dahliapfloludwighelfertrvroger

Flower. Photo from R. V. Roger

Click on photo from The National Dahlia Collection

Foliage

Click on photo from Endless Summer Flower Farm

Form

Click on photos from Plant Database

Plant Name

Dahlia 'Ludwig Helfert' in NDS Group 9(d) and ADS Group 3BB Orange

Named for Dr Andreas Dahl, an 18th century Swedish botanist. The Dahlia was brought to Spain from its native Mexico in the late 1780s. Its first introduction to Britain was in 1798.

(NDS) is National Dahlia Society classified directory
and
(ADS) is American Dahlia Society current classification and handbook of dahlias

Ludwig Helfert in Group Semi-Cactus Small-flowered Orange is in The World Dahlia Directory of over 57,000 dahlias. Raised by Veelen in the Netherlands in 1978 and introduced in 1980.

Common Name

Dahlia

Soil

Well-drained Chalk and Sand with plenty of humus (after lifting the tuber, mulch with 2 inch (5 cms) depth of mown autumn leaves in the autumn to create this humus during the winter, for use by the replanted-in-the-spring-Dahlia during the Summer-Autumn)

Sun Aspect

Full Sun

Soil Moisture

Moist

Plant Type

Herbaceous Tuber

Height x Spread in inches (cms) (1 inch = 2.5 cms, 12" = 1 foot = 30 cms, 3 feet = 1 yard, 40 inches = 1 metre)

40 inches x 18 inches (100 x 45) (leave 36 inches (90 cms) between these dahlia plants)

Foliage

Dark Green

Flower Colour in Month(s). Fruit

Orange in June-November. Bloom size is 6-8 inches (15-20 cms) across.

Comment

"A good clear orange colour. Simple yet very attractive. Makes excellent cut flower. Height 80cm. Medium blooms." from R. V. Roger.

Plant 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cms) deep and 36 inches (90 cms) apart. Loved by butterflies and bees. Support with a stout stick and tie in every fortnight.
For best flowers, disbud by removing two of the three blooms at the end of each branch. Only pick dahlias in full flower. Recut the hollow stem ends under water to avoid airlocks. Cutting flowers is best done early in the morning or late in the afternoon. As dahlia buds do not open in water, cut the flowers only when completely developed.
The Culture and Care page from Verwer Dalias BV of The Netherlands who breed and grow Dahlias provides more growing information.

Cutflower. Clump-forming.

Instructions with photos for planting dahlias in a pot or tub from the International Flower Bulb Centre in Holland and from Growing Dahlias in Containers written by Barbara Jenke between 1995-2000.

Available from R. V. Roger , The National Dahlia Collection and other suppliers from the UK/Europe with suppliers from the USA

 

DAHLIA TUBER GALLERY PAGES
Site Map of pages
with content (o)


Introduction

FLOWER COLOUR
(o)Bicolour
Blue
Green
(o)Orange
(o)Pink
(o)Purple
(o)Red
(o)Unusual Colours
(o)White
(o)Yellow

FOLIAGE COLOUR
(o)Green
(o)Other Colour

FORM and USE
(o)Clump-forming

(o)Use in Pots
(o)Use for Cut-Flower
(o)Use in Bedding

NDS CLASSIFICATION GROUP
(o)1 Single-flowered
(o)2 Anemone-flowered
(o)3 Collarette
(o)4 Waterlily
(o)5 Decorative
(o)6 Ball
(o)7 Pompon
(o)8 Cactus
(o)9 Semi-Cactus
(o)10 Miscellaneous
11 Fimbriated
12 Single Orchid/Star
13 Double Orchid

ADS CLASSIFICATION GROUP
(o)1 Formal Decorative
2 Informal Decorative
(o)3 Semi-Cactus
(o)4 Straight Cactus
(o)5 Incurved Cactus
6 Laciniated
7 Ball
8 Miniature Ball
9 Pompon
10 Stellar
(o)11 Waterlily
(o)12 Peony-flowering
13 Anemone-flowered
14 Collarette
15 Single
16 Mignon Single
17 Orchid-flowering
18 Novelty Open
19 Novelty Fully Double

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7 Flower Colours per Month in Colour Wheel below in BULB, CORM, RHIZOME and TUBER GALLERY.

Click on Black or White box in Colour of Month.

BULB, CORM, RHIZOME AND TUBER INDEX - There are over 700 bulbs in the bulb galleries. The respective flower thumbnail, months of flowering, height and width, foliage thumbnail, form thumbnail use and comments are in the relevant index page below:-
(o): A
(o): B
(o): C
(o): D
(o): E
(o): F
(o): G
(o): H
(o): I
....: J
....: K
(o): L
(o): M
(o): N
(o): O
(o): P
....: Q
....: R
(o): S
(o): T
....: U
(o): V
....: W
(o): XYZ

colormonthbulb9a1a1a1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dahlia Gallery INDEX link to Tuber Description Page

Flower Colour with Flower Thumbnail

Flowering 
Months 
with Link to Flower Colour Comparison Page in that month


Clump-forming
as its form

Height x Width in inches (cms) -

1 inch = 2.5 cms,

12 inches = 1 foot = 30 cms,

36 inches = 3 feet = 1 yard = 90 cms,

40 inches = 100 cms

Seed Head Thumbnail

Foliage Colour

Tuber Use
in Pots
in Bedding
for Cut-Flower

Comments

Group 1(b). Single Dahlias - Singles

Dahlia 'Summer-time'

Pale Primrose-Yellow
with Gold centre

June, July, August,
September, October,
November

 

 

 

 

Group 2. Anemone-Flowered Dahlias

Dahlia 'Purpinka'

Deep Plum-Purple
with Purple centre

July, August

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Toto'

White
with Golden centre - small flowers

dahliacflototorvroger1a1

June, July, August,
September, October

16 inches x 12 inches (40 x 30) (leave 20-30 inches (50-75 cms) between these dahlia plants)

Dark Green

Suitable for growing in Pots and for Cut-Flower. It is exceptionally free-flowering, especially if the dead flowers are removed from this low compact plant.

