List of all plants with their own page in this gallery, who do not have Plant Description Pages elsewhere:-

Photos of Each Rock Garden Plant returned to its 1 of 52 Flower Petal Colour Wheel Page
January Blooms
February Blooms
March Blooms
April Blooms
May Blooms
June Blooms
July Blooms
August Blooms
September Blooms
October Blooms
November Blooms
December Blooms
Small size Rock Garden Plants in different Flower Colours
Miniature Rock Garden Plants in different Flower Colours
Small size Rock Garden Plant flower in Month
Miniature Rock Garden Plant flower in Month
Acantholimon armenum - Violet 789 is Magenta Shift Flowers
Acantholimon echinus - Red Violet 789 is Pink Flowers
Acantholimon huetii - Red 789 is Flat Pink Flowers
Acantholimon ulicinium var. creticum - White Flowers
Aethionema schistosum - Red Violet 789 is Pink Flowers
Alectorurus yedoensis platypetala - White Flowers
Allium cernuum - White Flowers
Allium cyaneum - Blue 789 is Offwhite Blue Flowers
Allium mairon var. amabile - Red 789 is Flat Pink Flowers
Allium sikkimense (beesianum) - Blue 789 is Offwhite Blue Flowers
Anagallis monellii - Blue 56 is Blue Flowers
Aquilegia scopulorum - Blue 789 is Offwhite Blue Flowers
Arabis bryoides - White Flowers
Arenaria grandiflora - White Flowers
Arenaria montana - White Flowers
Crocus angustifolius - Yellow Orange 45 is Tangerine
Crocus medius - Blue Violet 7 is Mauve Flowers
Cyclamen africanum - Violet 789 is Magenta Shift
Cyclamen graecum - Violet 789 is Magenta Shift
Cyclamen libanoticum - Violet 789 is Magenta Shift
Cyclamen purpurascens - Violet 789 is Magenta Shift Flowers
Daphne arbuscula - Red Violet 789 is Pink Flowers
Dianthus alpinus - Red 789 is Flat Pink Flowers
Dianthus callizonus - Blue Violet 7 is Mauve Flowers
Dianthus haematocalyx subsp. pindicola - Violet 789 is Magenta Shift Flowers
Dionysia aretioides - Yellow 56 is Yellow Flowers
Draba dedeana - White Flowers
Fritillaria pudica - Yellow 56 is Yellow Flowers
Globularia incanescens - Blue 789 is Offwhite Blue Flowers
Iris histrioides 'George' - Blue Violet 34 is The Bands Flowers
Iris histrioides 'Lady Beatrix Stanley' - Blue 56 is Blue Flowers
Lewisia cotyledon 'Regenbogen' - Red Violet 56 is Process Pagenta Flowers
Narcissus bulbocodium - Yellow 56 is Yellow Flowers
Narcissus bulbocodium x romieuxii - Yellow 56 is Yellow Flowers
Petrophytum caespitosum - White Flowers
Site Map for Rock Garden Plants who do not have Plant Description Pages

Rock Plant Colour Wheel - Flowers Link Map

Click on Number in Colour Wheel or Black sections below:-

colourwheelexported1a1a1a

 

Some abbreviations have been used in compiling the list of Rock Plants for small gardens in order to make it possible to provide all the required information at a glance in a condensed form within the Rock Garden Plant Index Pages.

 

Name

First is the name of the genus to which the plant belongs which is given in capitals. Under the generic name the names of the species and varieties are recorded.

Link to photos, cultivation details or mail-order business that sells it.

Link in *** to Rock Garden Colour Wheel Page with photo of the plant at bottom of page. Then, More Photos Page links to further photos / description in its Rock Plant Photos Gallery Page. Followed by link in Return to Rock Garden Colour Wheel Page for comparison of flower photos or link in Index Page in the Rock Garden Colour Wheel Gallery for possible further description.

Suitability

Details of which container to grow the plant in:-

Type

Abbreviated to:-

  • B for Bulb
  • H for Herb - any non-woody plant that is not a tree or shrub
  • HP for Herbaceous Perennial
  • S for Shrub
  • SS for Sub-shrub

followed by

  • E for Evergreen
  • D for Deciduous

Height and Spread

The approximate height is given first in inches, followed by the approximate spread, when mature. 1 inch (") = 25.4 millimetres (mm)

Soil

The figures A, B, C and D denote that the plant in question requires one of the following soil mixtures:-

  • A. Equal parts of loam, leafmould and sand. This is a suitable mixture for plants which require a light, open, porous soil with good drainage. A good mixture for troughs in a sheltered position in part shade. All bulbs and conifers do well in this medium.
  • B. Equal parts of loam, leafmould, peat and sand. This is more retentive of water but is well-drained and will grow all the plants in this Rock Plant List which are suitable for full sun, and it is ideal for woodland plants in part shade.
  • C. Four parts leafmould and one part each of loam and sand. A soil for growing dwarf rhododendrons and other ericaceous plants in the raised bed type of trough and peat beds.
  • D. Three parts Cornish silver sand and one part flaked leafmould. For all difficult and rare high alpines, including most of the cushion type. The trough containing this mixture is best situated in part shade.

which may be followed by

  • N for when a neutral pH medium is required.
  • L for when a limey pH medum is required.

