Ivydene Gardens Gladiolus American C Corm Gallery:
Introduction

The 10,000 cultivars are classified into 3 major groups: they are Nanus, Primulinus and Grandiflorus.

• Hybrids and cultivars in the group of Nanus bloom in early summer with two/three 22 to 35 cm spikes per corm, the spike each bearing 3 to 5 open flowers at a time.

• Those in the group of Primulinus bloom in midsummer with a single very slender 30 to 60 cm stem per corm, the stem bears 20 buds with up to 7 open at a time.

• Cultivars and hybrids from the Grandiflorus group bloom from late spring through autumn with as many as 28 buds on (usually) a single spike of usually 35 to 90 cm tall, dozen of flowers may be open at a time. Gladioli of the Grandiflorus group are classified further by flower size and color in an elaborate trinomial system, with first digit indicating size, the second indicating color and the third intensity of color. The largest Grandiflorus cultivars can get up to 1.7 metre tall, while some miniatures do not reach 90 cm in height.

From the British Gladiolus Society:-

"ALL ABOUT CLASSIFICATION OF GLADIOLUS.

For anyone interested in the Gladiolus, and particularly for those of you interested in attending and competing in Gladiolus classes in shows, you should try and acquaint yourself with the world-wide classification codes. All codes consist of 3 digits, the first of which specifies the diameter of the fully developed bottom floret of the spike, thus:-

 

1st digit of Code

Description

Width of bottom floret (inches)

x

Not usually known for non-exhibition Gladioli

Unknown

1

Miniature

Less than 2.5 Inches

2

Small

2.5-3.5 inches

3

Medium

3.5-4.5 inches

4

Large

4.5-5.5 inches

5

Giant

Over 5.5 inches

 

The second digit denotes colour (i.e. green, yellow, orange etc, 0-9) and the third digit denotes the "strength" or hue of that colour. Second digits may be (0) = Pale, (2) = Light, (4) = Medium, (6) = Deep and (8) = Very Deep. Notice that the third digits are all even numbers: even numbers indicate that the colour is without any conspicuous markings present, whereas by increasing the number by 1 to make it an odd number signifies that conspicuous markings are present. For example, Doris Darling 442 is a large flowered pale Pink bloom without distinctive markings whereas Pink Elegance 443 is a large flowered pale pink with a distinctive mark, in this case a white throat. The table below indicates how the second and third digits in the classification are used.

So to summarize, all you need to do to become reasonably proficient at recognising Gladiolus codes is to learn the floret width codes (1-5, narrowest to widest) denoted by the first digit (see table above), and below, the second digit COLOUR codes (0-9) and the third digit COLOUR STRENGTH code (0-8). Don't forget that if the third code digit is an odd number it means that the floret has distinctive markings.

2nd and 3rd digits of code

Colour and Hue

2nd and 3rd digits of code

Colour and Hue

00

White (Pale)

56

Red (Deep) ****

02

Green (Pale)

58

Black (Red)

04

Green (Medium)

60

Rose (Pale)

10

Yellow (Pale)*

62

(Rose (Light)

12

Yellow (Light)

64

(Rose (Medium)

14

Yellow (Medium)

66

Rose (Deep)

16

Yellow (Deep)

68

Black (Rose)

20

Orange (Pale) **

70

Lavender (Pale)

22

Orange (Light)

72

Lavender (Light)

24

Orange (Medium)

74

Lavender (Medium)

26

Orange (Deep)

76

Lavender (Deep)

30

Salmon (Pale)

78

Purple

32

Salmon (Light)

82

Violet (Pale Blue)

34

Salmon (Medium)

84

Violet (Medium Blue)

36

Salmon (Deep) ***

86

Violet (Deep Blue)

40

Pink (Pale)

90

Smokies (Pale Tan)

42

Pink (Light)

92

(Smokies (Light)

44

Pink (Medium)

94

Smokies (Medium)

46

Pink (Deep)

96

Smokies (Dark)

50

Red (Pale)

98

Brown

Asterisks indicate the inclusion of the following colours:- (Medium)**** *Cream **Buff ***Orange Scarlet ****Red Scarlet - 54

 

The gladioli registered by the North American Gladiolus Council can also have the following added after their classification number:-

  • All American's have AA after their class number and is the ultimate acclaim for a glad cultivar.  All American Select  (new system ) are followed by AAS after class number and is the name that has been designated to the best glads that are chosen from trial gardens across North America.

 

This can be followed by:-

  • E for Early-Flowering,
  • M for Mid-Flowering and/or
  • L for Late-Flowering Season.

For Gladiolus in The British Gladiolus Classification System, the following applies:-
"As far as the early, mid and late season bit goes it refers to an average flowering time and is very dependent on the weather and location rather than the flowering months and for the ones we are talking about ie Exhibition types we would not really be wanting blooms before the end of July so the timings below are based on planting made from April through to early June:-

Term of Blooming

Notation

Term of blooming, days

very early

VE

Under 70 days

early

E

71-79 days

early middle

EM

80-84 days

middle

M

85-90 days

late middle

LM

91-99 days

late

L

100 days or more

Usually the number of days above from a May planting in the ground the flower will actually open all of its florets but those at the base need to be removed as they die otherwise they may start to set seed pods which will take energy from the florets higher up. Usually its about 14 days from the first floret opening to when the last is out on that flower spike" from Nigel Coe.

For Gladiolus in The North American Gladiolus Council Classification System and in Russia, the following applies:-

Term of Blooming

Notation

Term of blooming, days

very early

VE

66-70 days

early

E

71-74 days

early middle

EM

75-79 days

middle

M

80-84 days

late middle

LM

85-90 days

late

L

91-100 days

very late

VL

after 100 days

from Irina of The First Acquaintance in Russia.

 

The corms can be started earlier in peat pots in frost-free conditions in a greenhouse before planting outside after the last Spring frost, if you want flowering earlier in the year.

After this the Breeders Name and Year of Introduction, and three numbers (e.g. 8;23;30):-

  • which refer to the number of florets which will stay open together (8),
  • the number of buds (23) and
  • the length of the flower spike in inches (30). This information is only given for exhibition varieties.

