Ivydene Gardens Bee-Pollinated Bloom Plant Index Gallery:
Purple Flowers in July

Botanical Plant Name

with link to
UK or
European Union
mail-order supplier

Flower Colour /
Sun Aspect of Full Sun,
Part Shade, Full Shade

with link to photo/data

Flowering Months

with link to
USA or
Canada
mail-order supplier

Height with Spacings or Width (W) in inches (cms)

1 inch = 2.5 cms
12 inches = 30 cms
40 inches = 100 cms

Foliage Colour /
Soil Moisture of
Dry,
Moist or
Wet

with link to Australia, China or New Zealand mail-order supplier

Evergreen (Evg) or Deciduous (Dec or Her) Plant Type / Acidic (Acid), Alkaline (Alk) or
Any Soil

with link to other page in this website

Nectar / Pollen

* = very good bee plant

Amorpha fruticosa
(False Indigo)

Purple single petal /
Full Sun, Part Shade in light woodland.

July -

180 x 90
(450 x 225)

Mid-Green /
Dry, Moist. It can tolerate high winds.

Seed available from Zhong Wei Horticultural Products Company in Yunnan, China for shipping to all countries in the world.

Dec Shrub /
Well-drained soil in woodland garden sunny edge

Nectar, Pollen

Arctium lappa
(Burdock, Greater Burdock, gobo, Beggar's Buttons)

Purple /
Part Shade

July - September

78 x 39
(200 x 98)

Pale Green /
Moist

Biennial /Chalky or sandy well-drained soil
 

Pollen

Asclepias syriaca
(Common Milkweed, butterfly flower, silkweed, silky swallow-wort, Virginia silkweed)

Pinkish- Purple /
Full Sun.

Use in Butterfly gardens, meadows, prairies, or naturalized/native plant areas. This plant is considered by many gardeners to be too vigorous and weedy for borders.

June - August

Native American plant

36 x 12
(90 x 30)

Light Green /
Dry

Her Perennial /
Well-drained sandy soil

Nectar and Pollen. Pollen is in 2 masses connected by a strand. These strands may become entang-led in bee's legs causing heavy morta-lity of honey bees.

Centaurea scabiosa (Greater Knapweed, Black top)

Reddish -Purple /
Full Sun

Website on National Collection of Centaurea

July - September

30 x 16
(75 x 40)

Mid-Green /
Dry

Her Perennial Native Plant /
Well-drained chalky soil of wildflower meadows and prairie-style planting schemes

Nectar

Cynara cardunculus
(Cardoon, Globe Artichoke, Prickly Artichoke)

Purple /
Full Sun.
The Cardoon Group has edible leaf stems and the Artichoke of the Scolymus Group has edible flower buds. If eaten before flowering, you may not get the flowers pollinated by bees.

June - September

Weed in California and Argentina

60 x 48
(150 x 120)

Deeply-cut, silvery-green /
Dry, Moist.
Weed in Australia

Her Perennial /
Well-drained soil

Nectar

Cynoglossum officinale
(Houndstongue, Houdstooth, Dog's Tongue, Gypsy Flower, Rats and Mice)

Reddish -Purple /
Full Sun.
Prolonged eating of this plant is poisonous to the liver of cattle, horses and humans

May - September
Weed sticking to the wool of sheep in America. Due to grooming before shows in the UK, this is not so much of a problem.

24 x 12
(60 x 30)

Foliage is toxic to cattle and horses in Canada.

Mid-Green /
Moist, Wet

Cynoglossum creticum is a problem weed in Argentina and Chile and is on the Alert List for Environmental Weeds in Australia.

Annual or Biennial /
Wet places, waste land and hedges in poor soil with no mulch or feeding

Nectar All Cyno-glos-sum variet-ies are used by bees

Hedysarum hedysaroides
(Alpine French Honeysuckle)

Purple/ Scarlet/ Red /
Full Sun only. Use in Rock Garden. Edible roots

June - August

Native American and Russian plant

16 x 28
(40 x 70)

Mid-Green /
Moist

Her Perennial /
Well-drained soil

Nectar

Medicago sativa
(Alfalfa, Lucerne)

Purple /
Full Sun only.
Alfalfa is the most cultivated forage legume in the world. Worldwide production was around 436 million tons in 2006.

June - July

39 x 18
(98 x 45)

Seed available from Zhong Wei Horticultural Products Company in Yunnan, China for shipping to all countries in the world.

Dark Green /
Dry, Moist.

If the Green Manure Hedge has a chicken wire fence on both sides of it, your rabbit can use it for food as a Rabbit run.

Her Perennial /
Well-drained alkaline soil with lime. Can be grown as a Green Manure for 2 or more years as a low dividing hedge in the vegetable garden.