Where no additional letter is given, the plant will thrive under either condition.

Position and Protection

The following terms and abbreviations used singly or in combination will minimize the risk of planting in an unsuitable spot:-

  • C --- This means that the plant will do well planted on its side in a crevice built up on the rocks for preference.
  • P --- This plant requires a pane of glass suspended over it in winter, generally from October to the end of March.
  • PS -- A part-shady spot or facing west with protection from the south by a shadow cast by either a rock or shrub.
  • SA -- Shady position either facing north or protected by a rock.
  • Sun - This means that the plant will require a normal amount of direct sunlight.
  • W --- The plant will do well planted in a vertical position in the side of a trough or scree frame.

Flower Colour, Nearest Colour Wheel - Flowers Colour and Months of Flowering

These 3 columns are self-explanatory;
for example, Orange June, means that

  • the flowers are orange (if the plant has a Plant Description Page in this website then the link from here will be to that Plant Description Page otherwise to a Plant Description found on the Internet),
  • orange3 in the Colour Wheel - Flowers is the nearest colour for the majority of the flower petal (either from a flower image in this website or an image found on the Internet), with link to the Colour Wheel - Flowers Colour and
  • the flowering month is June with link to the flower photo on the Internet.

A double entry such as
Orange August
Red October
means that the plant has orange flowers in August and red fruits or berries in October.

Propagation

A general idea to the best method of increasing the stock:-

  • C ---- Half-ripened wood at the end of July.
  • D ----- Division.
  • GC ---- Green Cuttings in late spring.
  • L ------ Layering.
  • Leaf C - The plant is best propagated by leaf cuttings.
  • RC ----- Fully ripened wood at the end of September.
  • Root C - The plant is best propagated by cutting the thick root thongs at the end of September.
  • S ------- The best method is by seed.

may be followed by

  • H - Where this letter is placed after any of the above abbreviations, it means that bottom heat is essential to obtain a fair percentage of strikes.
    The omission of this letter does not mean that bottom heat cannot be employed; in fact, its use will certainly save an appreciable amount of time taken to increase the stock.

A combination of the above will denote that the plant can be increased by all the methods which those abbreviated letters stand for.

Propagation Seed Composts

"I am giving 3 types of composts which will be numbered 1, 2 and 3 so that they will not be confused with the potting mixtures. The number of the compost will be noted under the heading of propagation in the list of plants. These are not offered as the only types in which seedlings may be grown, but they have proved their worth over many years. As it will only be on rare occasions that a bushel of compost of any one of the seed mixtures will be required, I will give the size of the box which can be constructed easily to hold a quarter of a bushel, an amount more in keeping with the average amateur's need. The inside measurements of the box, which is best made of wood are 10 by 10 x 5.5 inches deep (25 by 25 x 13.25 cms). By doubling the depth a half bushel measure is available.

Compost 1
A mixture that has been found suitable for all the ordinary and easy types of alpine seed is the John Innes seed compost.
It can of course be mixed at home as required. Only the amount needed at the time should be made for its lasting qualities are strictly limited. All the following ingredients are mixed by bulk, not weight, and are best used dry after mixing, storing the compost for a day or 2 before use.

  • Take 2 parts of medium-heavy sterilised loam from a reliable source, full of rotted grass roots. The soil should be rubbed down between the hands into a light granular texture. All fibrous material must be retained and if large; cut into small pieces with scissors and mixed into the loam. On no account should the loam be sieved. This will spoil the texture of the finished compost and cause it to pack readily, a state of affairs to be avoided, for it is essential that the soil be open and granular in texture.
  • Add 1 part of sieved peat,
  • 1 part of Cornish sand

and well mix the whole together dry. Afterwards to this is added

  • 1.5 ounces of superphosphate of lime and
  • 0.75 ounces of chalk

to each bushel of compost. If this mixture is to be used for plants which are lime haters, the chalk should be omitted.

 

Compost 2
The more difficult and rare plants need a light, open soil in which to germinate and the following has been tried and found suitable. Equal parts by bulk of medium heavy fibrous loam and leaf-mould. Both the loam and leaf-mould should be sterilised and then rubbed down to a fine granular texture. The particles are better if small, but should not be sieved. To this is added 2 parts of Cornish sand, after sieving through a 1/16 inch sieve (2 mm) as the larger particles are not needed.

 

Compost 3
Shade-loving dwarf rhododendrons and other ericaceous and woodland plants like a more spongy yet still open medium. This consists of equal parts leaf-mould, peat and Cornish sand. The leaf-mould must be sterilised and rubbed down fine, the peat and sand should be sieved though a 1/16 inch (2 mm) sieve, and the wole well mixed together.

 

Both composts 2 and 3 need a very fine sprinkling of superphosphate of lime, just under 0.5 ounce for a a quarter of a bushel of mixture or to be more precise 3/8 of an ounce. The superphosphate is needed by the seedlings in their early growth. In fact it is essential as a plant food as soon as the seed starts to germinate, so it must be mixed with the composts, not applied afterwards. " from Collector's Alpines by Royton E. Heath published in 1964 by Collingridge Limited.

