Tolerant of Shade
...In Woodland Areas
...Under-plant
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Covering Banks
...In Water
...Beside Stream or Water Garden
...Coastal Conditions
...Edging Borders
...Back of Border or Back-ground Plant
...Fragrant Flowers
...Not Fragrant Flowers
...Indoor
House-plant

...Grow in a Patio Pot
...Grow in an Alpine Trough
...Grow in an Alpine House
...Grow in Rock Garden
...Speciman Plant
...Into Native Plant Garden
...Naturalize in Grass
...Grow in Hanging Basket
...Grow in Window-box
...Grow in Green-house
...Grow in Scree
...Naturalized Plant Area
...Grow in Cottage Garden
...Attracts Butterflies
...Attracts Bees
...Resistant to Wildlife
...Bulb in Soil:-
......Chalk
......Clay
......Sand
......Lime-Free (Acid)
......Peat

Uses of Rose
...Bedding
...Climber /Pillar
...Cut-Flower
...Exhibition, Speciman
...Ground-Cover
...Grow In A Container
...Hedge
...Climber in Tree
...Woodland
...Edging Borders
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Tolerant of Shade
...Back of Border
...Adjacent to Water
...Page for rose use as ARCH ROSE, PERGOLA ROSE, COASTAL CONDITIONS ROSE, WALL ROSE, STANDARD ROSE, COVERING BANKS or THORNLESS ROSES.
...FRAGRANT ROSES
...NOT FRAGRANT ROSES


Topic -
Camera Photo Galleries showing all 4000 x 3000 pixels of each photo on your screen that you can then click and drag it to your desktop as part of a Plant Selection Process:-

RHS Garden at Wisley

Plant Supports -
When supporting plants in a bed, it is found that not only do those plants grow upwards, but also they expand their roots and footpad sideways each year. Pages
1
, 2, 3, 8, 11,
12, 13,
Plants 4, 7, 10,
Bedding Plants 5,
Plant Supports for Unknown Plants 5
,
Clematis Climbers 6,
the RHS does not appear to either follow it's own pruning advice or advice from The Pruning of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers by George E. Brown.
ISBN 0-571-11084-3 with the plants in Pages 1-7 of this folder. You can see from looking at both these resources as to whether the pruning carried out on the remainder of the plants in Pages 7-15 was correct.

Narcissus (Daffodil) 9,
Phlox Plant Supports 14, 15

Coleus Bedding Foliage Trial - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, Index

National Trust Garden at Sissinghurst Castle
Plant Supports -
Pages for Gallery 1

with Plant Supports
1, 5, 10
Plants
2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9,
11, 12
Recommended Rose Pruning Methods 13
Pages for Gallery 2
with Plant Supports
2
,
Plants 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Dry Garden of
RHS Garden at
Hyde Hall

Plants - Pages
without Plant Supports
Plants 1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Nursery of
Peter Beales Roses
Display Garden

Roses Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Nursery of
RV Roger

Roses - Pages
A1,A2,A3,A4,A5,
A6,A7,A8,A9,A10,
A11,A12,A13,A14,
B15,
B16,B17,B18,B19,
B20,
B21,B22,B23,B24,
B25,
B26,B27,B28,B29,
B30,
C31,C32,C33,C34,
C35,
C36,C37,C38,C39,
C40,
C41,CD2,D43,D44,
D45,
D46,D47,D48,D49,
E50,
E51,E52,F53,F54,
F55,
F56,F57,G58,G59,
H60,
H61,I62,K63,L64,
M65,
M66,N67,P68,P69,
P70,
R71,R72,S73,S74,
T75,
V76,Z77, 78,

Damage by Plants in Chilham Village - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4

Pavements of Funchal, Madeira
Damage to Trees - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13
for trees 1-54,
14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
for trees 55-95,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, 33, 34, 35,
36, 37,
for trees 95-133,
38, 39, 40,
41, 42, 43, 44, 45,
for trees 133-166

Chris Garnons-Williams
Work Done - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Identity of Plants
Label Problems - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11

Ron and Christine Foord - 1036 photos only inserted so far - Garden Flowers - Start Page of each Gallery
AB1 ,AN14,BA27,
CH40,CR52,DR63,
FR74,GE85,HE96,

Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens - 1187
A 1, 2, Photos - 43
B 1, Photos - 13
C 1, Photos - 35
D 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
Photos - 411
with Plants causing damage to buildings in Chilham Village and Damage to Trees in Pavements of Funchal
E 1, Photos - 21
F 1, Photos - 1
G 1, Photos - 5
H 1, Photos - 21
I 1, Photos - 8
J 1, Photos - 1
K 1, Photos - 1
L 1, Photos - 85
with Label Problems
M 1, Photos - 9
N 1, Photos - 12
O 1, Photos - 5
P 1, Photos - 54
Q 1, Photos -
R 1, 2, 3,
Photos - 229
S 1, Photos - 111
T 1, Photos - 13
U 1, Photos - 5
V 1, Photos - 4
W 1, Photos - 100
with Work Done by Chris Garnons-Williams
X 1 Photos -
Y 1, Photos -
Z 1 Photos -
Articles/Items in Ivydene Gardens - 88
Flower Colour, Num of Petals, Shape and
Plant Use of:-
Rock Garden
within linked page

 

Topic -
Fragrant Plants as a Plant Selection Process for your sense of smell:-

Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an Acid Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
1
, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3
Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves
1
, 2
Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5
Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit
1
, 2, 3
Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2
Night-scented Flowering Plants
1
, 2


Topic -
Website User Guidelines


My Gas Service Engineer found Flow and Return pipes incorrectly positioned on gas boilers and customers had refused to have positioning corrected in 2020.
 

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