Instead of the Fieldheight, which is the normal height used in comparison pages for all other plants, all the Gladioli are compared throughout all the comparison galleries using their Flowerhead size.

Cultivation details are provided in the The British Gladiolus growing page."

and the North Dakota State University with the U.S. Department of Agriculture article.

How to grow Gladioli from article in The Telegraph 15 February 2008 by Sarah Raven:-

"All gladioli are easy to grow. As soon as the soil has warmed up in March or April, plant the corms 20cm (8in) deep; this is deeper than most books will tell you. I use a bulb planter but a long trowel or leek dibber will do. Secured deep in the ground, you are less likely to need a stake. Plant them about 15cm (6in) apart.

If you have bought quite a few, don't plant them all at once. Stagger their planting and you will get a better succession of flowers.

Gladioli need plenty of water to flower well. So, if you can, dig a trench and pile well-rotted manure into the base before planting. This will help feed the bulbs and will also retain water. On well-drained poorer soil, extra watering will be required.

As soon as the flowers appear and until at least three weeks after flowering, apply a high-potash feed (like Tomarite or comfrey juice) every two weeks.

This is essential on poorer soils where flowering will diminish with each successive season.

It's always said you need to lift your gladioli - that, like dahlias, they'll be frosted if left in the ground. It's my fourth year of growing them at Perch Hill and I've never lifted them. I mulch them deeply with 6-7cm (2.5in) of mushroom compost to give them an insulating duvet over their heads in late autumn. You should be safe with this in the south of England and the western fringes of the British Isles, but in colder counties, grow them in a sheltered spot and lift them for the winter when the leaves turn yellow-brown. Lift them and snap the corms from the stems. Dust with sulphur and dry them out for a couple of weeks. Then snap the new corms from the old, discarding the old. The new must be kept dry and cold (but frost-free) until they are replanted.

You can dig and divide the clumps every few years to select the best corms for replanting. Without this, the new cormlets forming will invade the space of the original corm and the nutrients will have to be shared. The risk is lots of foliage and no flower spikes."

Plant Combinations:-

The Extension Bulletin 9 December, 1916 Cornell Extension Bulletin Published by the New York State College of Agriculture at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York Gladiolus Studies - I Botany, History and Evolution of the Gladiolus states:-

"Unless used in masses, the plants are likely to appear rather spindling; but when properly planted, the bed of gladioli is one of the most showy features of summer or autumn.

The beds so used need not be for gladioi exclusively, but may have some annuals or perennials growing with them. Good combinations result from planting early in the spring a bed of white Phlox Drummondii, and later using the gladiolus 'America' between the plants; or pink phlox and the gladiolus 'Rochester White' may be combined. Especially effective is the combination of gladiolus with the summer hyacinth - Galtonia hyacinthiis candicans, the tall spikes of white bloom and the bold foliage of the latter seeming especially harmonious. No better combination is available than that which results from the planting of some corms among irises, which have leaves in perfect harmony with the gladiolus and which bloom in a widely separated season.

The stately spikes are attractive when used in large clumps of one variety among shrubbery. Care must be taken not to place the plants within the detrimental influence of large tree roots or in too much shade.

Gardeners frequently start certain good varieties in boxes or pots, and, when in full growth, transplant them in clumps to places in the border where a bit of color is needed after some other plants have failed.

Miss Andres advocates combining columbines, petunias, and gladioli, not only because of their colors, but also, and mainly, for the excellent succession of bloom provided.

Bold masses of Gladiolus primulinus hybrids are extremely effective, since their various colors blend so well. 'Blue Jay' and 'Baron Joseph Hulot' are violet and blue varieties which harmonize well with yellow varieties, such as 'Golden King' or 'Sulphur King'.

Excellent combinations have been made with roses and gladioli. The June-flowering roses are best for this purpose, since they are entirely out of season when the gladiolus is at its best."

The Extension Bulletin 9 December, 1916 Cornell Extension Bulletin Published by the New York State College of Agriculture at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York Gladiolus Studies - I Botany, History and Evolution of the Gladiolus states:-

DEPTH OF PLANTING DIFFERS WITH THE SOIL TYPE
"The depth of planting will obviously differ with the soil. The lighter the soil, the deeper the corms may be planted. Deep planting is especially successful in dry seasons, because the roots are in cool, moist soil. Usually, with deep planting, staking will be unnecessary. There is danger in deep planting in a heavy, moisture-holding soil. The soil may be too wet and may cause a rotting of the young shoots as well as the corms. If the soil is too clayey the shoots may not have strength enough to emerge, or they may be twisted, and thus made unable to produce a good, strong spike.

It is seen that many of the growers consulted prefer a sandy loam.

E. H. Cushman says that the gladiolus does equally well on any soil, if given the proper culture. The commercial grower, however, who must produce stock at a profit, will choose soil as nearly ideal as possible — in other words, a light loam.

 

FERTILIZERS AND THEIR USE
Fertilizers applied to plants are valuable in proportion to the amount of the needed plant-food that is available. Only such nutriment as is soluble can be taken into the plant, and therefore much food is locked up, or unavailable. Some fertilizers are applied for their value in unlocking, or freeing, plant-food, rather than for their actual fertilizer value.

The production of gladiolus corms is very analagous to the production of a crop of potatoes. A good standard special potato fertilizer is therefore recommended. Such a fertilizer will be rich in phosphoric acid and potash. The gladiolus is a rank grower and a gross feeder, and responds to any treatment that increases the available plant-food. Either manures or chemicals may be applied as a fertilizer, both of which are valuable in their way. The first kind, stable manure, is of prime importance, but each year it is getting more difficult to obtain this. When possible it is well to use cow, pig, sheep, or poultry manure, rather than that from the horse. It must be borne in mind that sheep manure and poultry manure are especially strong and cannot be applied too abundantly without danger of causing too great vegetative growth, watery corms, or perhaps even a burning of the whole plant. It is thought that the gladiolus is very susceptible to the presence of any manure in contact with its roots. All manure, then, should be thoroughly incorporated with the soil, rather than left in lumps. This is best accomplished by application in the autumn.