Toto is in Group Anemone-Flowered in The World Dahlia Directory of over 57,000 dahlias. Introduced in 1967.

Group 3(a). Collarette Dahlias - Collarette Singles

Dahlia 'Alstergruss'

Orange-Red
with Yellow centre

June, July, August,
September, October

 

 

 

 

Group 4(a). Waterlily Dahlias - Medium-flowered

Dahlia 'Glory of
Heemstede'

Sulphur-Yellow

July, August, September, October, November

 

 

 

 

Group 4(b). Waterlily Dahlias - Small-flowered

Dahlia 'Gerrie Hoek'

Shell Pink

June, July, August,
September, October,
November

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Twilight Time'

White and Purple Blends

dahliacflotwilighttimervroger1

July, August,
September, October

40 inches x 16 inches (100 x 40) (leave 20-30 inches (50-75 cms) between these dahlia plants)

Dark Green

Cut-Flower. A leafy plant with stout stems and full heads of pale lilac flowers. It is a colour that looks equally good with pinks or blues but try it with deep reds for a challenging combination. It is tall enough to need staking if it is not to fall over in windy or wet conditions.

Twilight Time in Group Waterlily Small-flowered White and Purple Blends is in The Growing World of Dahlias of the varieties known to be available commercially in UK and parts of Europe.

Group 5(a) - Decorative Dahlias - Giant-flowered

Dahlia 'Edinburgh'

Bicoloured - Dark Red with White tips

dahliacfloedinburghrvroger1a

June, July, August

32 inches x 16 inches (80 x 40) (leave 20-30 inches (50-75 cms) between these dahlia plants)

Dark Green

128 awards between 1991 and 2005. Use for Cut-flowers and looks good with Sedum telephium subsp. maximum 'Atropur-pureum' and Amaranthus caudatus.

Bicolour of Dark Red with White tips (or Purple with White tips) in June-August. Bloom size is 10 inches (25 cms) across with very strong stems.

Dahlia 'Fleur'

Pure White with pale Yellow centre

June, July, August

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Kelvin Floodlight'

Primrose-Yellow

June, July, August

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'White Perfection'

White

June, July, August,
September, October,
November

 

 

 

 

Group 5(b) - Decorative Dahlias - Large-flowered

Dahlia 'Red/White
Fubuki

Red with White edges

July, August, September, October

 

 

 

 

Group 5(c) - Decorative Dahlias - Medium-flowered

Dahlia 'Duet'

Bicoloured - Blood-Red with White tips

dahliacfloduetrvroger1a

July, August,
September, October

42 inches x 20-30 inches (105 x 50-75) (leave 36 inches (90 cms) between these dahlia plants)

Dark Green

Long-lasting Cut-flowers and it can grow in pots. Received 783 awards between 1983 and 2007.

Bicoloured - Blood-Red with White tips in July-October. Bloom size is 6-8 inches (15-20 cms) across.

Dahlia 'Funny Face'

Bright Yellow with Red Variegation

June, July, August,
September, October,
November

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Golden Emblem'

Yellow

June, July, August

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Lilac Time'

Lilac and White Blends

June, July,
August, September,
October, November

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Rosella'

Purple

July, August,
September, October

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Smokey'

Dark Pink and White Variegated

dahliacflosmokeyrvroger1a

July, August,
September

40 inches x 24 inches (100 x 60) (leave 20-30 inches (50-75 cms) between these dahlia plants)

Dark Green

 

Dark Pink and White variegated in July-September. Bloom size is 6-8 inches (15-20 cms) across.

Dahlia 'Snow Country'

White

July, August,
September, October,
November

 

 

 

 

Group 5(d) - Decorative Dahlias - Small-flowered

Dahlia 'Abba'

Scarlet-Red

July, August,
September, October,
November

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Arabian Night'

Dark Red

July, August,
September, October,
November

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Arnhem'

Bright Red

July, August,
September, October

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Canary Fubuki'

Decasplit Soft Yellow fading to light Lemon Yellow

July, August,
September, October

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Christine'

Bright Pink
with a light centre

July, August,
September, October

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Claudette'

Bright Lilac-Purple

June, July,
August, September

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Cobra'

Rusty-Orange, paler
on outer petals,
Red reverse

June, July, August,
September, October,
November

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'El Paso'

Pink and
Yellow Blends

June, July, August,
September, October,
November

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Gallery
Vincent
'

Yellow and Orange
Blends

dahliapflogalleryvincentrvroger1a1a

June, July, August,
September, October,
November

11 inches x 20-30 inches ( 28 x 50-75) (leave 20-30 inches (50-75 cms) between these dahlia plants)

Dark Green

Hot orange, good for Bedding.