Nectar, some pollen is also coll-ected from the Medi-cago lupulina - Black Medic

"Alfalfa seed production requires the presence of pollinators when the fields of alfalfa are in bloom. Alfalfa pollination is somewhat problematic, however, because western honey bees, the most commonly used pollinator, are not suitable for this purpose; the pollen-carrying keel of the alfalfa flower trips and strikes pollinating bees on the head, which helps transfer the pollen to the foraging bee. Western honey bees, however, do not like being struck in the head repeatedly and learn to defeat this action by drawing nectar from the side of the flower. The bees thus collect the nectar, but carry no pollen, so do not pollinate the next flower they visit. Because older, experienced bees do not pollinate alfalfa well, most pollination is accomplished by young bees that have not yet learned the trick of robbing the flower without tripping the head-knocking keel. When western honey bees are used to pollinate alfalfa, the beekeeper stocks the field at a very high rate to maximize the number of young bees. Western honey bee colonies may suffer protein stress when working alfalfa only, due to shortage of one of the amino acids comprising the pollen protein, isoleucine. Today, the alfalfa leafcutter bee is increasingly used to circumvent these problems. As a solitary but gregarious bee species, it does not build colonies or store honey, but is a very efficient pollinator of alfalfa flowers. Nesting is in individual tunnels in wooden or plastic material, supplied by the alfalfa seed growers. The leafcutter bees are used in the Pacific Northwest, while western honeybees dominate in California alfalfa seed production."

The spacings (the distance between the plants) recommended above should enable the plants of the same genera to cover the ground in 2-3 years.

From Kew in the UK, when I googled Hedysarum hedysaroides:-

"From the Editors

Joseph H. Kirkbride, Jr., John H. Wiersema, and Roger M. Polhill

The Bean Bag is designed to promote communication among research scientists concerned with legume systematics. To achieve this goal The Bean Bag is issued in May and November of each year and features six columns:

• From the Editors (this page),

• News (meetings, major events, announcements, etc.),

• Latin American Legume Report,

• Nodulation and Nitrogen Fixation (new nodulation records),

• Gleanings, and

• Recent Legume Literature.

Data in the Gleanings column are derived from questionnaire sheets which Readers complete and return. If you have news about legume systematics, send it to us for this column. The Recent Legume Literature column contains published research papers of specific interest to Bean Bag Readers. Recent is defined as one year old. We rarely will publish a citation that is more than one year old. Specific interest to Bean Bag Readers is defined as research papers of interest to a worldwide group of legume systematic botanists. We encourage Bean Bag Readers to send us notices, observations, etc.

Diacritical marks can now be placed in The Bean Bag. If such marks should be placed in your name, address, publications, etc., please let us know. We are especially interested in correcting our Directory.

The Bean Bag and the Directory can now be delivered to Readers via e-mail. If you wish to have your copies e-mailed to you, please send the following standard e-mail message

To: beanbag-request@rbgkew.org.uk -- Subscribe BeanBag .

Electronic copies of the current and past Bean Bags and the Directories (1987 through the present) can be obtained from the World Wide Web servers of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, United Kingdom or Biodiversity and Biological Collections Web Server, University of Kansas Natural History Museum, Lawrence, Kansas, USA. Beginning in June, 1995, The Bean Bag is available on the World Wide Web at http://WWW.rbgkew.org.uk:80/herbarium/legumes/legumes.html or at http://www.keil.ukans.edu/misc/news.html. Beginning in June, 1995, The Bean Bag will be available on the World Wide Web at

http://WWW.rbgkew.org.uk:80/herbarium/legumes/legumes.html or at

http://www.keil.ukans.edu/misc/news.html.

-- End --"

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Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
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Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12

All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index *

All Foliage 212
All Spring Foliage 212

All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212
Rock Plant Flowers 53

 

Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos

12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index

 

Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods

Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Vegetable

Wild Flower

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly

Bee-Pollinated Bloom Plant Index.
The 264 bee-pollinated plants in this Index are in addition to the bee-pollinated plants shown as thumbnails in the pages of the 12 Flower Colours per month FROM the Colour Wheel below.