All humus-making material produces acidity when rotting in the soil. This can be easily overcome, or neutralized, by the use of lime. B. C. Auten is emphatic in his denunciation of lime. He writes: " Two years' planting upon ground limestone nearly put me out of business." Cooper (1914 c) believes that it will be necessary to use lime "rather freely where heavy applications of stable manure are made or where green manure crops are plowed under, to prevent possible excessive acidity and fungoid or scab diseases."

A method of soil treatment and enrichment is outlined by W. P. Wright substantially as follows in Popular Garden Flowers: In autumn remove the top soil and break up the subsoil, turning in a dressing of three inches of decayed manure. If the ground is very stiff, leaf mold and sand may be added. Leave the surface lumpy. In February, spread on a coat of wood ashes, with an additional quantity of bone flour, at the rate of three ounces per square yard, and fork it in. This operation will simultaneously reduce the lumps to small particles.

H. H. Groff has used the same land for fifteen years, and the only fertilizer he has needed is stable manure and hardwood ashes applied in the autumn before plowing. Hardwood ashes are rich in potash and phosphoric acid as well as in calcium.

B. C. Auten prefers dried blood and steamed bone, with a top-dressing of nitrate of soda and potassium sulfate or muriate. The fertilizer is applied in the seed drill at the bottom of the furrow. Steamed bone and bone meal are to be strongly advocated, since they possess the necessary phosphoric acid and potash.

N. L. Crawford has used an application of five hundred pounds of potassium sulfate per acre at the time of planting, and from three to five hundred pounds more in July or August.

L. M. Gage applies barnyard manure in the fall, and a complete potato fertilizer (4-7-10) in the drills at the time of planting.

S. E. Spencer places a little sheep manure in the furrow at the time of planting, and works a chemical phosphate into the soil when the buds start.

C. W. Brown has used seven cords of manure per acre in the late fall, plowing it under at once to kill the witch grass.

C. Hoeg distributes hardwood ashes at planting, and nitrate of soda two or three times during the growing season.

W. C. Bull, of Ramsgate, England, uses " stable dung dug in during the winter, and superphosphate of lime at the rate of a double handful per square yard, dusted over the surface of the soil immediately after planting."

J. L. Moore uses hen manure and stable manure once in three years. Besides this, he sows a cover crop of rye after the bulbs are dug, and plows under the green growth in the spring.

C. Betscher also seeds rye at the time of the last cultivation, the earlier the better. This he would, no doubt, plow under when in greatest growth and full of sap, for the green crop should not be allowed to get woody, thereby losing its greatest value as a humus maker.

F. C. Thomanh has used, besides sheep manure and hardwood ashes, a great deal of soot. It seems impossible to account for the freedom from disease of his 'Rochester White' gladioli in any other way than by the probability that the soot prohibits the spread of the infection.

Coleman (1914 b) writes: "We make our own fertilizer, so do not have to pay freight on ' filler.' A formula that has given us the best of satisfaction and that the Glads respond to, is represented by 50 per cent sulphate of potash, 25 per cent sulphate of ammonia and 25 per cent nitrate of soda, by weight." This is applied sparingly along the top of the row at planting.

 

TIME AND MANNER OF PLANTING
In the Northern States of America gladiolus corms may be planted in April or May, according to the season, or they may be kept until July if they do not sprout in their place of storage. They should not be planted until the danger of hard frosts is passed, although a slight frost when the shoots are still below the surface of the soil will not injure them. It is necessary to wait until the soil is somewhat dried, especially with clay soil. A corm naturally begins sending out shoots at the approach of spring, so that if the storage conditions are rather warm the corms must be planted before these growing shoots have exhausted their resources. They must be planted so as to allow the shoots to emerge readily from the soil. The shoots often grow around the corm and are difficult to manage, so that the corms need to be planted properly.

When possible a succession of bloom should be planned, the corms being planted in lots every week or ten days until July. In this way an excellent yield of blooms from a favorite variety may be obtained throughout the season.

Corms that are to be grown for rapid increase in size should be planted as early as possible, so that they may have a longer growing period and make good vegetative growth as well as mature a large corm. Seeds and cormels also need to be planted as early as possible, so that they too may have a long growing season. Soon after the base of the growing stem of the gladiolus has begun to thicken, small corms are found to have formed between the old and the new corm. These are properly called cormels. They are covered with a hard shell, thus differing from seedling gladioli of the same size, which have a covering more like a husk, composed of the dried bases of the previous season's leaves. To keep up the standard of the stock and for rapid propagation, reproduction by cormels is essential. Cormels range from one-sixteenth to three-fourths inch in diameter, and will produce corms of blooming size in a year less time than will seeds. According to the variety, thev flower in from one to four years. A single corm has been known to produce as many as two hundred cormels in a season.

Dombrain (1873) describes a method of planting individual corms for the home garden. With a trowel he digs a hole six or seven inches deep and about five inches across, and fills this hole " with a mixture of sand, powdered charcoal, and light soil in about equal proportions, so that the bulb, when it begins to start and throw out its rootlets, has a light and dry material into which to penetrate, and thus is likely to be saved from rotting, and taking care that the top of the bulb is about four inches beneath the surface." This method, although slow and laborious, might be adaptable in the planting of choice seedlings. Usually, however, for small beds the corms may be planted with a dibber, or the bed may be dug out evenly from a depth of from six to eight inches and the corms put in place and covered evenly.

The commonest commercial method is to plant in rows, the corms being placed a little more than their own diameter apart ; that is, two-inch corms are placed two and one-half or three inches apart. All bulbs over an inch in diameter are placed right side up; others are merely sown in the row as seed. B. F. White recommends setting the corms with the eyes lengthwise of the row. Many of the corms send up two or three flower stems, which will not lean over crosswise of the row as they would if the corms were planted promiscuously, for in the way suggested they help to support one another.

In large plantings the rows are frequently three feet apart. This allows for horse cultivation. The furrows are made with the plow. The fertilizer may be applied at the bottom of the furrow, which is leveled with a hand hoe. Two or three rows of corms are frequently placed in each furrow by bulb growers, since they do about as well as if planted otherwise, and, as Gage suggests, " it is surely much more economical to plant 100,000 bulbs on one acre than the same number using two acres or more."