Well-drained Chalk and Sand with plenty of humus (after lifting the tuber, mulch with 2 inch (5 cms) depth of mown autumn leaves in the autumn to create this humus during the winter, for use by the replanted-in-the-spring-Dahlia during the Summer-Autumn. Hardiness Zone: 8,9,10)

Dahlia 'Sisa'

Yellow

July, August,
September, October

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Wittem'

White and Pink
Blends

dahliacflowittemrvroger1a

June, July, August,
September, October,
November

22 inches x 20 inches ( 55 x 50) (leave 20-30 inches (50-75 cms) between these dahlia plants)

Dark Green

Bedding plant.

White and Pink Blends in June-November. Bloom size is 4-6 inches (10-15 cms) across.

Group 5(e) - Decorative Dahlias - Miniature-flowered

Dahlia 'Gallery
Cezanne
'

Yellow

June, July, August,
September, October,
November

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Little Tiger'

Bicolour of Red
with White tips

dahliacflolittletigerrvroger1a

June, July, August,
September, October,
November

18 inches x 12-16 inches (45 x 30-40) (leave 20-30 inches (50-75 cms) between these dahlia plants)

Dark Green

Cut-Flower. Upright and Clump-forming form. Sow seeds from March to May. Perfect for a window-box garden.

Bicolour flowers of Red with White tips in June-November. Bloom size is less than 4 inches (10 cms) across.

Group 6(b) - Ball Dahlias - Miniature Ball

Dahlia 'Orange Nugget'

Orange

dahliacfloorangenuggetrvroger1

July, August,
September, October

16-20 inches x 20 inches (40-50 x 50) (leave 20-30 inches (50-75 cms) between these dahlia plants)

Dark Green

Plant 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cms) deep and 12-18 inches (30-45 cms) apart. Loved by butterflies and bees. Support with a stout stick and tie in every fortnight.

Orange in July-October. Bloom size is 2-4 inches (5-10 cms) across.

Dahlia 'Stolze
von Berlin
'

Lilac-Pink

June, July, August,
September, October, November

 

 

 

 

Group 7 - Pompon Dahlias

Dahlia 'Golden
Sceptre
'

Canary-Yellow

July, August,
September, October

 

 

 

 

Group 8(c) - Cactus Medium-flowered

Dahlia 'Garden
Princess
'

Yellow and Pink
Blends

dahliapflogardenprincessrvroger1a

June, July, August,
September, October, November

18-24 inches x 18-24 inches (45-60 x 45-60) (leave 20-30 inches (50-75 cms) between these dahlia plants)

Medium Green

Cut-Flower. Suitable for zones 8, 9, 10 with the map on Brent and Becky's Page showing the relevant suitable parts of America in purple, otherwise put in Pot and take pot into frost free conditions from the first frost in the Autumn till 10 days before the last expected frost next Spring.

Yellow and Pink Blends in June-November. Bloom size is up to 4 inches (10 cms) across.

Dahlia 'Nuit d'Ete'

Dark Red

July, August,
September, October

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Orfeo'

Purple and
Raspberry

June, July, August,
September, October, November

 

 

 

 

Group 8(d) - Cactus - Small-flowered

Dahlia 'Playa Blanca'

White

August, September,
October

 

 

 

 

Group 9(b) - Semi-Cactus Dahlias - Large-flowered

Dahlia 'Colour Spectacle'

Bright Orange
with White tips

July, August,
September, October,
November

 

 

 

 

Group 9(d) - Semi-Cactus Dahlias - Small-flowered

Dahlia 'Extase'

Pink and Yellow
Blends

June, July, August,
September, October, November

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Hayley Jane'

White and Purple
Bicoloured

dahliacflohayleyjanervroger1

August, September,
October, November

48 inches x 20-30 inches (120 x 50-75) (leave 36 inches (90 cms) between these dahlia plants)

Dark Green

White flowers with bright lilac-pink tips to the petals. Excellent as cut flower.
Great for bouquets. Clumping-form. Its regal height makes it perfect for the back of the border. Hardiness zones 8, 9, 10.

White and Purple Bicoloured in August-November. Bloom size is 6 inches (15 cms) across.

Dahlia 'Ludwig
Helfert
'

Orange

June, July, August,
September, October, November

 

 

 

 

Group 9(e) - Semi-Cactus Dahlias -Miniature-flowered

Dahlia 'Autumn Fairy'

Soft Orange, Bronze at the centre

July, August,
September, October

 

 

 

 

Dahlia 'Munchen'

Sunshine-Yellow

June, July, August

 

 

 

 

Group 10PE(c) - Miscellaneous Dahlias - Small-flowered

Dahlia 'Bishop of Llandaff'

Rich Red

July, August,
September

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Site design and content copyright ©December 2011. Page structure amended November 2012. Menus amended July 2015. Dahlia Tuber Pages Menu Table changed May 2017. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

Plant 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cms) deep and 20-30 inches (50-75) cms) apart. Loved by butterflies and bees.
For best flowers, disbud by removing two of the three blooms at the end of each branch. Only pick dahlias in full flower. Recut the hollow stem ends under water to avoid airlocks. Cutting flowers is best done early in the morning or late in the afternoon. As dahlia buds do not open in water, cut the flowers only when completely developed.
 