 

THE 2 EUREKA EFFECT PAGES FOR UNDERSTANDING SOIL AND HOW PLANTS INTERACT WITH IT OUT OF 15,000:-


Explanation of Structure of this Website with User Guidelines Page for those photo galleries with Photos
(of either ones I have taken myself or others which have been loaned only for use on this website from external sources)

 

or

 

when I do not have my own or ones from mail-order nursery photos , then from March 2016, if you want to start from the uppermost design levels through to your choice of cultivated and wildflower plants to change your Plant Selection Process then use the following galleries:-

  • Create and input all plants known by Amateur Gardening inserted into their Sanders' Encyclopaedia from their edition published in 1960 (originally published by them in 1895) into these
    • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery,
      then
    • Stage 2 - Infill Plants Index Gallery being the only gallery from these 7 with photos (from Wikimedia Commons) ,
      then
    • Stage 3 - All Plants Index Gallery with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2
    • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery,
    • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery with
    • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery and
    • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery
    • Unfortunately, if you want to have 100's of choices on selection of plants from 1000's of 1200 pixels wide by up to 16,300 pixels in length webpages, which you can jump to from almost any of the pages in these 7 galleries above, you have to put up with those links to those choices being on
      • the left topic menu table,
      • the header of the middle data table and on
      • the page/index menu table on the right of every page of those galleries.

 

 

I hope that you find that the information in this website is useful to you:-

I like reading and that is shown by the index in my Library, where I provide lists of books to take you between designing, maintaining or building a garden and the hierarchy of books on plants taking you from

There are the systems for choosing plants as shown in

 

Site design and content copyright ©August 2013 Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

There are other pages on Plants which bloom in each month of the year in this website:-

 

 

PAGES FOR PHOTOS OF ROCK GARDEN PLANTS WHO DO NOT HAVE THEIR OWN PLANT DESCRIPTION PAGE

Site Map

Introduction

Small size plant in Flower Colours
Miniature size plant in Flower Colours
Small Size plant flower in Month *
Miniature Size plant flower in Month

Dark Tone or Shades
(Colours mixed with Black)
Mid-Tone
(Colours mixed with Grey)
Pure Hue
(the Primary, Secondary or Tertiary Colour named)
Pastel
(Colours mixed with White)

ROCK GARDEN PLANT INDEX
(o)Rock Plant: A
(o)Rock Plant: B
(o)Rock Plant: C
(o)Rock Plant: D
(o)Rock Plant: E
(o)Rock Plant: F
(o)Rock Plant: G
(o)Rock Plant: H
(o)Rock Plant: I
(o)Rock Plant: J
(o)Rock Plant: K
(o)Rock Plant: L
(o)Rock Plant: M
(o)Rock Plant: NO
(o)Rock Plant: PQ
(o)Rock Plant: R
(o)Rock Plant: S
(o)Rock Plant: T
(o)Rock Plant: UVWXYZ

 


Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

Ivydene Gardens Photos of Rock Garden Plants Suitable for Small Gardens :
Small size Rock Garden Plants Flower in Month for Pan or Trough
 

"Flowering Seasons -
During November, December and January, an indoor garden will often produce a number of out-of-season flowers on the most unexpected species, but as a rule these 3 months can be taken as the off season, while the summer months represent the peak. In selecting Small size plants for a pan or trough, each monthly flower list is useful as it enables a preponderance of bloom at 1 season to be avoided - or achieved, if this is desired." from Miniature Alpine Gardening by Lawrence D. Hills, published by Faber and Faber in 1944:-

Plant Name for the Pan Garden with link to description

Flower Colour with link to mail-order supplier

Comments

February

Cyclamen coum

Rosy-
Pink

Rosy-pink flowers in December-March with dark green kidney-shaped leaves. It prefers part shade and a cool root run in 2 parts leaf-mould, 1 of natural peat, 1 part of sand and 1 of good loam, but not in a very dry garden.

March

Cyclamen coum

Rosy-
Pink

Same data as in February.

Morisia hypogaea

(Morisia monanthos)

Almost stemless golden Yellow

After the ring of almost stemless golden-yellow flowers are over, the fertilized empbryo seed pods are slowly thrust into the ground with such force that the plant will raise itself in the air where seed burying is prevented by hard ground. This behaviour in the drifting sands of the sea shores of Corsica and Sardinia is intended to help the colony hold together. Maltese Cross shaped flowers in March-June with dark green saw-edged leaves. Full sun on moist sandy soil with lime. For propagation; the stock plant should be dug up after flowering and a few of the smallest of the long white main roots removed. 0.5 inch (1.25 cms) sections of these should be inserted in a pan of sand, with the tops just showing above the surface, watered well and covered with a pane of glass, which should be turned night and morning to remove surplus moisture. They should be kept covered until the leaves are formed, and the ventialtion should be gradually increased. The plants will be ready for potting about 6 weeks after the cuttings are put in, and for planting on the rock garden the following spring.

Saxifraga oppositifolia 'Splendens'

Red- Purple

Grows into a mat of small snaky branches of dark green foliage with almost stemless red-purple flowers in March-April. It prefers part shade in a mixture of equal parts of sand, crock chips and mortar rubble to 3 of alpine soil. Division in the summer. More details from The Saxifrage Society.