When planted in single rows, however, the blooms usually become larger, so that for cut-flower or exhibition purposes this method is the better. "

"Immediately on receiving your parcel please open and unpack it. Strip off the outer skin and space the corms out with the buds uppermost. Put them in a clean container such as a seed tray, without any sand or compost under them, and store them uncovered in a cool, dry, frost-free place. Leave them there until you want to break their dormancy as described below.

All corms should be prepared before planting as many will still be dormant when received. The process is similar to chitting potatoes. Peel the outside skin from the corms and stand them somewhere light and warm indoors, e.g. a sunny window-sill. Do not stand them in sand, peat or soil. After a week or two, one or more shoots will emerge around the edge of the basal plate on the bottom of the corm. The corm has now broken dormancy and will grow away successfully. Planting dormant, un-peeled corms may lead to poor, late, or no growth, as will repeated plantings on the same ground and not lifting corms for winter storage. " from Great Western Gladiolus

 

Great Western Gladiolus have the following growing guides and Information Sheets:-

"3rd Edition Growing & Showing 7 Part Guide
These notes tell you all you ever wanted to know about growing gladioli well. Even if you don’t exhibit them, you will have much better flowers if you follow these suggestions.

 

INFORMATION SHEETS
Hybrid Gladioli from Seed
Hybrid Gladioli from Cormlets
Keeping Glads through the Winter
Planting Dates "

Direct access to an individual bulb description page is available:-

These gallery photographs were provided by North American Gladiolus Council.

During a visit to my doctor, I asked him, "How do you determine whether or not an older person should be put in an old age home?"

"Well," he said, "we fill up a bathtub, then we offer a teaspoon, a teacup and a bucket to the person to empty the bathtub."

"Oh, I understand," I said. "A normal person would use the bucket because it is bigger than the spoon or the teacup."

"No" he said. "A normal person would pull the plug. Do you want a bed near the window?"

.

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Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
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...Allium/ Anemone
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...Gladiolus
......European A-E
......European F-M
......European N-Z
......Eur Non-classified
......American A
......American B
......American C *
......American D
......American E
......American F
......American G
......American H
......American I
......American J
......American K
......American L
......American M
......American N
......American O
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......American S
......American T
......American U
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......American W
......American XYZ
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Odds and Sods

Rhododendron
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Top Fruit
Vegetable
Wild Flower

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly

 

GLADIOLUS AMERICAN C CORM GALLERY PAGES
Site Map of pages with content (o)

Introduction

FLORET DIAMETER
(o)1 Miniature <2.5"
(o)2 Small 2.5-3.5"
(o)3 Medium 3.5-4.5"
(o)4 Large 4.5-5.5"
(o)5 Giant >5.5"

FLOWERING SEASON
(o)VE Very Early

(o)E Early
(o)EM Early Mid
(o)M Mid
(o)LM Late Mid
(o)L Late
VL Very Late

FOLIAGE COLOUR
(o)Green

Other Colour

CULTIVAR GROUP
(o)Nanus

(o)Primulinus
(o)American Grandiflorus
(o)European Grandiflorus
(o)From Russia

SEED/CORM COLOUR
Corm

BED PICTURES
Garden

 

 

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

Click on Number in the Flower Colour Wheel below to link to that Gladiolus Flower Colour Page

gladiolicolourwheel1a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See Introduction Page for Colour Classification Code details.

00 is White (Pale)

 

Gladiolus in Gladiolus Bulb European A-E, F-M, N-Z Galleries for those classified by The British Gladiolus Society, or Non-Classified Gallery.

Nigel Coe from the British Gladioli Society has kindly let me use his photos. If a mail-order nursery from the UK is prepared to donate the use of their photos of the flower, foliage, overall plant, corm, flower arrangement, floret or award photo of any of their mail-order gladioli to this website, then more information can be provided with the existing gladioli from Europe and new ones added and compared. There are more than 600 Classified Code Gladioli in the list from the British Gladiolus Society and over 2500 in the classified list from the North American Gladiolus Council. This gallery and the other Gladioli galleries in this website were set up to detail and compare all those Gladioli.
No nursery from the UK, America, India or Australia has donated their photos from January 2012 to July 2015. I apologise that unlike the clothing industry who display their wares, that nurseries seem to only want to grow and not to inform the public about their plants for sale.

 

Gladiolus INDEX link to Corm Description Page

Flower Colour

is the Second
- Colour Code (0-9) -
and third digit
- Colour Strength (0-8)
-
of 3 digit code
and
in the Colour Wheel above
and
on the right

Flowering Months

Blue back-ground if I have found a current mail-order supplier in October 2015

FLORET DIAMETER -
Diameter of the fully developed bottom floret of the spike

1st digit of 3 digit code

Description

Width of bottom floret
 

Notation for Gladioli in UK Classification System following 3 digit code in the Flower Colour Column

Term of Blooming

Notation

Term of blooming, days

very early

VE

Under 70 days

early

E

71-79 days

early middle

EM

80-84 days

middle

M

85-90 days

late middle

LM

91-99 days

late

L

100 days or more

Notation for Gladioli in USA Classification System following 3 digit code in the Flower Colour Column
 

Term of Blooming

Notation

Term of blooming, days

very early

VE

66-70 days

early

E

71-74 days

early middle

EM

75-79 days

middle

M

80-84 days

late middle

LM

85-90 days

late

L

91-100 days

very late

VL

after 100 days


 

x

1

2

3

4

5

Not usually known for non-exhibition Gladioli

Miniature

Small

Medium

Large

Giant

Unknown Width

Less than 2.5 inches (6.25 cms)

2.5-3.5 inches (6.25- 8.75 cms)

3.5-4.5 inches (8.75- 11.25 cms)

4.5-5.5 inches (11.25- 13.75 cms)

Over 5.5 inches (13.75 cms)

Gladiolus 'Amster-dam'

White (Pale) - 500 EM

June, July, August

 

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloamsterdamrvroger1a1a1a

Gladiolus 'Atom'

Bright Red edged
Silver -
254 EM

May,
June

 

 

gladioluscflo1atomrvroger1a1a1

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Ben Venuto'

Pink (Medium) - 444 EM

June, July, August

.....