Instructions with photos for planting dahlias in a pot or tub from the International Flower Bulb Centre in Holland and from Growing Dahlias in Containers written by Barbara Jenke between 1995-2000.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group classification and formation from the Royal Horticultural Society - Formed through consultation with the national societies or overseeing bodies for dahlias of the Netherlands, the UK and the USA (type abreviation used in World Directory of Dahlias Last Updated January 24th, 2010 and type abbreviation in 2008 ADS Classification and Handbook of Dahlias ):-

 

Group 1 SINGLE-FLOWERED dahlias Sing
Single-flowered dahlias have blooms with a single outer ring of florets, which may overlap, the centre forming a disc.

  • (a). Show Singles. Flower heads not more than 3 inches across, 8 (only) rays, smooth, somewhat recurved at the tips, overlapping to form perfectly round flower. Show
  • (b). Singles. Flower heads with rays not so completely over-lapping as in (a), tips separated.
  • (c). Mignon Dahlias. Flower heads as in (b), however, plants not more than 18 inches high.

 

Group 2 ANEMONE-FLOWERED dahlias Anem
Anemone-flowered dahlias have blooms with one or more outer rings of generally flattened ray florets surrounding a dense group of tubular florets, which are longer than the disc florets in Single-flowered dahlias, and showing no disc.

 

Group 3 COLLARETTE dahlias Col
Collarette dahlias have blooms with a single outer ring of generally flat ray florets, which may overlap, with a ring of small florets (the Collar), the centre forming a disc.

  • (a). Collarette Singles. Flower heads with single series of rays and one collarette with yellow disk.
  • (b). Collarette Peony-flowered. Flower heads with 2 or 3 series of rays and collars and yellow disk.
  • (c). Collarette Decorative. Similar to (b) but fully double.

 

Group 4 WATERLILY dahlias WL
Waterlily dahlias have fully double blooms characterised by broad and generally sparse ray florets, which are straight or slightly involute along their length giving the flower a shallow appearance. The depth should be less than half the diameter of the bloom.

  • (a) Medium-flowered – usually between 150mm (6in) and 200mm (8in) in diameter MWL
  • (b) Small-flowered – usually between 100mm (4in) and 150mm (6in) in diameter SWL
  • (c) Miniature-flowered – not usually exceeding 100mm (4in) in diameter MinWL

Group classification and formation from the Royal Horticultural Society...continued

Group 5 DECORATIVE dahlias
Decorative dahlias have fully double blooms showing no disc. The ray florets are generally broad and flat and may be involute for no more than 75% of their length (longitudinal axis), or slightly twisted and usually bluntly pointed.

  • (a) Giant-flowered – usually exceeding 250mm (10in) in diameter GD
  • (b) Large-flowered – usually between 200mm (8in) and 250mm (10in) in diameter LD
  • (c) Medium-flowered – usually between 150mm (6in) and 200mm (8in) in diameter MD
  • (d) Small-flowered – usually between 100mm (4in) and 150mm (6in) in diameter SD
  • (e) Miniature-flowered – not usually exceeding 100mm (4in) in diameter MinD

 

Group 6 BALL dahlias
Ball dahlias have fully double blooms, which are ball-shaped or slightly flattened. The ray florets are blunt or rounded at the tips, with margins spirally arranged and involute for at least 75% of the length of the florets.

  • (a) Small Ball dahlias – usually between 100mm (4in) and 150mm (6in) in diameter SBa
  • (b) Miniature Ball dahlias – usually between 50mm (2in) and 100mm (4in) in diameter MinBa

 

Group 7 POMPON dahlias Pom
Pompon dahlias have fully double, spherical blooms of miniature size, with florets involute for the whole of their length (longitudinal axis).

  • Pompon dahlias – not exceeding 50mm (2in) in diameter SPom

 

Group 8 CACTUS dahlias
Cactus dahlias have fully double blooms, the ray florets are usually pointed, the majority narrow and revolute for more than 50% or more of their length (longitudinal axis) and either straight or incurving.

  • (a) Giant-flowered – usually exceeding 250mm (10in) in diameter GC
  • (b) Large-flowered – usually between 200mm (8in) and 250mm (10in) in diameter LC
  • (c) Medium-flowered – usually between 150mm (6in) and 200mm (8in) in diameter MC
  • (d) Small-flowered – usually between 100mm (4in) and 150mm (6in) in diameter SC
  • (e) Miniature-flowered – not usually exceeding 100mm (4in) in diameter MinC

 

Group 9 SEMI-CACTUS dahlias
Semi-cactus dahlias have fully double blooms; the ray florets are usually pointed and revolute for more than 25% of their length and less than 50% of their length (longitudinal axis), broad at base and either straight or incurving.

  • (a) Giant-flowered – usually exceeding 250mm (10in) in diameter GSC
  • (b) Large-flowered – usually between 200mm (8in) and 250mm (10in) in diameter LSC
  • (c) Medium-flowered – usually between 150mm (6in) and 200mm (8in) in diameter MSC
  • (d) Small-flowered – usually between 100mm (4in) and 150mm (6in) in diameter SSC
  • (e) Miniature-flowered – not usually exceeding 100mm (4in) in diameter MinSC

 

Group 10 MISCELLANEOUS dahlias Misc for Miscellaneous
Miscellaneous dahlias are any dahlias which do not fall into one of the listed groups, such as
Peony-flowered dahlias. Peony-flowered dahlia flower heads with 2 or 3 series of ray-florets and central disk.