April

Armeria caespitosa

Soft shell pink

Tightly growing clump rarely more than an inch high of dark green foliage hedgehogs about a quarter of an inch (6 mm) in diameter, in which are set almost stemless Dwarf Thrift soft shell pink flowers from March to August. Full sun and prefers a gritty and limy soil - 1 part of mortar rubble, 1 part of crock or brick dust and 2 parts of alpine soil. Propagation by careful division, retaining a supply of root with each fragment, in spring or early autumn, whenever the plant is out of bloom, or by rosette cuttings. The latter should be taken in June or July with as much brown stem as possible and great care should be exercised to avoid cutting any surrounding rosettes. The small dead leaves are removed from the base and the cuttings inserted in a well-drained pot or pan of a mixture of 2 parts sand to 1 each of crock dust and mortar rubble, and watered sparingly until struck. The young plants should remain in the pan until they are well rooted, then potted into thumb pots - about 1.5 inches (4 cms) - or the very small pots sold for cactus growing. They reach flowering size by the second spring.

Draba bruniifolia

Yellow,

Rosette of green, toothed foliage with yellow flowers in full sun or part shade and sandy soil. Height 1-2 inches (2.5-5.0 cms) and width 6-8 inches (15-20 cms).

Draba dedeana

White,

Rosette of grey-green, toothed foliage with white flowers in full sun and any alpine soil. Height 3 inches (7.5 cms) and width 4 inches (10 cms).

Gentiana verna

Sapphire- Blue

Low spreading clump of dark green leaves about 0.5 inches (1 cm) high, clustered with sapphire-blue flowers in June-July. It will grow on chalk in a pocket of equal parts of good turfy rotted loam, leaf-mould and coarse sand, in which it should remain undisturbed, as it hates being moved once it is established. When the seed vessels turn light brown, sow the seed very thinly in a pan of sandy soil at once; like all Gentians it will come up like mustard when freh, but will germinate slowly and irregularly from long packeted seed. The seedlings should be dug out with great care to avoid damaging the roots, and potted with good drainage in the growing mixture. They will be ready for planting out the spring after sowing, or the following autumn.

Morisia hypogaea

(Morisia monanthos)

Almost stemless golden Yellow

Same data as in March.

Narcissus minimus

(Narcissus asturiensis)

Pale Yellow flowers

Between 2-3 inches (5-7.5 cms) high with pale yellow flowers in April, this Daffodil prefers full sun and shelter from drying winds, in a gritty leafy soil - it will grow on chalk in a pocket of equal parts of good turfy rotted loam, leaf-mould and coarse sand. In damp places or on a heavy clay, it is inclined to vanish mysteriously as its roots are not sufficiently vigorous with stiff soils. Lift in May, when the foliage has completely died down, and replant the offsets at wider intervals, even tiny bulbs like barley grains will reach flowering size the following year. Available as decoration on plates!!

Polygala calcarea

(Polygala communis)

sky- blue

Thick round mat of wiry branches with narrow dark green leaves well sprinkled in May-June with small spikes of sky-blue flowers. Full sun on a mixture of 3 parts of ordinary alpine soil to 1 of crushed chalk - the chalk is the secret of growing healthy and free-flowering clumps. Division in spring.

Saxifraga oppositifolia 'Splendens'

Red- Purple

Same data as in March.

May

Arenaria tetraquetra

White

White flowers in May-June on a mat former with rounded dark green leaves. Prefers full sun, but will tolerate semi-shade; also chalk and drought. Dislikes damp positions, but will grow on any soil, even a peaty one, provided sand and mortar rubble are added. Propagate by splitting in spring, root in quantity from cuttings in September, or raised from seed which can be sown either as it is ripe or in March.

Armeria caespitosa

Soft shell pink

Same data as in April.

Draba bruniifolia

Yellow,

Same data as in April.

Draba dedeana

White,

Same data as in April.

Erinus alpinus

Lilac- Purple

Lilac-purple flowers in March and April on plants with dark green, blunt ended, much toothed leaves in small rosettes. Prefer sandy soil with lime, full sun, drought and to be planted where they are not damp in winter. Planting on the flat in heavy clay in partial shade, though they will grow well, merely results in them dying out in the second winter; otherwise they will last 4 or 5 years. Seed can be saved and sown in early spring and the plants bedded out direct, or sown where they are required. This method is very effective and is a suitable way of establishing them as wall, crevice, or even crazy paving plants; by merely scattering the seeds, sufficient will come up to produce a good effect and an ample supply can be gathered every year.

Gentiana verna

Sapphire- Blue

Same data as in April.

Iris lacustris - blue with orange crest

Blue

Blue with a hint of lavender and a bright gold crest flowers in May-September with 3 inch (7.5 cms) high sword-shaped narrow leaves. Remove dead blooms as seed rarely ripens in the UK. Plant in full sun and dryer area of the rock garden. They can only be propagated by careful division of the slow spreading rhizomes in July. The plant selected for propagation should be washed free from soil and sliced cleanly into sections each with a growing point, a supply of fibrous root and a minimum of 0.5 inches (1.25 cms) of rhizome. These may be potted to grow on in a suitable mixture, or replanted directly where they are required to grow. It is a good plan to sprinkle the cut end with garden lime and leave the sections exposed to the air for an hour or so for the sap to dry, if they are to be planted in the open, as a precaution against rotting.

Morisia hypogaea

(Morisia monanthos)

Almost stemless golden Yellow

Same data as in March.

Narcissus minimus

(Narcissus asturiensis)

Pale Yellow flowers

Same data as in April.