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflobenvenutorvroger1a1a1

 

Gladiolus callianthus
'Murielae'

Ivory White with Purpley-Brown centre

August, September

gladioluscflocallianthusmurielaervroger1a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

Gladiolus carneus

Light Pink with dark
Pink Spots

May, June

gladioluscflocarneusrvroger1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Carthago'

Orange-Scarlet -
456 M

June, July, August
Poland

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflo1carthagorvroger1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Charming Beauty'

Rose-Pink

June, July,
August

gladioluscflocharmingbeautyrvroger1a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Charming Lady'

Purple-Pink

June, July, August,
September, October

gladioluscflocharmingladyrvroger1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Cherry Berry'

Red (Pale) - 253 M

August

 

 

gladioluscflocherryberryncoe1a1a1

 

 

Gladiolus colvillei
'Albus'

White

June, July

gladioluscflocolvilleialbusrvroger1a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Cream
of the Crop
'

Yellow (Pale) - 310 M

August

 

 

 

gladioluscflocreamofthecropncoe1a1a1

 

 

Gladiolus 'Deciso'

Pink with Red blotch - 443 M

June

Australia

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflodecisorvroger1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Ed's Conquest'

Red (Pale) - 253 M

August

 

 

gladioluscfloedsconquestncoe1a1a1

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Elvira'

Pink with Red blotches

July, August America

gladioluscfloelvirarvroger1a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Espresso'

Red-Brown - 398 E

June, July,
August, September

 

 

 

gladioluscfloespressorvroger1a1a1

 

 

Gladiolus 'Eurovision'

Vermilion Red, White vain -
456 M

August

Australia

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloeurovisionrvroger1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Evergreen'

Green (Medium) -
404 M

June, July, August

Holland

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloevergreenrvroger1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Flevo Smile'

Yellow (Medium) -
215 M

July, August

 

 

gladioluscfloflevosmilencoe1a1a1

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Florence
Nightingale
'

Lavender (Light) -
472 LM

September

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloflorencenightingalencoe1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Friendship'

Pink with Yellow throat - 445 E

July

America

 

 

 

 

gladiolusfflofriendshiprvroger1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Golden
Melody
'

Yellow (Light) - 312 M

August

 

 

 

gladioluscflogoldenmelodyncoe1a1a1

 

 

Gladiolus 'Goldfield'

Golden-Yellow - 416 LM

September, October

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflogoldfieldrvroger1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Grand
Finale
'

Salmon-Pink with White throat - 445 M

August

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflograndfinalencoe1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Her Majesty'

Sky-Blue - 482 LM

August

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflohermajestyrvroger1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Hotline'

Rose (Deep) - 267 EM

August

 

 

gladioluscflohotlinencoe1a1a1

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Huron Fox'

Red (Deep) - 256 M

August

 

 

gladioluscflohuronfoxncoe1a1a1

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Huron Jewel'

Red with White Arrows - 356 M

August

 

 

 

gladioluscflohuronjewelncoe1a1a1

 

 

Gladiolus 'Impress-ive'

Pale Pink with deep pink markings

May, June, July, August, September

gladioluscfloimpressivervroger1a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Jayvee'

Yellow (Medium) -
214 E

July

 

 

gladioluscflojayveencoe1a1a1

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Jessica'

Salmon-Pink -
424 E

August

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflojessicarvroger1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Karen 'P' '

Scarlet-Red - 253 M

August

 

 

gladioluscflokarenpncoe1a1a1

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Lady Elenore'

Orange - 224 M

August

 

 

gladioluscfloladyelenorencoe1a1a1

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Little Jude'

Rose flecked with Gold - 263 M

July, August,
September

 

 

gladioluscflolittlejudencoe1a1a1

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Marina'

Gladiolus 'Marj 'S' '

Soft Toffee-Brown - 294 M
Pale Pink with White centre - 441 M

August


August

 

 

gladioluscflomarinancoe1a1a1

 

 

gladioluscflomarjncoe1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Mirella'

Orangey-Red -
x66

July, August

gladioluscflomirellarvroger1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Mr Chris'

Lavender - 271 EM

August

 

 

gladioluscflomrchrisncoe1a1a1

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Perth Pearl'

Creamy-White -
310 M

August

 

 

 

gladioluscfloperthpearlncoe1a1a1

 

 

Gladiolus 'Pink
Elegance
'

Pink with White
throat - 443 LM

September

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflopinkelegancencoe1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Pinnacle'

Lavender - 470 M

August

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflopinnaclencoe1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Plaisir'

Salmon - 433 EM

August

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloplaisirncoe1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Prins Claus'

White with Dark Pink markings - x01

June, July, August

gladioluscfloprinsclausrvroger1a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Raymond
'C' '

Lavender-rose with Cerise blotch - 463 EM

August

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloraymondcncoe1a1a1

 

Gladiolus 'Rose Elf'

Rose -
263 M

August

 

 

gladioluscfloroseelfncoe1a1a1

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Ruth Ann'

White -
200 M

August

 

 

gladioluscfloruthannncoe1a1a1a

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Slick Chick'

Salmon-Orange - 225 M

August

 

 

gladioluscfloslickchickncoe1a1a1

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Tesoro'

Yellow - 314 M

July, August

 

 

 

gladioluscflotesoroncoe1a1a1

 

 

Gladiolus 'Tristis'

Soft Yellow, striped
darker Yellow or Green

May, June, or October, November, December

 

 

gladioluscflotristisrvroger1a1a1a1

 

 

 

Gladiolus 'Whistle
Stop
'

Cream with Rose blotch on Yellow throat - 213 M

August

 

 

gladioluscflowhistlestopncoe1a1a1

 

 

 

Gladiolus in Autumn Bulb Gallery

Gladiolus communis
subsp. byzantinus

Deep Magenta -
x56

June, July

America
UK

gladioluscommunisbyzantinusflot9a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

Gladiolus papilio
'Butterfly'

Red and Yellow -
x25

July, August

UK

gladiolusbutterflyflot9a1a1a

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gladiolus in Gladiolus Bulb American A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, XYZ Galleries for those registered with North American Gladiolus Council pre 2008

If Peeters Enterprises Gladiolus , Pleasant Valley Glads & Dahlias , Honker Flats or other mail-order nursery from America are prepared to donate the use of their photos of the flower, foliage, overall plant, corm, flower arrangement, floret or award photo of any of their mail-order gladioli to this website, then more information can be provided with the existing gladioli from America and new ones added and compared.