  • (a). Large Peony-flowered. Flower heads more than 7 inches across. Paeony
  • (b). Medium Peony-flowered. Flower heads from 5-7 inches across. Paeony
  • (c). Small Peony- flowered. Flower heads less than 5 inches across. Paeony
  • (d). Dwarf Peony-flowered. Plants not more than 30 inches high. Paeony

 

Sub-Classification of Group 11 FIMBRIATED dahlias Fim or f
Fimbriated dahlias have blooms where ray florets should be evenly split or notched into two or more divisions, uniformly throughout the bloom to create a fringed overall effect. The petals may be flat, involute, revolute, straight, incurving or twisted. These can occur in any of the other 12 Groups, so the other group identity - like SSC for Small-Flowered Semi-Cactus - is identified first followed by (Fim) in another column to indicate this further sub-classification.

  • (a) Giant-flowered – usually exceeding 250mm (10in) in diameter
  • (b) Large-flowered – usually between 200mm (8in) and 250mm (10in) in diameter
  • (c) Medium-flowered – usually between 150mm (6in) and 200mm (8in) in diameter
  • (d) Small-flowered – usually between 100mm (4in) and 150mm (6in) in diameter
  • (e) Miniature-flowered – not usually exceeding 100mm (4in) in diameter

 

International Dahlia Register (1969) 20th Supplement:-

Group 12 SINGLE ORCHID and SINGLE STAR dahlias
Single Orchid or Star dahlias have blooms with a single outer ring of florets surrounding the disc. Ray florets are uniformly either involute or revolute. Orc
Single Star dahlias have
flower heads small, with 2 or 3 series of slightly pointed rays, barely overlapping or not overlapping at all at their more-or-less recurving margins, forming cup-shaped flower head with disk. star

 

Group 13 DOUBLE ORCHID dahlias Dou.Orc

Double orchid dahlias have fully double blooms, showing no disc, that have triangular centres. Ray florets are narrowly lanceolate and either involute or revolute.

 

 

Groups and sizes
Certain groups have been subdivided and these, with their relative sizes, are given below.

Waterlily dahlias (Group 4), Decorative dahlias (Group 5), Cactus dahlias (Group 8), Semi-cactus dahlias (Group 9) and Fimbriated dahlias (Group 11):-

  • (a) Giant-flowered – usually exceeding 250mm (10in) in diameter
  • (b) Large-flowered – usually between 200mm (8in) and 250mm (10in) in diameter
  • (c) Medium-flowered – usually between 150mm (6in) and 200mm (8in) in diameter
  • (d) Small-flowered – usually between 100mm (4in) and 150mm (6in) in diameter
  • (e) Miniature-flowered – not usually exceeding 100mm (4in) in diameter

Ball dahlias (Group 6)

  • (a) Small Ball dahlias – usually between 100mm (4in) and 150mm (6in) in diameter
  • (b) Miniature Ball dahlias – usually between 50mm (2in) and 100mm (4in) in diameter

Pompon dahlias (Group 7)

  • Pompon dahlias – not exceeding 50mm (2in) in diameter

Please note that these sizes may differ from those given by the National Dahlia Society (UK) and the American Dahlia Society. The categories given here, which indicate the size of the cultivar in its country of origin, should be used to determine size when registering cultivars.

Dwarf Bedder
The use of (Dw.B.) after the classification of a cultivar indicates that these are dwarf bedding dahlias, not usually exceeding 600mm (24in) in height. Usually suitable at the front of the border and in pots.

Lilliput dahlias (Lil.)
A low-growing type of dahlia usually no more than 0.3m (12in) in height having single, semi-double or double florets attaining 26mm (1 inch) or so in diameter. They are especially suitable for borders or display in containers on patios, etc. Sometimes referred to as “baby” or “top-mix” types of dahlia.

Stellar Dahlias Stellar
Stellar represents a specific form defined by the American Dahlia Society. These are similar to Formals, however the florets (petals) tend to be a bit more cupped. We think of them as being "canoe-shaped".

Chrysanthemum Dahlias chrys
In one specific case, the ray florets are long, narrow and quilled. As they unfurl from the centre they give the bloom the overall appearance of a developing Chrysanthemum. One example of this type is Andries Wonder from Holland which was awarded a Highly Commended at Wisley in 1955 but this no longer seems to be available. In the mid eighties, a further example appeared from Japan, called Akita. Indeed at one show some blooms of this variety were included in a basket display and one member of the public complained that it was a dahlia show and why were chrysanths allowed!

Decasplit Dahlias decasplit
Native of Mexico, it
has big, fascicled and tuber-shaped root and herbaceous semi-wooden stems. "Decasplit" species is characterized by large double flowers, tight, and elongated petals, fringed on top with bright colours.

 

The National Dahlia Collection has added other classifications for its identification system.