Polygala calcarea

(Polygala communis)

sky- blue

Same data as in April.

Rosa Oakington Ruby

Scarlet- Red

Not only does a 3 inch (7.5cms) high rose bush require spraying to ward off greenfly during the summer (any of the allium family growing close by willalso deter greenfly) , but it needs a pocket of good clayey loam and sand in which to thrive; equal parts loam and sand. Pruning is also necessary in early spring - a pair of nail scissors are an easier tool on this scale than a knife or secateurs - cutting hard back to a maximum of 4 eyes on the strongest shoots and 2 or less on the less vigorous, removing weak or elderly wood entirely. This drastic treatment is the only way of maintaining the vigour and dwarf habit. Propagation is from soft cuttings, using only the young smooth green or red tinted growth, in July-August. It is easy in sand and fresh plants can be raised to replace the old bushes when their rich scarlet-red fading to cherry red-pink flowering display detoriates, as it will in about 6 years.

Silene acaulis

Starry Pink

Neat inch-high evergreen pale green clump with stemless starry pink flowers in May-July. A mixture of 1 part each of coarse sand, fine crock chips, crushed slate and leaf-mould to 3 of good clayey loam, should be used for both growing and potting. Division in the autumn.

June

Alyssum serpyllifolium (Madwort)

Yellow

Prostrate snaky stems (hence the name) has small, oval, white on the undersise and grey-green above, evergreen foliage with yellow flower heads on 1 inch-high stems in June-July. It is 4 inches (10 cms) tall, 10 inches (25 cms) wide. On a pan garden, or where a plant gets too large for its space, the straggling stems may be trimmed to the base in late summer.

Arenaria purpurascens

Rosy- lilac

Starry rosy-lilac flowers on 2 inch (5 cms) stems in June-August. Pointed leaves set together in 4s on very short stems that make a flat dark green solid mound. The dead foliage in a bare brown patch in the middle may be carefully removed about April and the hole filled with fine sandy soil - 1 part sand, 1 part loam, 0.5 of fine leaf-mould and 0.5 of mortar rubble - which mixture should also be spread out over the rest of the plant. This is then worked between the stems as thoroughly as possible - there are no buds to break at this season - and the surplus brushed away; finally the clump should be watered to wash the leaves clean. Prefers full sun, but will tolerate semi-shade; also chalk and drought. Dislikes damp positions, but will grow on any soil, even a peaty one, provided sand and mortar rubble are added. Propagate by splitting in spring, root in quantity from cuttings in September, or raised from seed which can be sown either as it is ripe or in March.

Arenaria tetraquetra

White

Same data as in May.

Asperula suberosa

Pink

Pink trumpet flowers from June to August.Cobweb hair on its foliage. Full sun on a slope of 1 part each of coarse sand, fine crock chips, mortar rubble and leaf-mould to 3 of good clayey loam, should be used for both growing and potting. Top dress elderly specimen with bonemeal, spread thickly round the roots and lightly forked in during the early spring and then the plant watered. Propagation of soft cuttings in July-September; 0.75 inches long (2 cms) is the best size, half of which should be bare stem. They root readily in pure sand under a pane of glass in a frame or cold greenhouse.

Campanula arvatica

Deep Violet

Deep violet star flowers in July-August. Leaves are small, pointed and dark grey-green. 2 inches (5 cms) high, 8 inches (20 cms) across. Full sun or part shade in any soil, even a peaty sand provided mortar rubble is added, and drought and chalk bring it to perfection. Propagate from soft cuttings or division in spring. Its underground runners may also be lifted and potted.

Campanula pusilla

Pale Blue

Now Campanula cochleariifolia with pale blue flowers on 3 inch (7.5 cms) stems. The foliage forms a low pale green mat and its underground runners are the most energetic of any. If it becomes too wide-spread, it can be dug out at any time of the year without harm. It is a sun and lime lover.

Campanula pusilla alba

White

Now Campanula cochleariifolia alba with white flowers on 3 inch (7.5 cms) stems. The foliage forms a low pale green mat and its underground runners are the most energetic of any. If it becomes too wide-spread, it can be dug out at any time of the year without harm. It is a sun and lime lover.

Campanula Zoysii

Pale Blue

Mat former with pale blue bell-shaped flowers in June-August. Ring of perforated zinc about 2 inches high in the winter should deter slugs or plant in full sun on a slope. Mixture of 1 part each of mortar rubble, crock or brick dust and 2 of alpine soil. Propagation by division and by cuttings in spring.

Dianthus alpinus

Rose- Pink

Deep rose-pink flowers in July-August on 2 inch (5 cms) high and 8 inches (20 cms) across lime loving with its mortar rubble, tolerant of drought, poor soil and solid chalk plants in full sun. Dead foliage on dead section in the middle should be removed in early spring, the centre of the clump filled in with soil, working it well between the branches, and watered thoroughly with a rosed can. The shoots about 0.5 inches (1 cm) to 1 inch (2.5 cms) long are removed in July-August, and inserted into a pan of sand in a shaded cold frame.

Douglasia laevigata

Rose-pink

Shiny dark green leaves in rosettes, growing in a neat flattened mound, with bright rose-pink flower heads in May-June. Full sun on a slope of 1 part each of coarse sand, fine crock chips, mortar rubble and leaf-mould to 3 of good clayey loam, should be used for both growing and potting. Division in the autumn, or single rosettes struck as cuttings in July-August.