 

 

 

Gladiolus in Gladiolus Bulb American A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, XYZ Galleries for those registered with North American Gladiolus Council in 2008

'After-burner'

Red -
455 LM

August

 

 

 

 

gladiolusffloafterburnernagc1a1a1

 

'Akvarel'

Pink -
543 L

August

 

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloakvarelnagc1a1a1a

'Alpen Glow'

Orange - 425 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloalpenglownagc1a1a1

 

'Anna Lynn'

Rose -
265 EM

July

 

 

gladioluscfloannalynnnagc1a1a1

 

 

 

'Ant. Peeters'

Rose -
465 EM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloantpeetersnagc1a1a1

 

'Assol'

White -
301 LM

August

 

 

 

gladioluscfloassolnagc1a1a1a

 

 

'Beauty Mark'

Yellow - 311 LM

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflobeautymarknagc1a1a1

 

 

'Blushing Blonde'

Yellow - 413 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloblushingblondenagc1a1a1

 

'Charm School'

Lavender - 375 EM

July

 

 

 

gladiolusfflocharmschoolnagc1a1a1

 

 

'Cherokee Nation'

Rose - 365 EM

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflocherokeenationnagc1a1a1

 

 

'Christmas Orchid'

Rose - 265 E

July

 

 

gladioluscflochristmasorchidnagc1a1a1

 

 

 

'Cindy B'

Lavender - 473 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflocindybnagc1a1a1

 

'Conuma'

Rose - 267 EM

July

 

 

gladioluscfloconumanagc1a1a1

 

 

 

'Cool White'

White - 200 M

July

 

 

gladioluscflocoolwhitenagc1a1a1a

 

 

 

'Court Jester'

Yellow - 215 EM

July

 

 

gladioluscflocourtjesternagc1a1a1

 

 

 

'Dymos'

Rose - 466 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflodymosnagc1a1a1

 

'Enchanted'

Smokies - 295 E

July

 

 

gladioluscfloenchantednagc1a1a1

 

 

 

'Fancy Ruffles'

Yellow - 313 LM

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflofancyrufflesnagc1a1a1

 

 

'Fragrant Lady'

Rose - 465 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflofragrantladynagc1a1a1

 

'Glad Boy'

Lavender - 474 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflogladboynagc1a1a1

 

'Goluboj Vodopad'

Violet - 584 LM

July

 

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflogolubojvodopadnagc1a1a1

'Harvest Sunset'

Orange - 325 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscfloharvestsunsetnagc1a1a1

 

 

'Huron County'

Orange - 424 EM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflohuroncountynagc1a1a1

 

'Island Sunset'

Salmon - 235 M

July

 

 

gladioluscfloislandsunsetnagc1a1a1

 

 

 

'Jupiter'

Orange - 521 LM

July

 

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflojupiternagc1a1a1

'Kiss of Rose'

Rose - 465 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflokissofrosenagc1a1a1

 

'Lava Dandy II'

Lavender - 473 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflolavadandyiinagc1a1a1

 

'Leah Carolyn'

Yellow - 315 LM

August

 

 

 

gladioluscfloleahcarolynnagc1a1a1

 

 

'Lemon Blush'

Yellow - 313 VE

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflolemonblushnagc1a1a1

 

 

'Lemon Meringue'

Yellow - 111 M

July

 

gladioluscflolemonmeringuenagc1a1a1

 

 

 

 

'Lemon Tart'

Yellow - 215 M

July

 

 

gladioluscflolemontartnagc1a1a1

 

 

 

'Light Snow'

White - 100 VE

July

 

gladioluscflolightsnownagc1a1a1a

 

 

 

 

'Merriment'

Pink - 243 EM

July

 

 

gladioluscflomerrimentnagc1a1a1

 

 

 

'Neat'

Rose - 365 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscfloneatnagc1a1a1

 

 

'Nezhnost
(tender-ness)'

Pink - 541 LM

July

 

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflonezhnostnagc1a1a1

'Noch-naya Melod-iya
(night Melody
)'

Blue - 485 LM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflonochnayamelodiyanagc1a1

 

'Nostalgie'

Rose - 363 M

July

 

 

 

gladiolusfflonostalgienagc1a1a1

 

 

'Okouzlein'

Salmon - 335 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflookouzleinnagc1a1a1

 

 

'Opal Splash'

Lavender - 171 VE

July

 

gladioluscfloopalsplashnagc1a1a1

 

 

 

 

'Orange Dart'

Orange - 127 EM

July

 

gladioluscfloorangedartnagc1a1a

 

 

 

 

'Osenni Karnaval'

Lavender - 371 L

August

 

 

 

gladioluscfloosennikarnavalnagc1a1a

 

 

'Passion'

Pink -
445 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflopassionnagc1a1a

 

'Peppi (female cat)'

Salmon - 435 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflopeppinagc1a1a

 

'Perth Silence'

Lavender - 373 LM

August

 

 

 

gladioluscfloperthsilencenagc1a1a

 

 

'Pete's Gold'

Yellow - 314 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflopetesgoldnagc1a1a

 

 

'Powerful Lady'

Salmon - 435 LM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflopowerfulladynagc1a1a

 

'Raspberry Cream'

Rose - 365 VE

July

 

 

 

gladioluscfloraspberrycreamnagc1a1a

 

 

'Red Deer'

Red - 453 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloreddeernagc1a1a

 

'Red My Mind'

Red - 354 EM

July

 

 

 

gladioluscfloredmymindnagc1a1a

 

 

'Reflection'

Pink - 345 EM

July

 

 

 

gladioluscfloreflectionnagc1a1a

 