 

Dahlia floral size chart as defined by The American Dahlia Society (ADS):-

  • AA: Giant, plate-sized flowers that exceed 10-inches (25.4 cm)
  • A: Large flowers over 8 to 10 inches (25.4 to 20.3 cm) in diameter
  • B: Medium flowers that exceed 6 to 8 inches (20.3 to 15.2 cm) in diameter
  • BB: Small flowers that exceed 4 to 6 inches (15.2 to 10.2 cm) in diameter
  • M: Miniature flowers that reach 4 inches (10.2 cm) in diameter
  • BA: Ball-shaped flowers over 3.5 inches (8.9 cm) in diameter
  • MB: Miniature ball-shaped flowers that exceed 2 to 3.5 (5.1 to 8.9 cm) inches in diameter
  • P: Pompon-shaped flowers that reach 2 inches (5.1 cm) in diameter
  • MS: Single blooms, called mignon single dahlias, that reach 2 inches (5.1 cm) in diameter MS

The 20 Dahlia floral form classifications as recognized by The American Dahlia Society with links to the dahlias of that classification in the 2008 ADS Classification and Handbook of Dahlias:-

Formal Decorative: petals are double, uniformly distributed, flattened, with edges that roll upward or backward and often curve down towards the stem. FD for Formal Decorative

Informal Decorative: petals are double, irregularly distributed, not flattened but wavy, twisted, or curly and may roll backward. ID for Informal Decorative

Semi-Cactus: petals are double, broad at the base, straight, curving inward or backward and have tips that roll back to nearly half their length. SC for Semi-Cactus

Straight Cactus: petals are double, uniformly radiate in all directions from the center of the flower, are rolled inward more than half of their length and may be pointed, straight, or curved backwards. C for Straight Cactus

Incurved Cactus: pointed petals are double, curve towards the flower’s center and are curved for more than one half of their length. IC for Incurve Cactus

Laciniated: double flowers have individual petals that are split at the tips and often twist giving and irregular fringed look to the flower. LC for Laciniated

Ball: flowers are tight, fully double, and ball-shaped—occasionally with a flattened at the face. The petals are rounded, blunt or indented, sometimes rolled inward and commonly in a spiral display. BA for Ball

Miniature Ball: smaller ball-type. MB for Miniature Ball

Pompon: flowers are tight, fully double and similar to ball dahlias but fully rounded and smaller. The petals tightly curve upwards along the edges. P for Pompon

Stellar: flowers are double and have smaller, less developed petals towards the center that graduate to fully developed outer petals. Petal edges curve upwards and outer petals are narrower and lightly curve back towards the stem. Flower depth should be one half to two thirds of the diameter of the bloom. ST for Stellar

Waterlily: flowers are double, symmetrical and flattened when viewed from the side. The petals are broad and flowers open with those in the center appearing closed and dome-shaped and those along the exterior being fully developed and slightly cupped. WL for Water Lily

Peony-flowering: flowers are not fully double and have open centers. They have two or more rows of petals that may be straight, broad, twisted or curled. These subtend centers filled with tiny central disc flowers of varying colors. PE for Peony-flowering

Anemone-flowered: flowers are not fully double and have centers filled with smaller elongated disc flowers of varying colors, which may appear rounded or spiky. They may have one or more rows of out petals that are often broad and open. AN for Anemone-flowered

Collarette: flowers are not fully double and the opened faced flowers have three tiers of petals. A single row of uniformly flattened, evenly distributed outer petals surround shorter petaloids (approximately one half the length of the outer petals), which surround a small flattened “eye” of disc flowers. CO for Collarette

Single: single, open faced blooms with one row of uniform petals surrounding an eye of disc flowers. S for Single

Mignon Single: smaller single flowers. MS for Mignon Single

Orchid-flowering: flowers are not double but have open centers and a single row of evenly spaced flattened petals surrounding the disc flowers. The petals are rolled inward for two thirds or more of their length. O for Orchid-flowering

Novelty Open: flowers are not double but have open centers and unique characteristics which set them apart from other classifications. N for Novelty, NO for Novelty Open

Novelty Fully Double: flowers are double but have unique characteristics which set them apart from other classifications. N for Novelty, NX for Novelty Fully Double

Colour abbreviation in 2008 ADS (American Dahlia Society)
Classification and Handbook of Dahlias
:-

  • BI for Bicolour
  • FL for Flame Blend
  • LB for Light Blend
  • DB for Dark Blend
  • V for Variegated

Primary Colour

  • BR for Bronze
  • DP for Dark Pink
  • DR for Dark Red
  • L for Lavender
  • OR for Orange
  • PK for Pink
  • PR for Purple
  • R for Red
  • W for White
  • Y for Yellow

Secondary Colour

  • bls for blends
  • Dk for dark
  • Lt for Light
  • br for bronze
  • dp for dark pink
  • dr for dark red
  • l for lavender
  • or for orange
  • pk for pink
  • pr for purple
  • r for red
  • w for White
  • y for yellow

COLOURS used by the NDS (National Dahlia Society) from the World Directory of Dahlias:-
For the purpose of Colour Classification, all colours, shades, tints hues and combinations thereof found in the cultivated forms of the dahlia have been grouped in the following thirteen classes.

Colour Classification is determined by the predominant colour or colours which appear on the face of the ray florets and in such classification the colour of the reverse of the ray florets is not generally taken into consideration. An exception is made in the case of certain orchid-flowered, pompon or ball dahlias.

In the case of Blended, Bicolours or Variegated varieties the first colour indicated is the dominant colour.