Erigeron uniflorus

Lavender

Very slow growing in full sun on a poor sandy soil, with mortar rubble or chalk. The plant grows a tuft about an inch (2.5cms) high with dark green spoon-shaped leaves. It has small lavender daisy flowers with yellow centres in July and August. Carefully divide the plant in the spring.

Erinus alpinus

Lilac- Purple

Same data as in May.

Erodium chamaedryoides roseum

Pale Pink veined with Dark Red

The leaves are long, bluntly pointed, greyish-green, and rather hairy; they grow in a flat rosette with starry cup-shaped flowers, pale pink veined with dark red, on 0.5 inch (1 cm) stems from early June to October. It prefers full sun, dry poor soil and lime, making it an ideal plant for chalk or sand.

Erythrea diffusa (Centaurium scilloides)

Rose- Pink

The leaves are pale glossy green, round, and grow in a low mat on thin ground-clinging stems, and the rose-pink flowers are on 2 inch (5 cms) stalks. Full sun or part shade on the lower slopes where they will not get too dry in summer or as waterside plants in the ravine garden. Soil mixture of equal parts loam, leaf-mould and sand; indifferent to lime so can grow on chalk. Sow seed in March, division of the clump in early spring, or soft cuttings about August from the tips of the winding stems. These cuttings root easily in sand in a shaded cold frame. This plant could have colonised Britain by sea (good to know about my ancestors!!)

Helianthemum alpestre

Butter- Yellow

A mat of closely interwoven branches with small dark green oval leaves with bright butter-yellow flowers in June-August. Full sun and a poor limy soil in the drier parts of the ravine or on a dry wall. Take soft wooded cuttings in September.

Iris lacustris - blue with orange crest

Blue

Same data as in May.

Iris
rubro-marginata

(Iris melitta)

Crimson shot with purple

Sword-shaped narrow green leaves edged with dull red. Rich smoky crimson shot with purple flowers in May with a second crop in August or September. Remove dead blooms as seed rarely ripens in the UK. Plant in full sun and dryer area of the rock garden. They can only be propagated by careful division of the slow spreading rhizomes in July. The plant selected for propagation should be washed free from soil and sliced cleanly into sections each with a growing point, a supply of fibrous root and a minimum of 0.5 inches (1.25 cms) of rhizome. These may be potted to grow on in a suitable mixture, or replanted directly where they are required to grow. It is a good plan to sprinkle the cut end with garden lime and leave the sections exposed to the air for an hour or so for the sap to dry, if they are to be planted in the open, as a precaution against rotting.

Micromeria piperella

(Micromeria marginata)

Pale Violet

Full sun for this miniature alpine shrub in any soil, even a peaty sand provided mortar rubble is added, and chalk brings it to perfection. Small and rounded dark green leaves are set closely against the wiry lttle stems that form a round bush from 2-3 inches (5-7.5 cms) high. Pale violet flowers in a flower spike in July-August. Propagation is from seed, which is very tiny and difficult to collect, or from cuttings of non-flowering wood in May or August.

Morisia hypogaea

(Morisia monanthos)

Almost stemless golden Yellow

Same data as in March.

Phlox douglasii

White Red

Forms an inch (2.5 cms) high mat of closely packed dark green foliage, covered in May or June with 5-petalled flowers. It prefers full sun with a mixture of 1 part each of mortar rubble, and crock dust to 3 of alpine soil. Propagate from soft non-flowering shoots in July-August, taken about an 0.5 inch long and inserted into sand in a shaded cold frame. The lowest leaves should be removed with a razor blade and the stem cut cleanly just below the joint. They go in nicely with a small dibber, stand up well after watering and are chubby little plants to go out in the spring.

Rosa Oakington Ruby

Scarlet- Red

Same data as in May.

Sedum dasyphyllum

White flowers

Very low growing mat former with blue-grey foliage in small balls thickly clustered together. The flowers are white with a pink tinge at the ends of the petals in June-July, and the total height is not more than an inch (2.5 cms). It is a useful carpeter; small pieces may be tucked into corners or crevices as it is not only capable of standing dryness but also of growing in very little soil, and that light and limy. Every fragment will root as a cutting, and it can be split and pulled to pieces whenever further plants are required.

Silene acaulis

Starry Pink

Same data as in May.

July

Alyssum serpyllifolium (Madwort)

Yellow

Same data as in June.

Arenaria purpurascens

Rosy- lilac

Same data as in June.

Asperula suberosa

Pink

Same data as in June.

Campanula arvatica

Deep Violet

Same data as in June.

Campanula pusilla

Pale Blue

Same data as in June.

Campanula pusilla alba

White

Same data as in June.

Campanula Zoysii

Pale Blue

Same data as in June.

Cassiope lycopodioides

White

Japanese shrub with small drooping white bell-shaped flowers in June-July. Dark green scales cling closely to the stem, giving the effect of a candelabra. Height of 6 inches (15 cms) and 12 inches (30 cmds) in diameter. It prefers full sun or part shade and a cool root run in 2 parts leaf-mould, 1 of natural peat, 1 part of sand and 1 of good loam, but not in chalk districts or a very dry garden. Seed capsules become hard and dry, then its seed should be sown in a pan of 3 parts sand to 1 of fine peat. This mixture should also be used for cuttings in August or in the spring, which are dipped into rooting powder.