 

'Rosy Posy'

Rose -
465 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflorosyposynagc1a1a

 

'Royalist'

Purple - 278 E

July

 

 

gladioluscfloroyalistnagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Rozovaya Fantazia
(pink fantasy)'

Rose - 462 L

August

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflorozovayafantazianagc1a1a

 

'Scrump-tious'

Salmon - 333 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscfloscrumptiousnagc1a1a

 

 

'Show-bound'

Lavender - 475 LM

August

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloshowboundnagc1a1a

 

'Show-man's Delight'

Salmon - 435 LM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloshowmansdelightnagc1a1a

 

'Slastena
(sweeten-ing)'

Smokies - 493 LM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloslastenanagc1a1a

 

'Small Star'

Green - 103 VE

July

 

gladioluscflosmallstarnagc1a1a1

 

 

 

 

'Snow Owl'

White -
400 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflosnowowlnagc1a1a1

 

'Superior Champ'

Pink -
444 LM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflosuperiorchampnagc1a1a

 

'Terry'

Orange - 525 LM

August

 

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloterrynagc1a1a

'Vivacious'

Pink -
441 LM

August

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflovivaciousnagc1a1a

 

'Volunteer'

Orange - 426 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflovolunteernagc1a1a

 

'Vosmoe Marta
(8th of March)'

Rose -
562 L

August

 

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflovosmoemartanagc1a1a

'Water-melon Wine'

Rose -
464 LM

August

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflowatermelonwinenagc1a1a

 

'Willy Wonka'

Brown - 298 EM

July

 

 

gladioluscflowillywonkanagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Wondrous'

Rose -
163 E

July

 

gladiolusfflowondrousnagc1a1a1

 

 

 

 

Gladiolus in Gladiolus Bulb American A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, XYZ Galleries for those registered with North American Gladiolus Council in 2009

'Benjamin'

Purple - 379 LM

August

 

 

 

gladioluscflobenjaminnagc1a1a

 

 

'Blazing Arrow'

Red - 454 LM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloblazingarrownagc1a1a

 

'Bold Heart'

White - 201 M

July

 

 

gladioluscfloboldheartnagc1a1a1

 

 

 

'Catharina'

Orange - 423 E

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflocatharinanagc1a1a

 

'Cheers'

Rose - 267AA M

July

 

 

gladioluscflocheersnagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Crowd Pleaser'

Lavender - 373 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflocrowdpleasernagc1a1a

 

 

'Eye Opener'

Rose - 265 EM

July

 

 

gladioluscfloeyeopenernagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Fiesta Americana'

Orange - 227 EM

July

 

 

gladioluscflofiestaamericananagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Fire Poker'

Red -
452 LM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflofirepokernagc1a1a

 

'Flower Girl'

Lavender - 175 M

July

 

gladioluscfloflowergirlnagc1a1a

 

 

 

 

'Grand Girl'

Yellow - 112 E

July

 

gladioluscflograndgirlnagc1a1a

 

 

 

 

'Heavenly Gold'

Pink -
343 EM

July

 

 

 

gladioluscfloheavenlygoldnagc1a1a

 

 

'Holy Moly'

Yellow - 213 EM

July

 

 

gladioluscfloholymolynagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Lavender Ice'

Lavender - 473 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflolavendericenagc1a1a

 

'Mercy Me'

Salmon - 235AA EM

July

 

 

gladioluscflomercymenagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Miss Midas'

Yellow - 314 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflomissmidasnagc1a1a

 

 

'Pure Poetry'

Salmon - 435 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflopurepoetrynagc1a1a

 

'Royal Touch'

Rose -
466 LM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloroyaltouchnagc1a1a

 

'Sassy'

Yellow - 515AA EM

July

 

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflosassynagc1a1a

'Secret Lady'

White -
300 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflosecretladynagc1a1a1

 

 

'Smarty Pants'

Purple - 279 EM

July

 

 

gladioluscflosmartypantsnagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Stately Lady'

Rose -
460 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflostatelyladynagc1a1a

 

'Suzanne'

Rose -
466 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflosuzannenagc1a1a

 

'Tsolum'

Orange - 222 M

July

 

 

gladioluscflotsolumnagc1a1a

 

 

 

Gladiolus in Gladiolus Bulb American A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, XYZ Galleries for those registered with North American Gladiolus Council in 2010

'Angelic'

Red - 252 M

July

 

 

gladioluscfloangelicnagc1a1a1

 

 

 

'Best Bet'

Pink -
444 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflobestbetnagc1a1a

 

'Blue Bay'

Pale Blue - 483 EM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflobluebaynagc1a1a

 

'Cool Compan-ion'

Rose -
267 M

July

 

 

gladioluscflocoolcompanionnagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Dream On'

Salmon - 233AA M

July

 

 

gladioluscflodreamonnagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Extra-vagant Eyes'

Rose -
367 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscfloextravaganteyesnagc1a1a

 

 

'Fiesta Frenzy'

Yellow - 313 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflofiestafrenzynagc1a1a

 

 

'Fragrant Art'

Rose -
363 E

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflofragrantartnagc1a1a

 

 

'Frosted Grape'

Lavender - 273 EM

July

 

 

gladioluscflofrostedgrapenagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Gussy Up'

Orange - 423 LM

August

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflogussyupnagc1a1a

 

'Huron Destiny'

Salmon - 431 EM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflohurondestinynagc1a1a

 

'Mary's Dream'

Pink -
347 LM

August

 

 

 

gladioluscflomarysdreamnagc1a1a

 

 

'Nesook'

Lavender - 273 E

July

 

 

gladioluscflonesooknagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Nimpkish'

Orange - 225 M

July

 

 

gladioluscflonimpkishnagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Rose Flash'

Rose -
463 LM

August

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloroseflashnagc1a1a

 

'Rusty Red'

Red -
452 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflorustyrednagc1a1a

 

'Teaser'

Rose -
464 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloteasernagc1a1a

 

'Warm White'

White -
200 LM

August

 

 

gladioluscflowarmwhitenagc1a1a1

 

 

 

'Wrigley'

Orange - 225 M

July

 