Click on the OOO in the Index below to link to those bee-pollinated plants of that flower colour in that month or any of
ACER (Deciduous/Evergreen Shrub/Tree) in March-April
CHAENOMELES SPECIOSA (Herbaceous Perennial) in March-May
CROCUS (Bulb) in September-April
CYDONIA OBLONGA (Deciduous Shrub) in April-June
DAFFODIL (Bulb) in December-May
DAHLIA (Bulb) in June-November
DUTCH HYACINTH (Bulb) in March-April
HEATHERS (Evergreen Shrub) in every month
HEDERA HELIX (Evergreen Climber) in September-November as last major source of nectar and pollen in the year
HELIANTHEMUM (Deciduous Shrub) in June-August - Pollen only collected when the flowers open during sunny weather
HELENIUM (Herbaceous Perennial) in June-October
HELLEBORUS (Herbaceous Perennial) in January-March
HEUCHERA (Evergreen Perennial) in May-September
HIBISCUS (Deciduous Shrub) in August-September
ILEX (Evergreen Tree) in May-June
LAVANDULA (Annual, Herbaceous Perennial or Shrub) in June-July
LAVATERA (Annual, Biennial, or Herbaceous Perennial) in May-August
LEPTOSIPHON (Annual) in June-August
MAGNOLIA GRANDIFLORA (Evergreen Tree) in August-September
MALVA SYLVESTRIS (Biennial) in June-Septemberr
MENTHA (Herb) in July-August
NEMOPHILA (Annual) in April-June
NIGELLA (Annual) in July-September
PHILADELPHUS species only with single flowers (Shrub) in June
POLEMONIUM (Herbaceous Perennial) in April-June
PRUNUS CERASIFERA (Deciduous Tree) in February-March
PRUNUS LAUROCERASUS (Evergreen Shrub) in April-June
PYRACANTHA COCCINEA (Evergreen Shrub) in May-June
ROSES (Deciduous Shrub/Climber) in June-October
RUBUS IDAEUS (Raspberry) (Soft Fruit) in May-June
SALVIA SUPERBA (Herbaceous Perennial) in June-September - no bee garden should be without this plant - for those plants.

Enumber indicates Empty Index Page.
Bottom row of Grey is Unusual or Multi-Coloured Flower Colour.

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

OOO E1.

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Blue

OOO

OOO
E11.

OOO
E12.

OOO E13.

OOO
E14.

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Mauve

OOO

OOO

OOO
E24.

OOO
E25.

OOO
E26.

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Purple

OOO
E34.

OOO
E35.

OOO
E36.

OOO
E37

OOO
E38

OOO

OOO
E40

OOO
E41

OOO
E42

OOO

OOO

OOO
Brown

OOO

OOO
E47

OOO
E48

OOO
E49

OOO
E50

OOO
E51

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Cream

OOO
E58

OOO
E59

OOO
E60

OOO
E61

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Green

OOO

OOO
E71

OOO
E72

OOO
E73

OOO
E74

OOO
E75

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
E80

OOO
E81Orange

OOO
E82

OOO
E83

OOO
E84

OOO
E85

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Pink

OOO

OOO
E95

OOO
E96

OOO
E97

OOO
E98

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Red

OOO

OOO
E107

OOO
E108

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
White

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Yellow

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
E133

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO

OOO
Unusual

OOO

OOO
E143

OOO
E144

"The Beesource Beekeeping website was started in 1997 by a hobbyist beekeeper and became an online community for beekeepers and beekeeping in 1999. It has experienced organic, word of mouth grassroots growth ever since. Today, Beesource.com has over 14,000 registered members and is the most active online beekeeping community of its kind in the world."

bloomsmonth2a

Inner circle of Grey is 12 months of Unusual or Multi-Coloured Flower Colour

Bulb and Perennial Height from Text Border

Brown = 0-12 inches (0-30 cms)

Blue = 12-24 inches (30-60 cms)

Green = 24-36 inches (60-90 cms)

Red = 36-72 inches (90- 180 cms)

Black = 72+ inches (180+ cms)

Shrub Height from Text Border

Brown = 0-12 inches (0-30 cms)

Blue = 12-36 inches (30-90 cms)

Green = 36-60 inches (90- 150 cms)

Red = 60-120 inches (150- 300 cms)

Black = 120+ inches (300+ cms)

Tree Height from Text Border

Brown = 0-240 inches (0- 600 cms)

Blue = 240-480 inches (600- 1200 cms)

Green = 480+ inches (1200 + cms)

Red = Potted

Black = Use in Small Garden

Climber Height from Text Border

 

Blue = 0-36 inches (0-90 cms)

Green = 36-120 inches (90-300 cms)

Red = 120+ inches (300+ cms)

 

Bamboo, Bedding, Conifer, Fern, Grass, Herb, Rhododendron, Rose, Soft Fruit, Top Fruit, Vegetable and Wildflower Height from Text Border

Blue = 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

Green = 24-72 inches (60- 180 cms)

Red = 72+ inches (180+ cms)

 

Plant Soil Moisture from Text Background

Wet Soil

Moist Soil

 

Dry Soil

BEE-POLLINATED BLOOM IN MONTH PLANT INDEX GALLERY PAGES

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