Dianthus alpinus

Rose- Pink

Same data as in June.

Douglasia laevigata

Rose-pink

Same data as in June.

Erigeron uniflorus

Lavender

Same data as in June.

Erodium chamaedryoides roseum

Pale Pink veined with Dark Red

Same data as in June.

Erythrea diffusa (Centaurium scilloides)

Rose- Pink

Same data as in June.

Frankenia thymifolia

Soft Shell Pink

The foliage resembles that of a miniature gorse bush but with plump blunt grey-green leaves set closely round thin wiry brown barked stems that grow in a thick mat with 4-petalled soft shell pink flowers in July-September. Full sun, poor soil and lime (chalk) are its first choice. Cramped quarters with part shade and drought, improves its flowering display. Propagate using soft cuttings after flowering. These root readily in a shaded frame or even in the ground where they can be watered and shaded.

Globularia cordifolia nana

Pale Blue

Spoon-shaped, dark green leaves with pale blue flowers in July-August. Full sun and prefers a gritty and limy soil - 1 part of mortar rubble, 1 part of crock or brick dust and 2 parts of alpine soil. Division of the clumps in spring.

Helianthemum alpestre

Butter- Yellow

Same data as in June.

Hypsela longiflora - white edged dark red

(Hypsela reniformis)

Clear White edged and veined with Crimson

Spreads by underground stems from which the narrow dark green leaves thrust to the surface, resembling a thickly sown patch of germinating seeds. It is studded from July-September with almost stemless upright 5-petalled flowers, clear white edged and veined with crimson. Part shade on the lower slopes of the ravine or waterside, requiring a moist mixture of equal parts of sand, leaf-mould and loam. Division of the clump in spring.

Iris lacustris - blue with orange crest

Blue

Same data as in May.

Micromeria piperella

(Micromeria marginata)

Pale Violet

Same data as in June.

Morisia hypogaea

(Morisia monanthos)

Almost stemless golden Yellow

Same data as in March.

Rosa Oakington Ruby

Scarlet- Red

Same data as in May.

Sedum dasyphyllum

White flowers

Same data as in June.

Sempervivum arachnoideum

Light Pink

Growing to 3 inches (8 cms) tall by 12 inches (30 cms) wide, it is a rosette-forming succulent perennial, valued in cultivation for its ability to colonise hot, dry areas via offsets. Its name arachnoideum refers to its furry central rosettes, resembling spider webs. It flowers in July, with pink flowers in flat cymes on 5 inch (12 cms) stems. These offsets can be collected and rooted as cuttings in sand.

Thymus serpyllum coccineus

Reddish- Purple

Forms dense evergreen mats with reddish-purple flowers in June-July. Prefers full sun on any ordinary soil. Division is easiest method of propagation.

August

Arenaria purpurascens

Rosy- lilac

Same data as in June.

Asperula suberosa

Pink

Same data as in June.

Campanula pusilla

Pale Blue

Same data as in June.

Campanula pusilla alba

White

Same data as in June.

Campanula Zoysii

Pale Blue

Same data as in June.

Crassula sarcocaulis

Red on outside Pink within

Small grey-green red marked fleshy leaves with small bright red on the outside and pink within flowers from June-September. Use on dry and full sun slopes of a chalk garden with 1 part mortar rubble and 2 of alpine soil, and as dry as possible in winter. Cuttings of the young shoots in spring root very easily in sand but they need little water.

Dianthus alpinus

Rose- Pink

Same data as in June.

Erigeron uniflorus

Lavender

Same data as in June.

Erodium chamaedryoides roseum

Pale Pink veined with Dark Red

Same data as in June.

Erythrea diffusa (Centaurium scilloides)

Rose- Pink

Same data as in June.

Frankenia thymifolia

Soft Shell Pink

Same data as in July.

Globularia cordifolia nana

Pale Blue

Same data as in July.

Hypsela longiflora - white edged dark red

(Hypsela reniformis)

Clear White edged and veined with Crimson

Same data as in July.

Micromeria piperella

(Micromeria marginata)

Pale Violet

Same data as in June.

Raoulia australis (foliage)

Yellow- Green

Its bright silvery-white foliage clinging like moss to a rock surface is an asset to all rock gardens, with its minute yellow-green shuttlecock flowers in . It prefers full sun on the lower slopes of the rock garden in a pocket of 1 part each of leafmould and sand to 3 of soil. Division in the spring.

Rosa Oakington Ruby

Scarlet- Red

Same data as in May.

Sempervivum arachnoideum

Light Pink

Same data as in July.

Thymus serpyllum coccineus

Reddish- Purple

Same data as in July.

September

Campanula pusilla

Pale Blue

Same data as in June.

Crassula sarcocaulis

Red on outside Pink within

Same data as in August.