 

gladioluscflowrigleynagc1a1a

 

 

 

Gladiolus in Gladiolus Bulb American A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, XYZ Galleries for those registered with North American Gladiolus Council in 2011

'Babsbill'

Yellow - 412 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflobabsbillnagc1a1a1

 

'Cocka-doodle'

Red -
357 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflocockadoodlenagc1a1a

 

 

'Coral Sea'

Salmon - 433 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflocoralseanagc1a1a

 

'Cypress Creek'

Red -
152 M

July

 

gladioluscflocypresscreeknagc1a1a

 

 

 

 

'High Stakes'

Red -
353 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflohighstakesnagc1a1a

 

 

'Immac-ulate Heart'

Pink -
441 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloimmaculateheartnagc1a1a

 

'Irish Cream'

Yellow - 210 M

July

 

 

gladioluscfloirishcreamnagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Mother Nature'

Rose - 463AAS EM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflomothernaturenagc1a1a1

 

'Orange Effect'

Orange - 223 EM

July

 

 

gladioluscfloorangeeffectnagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Pepper-mint Delight'

Pink -
441 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflopeppermintdelightnagc1a1a

 

'Peta Christina'

Rose -
462 EM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflopetachristinanagc1a1a

 

'Shenan-igans'

Red -
253 M

July

 

 

gladioluscfloshenanigansnagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Solar Star'

Yellow - 315AA M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflosolarstarnagc1a1a

 

 

'Velvet Revolution'

Red -
256 E

July

 

 

gladioluscflovelvetrevolutionnagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Wowzer'

Orange - 425 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflowowzernagc1a1a

 

Gladiolus in Gladiolus Bulb American A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, XYZ Galleries for those registered with North American Gladiolus Council in 2012

'Aaralyn'

Rose -
467 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloaaralynnagc1a1a1

 

'Bald's Beauty'

Salmon - 433 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflobaldsbeautynagc1a1a1

 

'Delightful'

Rose -
463 EM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflodelightfulnagc1a1a

 

'Destiny'

Rose -
266 M

July

 

 

gladioluscflodestinynagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Ex-president'

Salmon - 235 M

July

 

 

gladioluscfloexpresidentnagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Farmer's Daughter'

Orange - 424 AAS LM

August

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflofarmersdaughternagc1a1a

 

'French Rose'

Rose -
367 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflofrenchrosenagc1a1a

 

 

'Gypsy Belle'

Rose -
466 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflogypsybellenagc1a1a1

 

'Happy Face'

Salmon - 433 AAS M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflohappyfacenagc1a1a

 

'Happy Hour'

Rose -
265 M

July

 

 

gladioluscflohappyhournagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Hendrika'

Rose -
462 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflohendrikanagc1a1a

 

'Juicy Fruit'

Salmon - 435 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflojuicyfruitnagc1a1a

 

'Lauren'

Pink -
243 M

July

 

 

gladioluscflolaurennagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Libuse'

Yellow - 413 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflolibusenagc1a1a

 

'Lyle'

Salmon - 333 L

August

 

 

 

gladioluscflolylenagc1a1a

 

 

'Magic Rose'

Red -
257 M

July

 

 

gladioluscflomagicrosenagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Natural Flame'

Yellow - 413 LM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflonaturalflamenagc1a1a

 

'Orange Ensemble'

Orange - 425 EM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloorangeensemblenagc1a1a

 

'Professor Plum'

Purple - 278 EM

July

 

 

gladioluscfloprofessorplumnagc1a1a

 

 

 

'Pulchy'

Lavender 477 EM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflopulchynagc1a1a

 

'Quiver'

White -
201 M

July

 

 

gladioluscfloquivernagc1a1a1

 

 

 

'Sacia Lynn'

Lavender - 475 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflosacialynnnagc1a1a

 

'Scarlet Starlet'

Red -
454 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscfloscarletstarletnagc1a1a

 

'Spritzer'

Rose -
363 EM

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflospritzernagc1a1a

 

 

'Tabasco Cat'

Orange - 227 E

July

 

 

gladioluscflotabascocatnagc1a1a

 

 

 

'The King's Kisses'

Lavender - 377 M

July

 

 

 

gladioluscflothekingskissesnagc1a1a

 

 

'Velvet Mistress'

Black -
458 LM

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflovelvetmistressnagc1a1a

 

'William Tell'

Lavender - 475 M

July

 

 

 

 

gladioluscflowilliamtellnagc1a1a

 

Antanas Markevieius from Lithuania has kindly allowed me to use the photos from www.geles.biz, where he sells some Russian varieties as well as his own. If you want to buy the corms to grow in Lithuania or for export to your garden in your country, please contact him prior to middle of November each year. Lithuania became independent from Russia on 11 March 1990. The gladioli that he has registered with the North American Gladiolus Council are listed and linked to his website in the Cultivar from Russia / Lithuania Page. He has very kindly stated that he will provide the flowerhead height of his gladioli, so that I can create the relevant Gladiolus Description Page and then add them to the comparison pages and then they will appear in the next row.

 

 

 

Gladiolus are grown and hybridised in Australia and when a mail-order nursery donates the photos and cultivation details together with the specific climactic conditions appertaining to the gladioli that they have hybridised, then those can be added to the row below, together with their Gladiolus Plant Description Pages and comparison pages for those that they can export to you for your own garden in Australia and perhaps other countries.

 

 

 

The Integrated Sustainable Energy and Ecological Development Association (INSEDA) is the national India organization formed by the grassroots NGOs who had been involved in the promotion of renewable energy, ecological and natural resources development programmes with special focus on the implementation of biogas development in rural areas of the country, since 1980. They have hybridised some new varieties - see Gladiolus Bulb Site Map. These Gladiolus are grown in India and if a mail-order nursery donates the photos and cultivation details together with the specific climactic conditions appertaining to the gladioli that they have hybridised, then those can be added to the row below, together with their Gladiolus Plant Description Pages and comparison pages for those that they can export to you for your own garden.

 

 

 

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

 

Site design and content copyright ©January 2012. Page structure amended November 2012. Thumbnails added to above Index October 2015. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

 

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