 

COLOUR DIVISION OF DAHLIAS
The agreed abbreviation follows the colour.

  • White. (W.) Includes pale cream, ivory and colours that are nearly White or cream.
  • YELLOW. (Y.) All shades of yellow including dresden, primrose, sulphur, mimosa, straw, lemon, amber yellow, chrome yellow (light) and maize
  • ORANGE. (O.) All shades of orange including saffron, cadmium, apricot, tangerine and Indian orange.
  • FLAME. (Fl.) Includes spectral blends, xanthic in origin, of scarlet red or orange with yellow including saturn red, mars orange, nasturtium, fire red and poppy red.
  • BRONZE. (Br.) Includes buff, yellow ochre, majolica yellow, spanish orange, ochraceous orange, tan, zinc orange, terracotta, burnt orange, cinnamon and greyed suffusions and blends of such tones with pink and lavender.
  • RED (R.) Includes all shades of red from mandarin red to scarlet and crimson and also is to include cherry, claret rose, currant red, vermilion and carmine.
  • DARK RED. (Dk.R.) Includes cardinal, ox blood, and chrysanthemum crimson.
  • LIGHT PINK (Lt.Pk.) includes pale tints of orange-red and scarlets including salmon, peach, orient pink, shell pink, azalea pink, coral pink, venetian pink, french rose, porcelain rose, delft rose and empire rose.
  • DARK PINK. (Dk.Pk.) Includes tints and pinks of bluish tones including carmine rose, camellia rose, dawn pink, neyron rose, tyrian rose pink, china rose, phlox pink, spinel pink, rose pink, rhodamine pink and fuchsine pink.
  • LILAC, LAVENDER OR MAUVE. (L.) Includes all light tints of magenta, purple and violet and to include mauve, heliotrope, lilac and lavender.
  • PURPLES, WINES OR VIOLETS. (Pu.) Includes solferino purple, indian lake, magenta, magenta rose, ruby red, garnet lake, purple madder, paeony purple, dianthus purple, beetroot purple, maroon, petunia purple, imperial purple, royal purple, amethyst violet and violet.
  • BLENDS. (Bls.) Varieties in which two or more colours are intermingled and gradually merge into each other and are not provided for above.
  • BICOLOURED. (Bic.) Varieties in which the ground colour is tipped with another colour.
  • VARIEGATED. (Var.) Varieties in which the ground colour is striped or splashed with another colour.

 

Culture
from Bulbs Volume I, A-H by John E. Bryan:-

"Dahlias are easy to grow. Tolerant of a wide range of soils, they prefer one that is cultivated to a fair depth and with a high organic content. They require sun in order to grow and flower well. While the rootstocks will overwinter in the ground providing the soil temperature stays above 34 degrees Fahrenheit, it is preferable to lift them in the autumn, after the foliage has started to die back, and store them in a frost-free location with good air circulation.

Planting is best in early spring, some 10 days or so before the last expected frost. The tubers should be set 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cms) deep. This will allow a period of 14-20 days before the young shoots emerge. Thus they will not be damaged by frost, to which the young shoots are susceptible. The distances between the plants will vary according to height of the full-grown plants. Dwarf or low-growing types should be spaced 12-18 inches (30-45 cms) apart. The tallest-growing, those over 36-40 inches in height, space some 36 inches (90 cms) apart. The taller-growing cultivars will require support, specially if grown in a windy location.

Dahlias require regular watering in the summer months. To facilitate watering, plant the tubers in the center of a shallow depression or saucer of soil. This will allow easier watering as the water will stay where required, at the base of the plants above the tubers which will produce a large number of roots, but they stay quite close to the original tuber. The actual size of the depression is determined by the height of the plant; smaller plants that are set quite closely together can be placed in a shallow trench so they can be flooded.

While some natural branching of the young plants may occur, it is an advantage to pinch out the growth bud of young plants when they are 4-6 inches in height. Such pinching of the growing tip encourages branching from the stem, and a bushier plant is the result. Not neccessary with lower-growing cultivars that branch naturally themselves, but taller growing forms can become gangly, and pinching improves not only the appearance but increases flower production. A 4- or 5-branched plant is ideal.

Dahlias will continue to grow well into the autumn. As the days shorten, the growth rate slows. In colder areas the first frost will kill the top growth but not harm the tuber in the soil. In warmer climates, where little or no frost is experienced, growth will come to a halt in October-November. When the top growth is harmed by frost or when growth stops, the stalks should be cut, leaving some 4-5 inches above the ground. The actual time of harvesting the tubers also will depend on the climate in an area. Working in rain is not conducive to good production, therefore, the harvesting of tubers should be prior to the onset of autumn rains. The tubers are lifted with care so they are not damaged. The short length of stem left when cutting the plants will be useful when handling the plants. As soon as the soil around the tubers has dried, they are cleaned by removing dried soil with a brush and stored in a well-ventilated frost-free area. The tubers should be labeled so that when replanting, size, colour, type, etc. are known.

As all new shoots for the next season's growth will arise from "eyes" at the base of the stem, particular attention should be given to this area. Without such eyes, the tuber is worthless as the tubers themselves have no buds; eyes are found only on the portion of the stem adjoining the tubers."