Cyclamen neapolitanum (Cyclamen hederifolium)

Clear Pink

Clear pink flowers from September to November. When the blooms are over, the ripening seeds turn over and over and wind their down the stem out of sight amonst the leaves. The record is 15 revolutions in 4 days on a 2 inch (5 cms) journey. These seeds are the only means of increase for all Cyclamen; they should be collected when black and sown in a mixture of 1 part each of leaf-mould, sand and loam, in a pan or box, in spring under glass - either cold frame or greenhouse.They germinate erratically, some taking as long as a year, so it is best to dig them out of the box with a label when the leaf is about the size of a sixpence (1 cm), taking care not to damage the roots. They are then planted in the same mixture and grown in a shady frame, and should reach flowering size in about 3 years. The seed should be only just covered with soil, and the young corms should be level with the ground when potted,as the only real enemy of these cheerful little plants is earth on the leaf or flower buds on top of the corm.

Cyclamen neapolitanum album (Cyclamen hederifolium album)

White

White flowers from September to November. When the blooms are over, the ripening seeds turn over and over and wind their down the stem out of sight amonst the leaves. It prefers part shade and a cool root run in 2 parts leaf-mould, 1 of natural peat, 1 part of sand and 1 of good loam, but not in a very dry garden.

Erodium chamaedryoides roseum

Pale Pink veined with Dark Red

Same data as in June.

Erythrea diffusa (Centaurium scilloides)

Rose- Pink

Same data as in June.

Frankenia thymifolia

Soft Shell Pink

Same data as in July.

Raoulia australis (foliage)

Yellow- Green

Same data as in August.

Rosa Oakington Ruby

Scarlet- Red

Same data as in May.

October

Crassula sarcocaulis

Red on outside Pink within

Same data as in August.

Cyclamen neapolitanum (Cyclamen hederifolium)

Clear Pink

Same data as in September.

Cyclamen neapolitanum album (Cyclamen hederifolium album)

White

Same data as in September.

Rosa Oakington Ruby

Scarlet- Red

Same data as in May.

November

Cyclamen neapolitanum (Cyclamen hederifolium)

Clear Pink

Same data as in September.

Cyclamen neapolitanum album (Cyclamen hederifolium album)

White

Same data as in September.

 


Topic

Case Studies
Companion Planting
Garden Construction Garden Design
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants Garden Maintenance
Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants
Soil
Tool Shed
Useful Data

........

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape

Bulb
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
Climber
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evgr
...Heather Shrub
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evgr
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
...P -Herbaceous
...RHS Wisley
...Flower Shape
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable

Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour
NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown Note
...Cream Note
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note

......

Topic - Flower/Foliage Colour Colour Wheel Galleries
Following your choice using Garden Style then that changes your Plant Selection Process
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

or
you could use these Flower Colour Wheels with number of colours

All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index
Rock Garden and Alpine Flower Colour Wheel with number of colours
Rock Plant Flowers 53

...Rock Plant
Photos
*

or
these Foliage Colour Wheels structures, which have done but until I can take the photos and I am certain of the plant label's validity, these may not progress much further

All Foliage 212

All Spring Foliage 212
All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212

or
Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index

......

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly
Usage of Plants
by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly

Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly usage of
Plant A-C
Plant C-M
Plant N-W
Butterfly usage of Plant

.......

 

 

Fragrant Plants adds the use of another of your 5 senses in your garden:-
Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves.

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark.

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil
.

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
.

Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
.

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers.

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves.

Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves.

Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers.

Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit.

Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers.

Night-scented Flowering Plants.

Scented Aquatic Plants.

Plants with Scented Fruits.

Plants with Scented Roots.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums.

Scented Cacti and Succulents.

Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell.
 

Flower Perfume Group:-

Indoloid Group.

Aminoid Group with scent - Hawthorn.

Heavy Group with scents -
Jonquil and
Lily.

Aromatic Group with scents - Almond,
Aniseed, Balsamic,
Carnation, Cinnamon, Clove,
Spicy and
Vanilla.

Violet Group.

Rose Group.

Lemon Group with scent -
Verbena.

Fruit-scented Group with scents -
Apricot,
Fruity,
Green Apple,
Orange, Pineapple,
Ripe Apple , Ripe Banana and
Ripe Plum.

Animal-scented Group with scents -
Cat,
Dog,
Ferret,
Fox,
Goat,
Human Perspiration,
Musk,
Ripe Apple and
Tom Cat.

Honey Group.

Unpleasant Smell Group with scents -
Animal,
Fetid,
Fishy,
Foxy,
Fur-like,
Garlic,
Hemlock,
Manure,
Nauseating,
Perspiration,
Petrol,
Putrid,
Rancid,
Sickly,
Skunk,
Stale Lint,
Sulphur and
Urinous.

Miscellaneous Group with scents -
Balm,
Brandy,
Cedar,
Cloying,
Cowslip,
Cucumber,
Damask Rose, Daphne,
Exotic,
Freesia,
Fur-like,
Gardenia,
Hay-like,
Heliotrope, Honeysuckle,
Hops,
Hyacinth,
Incense-like, Jasmine,
Laburnham,
Lilac,
Lily of the Valley, Meadowsweet, Mignonette,
Mint,
Mossy,
Muscat,
Muscatel,
Myrtle-like,
Newly Mown Hay, Nutmeg,
Piercing,
Primrose,
Pungent,
Resinous, Sandalwood, Sassafras,
Seductive,
Slight,
Soft,
Stephanotis,
Sulphur,
Starch,
Sweet,
Sweet-briar,
Tea-rose,
Treacle and
Very Sweet.

 

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