 

 

Tuber Storage in the Winter
"If your area is not yet free of frost, store all of the dahlia bulbs/tubers in a dry, airy place where the temperature stays in the 60-65 degree Fahrenheit range, until the danger of a hard frost has passed." from Blooming Bulb.

 

Preserving Flowers by air drying
"Because this is a dinnerplate dahlia from the Decorative Group of ADS, if the blooms reach 8+ inches across, you can dry these for use in dried arrangements and they will form a nice fist sized dried flower when fully dried. Color will hold for about 1 year. 

To dry: cut (just) fully opened flower and leave a short (4" stem). Poke a 22 ga or 18 ga wire through the flower close to but not in the center of the flower. Loop the top wire into a U and pull down through the opposite side of the flower. Hang upside down in a warm dark place to dry (about 3 weeks). When dry, spray well with a flower preservative or hair spray to seal. I have read that you can preserve the blossoms using silica gel as well, but if you intend to do more than 1 or 2 flowers, air drying is best. Flowers dried in silica gel will absorb moisture from the air and fall apart much quicker." from Daves Garden.

 

Growing Dahlias in Containers written by Barbara Jenke between 1995-2000 explains how to grow any size of dahlia in a pot with comments from women who have used her advice.

 

Gallery Dahlia from Verwer Dahlias BV in The Netherlands (Holland) with their contact details:-

"Gallery dahlias are the result of over 15 years of crossings between common border-dahlias and botanical, genetically low-growing dahlias. They are very freely branching, start blooming in early summer and produce an abundance of flowers during months and months. These varieties with fully double flowers are very effective in smaller gardens or in the front of borders. They are also well adapted for container-growing.
They are for sale on the drymarket as tubers and as flowering pot-plants at the garden centres and flowershops. When danger of damage by frost is gone you can plant them in your garden or in containers in the patio, on your deck, balcony or doorsteps.

The present varieties of the Gallery Dahlia collection and their characteristics

Variety name

Class

Colour

Height

Flower size

Gallery Art Deco

dec

Orange, underside deep red brown

40cm, 16 inches

12cm, 4.8 inches

Gallery Art Fair

dec

(o)White, yellow-green in the centre

30cm, 12 inches

13cm, 5.2 inches

Gallery Art Nouveau

dec

Lilac, underside red-purple

40cm, 16 inches

12cm, 4.8 inches

Gallery Bellini

dec

Lilac pink, cream centre

40cm, 16 inches

14cm, 5.6 inches

Gallery Cezanne

dec

Yellow

30cm, 12 inches

12cm, 4.8 inches

Gallery Cobra

dec

Bright orange

45cm, 18 inches

13cm, 5.2 inches

Gallery Degas

dec

Lilac purple

45cm, 18 inches

10cm, 4 inches

Gallery Leonardo

dec

Salmon

35cm, 14 inches

12cm, 4.8 inches

Gallery Matisse

dec

Orange

30cm, 12 inches

13cm, 5.2 inches

Gallery Monet

dec

Creamy-(o)White with lilac top

30cm, 12 inches

13cm, 5.2inches

Gallery Pablo

dec

Salmon-orange with yellow centre

35cm, 14 inches

14cm, 5.6 inches

Gallery Rembrandt

dec

Lilac pink with green-(o)White tip

35cm, 14 inches

10cm, 4 inches

Gallery Renoir

dec

Bright mauve

30cm, 12 inches

14cm, 5.6 inches

Gallery Rivera

dec

Red

30cm, 12 inches

12cm, 4.8 inches

Gallery Rubens

dec

Bright Pink

40cm, 16 inches

9cm, 3.6 inches

Gallery Salvador

dec

Creamy-(o)White, large deep red top

35cm, 14 inches

15cm, 6 inches

Gallery Serenade

dec

Lemon

55cm, 22 inches

12cm, 4.8 inches

Gallery Singer

dec

Red

30cm, 12 inches

9cm, 3.6 inches

Gallery Sisley

dec

Lilac-purple, with some White in the centre

25cm, 10 inches

11cm, 4.4 inches

Gallery Vermeer

dec

Bronze-yellow

35cm, 14 inches

9cm, 3.6 inches

Gallery Vincent

dec

Orange

30cm, 12 inches

13cm, 5.2 inches

 

". The above Dahlias can also be purchased in the USA from Container Dahlias.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 1


(o)Adder's Tongue
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It is worth remembering that especially with roses that the colour of the petals of the flower may change - The following photos are of Rosa 'Lincolnshire Poacher' which I took on the same day in R.V. Roger's Nursery Field:-

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot91a1a1

Closed Bud

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot92a1a1

Opening Bud

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot93a1a1

Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot94a1a1

Older Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot95a1a1

Middle-aged Flower - Flower Colour in Season in its
Rose Description Page is
"Buff Yellow, with a very slight pink tint at the edges in May-October."

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot96a1a1

Mature Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot97a1a1

Juvenile Flower and Dying Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot98a1a1

Form of Rose Bush

There are 720 roses in the Rose Galleries; many of which have the above series of pictures in their respective Rose Description Page.

So one might avoid the disappointment that the 2 elephants had when their trunks were entwined instead of them each carrying their trunk using their own trunk, and your disappointment of buying a rose to discover that the colour you bought it for is only the case when it has its juvenile flowers; if you look at all the photos of the roses in the respective Rose Description Page!!!!

 

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